Waipapa

Papanui-Innes Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Friday 17 June 2022

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Board Room, Papanui Service Centre,
Corner Langdons Road and Restell Street, Papanui

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Emma Norrish

Simon Britten

Pauline Cotter

Mike Davidson

Ali Jones

Emma Twaddell

 

 

13 June 2022

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Pavey

Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

941 5107

emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To watch the meeting live, or a recording after the meeting date, go to:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuRzshsY8rjDJYUymoYeQtA
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, go to:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 


 

 

 

Mihi

 

 

Tēnā koutou

Kua hui mai nei

Ki tēnei whare ō tātou

Ki te kōrero, ki te whakarongo

i nga kaupapa ō to hapori

Nau mai, haere mai.

Nā reira tēnā koutou katoa

 

Greetings

to all who have gathered

within our (communal) house

to speak and to listen to the

topics/conversations of your community

Welcome, welcome

Therefore, again I greet all present

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Karakia Tīmatanga................................................................................................... 5 

C          1.        Apologies Ngā Whakapāha.......................................................................... 5

B         2.        Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga........................................... 5

C          3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua.......................... 5

B         4.        Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui.................................................................. 5

B         5.        Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga................................. 5

B         6.        Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga.................................................... 5

Staff Reports

CA       7.        Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui........................................................ 17

C          8.        Styx Living Laboratory Field Centre - Lease to Styx Living Laboratory Trust..... 55

C          9.        Cranford Street near McFaddens Road - Proposed P10 and No Stopping Restrictions............................................................................................................. 61

C          10.      Langdons Road - Transport Update............................................................ 69

C          11.      Waipapa Papanui-Innes 2021-2022 Discretionary Response Fund Application - Activation of Shirley Community Reserve and St Albans Residents Association. 71

C          12.      Waipapa Papanui-Innes 2021-2022 Positive Youth Development Fund Application - Villa Maria College................................................................................... 77

C          13.      Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report - June 2022................ 81

 

B         14.      Elected Members’ Information Exchange Te Whakawhiti Whakaaro o Te Kāhui Amorangi............................................................................................................ 111

 

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

Karakia Tīmatanga

1.   Apologies Ngā Whakapāha  

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua

That the minutes of the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board meeting held on Wednesday, 18 May 2022  be confirmed (refer page 6).

4.   Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui

A period of up to 30 minutes will be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

 

There were no public forum requests received at the time the agenda was prepared

5.   Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

5.1

David Gardner – Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui

David Gardner will speak to the Board regarding Item 7, Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui.

 

5.2

Susan Peake – Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui

Susan Peake will speak to the Board regarding Item 7, Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui.

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

Unconfirmed

 

 

Waipapa

Papanui-Innes Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Wednesday 18 May 2022

Time:                                   9.33am

Venue:                                 Held via Audio/Visual Link

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Emma Norrish

Simon Britten

Pauline Cotter

Mike Davidson

Ali Jones

Emma Twaddell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Pratt

Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

941 5428

matthew.pratt@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

Secretarial Note: This meeting was held via audio/visual link on the Zoom platform due to New Zealand being at the orange setting of the Covid-19 Protection Framework (the Traffic Alert system) on the date the meeting was scheduled. These minutes provide a written summary of the meeting proceedings.

 

The Chairperson advised that the meeting was being publicly livestreamed and opened the meeting.

 

Karakia Tīmatanga: Emma Norrish  

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies Ngā Whakapāha

Part C

There were no apologies.

 

2.   Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua

Part C

The Chairperson asked members to confirm that the minutes of the previous Board meeting held on 29 April 2022 were a true and accurate record of the meeting. No issues concerning the accuracy of the minutes were raised. Pauline Cotter moved that the minutes be confirmed. The motion was seconded by Mike Davidson and when put to the vote was carried unanimously.

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00036

That the minutes of the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board meeting held on Friday, 29 April 2022 be confirmed.

Pauline Cotter/Mike Davidson                                                                                                                             Carried

 

4.   Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui

Part B

4.1

Cultivate Christchurch

Harry Baitz spoke on behalf of Cultivate Christchurch regarding Cultivate’s work and Red Zone Project.

 

Ms Baitz as the coordinator of Cultivate's Red Zone project highlighted:

·   Rising price of fruit and vegetables, and state of food insecurity in Christchurch, as a concern.

·   Role of interactive education / skills development around growing kai as one part of the complex issue of addressing food security.

·   Cultivate’s Red Zone Project partners with Te Putahitanga to work with whānau who may be experiencing food insecurity. The work reaches into their homes, helping to build edible gardens and coaching whānau to grow some of their own kai.

·   Another part of the project in the Red Zone is joined with the Climate Action Campus on the old Linwood College site, working with school and youth groups to teach them about growing kai.

·   A challenge in this model with youth is around what to do in summer holidays when a lot of food production is happening during the break, so part of the project is encouraging a whānau-centric approach where it is community gardening with a youth focus.

·   Working on learning pathways with the Biological Husbandry Unit (BHU) Organics training college, a joint venture between Lincoln University and the New Zealand Organic Movement. 

Questions from the Board highlighted further points relating to urban farming that:

·   Cultivate is part of a network of community gardeners and urban farmers seeking ways to collaborate to strengthen the food security of the city. There are a lot of different voices, and sharing of resources, as well as work on avoiding replication, filling gaps, and focusing on hubs like Climate Action Campus.

·   Getting food out to people in a compliant manner is a challenge for the model.

·   Christchurch is very well-positioned to do urban food production, and a well-resourced, strategic umbrella group for Christchurch, building on the likes of Food Resilience Network, could help address larger issues like distribution challenges.

·   Opportunities to work with Canterbury Community Garden Coordinators and related networks (information could be shared about those involved with community gardens).

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.

 

7.   Correspondence

 

Board Consideration

The Board took the Correspondence in the Report, as well as the subsequent correspondence from Juliana Venning regarding Graham Condon Pool, which was tabled for the meeting (and so is attached as Minutes Attachment A), as read.

 

The Board especially acknowledged the correspondence from Tegan Hofmeyer on her participation in the Spirit of Adventure - Year 10 Trophy Voyage, and the excellent accompanying photos, and thanked Tegan for providing this report back to the Board.

 

The Board discussed in a general sense correspondence relating to customer service requests (CSRs), and expressed interest in standard pre-written advice they could share with residents who are raising CSRs with Board members, explaining the CSR system they can follow and why it is important, so Board members can know if the system is working in any case. The Chairperson requested advice to come to Board members outlining the process for directing such interactions with residents, which also explains the significance of using the CSR system as outlined.

 

Pauline Cotter moved to receive all the correspondence, and that requests be made of staff as detailed below. The motion was seconded by Ali Jones and when put to the meeting was carried unanimously.

 

Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receives the correspondence from Tegan Hofmeyer reporting on Spirit of Adventure - Year 10 Trophy Voyage.

2.         Receives the correspondence from Clint Marston regarding the buses travelling on Flockton Street.

3.         Receives the correspondence from Grace Leckie regarding traffic speed change proposal for Kāinga.

 

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00037

Part B

That the Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receives the correspondence as listed and tabled.

Pauline Cotter/Ali Jones                                                                                                                                        Carried

 

7.1      Buses on Flockton Street

Board Consideration cont.

The Chairperson noted that part of Mr Marston’s correspondence has been included in the Board’s correspondence to Environment Canterbury supporting the Board’s concerns regarding heavy buses traversing Flockton Street and the vibration impact on residents, and seeking response from Environment Canterbury on the issue.

 

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00038

2.         Receives the correspondence from Clint Marston regarding the buses travelling on Flockton Street.

Pauline Cotter/Ali Jones                                                                                                                                        Carried

 

 

7.2      Traffic Speed Change Proposal for Kāinga

Board Consideration cont.

The Board considered asking staff to investigate the speed change proposal in the correspondence from Ms Leckie for Kāinga (which the Board felt should also be extended to include Stewart’s Gully). It was discussed whether the investigation should include looking back for any complaints about traffic speed in the area to endeavor to address any and all issue/s, during this electoral term.

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00039

3.         Receives the correspondence from Grace Leckie regarding traffic speed change proposal for Kāinga.

4.         Requests that staff investigate the speed change proposal in the correspondence from Ms Leckie (also giving consideration to Stewart’s Gully), including looking back for any previous complaints about the speed in the area.

Pauline Cotter/Ali Jones                                                                                                                                        Carried

 

7.3      Women's Only Sessions for Graham Condon Pool

Board Consideration cont.

It was discussed that the women’s only sessions at Linwood Pool have been very successful, and the team at Graham Condon Pool could usefully be worked with to determine whether there is a demand in the community, and if it is feasible, to provide such sessions at Graham Condon Pool as well.

It was considered in the discussion in respect of the feasibility aspect that the sessions would need to be suitably private, such as through the provision of a blind as employed at Linwood Pool, to meet diverse cultural needs around women’s only sessions.

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00040

5.         Receives the tabled correspondence (Minutes Attachment A) from Juliana Venning regarding Graham Condon Pool.

6.         Requests staff to work with the team at the Graham Condon Pool to determine if there is a demand in the community, and if it is feasible, to provide women’s only sessions at the Pool.

Pauline Cotter/Ali Jones                                                                                                                                        Carried

Attachments

a       Correspondence regarding Graham Condon Pool (relating to discussion of women's only sessions)  

 

8.   Papanui-Innes Community Board Submissions Committee Minutes - 6 May 2022

 

The Chairperson asked members to confirm that the minutes of the Submissions Committee meeting held on 6 May 2022 were a true and accurate record of the meeting. No issues concerning the accuracy of the minutes were raised. Emma Norrish moved that the minutes be confirmed. The motion was seconded by Simon Britten and when put to the vote was carried unanimously.

 

The Councillors on the Board thanked the Submissions Committee for their work on the submissions, and clarified that the reference in the submission to supporting the heritage areas in Shirley and St Albans was intended to capture supporting heritage, including character areas and heritage elements, in a broad sense (more broadly places of notable historical significance or importance in the area), without being strictly confined to supporting just the proposed new Residential Heritage Areas as a Qualifying Matter specified in the Draft Plan Changes.

 

The Board did not seek to change the submissions as already submitted, but considered that they had conveyed the broader intent to support the recognition of heritage in the area, noting that the Board explicitly supported the other heritage elements in their submission on the Draft Heritage Plan Change.

 

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00041

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board receives and confirms the Minutes from the Papanui-Innes Community Board Submissions Committee meeting held 6 May 2022.

Emma Norrish/Simon Britten                                                                                                                              Carried

 

9.   Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Service Awards 2022

 

Board Consideration

The Board took the report on the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Service Awards as read.

It was agreed that the awards would be presented on site in the recipients’ spaces, recognising them in front of their peers where that was welcomed.

Mike Davidson moved that the officer recommendation to confer Community Service Awards on all 22 of the nominees be adopted, noting they (and their nominators) would all then be advised in writing of the decision. The motion was seconded by Emma Twaddell and when put to the meeting was carried unanimously.

 

Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Confer Community Service Awards on the nominees listed on the Summary of Nominations 2022 (separately circulated).

2.         Recommend that all successful nominees be advised in writing of the decision.  In addition, the nominators of the successful nominees to also be advised in writing of the decision.

3.         Recommend that if there are any unsuccessful nominees, that the relevant nominators be advised of this decision and the reasons for the decision.

 

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00042

Part C

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Confers Community Service Awards on all the nominees listed on the Summary of Nominations 2022 (separately circulated).

2.         Notes that all successful nominees will be advised in writing of the decision.  In addition, the nominators of the successful nominees will also be advised in writing of the decision.

Mike Davidson/Emma Twaddell                                                                                                                         Carried

 

 

 

10. Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report - May 2022

 

Board Consideration

The Board took the Area Report as read.

Monthly action reporting the Board has visibility of was referenced in respect of whether actions from the 29 April 2022 Board meeting could be added. Update on the action from that meeting relating to maintenance of public toilets in particular was requested.  Update was also requested on an action arising from an earlier date relating to investigation of measures to prevent delivery vehicles stopping on the cycleway on Rutland Street opposite the shops and provision for a loading zone to be made elsewhere.

It was noted that the Board was to be briefed after the meeting on a further break down of speed data requested from Waka Kotahi relating to the Christchurch Northern Corridor, and on a query made about traffic light phasing for Westminster Street at its intersection with Cranford Street.

The alcohol licence applications reproduced in the Area Report as having been notified for premises within the Board area were discussed. The application by Gift Genie (2022) Limited was queried, and it was noted that it is for remote sales. And it was requested the Board be kept informed in respect of the application by Pari International Limited related to proposed premises at 565 Barbadoes Street, noting that it would be open to the local residents’ association approaching the Board if it wished to in respect of the application.

The Board noted that the application for an new Off-Licence by Liquorsea Limited in respect of proposed premises at 1 Radcliffe Road was heading to a hearing, but with no approach having been made to the Board by any member of the public in regard to it, did not see basis for seeking leave to appear.

The Board thanked staff for the work helping resolve the retention of a Eucalyptus and a Palm tree at the demolition site on Westminster Street as a good result.

Referencing further update provided to the Board since its last meeting regarding investigations underway towards an options report around Edgeware Road flooding outside Edgeware Village, further clarity was requested on going to market for a kerb replacement assessment, seeking understanding what it would look like, where it would be, and what the reason for it would be.

The Chairperson noted in relation to Spring Grove residents’ issues that she would be attending a public meeting, particularly in relation to the rail crossing, which transport staff would also be attending to speak to.

Mike Davidson moved that the Area Report be received and that the requests discussed as detailed below be resolved. The motion was seconded by Emma Twaddell and when put to the meeting was carried unanimously.

 

Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report for May 2022.

 

 

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00043

Part B

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report for May 2022.

Mike Davidson/Emma Twaddell                                                                                                                         Carried

 

 

 

10.1   Working with Papanui Youth Development Trust to investigate Disability Playgrounds

Board Consideration cont.

In reference to the forum the Board held with Papanui Youth Development Trust (PYDT), it was considered that a good point was raised around looking at options and need in respect of disability playgrounds in the Papanui area, and the Board requested staff investigate this and work with PYDT in this regard (as a starting point, potentially developing into talking to the disability groups).

It was discussed that staff might also work with PYDT around whether there is need to assist with transport to Malvern Park to use the equipment there.

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00044

2.         Requests staff to investigate options and need around disability playgrounds in the Papanui area, including working with Papanui Youth Development Trust.

Mike Davidson/Emma Twaddell                                                                                                                         Carried

 

10.2   Courtenay Street Briefing

Board Consideration cont.

It was noted that information had been received about programmed resurfacing for Courtenay Street, though follow up was sought in respect of a briefing around where Courtenay Street sits within the DEMP work.

It was confirmed that Courtenay Street was resurfaced a couple of years ago, and it was included in the DEMP, so it was queried whether the resurfacing would be an effective use of resources. The Board requested that the Courtenay Street briefing come urgently prior to any work being done on Courtenay Street. It being noted that pre-earthquake, the condition of the street was such it was due to get a rebuild.

Community Board Resolved PICB/2022/00045

3.         Requests the briefing to come on Courtenay Street prior to programmed resurfacing work being completed.

Mike Davidson/Emma Twaddell                                                                                                                         Carried

 

 

10.3   Springfield Road

Board Consideration cont.

The Springfield Road request from last meeting was discussed in regard to lack of pedestrian crossings and related safety concerns at the corner with Rutland Street; it being identified as a dangerous spot.

It was further discussed to also consider the intersection of Springfield Road with Edgeware Road in respect of pedestrian safety (including for the visually impaired known to use the area); and to consider a safe crossing from Rehua Marae – the Board ultimately supporting the consideration to improve pedestrian safety along the whole Springfield Road corridor. It was discussed in respect of the current division of the corridor among different Boards to prepare a way forward now for decision when the boundary adjustment will bring this more into the Board area.

11. Elected Members’ Information Exchange Te Whakawhiti Whakaaro o Te Kāhui Amorangi

Part B

Board members exchanged information on the following matters of interest:

 

11.1   St Albans Park

 

The Board thanked staff for the work that made the St Albans Skate Park Extension opening such a success, and noted that the fencing off of the toddlers’ playground from the road is progressing, as well as replacement of a gate there to create a more secure toddlers’ play area.

It was further noted that the concrete walls are being painted, and there could be opportunity for the community to get involved in a mural for those walls if locals are interested.

 

11.2   Opening of Styx Living Laboratory Trust's New Field Centre

 

The Chairperson noted that she and a couple of other Board members attended the opening of the Styx Living Laboratory’s new Field Centre, which will be an amazing resource for the community and Trust. Noting the calibre of the guests signalled the significance of the facility.

 

11.3   Meeting with Matt Doocey MP to discuss Psychological Wellbeing Support for Community Organisations and Volunteers

 

The Chairperson noted the Board’s invitation to meet with Matt Doocey MP further to writing to him and other local MPs in relation to psychological wellbeing support for community organisations and volunteers. It was also noted that Duncan Webb MP’s Office has also acknowledged receipt of the letter that they will follow up.

 

11.4   Abandoned Shopping Trolleys

 

Further to observations from a resident of Hoani Street regarding abandoned shopping trolleys, the Chairperson proposed the Board write to the supermarkets, the Warehouse and Kmart in Northlands and North Link, requesting that they be more vigilant in the collection of their shopping trolleys, especially in the Hoani Street area. (It was noted that abandoned trolleys have also been an issue around Northcote Road).

There was awareness that Snap, Send Solve can be used to report abandoned trolleys, but it was considered that the retailers could be more proactive in their collections.

It was observed by a Board member on the weekend there were four abandoned trolleys down Hoani Street. No rubbish was observed at that time, but noting the resident’s observations extended to rubbish as well, it was acknowledged that consideration is being given to the issue by staff further to the resident’s observations.

 

11.5   Neighbourhood Trust AGM

 

It was noted that Neighbourhood Trust had their AGM on the weekend, which some Board members attended. It was noted that it was interesting to hear the extent of the Trust’s work dedicated to addressing food security, including working to establish a community garden on their site, and distributing food parcels. The Board acknowledged the Trust’s hard work in these respects.

 

 

 

 

Meeting concluded at 10.38am.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 17th DAY OF JUNE 2022

 

Emma Norrish

Chairperson


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

7.     Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui

Reference Te Tohutoro:

22/576659

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Gemma Dioni, Senior Transportation Engineer gemma.dioni@ccc.govt.nz
Hannah Ballantyne, Engagement Advisor
hannah.ballantyne@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager  Pouwhakarae:

Jane Davis, General Manager Infrastructure, Planning & Regulatory Services, jane.davis@ccc.govt.nz

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board to consider the consultation feedback and views on the proposed speed limit changes for the Slow Speed Neighbourhood in Papanui, and to make a recommendation to the Council.

1.2       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. The level of significance was determined by the low level of impact and low number of people affected by the recommended decision.

1.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

1.4       The recommended option is to change the speed limits from 50 kilometre per hour to 40 and 30 kilometres per hour in accordance with Attachment A. 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approves, pursuant to Part 4 Clause 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, that the speed limits on the following roads be revoked and set generally as identified in Attachment A to the staff report and listed below in clauses 1a-1aaaaa (including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps).

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Vagues Road (entire length).

b.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Vagues Road (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

c.         Approves the installation of a 30 kilometres per hour variable speed limit on Vagues Road (School Zone) commencing at a point 61 metres north-west of its intersection with Main North Road and extending in a north-westerly direction for a distance of 228 metres.  Times of operation are as evidenced on the sign detail.

d.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Lydia Street (entire length).

e.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Lydia Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

f.          Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on La Perouse Place (entire length).

g.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on La Perouse Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

h.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Nyoli Street (entire length).

i.          Approve that the permanent speed limit on Nyoli Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

j.          Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Satwell Place (entire length).

k.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Satwell Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

l.          Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Leander Street (entire length).

m.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Leander Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

n.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Primrose Street (entire length).

o.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Primrose Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

p.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Oakland Street (entire length).

q.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Oakland Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

r.          Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Morrison Avenue (entire length).

s.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Morrison Avenue (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

t.          Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Honey Suckle Lane (entire length).

u.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Honey Suckle Lane (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

v.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Virgil Place (entire length).

w.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on Virgil Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

x.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Boyne Avenue (entire length).

y.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Boyne Avenue (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

z.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Langdons Road from its intersection with Greers Road to its intersection with Chapel Street.

aa.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Langdons Road from its intersection with Greers Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 482 metres be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

bb.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Langdons Road from its intersection with Chapel Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 267 metres be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

cc.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Hoani Street (entire length).

dd.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Hoani Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ee.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Cone Street (entire length).

ff.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on Cone Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

gg.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Ellery Street (entire length).

hh.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Ellery Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ii.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Wilmot Street (entire length).

jj.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Wilmot Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

kk.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Sails Street (entire length).

ll.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Sails Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

mm.   Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Chapel Street (entire length).

nn.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Chapel Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

oo.      "Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Meadow Street (entire length).

pp.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Meadow Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

qq.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Apollo Place (entire length).

rr.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on Apollo Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ss.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Shearer Avenue (entire length).

tt.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on Shearer Avenue (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

uu.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Grassmere Street (entire length).

vv.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Grassmere Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ww.    Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Tulloch Place (entire length).

xx.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Tulloch Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

yy.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Halliwell Avenue (entire length).

zz.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Halliwell Avenue (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

aaa.    Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Proctor Street (entire length).

bbb.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Proctor Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ccc.     Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Mary Street (entire length).

ddd.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Mary Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

eee.   Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Loftus Street (entire length).

fff.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Loftus Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ggg.    Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Horner Street (entire length).

hhh.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Horner Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

iii.        Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Wyndham Street (entire length).

jjj.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Wyndham Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

kkk.    Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Gambia Street (entire length).

lll.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on Gambia Street (entire length) be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

mmm.  Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Frank Street (entire length).

nnn.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Frank Street from its intersection with Papanui Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 272 metres be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

ooo.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Frank Street from its intersection with Proctor Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 169 metres be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ppp.   Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Grants Road (entire length).

qqq.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Grants Road from its intersection with Papanui Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 325 metres be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

rrr.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Grants Road from its intersection with Grassmere Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 488 metres be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

sss.     Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Taunton Green (entire length).

ttt.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Taunton Green (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

uuu.   Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Dulles Place (entire length).

vvv.    Approve that the permanent speed limit on Dulles Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

www. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Erica Street (entire length).

xxx.    Approve that the permanent speed limit on Erica Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

yyy.    Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Dormer Street (entire length).

zzz.     Approve that the permanent speed limit on Dormer Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

aaaa.  Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Rayburn Avenue (entire length).

bbbb. Approve that the permanent speed limit on Rayburn Avenue (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

cccc.   Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Perry Street (entire length).

dddd. Approve that the permanent speed limit on Perry Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

eeee. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Paparoa Street (entire length).

ffff.     Approve that the permanent speed limit on Paparoa Street from its intersection with Papanui Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 399 metres be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

gggg.  Approve that the permanent speed limit on Paparoa Street from a point 63 metres west of its intersection with Claremont Avenue and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 297 metres be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

hhhh. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Claremont Avenue (entire length).

iiii.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Claremont Avenue (entire length) be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

jjjj.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Bennett Street (entire length).

kkkk.  Approve that the permanent speed limit on Bennett Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

llll.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Nightingale Place (entire length).

mmmm.           Approve that the permanent speed limit on Nightingale Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

nnnn. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Tomes Road (entire length).

oooo. Approve that the permanent speed limit on Tomes Road from its intersection with Papanui Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 399 metres be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

pppp. Approve that the permanent speed limit on Tomes Road from a point 63 metres west of its intersection with Claremont Avenue and extending in an easterly direction to the intersection of Rutland Street be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

qqqq. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Norfolk Street (entire length).

rrrr.     Approve that the permanent speed limit on Norfolk Street (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

ssss.   Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Scotson Avenue (entire length).

tttt.     Approve that the permanent speed limit on Scotson Avenue (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

uuuu. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Tavendale Place (entire length).

vvvv.  Approve that the permanent speed limit on Tavendale Place (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

wwww. Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Mays Road (entire length).

xxxx.  Approve that the permanent speed limit on Mays Road (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour."

yyyy.  Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Rutland Street from its intersection with Tomes Road to its intersection with Mays Road.

zzzz.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Rutland Street from its intersection with Tomes Road and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 58 metres be set at 30 kilometres per hour.

aaaaa.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Rutland Street from its intersection with Mays Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 127 metres be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

2.         Approve that these resolutions take effect when the signage that evidence the restrictions described in the staff report are in place (or removed in the case of revocations).

3.         Authorise staff to make any typographical changes or to correct minor errors or omissions in the above descriptions of the roads to which the speed limits apply (being changes that do not affect the materiality of the resolutions).

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       The preferred option is to change the speed limits as outlined in the staff recommendations in this report for the following reasons:

3.1.1   Traffic speed data indicates that most road users in this area already recognise that the currently posted speed limit is not safe and appropriate for this area, and are travelling below this limit.

3.1.2   Reduces the likelihood and severity of crashes and improves safety on local roads.

3.1.3   Aligns with the overall vision of the Ministry of Transport/Te Manatū Waka New Zealand Road Safety Strategy - Road to Zero 2020-2030.

3.2       Achieves safe and appropriate speeds that reflect the road function, design, safety, and safer use by all. Local neighbourhood roads are low volume and low speed roads and are where we would see more of our vulnerable road users such as school children, cyclists and pedestrians on the road and footpaths.

3.3       Through consultation on Slow Speed Neighbourhoods – Papanui, there were requests from submitters to extend the zone to cover these roads bound by Papanui Road and Innes Road and to change some streets to 30 kilometres per hour.  Following changes to the Setting of Speed Limits Rule: 2022 it is now possible to include the extra streets as slow streets and introduce 30 kilometres per hour speed limits outside of schools and on streets surrounding the schools.

3.4       The Council determined through the Long Term Plan (LTP) to implement at least five slow speed neighbourhoods per year over the next three years.  The Papanui Slow Speed Neighbourhood is identified as one of the five neighbourhoods.

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

Maintain the status quo

4.1       Maintain the status quo – Retain the existing speed limits.

4.2       The advantages of this option include:

4.2.1   There are no identified benefits to road safety or consistency of speed limits from retaining the existing speed limits.

4.2.2   No further costs are incurred for providing or modifying speed limit signs.

4.3       The disadvantages of the option include:

4.3.1   Does not align with the objectives of the Waka Kotahi Speed Management Guide 2016.

4.3.2   Does not align with the overall vision of Road Safety Strategy- Road to Zero 2020-2030.

4.3.3   Does not align the posted speed limits with the operating speeds, the safe and appropriate speeds, and does not help improve the credibility and consistency across the network.

4.3.4   Does not deliver one of the five slow speed neighbourhoods this financial year as identified in the Long Term Plan.

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

5.1       Improving safety on local roads in Christchurch is a priority for Council, and is also a national priority under the principles and guidance of the Road to Zero - New Zealand’s road safety strategy for 2020-2030. Road to Zero sets an initial target to reduce deaths and serious injuries on New Zealand’s roads, streets, cycleways, and footpaths by 40 percent over the next 10 years. There are several focus areas being looked at nationally to achieve this, but where significant difference can be made is through having safe and appropriate speeds on Christchurch’s roads.

5.2       It is proposed to reduce the speed limit from 50 kilometres per hour to 40 and 30 kilometres per hour on selected streets in Papanui.

5.3       The Council traffic and speed count data indicates that the majority of road users already recognise that the currently posted speed limit is not safe and appropriate for this area, and are travelling well below this limit. Implementing a lower speed limit will help to reinforce this safer driving behaviour, and help those unfamiliar with the area to understand the safe and appropriate speed. Research suggests that, in some environments, changing speed limit signage alone (without complimentary engineering treatments) may result in a 2 to 3 kilometres per hour reduction in operating speeds. Installation of new speed limit signage in this area may also therefore result in a slight reduction in operating speeds.

5.4       Neighbourhoods are areas where we can make the most difference with slower speeds to improve safety for vulnerable road users, because everyone should get where they’re going safely whether they’re walking, cycling, driving, motorcycling, or using public transport.

5.5       The proposed slower speeds will also assist in improving pedestrian connectivity through the neighbourhood by making it safer for people to cross to get where they are going.

5.6       The slow neighbourhood speed limit has been determined based on several speed management principles. The fundamental principle is that speed affects the severity of all crashes. Even when speed doesn’t cause the crash, it’s what will most likely determine whether anyone is killed, injured, or walks away unharmed from that crash.

5.7       Approval is required by the Council.  If approved, the recommendations will be implemented within the next financial year.

Community Views and Preferences

5.8       Consultation was open from 8 April to 3 May 2022.

5.9       The consultation was advertised through a letter box flyer (1,000 households), Newsline story, social media posts on community Facebook pages, on-site signage at two locations, and the online Have Your Say portal.

5.10    The Council received 82 submissions. The table of submissions is available in Attachment B.

5.11    63 submitters (77%) clearly support the proposal, 14 clearly oppose (17%) and five submitters (6%) take no clear stance either way. The full analysis of submissions is available in Attachment C.

5.12    Following a review of the submissions and changes to the Setting of Speed Limits Rule: 2022, the Slow Speed Neighbourhood was extended to the south to cover Mays Road, Rutland Street and the streets that are bound by Mays Road, Rutland Street, Papanui Road and Innes Road. The Rule change also allowed for the introduction of permanent 30 kilometres per hour streets around schools.  The school speed zone for St Josephs School on Vagues Road will remain a variable speed limit but will be changed to 30 kilometres per hour to align with the new rule.

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       The New Zealand Road Safety Strategy - Road to Zero: sets a target to reduce death and serious injuries on New Zealand roads by 40 percent over the next 10 years. There are five key focus areas: infrastructure improvements and speed management, vehicle safety, work related road safety, road user choices, and system management.

6.2       Waka Kotahi’s Speed Management Guide 2016: setting safe and appropriate speeds, consistency and credibility of speed limits.

6.3       Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022: requires that road controlling authorities must set speed limits that are safe and appropriate, and encourages a consistent approach to speed management throughout New Zealand.

6.4       The Council’s strategic priorities have been considered in formulating the recommendations in this report, however this area of work is not specifically covered by an identified priority.

6.5       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031):

6.5.1   Activity: Transport

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of death and serious injury crashes on the local road network - ≤ 105 crashes. 

·     Level of Service: 10.5.1 Limit deaths and serious injury crashes per capita for cyclists and pedestrians - ≤ 12 crashes per 100,000 residents.

·     Level of Service: 16.0.10 Maintain the perception that Christchurch is a walking friendly city - ≥85% resident satisfaction.

·     Level of Service: 10.0.2 Increase the share of non-car modes in daily trips - ≥17% of trips undertaken by non-car modes.

·     Level of Service: 10.5.2 Improve the perception that Christchurch is a cycling friendly city) - ≥65% resident satisfaction.

·     Level of Service: 10.5.3 More people are choosing to travel by cycling - ≥12,000 average daily cyclist detections.

·     Level of Service: 10.0.41 Reduce emissions and greenhouse gases related to transport - ≤1.10 million tonnes of CO2 equivalents.

6.5.2   Capital Programme

         $250,000 capital expenditure per year for three years to implement at least five slow speed neighbourhoods a year.

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.6       The decisions in this report are consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.7       The effects of this proposal upon Mana Whenua are expected to be insignificant.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.8       This proposal includes measures to encourage walking/cycling/public transport and therefore will result in positive changes to reduce carbon emissions and the effects of Climate Change.

6.9       This proposal includes measures to slow vehicle speeds and improve road safety.  This could encourage people to use alternative modes to the private vehicle which will result in positive changes to reduce carbon emissions and the effects of Climate Change.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.10    This proposal will result in vehicles travelling at reduced speeds, which will provide a safer and more accessible environment for all road users, including pedestrians and cyclists.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement - $75,000.

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – approximately $2,000/year.

7.3       Funding Source – Slow Speed Neighbourhoods project 65987.

Other

7.4       None identified.

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       Speed Limits must be set in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022.

8.2       Clause 27 (Part 4) of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides the Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

8.3       The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

8.4       The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.5       There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision. 

8.6       This specific report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit however the report has been written using a general approach previously approved of by the Legal Services Unit, and the recommendations are consistent with the policy and legislative framework outlined in sections 8.1 – 8.4.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui - Proposed Speed Limit Map

28

b

Slow Speed Neighbourhood - Papanui | Submission Tables for public

29

c

Slow speeds neighbourhood - Papanui | Analysis of submissions

54

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Gemma Dioni - Senior Transportation Engineer

Hannah Ballantyne - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Stephen Wright - Acting Manager Operations (Transport)

Lynette Ellis - Head of Transport & Waste Management

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


























Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

8.     Styx Living Laboratory Field Centre - Lease to Styx Living Laboratory Trust

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

22/451636

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Kathy Jarden, Team Leader Leasing; Kathy.Jarden@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens & Community; Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is grant a lease to Styx Living Laboratory Trust (the "Trust") of the land and buildings at 75 Lower Styx Road.

1.2       This report has been written to support the granting of the lease to support the Council's long term vision for the land.  This follows a briefing to the Community Board on 18 February 2022 by the Trust.

1.3       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and previous consultation in the development of a vision for the site.

1.4       In 2001 the Christchurch City Council approved and adopted The Styx Vision 2000-2040 (the "Styx Vision") planning document.  Vision Three of the Styx Vision was to establish the catchment as a "Living Laboratory”.

1.5       In 2002 the Styx Living Laboratory Trust was established to achieve the Council vision and a Memorandum of Understanding between the Trust and Council was signed.

1.6       The Council and the Trust are now ready to establish the Styx Living Laboratory Field Centre ("Field Centre") at the property.  The Council has issued a temporary licence for the use of the property while the Trust develops the site in partnership with the Council and community.

1.7       A longer term of tenure is sought and officers propose a lease term of 20 years including provisions for the Trust to enter into occupancy arrangements to organisations that provide complementary activities that would provide additional financial support to the Trust to cover day-to-day costs associated with the property. This may include agreements to make available office space, storage and provisions for an on-site caretaker in a self-contained dwelling.

1.8       Permission is also sought for the Trust to host community events promoting their work through activities such as open days and farmers markets.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Approve the granting of a lease to the Styx Living Laboratory Trust for a period up to twenty years including renewals over that part of land described as Lot 5 Deposited Plan 305008 being 6100 square metres more or less held for the purpose of a Local Purpose Reserve (Community Buildings) subject to the Reserves Act 1977 at an annual rental of $20,000 per annum including GST for the purpose of establishing and managing a Living Laboratory.

2.         Approve the proposed use of the property to include the Styx Living Laboratory Trust entering into occupancy agreements for the purpose of complementary activities fitting the purpose of the Styx Vision; such uses to be approved by the Head of Parks and Manager Property Consultancy.

3.         Request the Manager Property Consultancy to conclude and administer the terms and conditions of the lease and any supporting occupancy arrangements such as hire agreements and licences to occupy.

 

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       To support the Styx Vision 2000 - 2040 which sought to establish a Styx Living Laboratory Field Centre.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       Continue to rent the property as a residential tenancy. This was discounted as it is contrary to the Council's Styx Vision.

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

5.1       The property is located at 75 Lower Styx Road.

5.1.1   Legal Description Lot 5 Deposited Plan 305008 being 6100 square metres more or less held for the purpose of a Local Purpose Reserve (Community Buildings) subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

5.2       The Site and Buildings

 

5.3       The Tenant

5.3.1   The Styx Living Laboratory Trust was established in 2002 to achieve the Council's Styx Vision and is registered as a charity on the Charities Register.

5.3.2   The Trust is in partnership with the Council, Environment Canterbury, Landcare Research, NiWA, Lincoln University and Willowbank Wildlife Reserve.

5.4       Lease Details

5.4.1   Lease Term - 20 years including renewals

5.4.2   Annual Rent - $20,000 including GST to be reviewed 5 yearly

5.4.3   Outgoings - water, electricity, telecommunications, compliance costs

5.4.4   Inclusions - costs for servicing wastewater septic tank system, monthly costs associated with managing security systems to the buildings

5.4.5   Provision for tenant to enter into occupancy agreements with community agencies and organisations whose activities support the Living Laboratory, including approval to put in place an on-site caretaker in a separate self-contained dwelling.

5.4.6   All building and regulatory consents to be funded by the Tenant.

5.5       Community consultation was undertaken with the preparation and adoption of the Styx Vision 2000 - 2040.

5.6       The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.6.1   Waipapa Papanui-Innes

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       Resilient Communities

The Trust actively engages with local communities through various outreach and monitoring programmes and community events. It is the intention that the Field Centre will be the base for these activities, and that the number and scale of activities will continue to increase significantly in the next five years. The Trust also employs a full-time Community coordinator who is based at the field centre, and will be hosting a programme of artists in residence over the coming five years.

 

6.2       Liveable City

Staff and volunteers working from the Field Centre will be actively contributing to Christchurch as a 21st century Garden City through one of its  key performance indicators of improving resident satisfaction with the management of parks and reserves and public spaces in the Styx catchment. It will also be actively supporting the establishment of the Styx Source to Sea walkway (Vision 2 of the Styx Vision 2000 – 2040).

 

6.3       Healthy Environment

The Styx Living laboratory Trust has received $4.2M over a five year period from the Ministry for the Environment’s Freshwater Improvement Fund (FIF). This funding is targeted at significant environmental enhancement throughout the Styx Catchment, and covers the hiring of staff - including field staff - who are based at the Field centre. Note that the FIF project is partnership between the Trust and Council.

 

6.4       Prosperous Economy

Through the FIF work stream, The Trust will be supporting local businesses. Also, as part of the FIF project the Trust has a key performance indicator of contacting all businesses in the Styx River catchment to gain support for the Styx project.

6.5       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.5.1   Activity: Parks and Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.3.9 Support conservation groups to achieve the city’s biodiversity outcomes. - 100% of funded conservation group project agreed outcomes met.

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.6       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies:

·   Styx Vision 2000 - 2040

·   Biodiversity Strategy

·   Climate Change Strategy

·   Surface Water Strategy

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.7       The Styx Living Laboratory Trust are working closely with various Mana Whenua-based groups to protect and restore natural environments and cultural sites throughout the Styx Catchment as part of its Freshwater Improvement Fund Project. The Field Centre and its associated activities will also provide opportunities to promote traditional knowledge and matauranga Maori.

6.8       The Establishment of the Styx Field Centre at 75 Lower Styx Rd is part of Council’s Styx Vision 2000 – 2040, which entailed consultation and partnership with Mana Whenua.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.9       The Trust are planting two (2) hectares of forest in the Styx catchment per year over the next five years.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.10    Any modifications to the buildings used by the Trust will be in accordance with current building code requirements to ensure it services all accessibility levels.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement - Staff time to prepare the report.

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs - costs for security monitoring and servicing of wastewater septic tank systems to be met by Council.

7.3       Funding Source - current operational budgets.

Other / He mea anō

7.4       Improvements to the buildings to make it fit for purpose will be at the cost of the Tenant.

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       The Reserves Act 1977, section 61 (2A) - the administering body may lease all or part of the reserve to a voluntary organisation for the purpose of farming, grazing, cultivation, cropping or other like purposes.  The activity of the Living Laboratory fit in this category.

8.2       Delegations – Community Boards have the delegation to grant leases of local purpose reserves in accordance with section 61 of the Reserves Act.

Other Legal Implications / Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.3       The legal considerations are:

8.3.1   Correct application of the provisions pursuant to section 8.1 and 8.2 above;

8.4       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.  The matter of the preparation of the lease is a routine matter on which the legal situation is well known and settled.

8.5       The lease documentation will be prepared by the Council's Legal Services team.

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       There is some minor risk to the Community Board in not approving the staff recommendation.  There may be reputational damage in not proceeding with the establishment of the Living Laboratory which is part of the Council's Styx Vision 2000-2040.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

The Styx: Vision 2000 - 2040

https://ccc.govt.nz/environment/water/water-policy-and-strategy/the-styx-vision-2000-2040

 

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Kathy Jarden - Team Leader Leasing Consultancy

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Kay Holder - Manager Regional Parks

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

9.     Cranford Street near McFaddens Road - Proposed P10 and No Stopping Restrictions

Reference Te Tohutoro:

22/563200

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Barry Hayes, Senior Traffic Engineer, barry.hayes@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager  Pouwhakarae:

Jane Davis, General Manager Infrastructure, Planning & Regulatory Services, jane.davis@ccc.govt.nz

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board to consider options to improve safety and visibility for drivers turning out of the Waitomo petrol filling station and the Small World pre-school off Cranford Street.  This report has been written in response to a request from the manager at the pre-school and at the Waitomo petrol filling station.

1.2       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. The level of significance was determined by the low level of impact and low number of people affected by the recommended decision.

1.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

1.4       The recommended option is to Install P10 and No Stopping restrictions in accordance with Attachment A

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Approves that in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic & Parking Bylaw 2017, that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 10 minutes, on the north east side of Cranford Street, commencing at a point 103 metres north west of its intersection with McFaddens Road and extending in a north west direction for a distance of 7 metres.

2.         Approves that in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic & Parking Bylaw 2017, that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 10 minutes, on the north east side of Cranford Street, commencing at a point 110 metres north west of its intersection with McFaddens Road and extending in a north west direction for a distance of 8 metres.

3.         Approves that in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic & Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited at any time, on the south west side of Cranford Street commencing at a point 143 metres north of its intersection with McFaddens Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 13 metres.

4.         Revoke any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls described in resolutions 1-3 above.

5.         Approve that these resolutions take effect when parking signage and/or road markings that evidence the restrictions described in the staff report are in place (or removed in the case of revocations).

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       Safety concerns have been identified/raised for vehicles exiting 304 (occupied by Small World pre-school) and 311 Cranford Street (occupied by Waitomo filling station and Cranford Mowers and Chainsaws) due to parked vehicles obstructing visibility.

3.2       In both cases, by implementing the noted recommendations will lead to a reduction in the risk of a crash by improving sightlines for drivers turning onto Cranford Street.

3.3       The recommendations in this report will help to achieve the desired community outcome of a well-connected and accessible city through improved road safety.

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       Maintain the status quo – Currently drivers are only legally required to park one metre from the access

4.2       The advantages of this option include:

4.2.1   Retains two on-street parking spaces on the south west side and two unrestricted spaces on the north east side.

4.3       The disadvantages of the option include:

4.3.1   Does not address the identified safety issue of parked vehicles obstructing visibility on both sides of Cranford Street.

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

Background

5.1       As part of the Christchurch Northern Corridor (CNC) project, further work has been undertaken to monitor and respond to the downstream effects of the traffic using the road network within the St. Albans and Mairehau areas, which include the Cranford Street route.

5.2       A major package of road safety improvements has already been implemented over the last 2 years along this route and local streets. This proposal is a response to feedback received on the effects of parked vehicles upon driver safety. This section of Cranford Street is median divided and is classified as a major arterial within the road hierarchy in the District Plan.

Description of issues

5.3       On the north east side, at 304 Cranford Street an access is provided to the car park for parents picking up / dropping off children at the ‘Small World’ pre-school and nursery, with peak pick up / drop off times largely coinciding with peak periods on the adjacent road network. 

5.4       At the pre-school, there are unrestricted parking spaces on either side of the access, which equate to two parking spaces.  Both locations were occupied by drivers that park here for most of the day, which result in difficulties for parents and carers finding spaces during periods of high demand.

5.5       Consequently it is considered that it would be more appropriate to increase turnover at these two spaces, which will improve short stay parking opportunities for the pre-school. It also increases the probability of empty parking spaces which improves the sight line for drivers leaving the pre-school towards approaching city-bound traffic on Cranford Street.

5.6       On the opposite (south west) side of Cranford Street, the location of interest is situated between the two accesses to the petrol filling station which operates as an informal one way system. The section between the accesses is unrestricted for parking and is usually occupied by parked cars for most of the day.  These vehicle obstructed the sight line for drivers turning out of the access onto Cranford Street. Since the filling station is unmanned it would be advantageous to maintain clear sight lines consistently throughout the week.

5.7       At this location it is therefore considered appropriate to replace these two spaces with no stopping restrictions.

5.8       Approval is required by the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board.

5.9       If approved, the recommendations will be implemented within the current financial year.

Community Views and Preferences

5.10    An information leaflet (as shown in Attachment B) detailing the proposed parking restrictions parking was hand delivered to all businesses on the west side of Cranford Street north of McFaddens Road and to affected properties on the east side, namely 300-314 Cranford Street.

5.11    When the leaflets were being delivered two businesses supported the removal of on-street parking outside Waitomo Service Station to provide clear sightlines for vehicles exiting the site.  At the time of writing this report we have not received any other comment.

5.12    The Team Leader Parking Compliance supports the preferred option.

5.13    The do nothing option is inconsistent with community requests to improve visibility for drivers turning onto Cranford Street.

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       Council’s strategic priorities have been considered in formulating the recommendations in this report, however this area of work is not specifically covered by an identified priority.

6.2       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031):

6.2.1   Activity: Transport

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of death and serious injury crashes on the local road network  - ≤ 105 crashes

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.3       The recommendations in this report are consistent with the Christchurch Suburban Parking Policy.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.4       The effects of this proposal upon Mana Whenua are expected to be insignificant.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.5       This proposal does not have any significant effect upon carbon emissions and Climate Change.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.6       This proposal improves accessibility for pedestrians/drivers/cyclists, by improving visibility between drivers leaving the two properties and those travelling on Cranford Street.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement – approximately $600 for the 4 signs and road markings and $750 for investigation and preparation of this report.

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – Approximately $100 per annum for line marking renewal.

7.3       Funding Source – The CNC (Christchurch Northern Corridor) Downstream effects budget.

Other

7.4       Not applicable.

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       Part 1, Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

8.2       The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

8.3       The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.4       There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.5       This specific report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit however the report has been written using a general approach previously approved of by the Legal Services Unit, and the recommendations are consistent with the policy and legislative framework outlined in sections 8.1 – 8.3.

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       None Identified.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - Cranford at McFadden P10 and No stopping restrictions

66

b

Engagement Leaflet - Cranford North of Innes PIL

67

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Barry Hayes - Senior Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Oscar Larson - Team Leader Project Management

Jacob Bradbury - Manager Planning & Delivery Transport

Lynette Ellis - Head of Transport & Waste Management

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 



Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

10.   Langdons Road - Transport Update

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1131429

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Liqi Chen, Transport Network Planner
Kirsty Mahoney, Team Leader, Asset Planning Transport

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Jane Davis, GM Infrastructure, Planning and Regulatory Services

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The Papanui-Innes Community Board requested that staff ensure a full assessment is undertaken of the network affected by the Northlink retail park development in conjunction with Resource Management Act processes and report back to the Board, following its meeting held on 7 August 2020.

1.2       The purpose of this report is to inform the Board as to progress made on addressing in particular the concerns in relation to transport along Langdons Road.  This issue was first raised by the Community Board in August 2020, with a network study requested centred around Langdons Road.

1.3       Work on the network study has progressed, however, we are currently awaiting further details around the implementation of the Northlink Retail Park - Stage 3, including when this will proceed, what this will look like, what roading works might result, and the scale of additional network demands generated. 

1.4       As part of this network analysis and planning, staff are investigating safety and levels of service for all road users, and are seeking to develop improvement options including traffic management, pedestrian crossings, safe cycle access, and potential future public transport services.

1.5       It is highly likely that some improvements will be required, particularly for active transport mode users, and some of the less expensive options, such as pedestrian refuge islands, are already being delivered through existing Council programmes.  The addition of cycle lanes along Langdons Road will also be implemented following the resealing work in the near future.

1.6       Other projects and options associated with this corridor, includes investigation of the use of traffic signals at the access to Northlink Retail Park, as well as the installation of signals at the Greers Road / Langdons Road intersection.  The latter project is currently programmed for design and implementation in FY23-FY25 with a programmed budget of $2M.

1.7       Staffing changes have led to a delay in completing the network study, however, this work is now aiming to be completed in the 2022 calendar year.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the information, including the timing and scope of the network study.

 

 

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Kirsty Mahoney - Team Leader Asset Planning

Approved By

Jacob Bradbury - Manager Planning & Delivery Transport

Lynette Ellis - Head of Transport & Waste Management

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

11.   Waipapa Papanui-Innes 2021-2022 Discretionary Response Fund Application - Activation of Shirley Community Reserve and St Albans Residents Association.

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

22/670554

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Helen Miles Community Recreation Advisor  Helen.miles@ccc.govt.nz
Stacey Holbrough  Community Development Adviser
Stacey.Holbrough@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson General Manager Citizens & Community
Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board to consider two applications for funding from its 2021/2022 Discretionary Response Fund.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

Amount Recommended

00064542

Papanui-Innes Community Board

Activation of Shirley Community Reserve

$10,000

$10,000

00064545

St Albans Residents Association

Morning Tea at Kohinga and Entertainer at the Mid-Winter Christmas Market

$840

$450

 

1.2       There is currently a balance of $22,847 remaining in the fund.

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $10,000 from its 2021-22 Discretionary Response Fund towards the Activation of Shirley Community Reserve project, with any unspent funds to be returned to the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board’s Discretionary Response Fund.

2.         Approves a grant of $450 from its 2021-22 Discretionary Response Fund to St Albans Residents Association towards Volunteer Morning Teas at Kohinga.

3.         Approves the move of any unspent funds from the Community Board Projects; Summer with your Neighbours, Community Service Awards, Community Garden Pride, Community Liaison and Events, Positive Youth Development Fund, and Edible Gardens projects to be transferred back to the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Discretionary Response Fund.

4.         Approves the carry forward of the remaining balance of the 2021-22 Strengthening Communities Fund to the 2021-22 Waipapa Papanui-Innes Discretionary Response Fund.

5.         Approves that any remaining 2021-22 Discretionary Response Funds at the end of the financial year, be carried forward to the 2022-23 Discretionary Response Fund and 2022-23 Strengthening Communities Fund with a 30% /70% split, respectively.

3.   Key Points Ngā Take Matua

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

3.1       The recommendation is strongly aligned to the Strategic Framework and, in particular, the strategic priority of Physical Recreation and Sport Strategy Goal one- A safe physical environment that encourages participation in recreation and sport.  Strengthening Communities Together Strategy Pillars Place and Participation – We support and help build connections between communities and their places and spaces to foster a sense of local identity, shared experience and stewardship.  Residents and groups in the wider community are socially and actively engaged and are able to initiate, influence and make decisions that affect their lives.

Decision Making Authority Te Mana Whakatau

3.2       The Community Board has the delegated authority to determine the allocation of the Discretionary Response Fund for each community.

3.2.1   Allocations must be consistent with any policies, standards or criteria adopted by the Council.

3.2.2   The Fund does not cover:

·     Legal challenges or Environment Court challenges against the Council, Council Controlled organisations or Community Board decisions.

·     Projects or initiatives that change the scope of a Council project or that will lead to ongoing operational costs to the Council (though Community Boards can recommend to the Council that it consider a grant for this purpose).

Assessment of Significance and Engagement Te Aromatawai Whakahirahira

3.3       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.4       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.5       Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

Discussion Kōrerorero

3.6       At the time of writing, the balance of the 2021-22 Discretionary Response Fund is as below.

Total Budget 2021/22

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$54,547

$31,700

$22,847

$12,397

 

3.7       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the applications listed above are eligible for funding.

3.8       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the applications.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board 17 June 2022 Matrix  Shirley Community Reserve Activation

74

b

Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board 17 June 2022 Matrix St Albans Residents Association DRF application

75

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Helen Miles - Community Recreation Advisor

Stacey Holbrough - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Emma Pavey - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

12.   Waipapa Papanui-Innes 2021-2022 Positive Youth Development Fund Application - Villa Maria College

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

22/715934

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Helen Miles: Community Recreation Advisor
Helen.Miles@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson: General Manager Citizens & Community
Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board to consider an application received for funding from its 2021-22 Youth Development Fund.

1.2       This report is to assist the Board to consider an application of funding from Youth Development Fund.

1.3       There is currently a balance of $5,125 remaining in this fund.

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve a grant of $600 from its 2021-22 Positive Youth Development Fund to Villa Maria College towards the costs of Gemma and Lilly Lysaght, Keeley Hughes and Beth O'Donovan attending the Hockey Federation Cup in Napier from 29 August to 3 September 2022.

 

 

3.   Key Points Ngā Take Matua

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

3.1       The recommendations in this report align to the Council's Community Outcome of Resilient Communities including:

·   Celebration of our identity through arts, culture, heritage and sport and recreation

·   Valuing the voices of all cultures and ages (including children)

Decision Making Authority Te Mana Whakatau

3.2       Determine the allocation of the discretionary Response Fund for each community (including any allocation towards a Youth Development Fund).

3.3       Allocations must be consistent with any policies, standards or criteria adopted by the Council

3.4       The Fund does not cover:

·   Legal challenges or Environment Court challenges against the Council, Council Controlled organisations or Community Board decisions

·   Projects or initiatives that change the scope of a Council project or that will lead to ongoing operational costs to the Council (though Community Boards can recommend to the Council that it consider a grant for this purpose).

Assessment of Significance and Engagement Te Mana Whakatau

3.5       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.6       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.7       Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

4.   Applicant/ Te Kaitono 1 – Villa Maria College

4.1       Villa Maria College are seeking funding support to send their First XI hockey team to the Federation Cup.  The Cup is New Zealand Hockey’s premier school tournament.

4.2       The following four students live in the Papanui-Innes Board area:

·    Gemma and Lilly Lysaght

·    Keeley Hughes

·    Beth O'Donovan

4.3       Event seeking support for: Federation Cup

4.4       The Federation Cup is the National Secondary Schools tournament for the top eight teams in New Zealand.  In the past, this has been dominated by Christchurch Schools. Villa Maria has consistently placed in the top four teams, and it is seen as an excellent opportunity for players to develop their skills and showcase their talents at a national tournament.

4.5       The team currently has six sessions a week, either training or playing games for their school and club teams.  These sessions focus not only on hockey skills but also on building a supportive culture where members can achieve their best.  Keeley, Gemma and Beth have all made the Canterbury U18 Hockey team and will be competing in Nelson in July 2022.

4.6       Gemma Lysaght is 17 years old and lives in Redwood. Gemma is co-captain of the hockey team.  She is in her final year at school; her favourite academic subjects are history and legal studies

4.7       Keeley Hughes is 17 years old and lives in St Albans.  Keely has two older sisters who played hockey and represented the school at the Federation Cup.  Keely’s Favourite academic subject is math. 

4.8       Beth O'Donovan is 15 years old and lives in Redwood.  Since the age of five, Beth has played hockey and has represented Canterbury for several years.  In the summer months, Beth enjoys participating in athletics.

4.9       Lilly Lysaght is 16 years old and lives in Redwood.  Lilly is in year 12.  Lilly started playing hockey when she was five years old because her older sister played hockey.  Lilly’s favourite academic subjects are design and business studies.

4.10    The team have been busy fundraising by selling cookies, running car washing and sausage sizzles. The team to date have raised $3,000.

4.11    The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Villa Maria College Hockey XI team per student:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Accommodation

676.00

Flights

741.00

Tournament fees

110.00

Food, Rental costs and sundry

479.00

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$2,006.00

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Helen Miles - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Emma Pavey - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

13.   Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report - June 2022

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

22/557543

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Emma Pavey – Community Governance Manager Papanui-Innes
Emma.Pavey@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson – General Manager Citizens and Community
Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

This report provides the Board with an overview on initiatives and issues current within the Community Board area.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report for June 2022.

 

3.   Community Support, Governance and Partnership Activity

3.1       Community Governance Projects

Activity

Detail

Timeline

Strategic Alignment

Downstream Effects Management Plan (DEMP)

Briefing updates were provided to the Board on 18 May 2022 and 10 June 2022.

 

Ongoing

·  Endorse and encourage a functioning and safe traffic network that supports a connected community

Summer with Your Neighbours 2021-22

 

Summer with Your Neighbours events were due to take place between November 2021 and March 2022.

In light of the Government decision to move the country into the Red traffic light setting, recipients of the subsidy were advised that the timeframe to hold events was extended, with requests for reimbursements accepted up until 1 June 2022.

The last event has now been held and reimbursements have all been processed.

1 June 2022

·  Resilient Communities

·  Strengthening Communities Strategy

Langdons Road Corridor

Network study requested. Work has progressed, but staff are currently awaiting further details around the implementation of the Northlink Retail Park - Stage 3, including when this will proceed, what this will look like, what roading works might result, and the scale of additional network demands generated.

Greers Road / Langdons Road signalisation is currently programmed for design and implementation in FY23-FY25.

Network study aiming to be complete in 2022

Endorse and encourage a functioning and safe traffic network that supports a connected community

Shirley Community Reserve  Activation

Staff are investigating options (Attachment A) for the activation of the site further to the Board’s site visit and follow up discussion of the Youth Audit Workshop.

On 18 May 2022, Council staff (local Community Development Adviser, Manager Parks Planning and Asset Management, Team Leader Visitor Experience) met with representatives from the Shirley Road Central group to discuss their ideas for the Shirley Community Reserve, and got an insight from the group on the local history of the site and surrounding area.

Ongoing

Improve and support community facilities and amenity in the Papanui-Innes Wards.

MacFarlane Park Centre

Report to come to seek the Board’s recommendation to the Council to deal unilaterally with the Shirley Community Trust (SCT) and to approve ‘gift’ of the MacFarlane Park Centre building to SCT together with the grant of a lease of the land.

Ongoing

Community Facilities Network Plan 2020

Psychological Wellbeing Support advocated for Community Organisations

Engagement with local MPs, followed up with Matt Doocey MP writing to relevant Government Ministers to explore options.

Ongoing

Support and encourage volunteering within the community.

Community Service Awards 2022

Council's Community Service Awards are a way of giving well-deserved recognition to people who make our communities better places to live.

Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board conferred Awards on all nominees this year; the offer has been made for the Awards to be delivered in person by available Board members, recognising successful nominees out in their communities.

Awards will be delivered in June/July.

·  Resilient Communities

·  Strengthening Communities Strategy

3.2       Community Funding Summary

3.2.1   The current balance of the 2021-2022 financial year’s Discretionary Response Fund at time of writing is $22,847. There is $5,125 remaining in the Positive Youth Development Fund. Further detail is to be found in Attachment B.

3.2.2   Applications for the 2022/23 Strengthening Communities Fund opened on 21 March 2022 and closed on 26 April 2022.  A SCF briefing is scheduled in July 2022 with the SCF decision meeting in August 2022.

3.3       Community Events

3.3.1   Walk Waitaha 2022

The new format Walking Festival, ‘Walk Waitaha’ ran throughout April and May 2022 and was very well received, offering a great array of self-guided walks and walking activities over a six week period.

 

3.3.2   Walking Festival 2021

In April 2022 the Christchurch City Council Walking Festival event received a Merit Award in the Best Event category at the Recreation Aotearoa Awards for 2020/2021.

The Recreation Awards recognise excellence, innovation, and effectiveness of outstanding activity within the recreation sector as well as the achievement and service of individuals whose commitment and contribution promotes the ongoing development and enhancement of the industry.

Thank you to the 35+ partners who were with us every step of the way to bring the Walking Festival to life each year.

We can’t wait to bring the Walking Festival back in its usual format in April 2023; where we will continue to explore, discover and connect with the wonderful world of walking.

 

3.3.3   Matariki 2022

Matariki will be marked around the wider city through the Libraries, the Lighting Festival (Tīrama Mai), and celebrations at The Arts Centre. Winter Fireworks will soon follow.

3.4       Participation in and Contribution to Decision Making

3.4.1   Report back on other Activities contributing to Community Board Plan [for items not included in the above table but are included in Community Board Plan]

·     “Summer with your Neighbours”

The Shirley Community Trust reported:

“We had a lovely event thank you – well worth waiting until COVID restrictions lifted, as we had between 150-200 people come through over the two hours we were in the park, so that was awesome. I think people just loved being able to get together again – in an outside, safe space, to have fun,”

The Trust sent in the following photos:

 

·     Eastern Community Sport and Recreation – Avon Hub

It was a lovely sunny day for the official opening of the Avon Hub, which is a community-based sport and recreational centre formerly home to the old Shirley Boys School Gym.

Local Minister for Parliament Honourable Poto Williams cut the ribbon with a beautiful Kapa haka performance from the Banks Avenue School.  The official opening was followed by Have Go opportunities for the Community to participate in.

The Community who had advocated to keep this building for community use, firstly after the earthquakes and then when its future was left hanging in the balance when vandals caused significant damage to the empty building, were delighted to see this milestone.

The new community facility has a gym, upstairs function room and artificial turf and will be known as Avon Hub.  Eastern Community Sport and Recreation Inc will manage the facility. 

The Avon Hub already has the following users: Canterbury Wheelchair Rugby, Korfball Canterbury, Dead End Derby Christchurch and TIMA, which provides integrated physical opportunities for youth with adapted needs.

·     Neighbourhood Trust AGM

On Sunday, 15 May 2022, staff, the councillors for the Board area and the Board’s Deputy Chair attended the AGM of Neighbourhood Trust.

The Trust’s Board Chair, highlighted the tremendous work staff and volunteers had achieved in delivering the programmes in the difficult pandemic times and the importance of the food resilience initiatives undertaken by the Trust.

·     Papanui Bush Planting Day

It was a frosty start to the Papanui Bush Planting Day, held on 27 May 2022.  There were large number of students from Papanui High School and Bishopdale School getting immersed in the site, and the day’s offering of a sausage sizzle.

There was also a very hard-working contingent of community members who volunteered their mahi and helped to give the Bush a significant boost.

Papanui Rotary meet every second Tuesday of the month from 9:30am through to noon to continue the work.

 

3.4.2   Council Engagement and Consultation

·   Te Kaha multi-use arena budget consultation (closes 5 July 2022)

The Council are seeking feedback in regard to investing extra money into Te Kaha - Canterbury's multi-use arena.

·   Demolition of Grand National Grandstand, 165 Racecourse Road (closes 16 June 2022)

Publicly notified resource consent application for the demolition of the heritage-listed Grand National Grandstand at Riccarton Racecourse.

·   Centaurus Road roundabout – pedestrian safety improvements (closes 3 June 2022)

Comments invited on proposed changes further to feedback from the community that there are concerns about pedestrian and cycle safety at the Centaurus Road/Wilsons Road/Albert Terrace roundabout.

·   Recreation and Sports Centres survey (closes 31 July 2022)

The Council will be opening two new centres towards the end of 2023.

Parakiore will be Aotearoa-New Zealand’s biggest sport and recreation centre, including pools, hydro-slides, indoor courts and more.

The Hornby Centre will be a combined recreation and sport centre, library and service centre.   

The Council is now planning how to bring these spaces to life and what activities, programmes and events it will offer.

This survey is to help understand what people want from Council’s recreation and sports centres – the two new centres and the existing centres – and is a chance to hear community feedback on the activities and programmes the Council offers and new ideas for consideration.

3.5       Governance Advice

3.5.1   Papanui-Innes Wards Community Parks Quarterly Board Update – May 2022

Along with the rest of New Zealand, Community Parks were impacted by the Covid-19 Omicron outbreak. In response we reprioritised selected schedule maintenance activities in March to ensure ongoing delivery of core services.

We experienced a wet summer with lower than expected evaporation rates. Although this presented us with some challenges for mowing, it benefitted our volunteer planting efforts as soil moisture levels were high enough to carry us through the usually dry January and February months.

We are currently in the midst of our planting season, with Community Partnership Rangers fully committed to facilitating volunteer working bees.

3.5.1.1  Volunteer and Partnership Activity

·    The Community Partnership Rangers have been particularly active in the Papanui and Innes wards, recording 2,946 volunteer hours worked since 1 July 2021.

·    Our new Community Partnership Ranger is out connecting with several community groups such as the Shirley Village Project, Styx Living Laboratories and Papanui Bush.

·    We are working closely with the Papanui Rotary, in preparation for the next volunteer event at Bridgestone Reserve/Papanui Bush. We are expecting large numbers of keen volunteers in attendance.

·    The Shirley Village Project group have been busy installing murals and painting fences at MacFarlane Park (pictured below).

3.5.1.2  Sports Parks

·    St Albans Park playground fences are receiving a face lift, with the old block walls to be stripped back and repainted. We are currently looking for local artists, or school art students to paint a mural on the wall once works are complete. The toddler playground gates are to be renewed and a new barrier installed. The pagoda and seating are also to be stripped back and re-stained. It is expected that these works will be completed by the end of June.

·    The St Albans Skate Park is complete and open, along with the installation of a new Smart Bin.

·    Our autumn sports field renovation programme was completed within set timeframes. This year we carried out soiling and seeding, de-compaction and fertilisation.

·    The St James Park rose garden entranceway gates were recently rust treated and painted and the pagoda re-stained. Our Rangers will complete rust treatment and painting works to the main entrance heritage gates in July (rose garden gates pictured below).

 

3.5.1.3  Garden Assets

·    Capital Project - Green Asset (gardens) Renewal is underway. This planting season we will be renewing gardens at Janet Stewart Reserve, Springfield Reserve and St Albans Park. We will be planting predominantly native species with selected exotic species where appropriate.

3.5.2   Customer Service Request Report – Hybris Report for the Papanui-Innes Wards

Refer to Attachment C for the 1 May – 31 May 2022 statistics, providing an overview of the number of Customer Service Requests that have been received, including the types of requests being received and a breakdown of how they are being reported.

3.5.3   Meeting with Matt Doocey MP

The Board met with Matt Doocey MP on 23 May 2022 to kōrero regarding psychological wellbeing support for community organisation and volunteers. Some notes from the meeting can be found in Attachment D.

3.5.4   Public Participation in Board Meetings and Correspondence

The Board received the following at its 18 May 2022 meeting:

·     Public Forum Presentations and Correspondence

-      Cultivate Christchurch - Harry Baitz spoke regarding Cultivate’s work and Red Zone Project.

-      Correspondence from Tegan Hofmeyer reporting on Spirit of Adventure - Year 10 Trophy Voyage.

-      Correspondence from Clint Marston regarding the buses travelling on Flockton Street - Part of Mr Marston’s correspondence was included in the Board’s correspondence to Environment Canterbury supporting the Board’s concerns regarding heavy buses traversing Flockton Street and the vibration impact on residents.

-      Correspondence from Grace Leckie regarding traffic speed change proposal for Kāinga – The Board referred this proposal to staff for investigation.

-      Correspondence from Juliana Venning regarding Graham Condon Pool. Staff responded to operational matters. The Board took the opportunity to ask staff to determine if there is a demand in the community, and if it is feasible, to provide women’s only sessions at Graham Condon Pool.

Women’s Wednesdays are currently available at Te Pou Toetoe Linwood Pool. The provision of descending blinds for privacy makes this a unique and substantive investment to provide this service, which the discussion recognised needs to be scoped for whether there is demand and ability for Graham Condon to offer it also. Investigation is scheduled for the first quarter of next year, reflecting the busy work programme and the current challenges of staffing the pools due to the pandemic.

3.5.5   Briefings

The Board received briefings since its last meeting about the following projects/issues:

·     Update on DEMP and CNC

·     Christchurch Transport Plan

·     ECan Briefing on Flockton Street Buses and CCC Update on DEMP and Street Meetings for Francis Ave and Flockton Street

3.5.6   Board Requests

·     Abandoned Shopping Trolleys

The Board noted that ‘Snap Solve Solve’ can be used to notify the main shopping trolley providers of trolleys dumped on street sides, but took up with the relevant retailers in Northlands and Northlink the issue where a complaint received suggested some frustration with the need to report the issue, writing to the retailers as follows:

Community Request for Increased Shopping Trolley Retrieval Rounds

The Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board is concerned about the prevalence of shopping trolleys being left on roadsides in the wards, particularly in the vicinity of Northlands and Northlink, as highlighted by a recent complaint referred to us by a Hoani Street resident, who put it to our Councillor for the ward that:

you sir have an obligation to the residents of Hoani Street , Northcote. I am talking about the abandoned shopping trolleys and before you respond to this yes I have contacted the supermarkets , The Warehouse , Kmart , & Briscoes about this.

Our Councillor visited Hoani Street to verify the extent of the issue, and our Community Board agreed at its last meeting to write to you and other retailers in the area to request greater vigilance in the collection of shopping trolleys from surrounding streets. We have been advised specifically of problems in the Hoani Street area, but are aware of the same being prevalent around Northcote Road and extending into Bishopdale and Casebrook.

The Board is aware that the Council’s ‘Snap, Send, Solve’ system can be used to report abandoned trolleys, but wanted to highlight that many residents of the area take particular pride in their streetscape, which is marred by this issue of trolleys continually littering their streets. It is evident that residents are becoming increasingly frustrated by their feeling they need to report the issue.

Clearly the residents see it as an obligation on the Community Board to address the issue with you, and so we ask you to please be proactive in retrievals, giving consideration to extending and increasing the frequency of retrievals, and options for prevention. Striving to avoid trolleys littering the streetscape contributes to recognising that littering in all its forms is unacceptable to the community and inconsiderate of our neighbours.

We would appreciate you advising us of your current reach and frequency of retrievals, initiatives to prevent trolleys exiting your carparks, any efforts to educate customers on alternatives for transporting their shopping, and any consideration you may have given to root causes and out-of-the-box solutions.

We would be pleased to share your advice on these matters with your peers and the public, especially if it would assist to promote some friendly collaboration amongst the retailers we are writing to in respect of their valued contribution to community pride in the area.

·     Rubbish / Unwanted Household Items Left Out on Berms

The complaint about abandoned shopping trolleys also indicated an issue of rubbish / abandoned household items being left out on berms, which the Council’s Waste Minimisation Officer responded to with guidance in relation to how such issue can be addressed, including note that:

-      Mitre 10 Mega Papanui takes polystyrene packaging back for free. There is a container just in the door for it. The supermarket does the same with clean soft plastics, another frequent recycling contaminant. This would free up space in red bins, where all household waste inappropriate for yellow or green bins must be fully contained within.

-      Some unwanted household items will be accepted for free by EcoDrops. Whiteware and scrap metal are all accepted for free. Other items, like furniture, mattresses, prams, and woodware, for example, are only accepted upon inspection by the staff at the Ecodrop. This is to ensure the item is in resale condition – items not in a desirable condition will not be accepted.

-      There are also of course several op shops in Papanui; it is equally inappropriate for unwanted items to be left outside op shops without confirming their acceptance of the items, but if residents utilised these free services, for acceptable items, they again free up space in red bins .

-      Educational pamphlets can be delivered along the complainant’s street, promoting free recycling schemes, noting that the red bin is the only rubbish pick up option, and that placing items next to the red bin or on the verge, is considered dumping.

-      Attached is a list of alternatives to the red bin (Attachment E). Work is being done on a second page to talk about options for larger items.

·     Hoani Street Speed and Footpaths

Concerns were passed on from Hoani Street resident about speeding on the street, and the road and footpath condition was queried, and it was noted that this area is within the proposed slow speed neighbourhood programme, so a speed reduction is in process.

·     Styx River Conservation Reserve Sign

The Board assisted in following up a sign for Styx River Conservation Reserve that had been delayed, learning this was necessary to confirm the real name of the reserve – it had been referenced as Styx River Esplanade Reserve, though its real name is actually Styx River Conservation Reserve. It happened to be the case that an entrance sign was also being installed at the real Styx River Esplanade Reserve on Lower Styx Road, which helped bring matters to light.

4.   Advice Provided to the Community Board  

4.1       Information sent to the Board:

·     Update on Private Plan Change request: Extension of Homebase (circulated 23 May 2022)

Update given to the Board ahead of Independent Hearings Panel’s recommendation on the proposed plan change request considered at the Council meeting on 9 June 2022.

·     Advice that draft Council submission on Water Services Entities Bill being prepared by staff, which members may provide feedback on for staff consideration.

·     Update on investigation of kerb and channel on Edgeware Road outside Edgeware Village, with indication that the results of this investigation when complete, the drainage investigation, and responses to the other issues the Board has raised in its endeavours to explore the difficulty addressing the surface flooding affecting Peter Timbs Butchers, will be compiled within an options report to Council.

·     Update on Courtenay Street - resurfacing put on-hold while staff investigate the opportunities to upgrade the street to simultaneously address a number of issues including DEMP-related matters, school safety improvements, kerb and channel upgrades and road surface conditions. Needs to be scoped, designed and costed in the first stage. In the next stage the project’s priority justification needs to be approved by the Transport Steering Group so it can turn into a capital project. Only after the decision at this stage can delivery of the project or otherwise be advised.

4.2       Start Work Notices (SWN)

·     SWN relating to the Board area have been sent to the Board throughout the month.  All Board area and city-wide start work notices can be found at this link.

4.3       Graffiti Snapshot:

·     Graffiti Snapshot May 2022 (refer Attachment F).

4.4       Memoranda sent to the Board:

·     CCC: Shirley Road – Speed Management (circulated 13 May 2022)

·     CCC Property Consultancy Team: Application to Stop Road at 55 Cornwall Street, St Albans (circulated 20 May 2022)

Memo regarding application circulated for any comment further to staff assessment in accordance with the Christchurch City Council Road Stopping Policy 2020 that application complies with the criteria of the Policy and can consequently be processed under the delegation given to the Manager Property Consultancy.

·     CCC:  Dudley Street – Impacts of Starlings (circulated 20 May 2022)

·     CCC: Residents Survey 2021-22 and attachments (circulated 2 June 2022)

·     SWN: Mairehau Drain – timber lining renewal (circulated 2 June 2022)

·     SWN: Sherborne Street – surface improvements (circulated 7 June 2022)

·     CCC: Shirley Community Reserve (circulated 10 June 2022)

4.5       Alcohol Licence Applications Notifications in the Board area

Date of notification

Closing date

Applicant name

Trading name

Address

Application and licence type

Type of business

3 Jun 2022

28 Jun 2022

Aksorns Thai Limited

Aksorns Thai Kitchen

281 Greers Road
Bryndwr
Christchurch

On-licence renewal

On- restaurant class 3

19 May 2022

10 Jun 2022

JS Laird Limited

Liquorland Shirley

195 Marshland Road
Marshland
Christchurch

Off-licence new

Off- bottle store

17 May 2022

8 Jun 2022

Cranwest Holdings Limited

Liquorland Cranford Street

153 Cranford Street
St Albans
Christchurch

Off-licence new

Off- bottle store

 

4.5.1   Every application for an alcohol licence requires a formal public notification to be made. These public notices can be found on the Alcohol Licensing website

4.5.2   Anyone with a greater interest than the public generally, may lodge an objection against an application by writing to: The Secretary, Christchurch District Licensing Committee, Alcohol Licensing, Christchurch City Council, PO Box 73013, Christchurch 8154 or by emailing: alcohollicensing@ccc.govt.nz.

4.5.3   Any such community objections must be lodged in writing within 15 working days of the first publication of the notice on the website. These objections may only be made against the specific criteria contained within the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. General guidance on objecting is available through this website run by Te Hiringa Hauora/Health Promotion Agency. Request to view, or query, a specific application may be directed to the Alcohol Licensing Team at alcohollicensing@ccc.govt.nz or 03 941 8999.

4.5.4   Community Boards in this district have been authorised by the Council to appear and be heard (upon seeking, and if granted, permission from the chairperson of the District Licensing Committee) at any hearing of an application for an alcohol licence. This is distinct and different from being an objector. Community objectors should thus make their objections direct to the Council’s Alcohol Licensing Team; they cannot be made via the Community Board.

4.5.5   However, anyone may ask to speak to the Community Board about whether the Community Board will seek permission to appear if an application for an alcohol licence is proceeding to a hearing. Again, the Community Board do not object on behalf of, or represent, individual objectors, but can (if they seek and are granted permission to appear) deliver a submission at the hearing, principally to provide the Community Board’s overview and insight into the community in the locality of the premises.

4.6       Alcohol Licence Application in the Board area with objections to be Heard

Hearing date

Applicant name

Trading name

Address

Application and licence type

Type of business

Aug 2022

Liquorsea Limited

Northwood Liquor Store

Shop F.03a, Northwood Supa Centa, 1 Radcliffe Road

Off-licence new

Off- bottle store

TBC

Pari International Limited

Liquor Spot Edgeware

565 Barbadoes Street

Off-licence new

Off- bottle store

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Shirley Community Reserve

97

b

Balances for Papanui-Innes Community Board 2021-2022 Positive Youth Development and Discretionary Response Funds

102

c

Papanui-Innes Hybris Report May 2022

104

d

Notes from Kōrero with Matt Doocey MP on 23 May 2022 re Psychological Wellbeing Support for Community Organisations

105

e

Alternatives to the Red Bin for Rubbish

108

f

Graffiti Snapshot May 2022

109

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Mark Saunders - Community Board Advisor

Lyssa Aves - Governance Support Officer

Stacey Holbrough - Community Development Advisor

Trevor Cattermole - Community Development Advisor

Helen Miles - Community Recreation Advisor

Emma Pavey - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Approved By

Emma Pavey - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support and Partnerships

  


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 






Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 



Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 




Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 


Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 



Waipapa Papanui-Innes Community Board

17 June 2022

 

 

14.   Elected Members’ Information Exchange Te Whakawhiti Whakaaro o Te Kāhui Amorangi

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.

 

 

 

Karakia Whakamutunga