Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Wednesday 30 March 2022

Time:                                    9.30am

Venue:                                 Held by Audio/Visual Link

Under the current provisions of the Covid-19 Protection Framework (traffic lights) the meeting is open to the public through access to the live broadcasting of the meeting: http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Councillor Sara Templeton

Councillor Melanie Coker

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Celeste Donovan

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Sam MacDonald

Councillor Phil Mauger

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

 

 

25 March 2022

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Mary Richardson

General Manager Citizens & Community

Tel: 941 8999

 

 

Simone Gordon

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 6527

simone.gordon@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nzNote:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

SUSTAINABILITY AND COMMUNITY RESILIENCE committee of the Whole - Terms of Reference Ngā Ārahina Mahinga

 

 

Chair

Councillor Templeton

Deputy Chair

Councillor Coker

Membership

The Mayor and All Councillors

Quorum

Half of the members if the number of members (including vacancies) is even, or a majority of members if the number of members (including vacancies) is odd.

Meeting Cycle

Monthly

Reports To

Council

 

Delegations

The Council delegates to the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee authority to oversee and make decisions on:

·             Enabling active citizenship, community engagement and participation

·             Implementing the Council’s climate change initiatives and strategies

·             Arts  and culture including the Art Gallery

·             Heritage

·             Housing across the continuum of social, affordable and market housing, including innovative housing solutions that will increase the supply of affordable housing

·             Overseeing the Council’s housing asset management including the lease to the Otautahi Community Housing Trust

·             Libraries (including community volunteer libraries)

·             Museums

·             Sports, recreation and leisure services and facilities

·             Parks (sports, local, metropolitan and regional), gardens, cemeteries, open spaces and the public realm (for the avoidance of doubt the Council retains its authority on matters relating to the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor).

·             Hagley Park, including the Hagley Park Reference Group

·             Community facilities and assets

·             Suburban Master Plans and other local community plans

·             Implementing public health initiatives

·             Community safety and crime prevention, including family violence

·             Civil defence including disaster planning and local community resilience plans

·             Community events, programmes and activities

·             Community development and support, including grants and sponsorships

·             The Smart Cities Programme

·             Council’s consent under the terms of a Heritage Conservation Covenant

·             Council’s consent to the removal of a Heritage Conservation Covenant from a vacant section.

Bylaws

The Council delegates to the Committee authority to:

·             Oversee the development of new bylaws within the Committee’s terms of reference, up to and including adopting draft bylaws for consultation.

·             Oversee the review of the following bylaws, up to and including adopting draft bylaws for consultation.

o      Alcohol Restrictions in Public Places Bylaw 2018

o      Brothels Bylaw 2013

o      Cemeteries Bylaw 2013

o      Dog Control Policy and Bylaw 2016

o      Freedom Camping Bylaw 2015

o      General Bylaw 2008

o      Parks and Reserves Bylaw 2018

o      Public Places Bylaw 2018

Submissions

·        The Council delegates to the Committee authority:

·        To consider and approve draft submissions on behalf of the Council on topics within its terms of reference. Where the timing of a consultation does not allow for consideration of a draft submission by the Council or relevant Committee, that the draft submission can be considered and approved on behalf of the Council.

Community Funding

The Council delegates to the Committee authority to make decisions on the following funds (but not limited to), where the decision is not already delegated to staff:

·             Heritage Incentive Grant Applications

·             Extensions of up to two years for the uptake of Heritage Incentive Grants

·             Christchurch Heritage Festival Community Grants over $5,000

·             Applications to the Events and Festivals Fund

·             Applications to the Capital Endowment Fund

·             Applications to the Enliven Places Projects Fund

·             Applications to the Sustainability Fund

·             Applications to the Metropolitan Strengthening Communities Fund [The Funding Committee will make recommendations on applications to this fund and report back to this Committee]

·             Applications to the Discretionary Response Fund

·             Applications to the Place Partnership Fund

·             Applications to the Community Organisation Loan Scheme

Limitations

·             This Committee does not have the authority to set project budgets, identify preferred suppliers or award contracts. These powers remain with the Finance and Performance Committee.

·             The general delegations to this Committee exclude any specific decision-making powers that are delegated to a Community Board, another Committee of Council or Joint Committee. Delegations to staff are set out in the delegations register.

·             The Council retains the authority to adopt policies, strategies and bylaws.

·             The Council retains its authority on matters relating to the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor.

·             The following matters are prohibited from being subdelegated in accordance with LGA 2002 Schedule 7 Clause 32(1) :

·             the power to make a rate; or

·             the power to make a bylaw; or

·             the power to borrow money, or purchase or dispose of assets, other than in accordance with the long-term plan; or

·             the power to adopt a long-term plan, annual plan, or annual report; or

·             the power to appoint a chief executive; or

·             the power to adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under this Act in association with the long-term plan or developed for the purpose of the local governance statement; or

·             the power to adopt a remuneration and employment policy.

 

Chairperson may refer urgent matters to the Council

As may be necessary from time to time, the Committee Chairperson is authorised to refer urgent matters to the Council for decision, where this Committee would ordinarily have considered the matter. In order to exercise this authority:

·             The Committee Advisor must inform the Chairperson in writing the reasons why the referral is necessary

·             The Chairperson must then respond to the Committee Advisor in writing with their decision.

If the Chairperson agrees to refer the report to the Council, the Council may then assume decision-making authority for that specific report.

 


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B          Reports for Information

Part C          Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Karakia Tīmatanga........................................................................................ 7 

C         1.        Apologies Ngā Whakapāha............................................................. 7

B         2.        Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga............................. 7

C         3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua........... 7

B         4.        Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui..................................................... 7

B         5.        Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga.................. 7

B         6.        Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga...................................... 7

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku

C         7.        Te Tira Kāhikuhiku - December 2021, February 2022 and March 2022 Minutes....................................................................... 13

Staff Reports

B         8.        Community Facilities update report...................................... 29

C         9.        Heritage Incentive Grant Fund Applications........................... 35

C         10.     Christ's College FENZ Access Easement In Botanic Gardens..... 65

C         11.     Community Applications to the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund................................................................................... 73  

Karakia Whakamutunga

 


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

 

Karakia Tīmatanga

1.   Apologies Ngā Whakapāha  

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua

That the minutes of the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee meeting held on Wednesday, 2 February 2022  be confirmed (refer page 8).

4.   Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui

A period of up to 30 minutes will be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

 

4.1

Sustainable Coastlines

Emma Hunter will present her MSc research on the "Quantification and Characterisation of Pre-Production Pellet Pollution in the Avon-Heathcote Estuary/Ihutai, Aotearoa-New Zealand" to raise awareness of this issue and encourage discussion around solutions. In addition, Emma has started working for Sustainable Coastlines: a charity enabling people to look after coastlines & waterways. She with be introducing this organisation and the work they are doing in Ōtautahi/Christchurch.

 

 

4.2

Historic Places Canterbury

Mark Gerrard will speak on behalf of Historic Places Trust Canterbury regarding the Council’s Heritage Strategy.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared.

6.   Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

Unconfirmed

 

 

Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Wednesday 2 February 2022

Time:                                    9.31am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Councillor Sara Templeton

Councillor Melanie Coker

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Celeste Donovan

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough – via Audio/Visual link

Councillor Yani Johanson – via Audio/Visual link

Councillor Aaron Keown - via Audio/Visual link

Councillor Sam MacDonald – via Audio/Visual link

Councillor Phil Mauger – via Audio/Visual link

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Mary Richardson

General Manager Citizens & Community

Tel: 941 8999

 

Simone Gordon

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 6257

simone.gordon@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B          Reports for Information

Part C          Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

Karakia Tīmatanga: Given by Councillor Davidson.

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies Ngā Whakapāha

Part C

Committee Resolved SACRC/2022/00001

That the apologies received from Councillor Galloway for lateness and the Mayor for early departure be accepted.

Councillor Cotter/Councillor Coker                                                                                     Carried

 

2.   Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua

Part C

Committee Resolved SACRC/2022/00002

That the minutes of the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee meeting held on Wednesday, 8 December 2021 be confirmed.

Councillor Davidson/Councillor Cotter                                                                               Carried

 

4.   Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui

Part B

There were no public forum presentations.

5.   Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

6.   Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.

 

7.   2021-22 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund Applications - Human Performance Incorporated and the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective

 

Committee Comment

1.        Due to a number of Elected Members attending the meeting by audio/visual link, the Chair put each recommendation to vote by way of division.

2.        The original staff recommendations were accepted without change.

 

Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

1.         Makes a grant of $15,000 from the 2021/22 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund to Human Performance Incorporated towards staffing costs.

2.         Makes a grant of $39,000 from the 2021/22 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund to the New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective towards wages of their Street-Based Sex Worker Outreach Coordinator position.

 

Committee Resolved SACRC/2022/00003

Part C

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

1.        Makes a grant of $15,000 from the 2021/22 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund to Human Performance Incorporated towards staffing costs.

The division was declared carried by 16 votes to 0 votes the voting being as follows:

For:                         Councillor Templeton, Councillor Coker, Mayor Dalziel, Deputy Mayor Turner, Councillor Chen, Councillor Chu, Councillor Cotter, Councillor Davidson, Councillor Donovan, Councillor Gough, Councillor Johanson, Councillor Keown, Councillor MacDonald, Councillor Mauger, Councillor McLellan and Councillor Scandrett

Against:                Nil

Councillor Chen/Councillor Cotter                                                                                        Carried

 

Committee Resolved SACRC/2022/00004

Part C

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

2.        Makes a grant of $39,000 from the 2021/22 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund to the New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective towards wages of their Street-Based Sex Worker Outreach Coordinator position.

The division was declared carried by 15 votes to 1 vote the voting being as follows:

For:                         Councillor Templeton, Councillor Coker, Mayor Dalziel, Deputy Mayor Turner, Councillor Chen, Councillor Chu, Councillor Cotter, Councillor Davidson, Councillor Donovan, Councillor Gough, Councillor Johanson, Councillor MacDonald, Councillor Mauger, Councillor McLellan and Councillor Scandrett

Against:                Councillor Keown

Councillor Chen/Councillor Cotter                                                                                        Carried

 

The Mayor left the meeting at 9.50am during consideration of item 8.

Councillor Galloway joined the meeting at 10.13am during consideration of item 8.

 

8.   Recreation, Sports and Events Unit Quarterly Update

 

Committee Comment

1.        Staff from the Recreation, Sports and Events Unit updated the Committee on matters relating to Council facilities, events, community partnerships and how the Unit has responded to Covid-19 restrictions.

2.        The Committee requested a memo on ways to encourage the public to utilise New Brighton businesses when visiting He Puna Taimoana Hot Pools.

3.        The Committee requested information on whether the Council have plans to audit playgrounds to check their usage.

4.        The original staff recommendation was accepted without change.

 

Committee Resolved SACRC/2022/00005

Part C

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

1.         Receive the information in the Recreation Sport and Events Unit Report

Councillor Cotter/Councillor Chen                                                                                        Carried

 

Attachments

a      Recreation, Sports and Events Update  

 

 

 

 

Karakia Whakamutunga: Given by Councillor Davidson.

 

Meeting concluded at 10.59am.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 25th DAY OF MARCH 2022.

 

Councillor Sara Templeton

Chairperson


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

 

7.     Te Tira Kāhikuhiku - December 2021, February 2022 and March 2022 Minutes

Reference Te Tohutoro:

22/265426

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Chrissie Williams, Te Tira Kāhikuhiku Chairperson

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community
mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku held meetings on the following dates and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee for its information:

 

·   9 December 2021 (Confirmed)

·   22 February 2022 (Confirmed)

·   15 March 2022 (Unconfirmed)

 

 The meetings were held via audio/visual link.

 

2.   Transitional Land Use applications recommended to LINZ for approval

Meeting

License to

For

9 December 2021

Avon Ōtākaro Network

A six month extension for the lease for storage of White Posts at 8A and 8B Eveleyn Couzins Avenue.

9 December 2021

CJM’s Events Ltd

A license for the Colour Zone fun run held on 21 November 2021.

9 December 2021

Avon Loop Planning Association

A six month extension to the lease on the land in the Avon Loop (at 370-468 Oxford Terrace, 61 Bangor Street, even numbers 14-60 Bangor Street (excluding 44 Bangor Street) and Rees Street.

9 December 2021

Christchurch City Council

A six month extension to the license to investigate and plan for an Empowerment Project, The Salam Garden, at 14 Harvey Terrace, Richmond.

22 February 2022

Eden Project New Zealand

A six month extension to the license to continue planning for the Eden Project in the Avonside Loop area north of Cowlishaw Street.

22 February 2022

Avon Ōtākaro Network

A six month extension to the licence to continue planning for a child-led project to enhance the area in conjunction with the Avon Loop Planning Association.

22 February 2022

Paul Cragg

A six month extension to the licence for a Community Berry Garden for the Sumner Community, situated at 7, 9 and 11 Richmond Hill Road.

22 February 2022

Ao Tawhiti Unlimited Discovery School

A six month extension to the lease for the continuation of the Climate Action Campus (CAC) with a variation to include Bee Hives.

22 February 2022

Life in Vacant Spaces

A six month extension to the lease to continue with the project to establish a Community Garden in Scouler Place, Avondale.

15 March 2022

CJM's Events - Red Zone 6 Bike Challenge

A licence for the 2022 Red Zone 6 Bike Challenge.

15 March 2022

Ōtautahi Beekeepers Limited

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku deferred the report to a future meeting and requested further information.

 

3.   Red Zones Transformative Fund November 2021 – February 2022

Meeting

To

For

Amount

9 December 2021

Waitākiri Eco-Sanctuary Charitable Trust

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku did not approve the grant funding at this stage but requested the group to work and consult with Council staff and others to establish an agreed project plan and to provide the plan to Te Tira Kāhikuhiku to reconsider funding.

        -

9 December 2021

Agora Lab Limited

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku did not grant funding to Agora Lab Limited at this stage and requested further detailed information about the project to demonstrate the applicant’s ability to deliver the project. Te Tira Kāhikuhiku suggested for Agora Lab Limited to collaborate with Climate Action Campus and/or Christchurch East Schools Cluster who are already establishing projects with schools in the red zone.

-

The funding remaining for allocation this financial year is $34,784.

 

 

4.   Recommendation to Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee receives the Minutes from Te Tira Kāhikuhiku meetings held on the follow dates

 

·    9 December 2021

·    22 February 2022

·    15 March 2022

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku 9 December 2021 Open Minutes

16

b

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku 22 February 2022 Confirmed Minutes

21

c

Te Tira Kāhikuhiku 22 March 2022 Unconfirmed Minutes

26

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Karen McNamara - Hearings & Council Support Officer

  


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 






Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 






Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 




Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

 

8.     Community Facilities update report

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

21/610611

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Paul McKeefry, Community Facilities Specialist, Paul.McKeefry@ccc.govt.nz, and Sylvia Docherty, Policy and Project Advisor, Sylvia.Docherty@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens & Community, Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1      The purpose of this report is to update the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee on Communities Facilities. The report is staff generated.

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

1.         Receive the information in the Community Facilities update report.

3.   Introduction

3.1      This report details recent activities associated with the Community Support and Partnership’s portfolio of community facilities including:

·        Portfolio overview

·        Venues for hire overview 2020/2021

·        Customer experience

·        Community Partnerships

·        Asset planning

·        Capital works

·        Current priorities

3.2      This report will be accompanied by a PowerPoint presentation highlighting key issues and innovations.

4.   Portfolio overview

4.1      Council has 82 Community Facilities including community centres, halls, volunteer libraries and early learning centres across Christchurch and Banks Peninsula with a gross replacement cost of $99,811,859 (July 2020). This includes facilities of national heritage significance that are NZ Heritage listed and as many as 24 identified as having potential heritage significance for example, The Gaiety Hall and Risingholme Community Centre.

4.2      Council operates and manages 21 of these community facilities referred to as ‘venues for hire’. Local community organisations operate and manage the majority of the portfolio generating significant volunteer activity and social capital.

4.3      A hyperlink to the community facilities smart map detailing the location and details of each facility is attached to this report below.

5.   Venues for hire overview

5.1      Facility use: Bookings have fluctuated over the last four years, impacted by temporary closures and restrictions on bookings related to COVID protection measures.  In 2018/2019, there were approximately 53,500 hours and current bookings for 2021/2022 are currently forecast at approximately 29,500 hours.

 

2018/2019

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

(forecast)

Number of bookings

17,636

13,872

16,314

10,130

Total Booked Hours

53496.75

39764.00

46151.75

29459.50

Revenue

$669,289

$500,122

$704,283

$478,104

Regular Hirers (percentage)

85.6%

84.9%

70.8%

69.6%

Casual Hirers (percentage)

14.4%

15.1%

29.2%

30.4%

 

5.2      Our larger spaces are most popular including Ōrauwhata Bishopdale Community Centre Hall, Te Hāpua Halswell Community Centre Auditorium, Fendalton Community Centre Recreation Hall, Waimairi Community Centre Larger Hall, Templeton Community Centre Hall and Hei Hei Community Centre Hall. 

5.3      Regular hires: In 2020/2021, 258 organisations and individuals had regular bookings that ran a wide range of intergenerational activities for communities including dance and martial art classes, support groups, art and crafts and special interest groups. The number of regular hirers has since dropped to 124 in 2022/2023 with teams throughout Council working to support and mitigate the effect of COVID restrictions.

5.4      Casual hires: Council’s Contact and Service Centres help casual hirers’ book spaces for a wide range of activities including private events such as weddings and birthdays; community meetings, gatherings and fundraisers; networks, specialist groups and recreation.

6.   Customer experience

6.1      Customer experience research:  In quarter 2 2021, an MBA intern undertook research on hiring Council operated community facilities to analyse the customer experience and current booking process. The research identified “location” as the main reason influencing the choice to hire a Council community facility.  It also identified a number of recommendations to improve customer service that will be prioritised over time; these include but are not limited to:

·     Developing a [post COVID] Marketing Plan. 

·     Improving the website experience.

·     Introducing a post-event / booking survey and follow-up action process.

·     Introducing an online venue search, availability and booking tool when available technology permits.

6.2      Marketing Plan:  The Community Facilities Specialist is working with Council’s marketing team to develop an ongoing marketing plan aimed at increasing public awareness and activation. Current marketing and communication initiatives are largely focused on communicating business continuity planning measures to ensure the community and Council cooperate to provide safe facilities under COVID arrangements.

6.3      Website information and online mapping tool: Staff are working to update and improve the online information that supports our venues for hire. Improved photographs help our customers when checking suitability and a new interactive map support customers identifying the locations and facility types across Christchurch and Banks Peninsula.

6.4      Online bookings:  Council is currently reviewing its customer transaction and booking software that includes Council-managed venues for hire. This will include the introduction of online bookings for venues for hire. Our goal is to be easy to deal with, informative, cut transaction time, boost participation and increase efficiency. This project is progressing well through the procurement process with demonstrations highlighting advances in the online customer experience.

7.   Community partnerships

7.1      Community development staff are progressively contacting community operators of our facilities in order to better understand how the facilities operate.  Staff will also share best practice, offer assistance and support where needed.

7.2      Opportunities have arisen to support different ways of doing things for a number of facilities in the portfolio. Community governance teams are working at a local level to support activation opportunities for community groups in Council’s community facilities.

7.2.1   At its meeting of 13 May 2021, Council resolved (CNCL/2021/00034) to gift the Old Halswell Library to Halswell Community Project Incorporated (HCP).

7.2.2   Staff are working with Shirley Community Trust, current community operators of both the MacFarlane Community Centre and MacFarlane Park Neighbourhood Centre, to explore possible ownership opportunities for these facilities.

7.2.3   The Te Waka Unua School now operates Woolston Community Centre under transitional arrangements, the handover taking place on 31 January 2022.  Staff will discuss formal arrangements with the Waikura Community Board at the meeting on 30 March 2022.

7.2.4   An Expression of Interest (EOI) process is currently underway for Yaldhurst Memorial Hall. Staff have shared this information with Waipuna and Waimāero Community Boards and community groups in the local area.

7.2.5   A Request for Proposals process is also underway for the management and activation of the Woolston Community Space at the Woolston Community Library. Staff will provide an options report to the Waikura Community Board following the evaluation of the proposals.

7.2.6   In quarter 3 2022, Aranui Community Trust Incorporated Society (ACTIS) will commence an Activation Agreement with Council for the operation of Aranui Wainoni Community Centre.  Transition from Council to community operation will run from March to June 2022.

8.   Asset management

8.1      Improvements have been undertaken to the network asset management plan.  The plan now better reflects the size and condition of the portfolio.  Incremental improvements are allowing better decisions to be made on the prioritisation of maintenance and R&R resources.  A hyperlink to the asset management plan is attached to this report below.

8.2      There is a diverse portfolio of buildings ranging from new to 142 years old and condition ratings are similarly varied. Staff are working to determine what improvements are required to the network across a number of factors including accessibility and sustainability to provide a more consistent standard of facility across Christchurch and Banks Peninsula for the future.

8.3      This year work will begin on a feasibility study for a facility, or other option, at 10 Shirley Road.  This project will interface closely with the Waipapa Community Board and potentially other organisations.  Staff are also working with the Phillipstown Community Hub.  This facility is provided for within the Plan and an important, valued community service.  Decisions will almost certainly need consideration over the next three years or so as a future for the site becomes clearer.

9.   Capital works

9.1      Post-Quake Facility Network Completed:  Construction is complete on Manuka Cottage, Kohinga St Albans Community Centre and Opawa Volunteer Library. All of these facilities are open to public and community managed under lease agreements.  This completes the post-quake rebuild / development programme and represents a substantial milestone.



9.2      2021/2022 Refurbishments:  In this financial year, $1,580,352 CAPEX R&R budget is being utilised for refurbishment of six community facilities identified as priorities in the Asset Management Plan. This requires temporary closures for each of the facilities with staff across Council working to supporting regular and casual hirers with alternative arrangements during this disruption.

9.2.1   Harewood Community Hall has recently underwent earthquake-strengthening works removing the building from the earthquake prone building register.

9.2.2   Work is almost complete on refurbishment of Waimairi Road Community Centre including upgrades to both halls, kitchen, toilets and storage areas.

9.2.3   Fendalton Community Centre, Harvard Lounge, Hei Hei Community Lounge and Ascot Community Centre have work planned or underway over the next quarter that support compliance requirements, accessibility, improved security and kitchen/bathroom upgrades.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Community Facilities Asset Management Plan

https://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Plans-Strategies-Policies-Bylaws/Plans/Long-Term-Plan/LTP-2021-final/Asset-Management-Plan-AMP-Community-Facilities-LTP-2021-2031.PDF

Community Facilities Network Plan

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Plans-Strategies-Policies-Bylaws/Plans/Community-Facilities-Network-Plan.pdf

Community Facilities Network map

https://smartview.ccc.govt.nz/map/layer/communityfacility

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a)  This report contains:

(i)   sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii)  adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b)  The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Sylvia Docherty - Projects and Events Coordinator

Paul McKeefry - Community Facilities Specialist

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

 

9.     Heritage Incentive Grant Fund Applications

Reference Te Tohutoro:

22/121548

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Victoria Bliss, Heritage Conservation Projects Planner Victoria.Bliss@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Jane Davis, General Manager, Infrastructure, Planning and Regulatory Services                                                   Jane.Davis@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1      The purpose of this report is for the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee to consider applications for Heritage Incentive Grant funding from the organisations listed below, noting that the recommendations can be accommodated within the funds available.

Applicant

Project Name

Total eligible costs

Amount Recommended

Parish of Christchurch

 St Michael’s and All Angels Church, West Rose Window conservation project

$52,576

$26,288 (50%)

Parish of Fendalton

 

St Barnabas Church Hall, conservation and upgrade project

$800,884

$87,500 (25% of requested grant)  

23 Mandeville Street

Re-approval of lapsed grant for conservation and maintenance project

$11,874

$5,136 (previous approved grant)   

 

Ferrymead Park Limited

Kinsey Cottage and Darkroom conservation project

$18,385

$5,692 (50% of requested grant)

Totals

$883,719

$124,616

 

1.2      This report is staff generated in response to applications received for Heritage Incentive Grant funding.

1.3      The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance is determined by the heritage significance of the items, the cultural wellbeing outcomes of the projects, the amount of funding requested, and the fact that Council has approved Heritage Incentive Grant funds for allocation in the 2021/22 financial year. There are no engagement requirements in the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund – Guidelines 2020 for this grant scheme.

1.4      Approval of these grants would support the Community Outcomes: “Resilient Communities”, “Liveable City” and “Prosperous Economy”.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu  

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

1.         Approve a grant of up to $26,288 for conservation of the west Rose Window at St Michael and All Angels Church, 243 Durham Street South, Christchurch.

2.         Note that payment of the St Michael’s Church grant is subject to the applicant entering a 10 year limited conservation covenant with the signed covenant having the Council seal affixed prior to registration against the property title.

3.         Approve a grant of up to $87,500 for conservation, upgrade, repair and maintenance works to St Barnabas Church Hall located at 8 Tui Street, Fendalton, Christchurch.

4.         Note that payment of the St Barnabas Church Hall grant is subject to the applicant entering a 20 year limited conservation covenant with the signed covenant having the Council seal affixed prior to registration against the property title.

5.         Re-approve the lapsed grant of up to $5,136 for conservation and maintenance works to the heritage building located at 23 Mandeville Street, Christchurch.

6.         Approve a grant of up to $5,692 for conservation and maintenance works to Kinsey Cottage and Darkroom, Ferrymead Heritage Park, Christchurch.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1      In summary staff recommend the following grants (see section 5 of this report for a full project description and rationale):

3.1.1   St Michael’s west Rose Window conservation - $26,288 (50% of eligible works). This level of grant funding supports the conservation of the badly damaged and threatened historic stained glass window. The project will preserve the window as an important architectural feature of the church for future generations.

3.1.2   St Barnabas Church Hall conservation and upgrade project- $87,500 (25% of funding requested). This level of grant funding supports the conservation, upgrade, repair and maintenance of the Church Hall, which has high architectural, aesthetic, technological and craftsmanship significance. The project will ensure the protection and ongoing use of this landmark building by the parish and wider community.

3.1.3   23 Mandeville Street, Christchurch grant re-approval - $5, 136. This level of grant funding was approved by the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee on October 3, 2018 (SOC/2018/00068) but has lapsed. Re-approval will support the conservation and maintenance of a significant scheduled heritage building and ensure its ongoing and viable use.

3.1.4   Kinsey Cottage and Darkroom conservation project - $5,692. This level of grant funding supports the conservation and maintenance of the heritage building and the historic Darkroom, which is associated with Antarctic exploration and photography, for future generations.

3.2      Supporting these four applications will enable the diverse heritage of the city and its unique history to be protected, conserved and shared. The projects contribute to the development of a collection of heritage places across Ōtautahi Christchurch which are identified by the community as having heritage significance and meaning to them.  This contributes to a distinctive identity, character and sense of place for the city and its communities.

3.3      Approving the recommended grants will enable the Council to support communities to protect our heritage, meet the vision of “Our Heritage, Our Taonga Heritage Strategy 2019 -2029” and achieve the purpose of heritage incentive grants “… to incentivise owners and kaitiaki to undertake works to protect, maintain, repair and upgrade heritage buildings, places structures and objects.” (17 December 2020, SACRC/2020/00046).

3.4      These projects will have a wide and diverse reach: they include engagement with multiple communities and groups across the city, and are accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Approving grant contributions for the eligible components of works to conserve these heritage buildings and structures will contribute to the Council’s aim to maintain and protect built, cultural, natural, and significant moveable heritage items, areas, and values.   

3.5      The recommended grants align with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund - Guidelines (2020) and can be accommodated within the available budget. 

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa   

4.1      St Michael’s Church west Rose Window conservation project

Option 1: Grant funding of $13,144 (25% eligible works): staff consider the project would be unlikely to proceed, or be delayed beyond the anniversary memorial, with a reduced level of funding.

Advantages: funding would be available for allocation to other projects/applicants.

Disadvantages: a lower level of funding would reduce the ability of the Parish to progress with the conservation works, and it is likely that the project would not proceed in time to be completed for the 150th anniversary memorial.

Option 2: Decline the application.

Advantages: funding would be available for allocation to other projects/applicants.

Disadvantages: would not support the conservation of a highly significant heritage item; would not align with the Heritage Strategy, and is not consistent with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund - Guidelines (2020).

4.2      St Barnabas Church Hall conservation and upgrade project 

Option 1: Grant funding of $175,000 (50% of the grant application): the building has heritage significance and wide community use, however staff consider this level of funding to be high in terms of the total grant funding available.

Advantages: this level of funding would provide greater support to the preservation and conservation of a significant heritage item and important community venue.

Disadvantages: a large investment in this project results in less funding being available for allocation to other applicants. This reduces the funding available to provide support for a broad range and diversity of heritage projects.

Option 2: Decline the application.

Advantages: funding would be available for allocation to other projects/applicants.

Disadvantages: would not support a project to preserve a significant heritage place; would not align with the Heritage Strategy, and is not consistent with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund - Guidelines (2020).   

4.3      23 Mandeville Street conservation and upgrade project

Option 1: Decline re-approval of the lapsed grant: the building is a significant scheduled heritage item, and one of only two remaining buildings in the Walker Settlement development, and its heritage fabric is at risk of ongoing deterioration and loss.

Advantages: funding would be available for allocation to other projects/applicants.

Disadvantages:  would not support a project to preserve a significant heritage place; would not align with the Heritage Strategy; is not consistent with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund - Guidelines (2020), and would not be consistent with the earlier grant approval decision.

 

4.4      Kinsey Cottage and Darkroom conservation project

Option 1: Grant funding of $2,846 (25% of the grant application): staff considered that the project was likely to be delayed with a lower level of funding, risking further deterioration and loss of heritage fabric.

Advantages: funding would be available for allocation to other projects/applicants.

Disadvantages: a lower level of funding would reduce the ability of the applicant to progress with the conservation works. This would result in deterioration of a significant heritage place and impact upon public access.

Option 2: Decline the application.

Advantages: funding would be available for allocation to other projects/applicants.

Disadvantages: would not support the conservation of a significant heritage item; would not align with the Heritage Strategy, and is not consistent with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund - Guidelines (2020).

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

St Michael’s and All Angels Church west Rose Window conservation project -

5.1      The applicant for the grant is the Anglican Parish of Christchurch - St Michael and All Angels, who is organising and fundraising for the project. The Church is owned by the Church Property Trustees.

The Project

5.2      The Rose Window of the west façade of St Michael’s Church was designed by Ward and Hughes and executed by Thomas Figgis Curtis. It was commissioned in memory of ‘Richard James Strachan Harman’, one of the early Canterbury settlers, and unveiled on 28 June 1903. The window features the ‘Nine orders of Angels’, and is specifically referenced in the ‘Statement of Significance’ as having craftsmanship and technological significance.

5.3      St Michael’s and All Angels Church was the first Anglican parish established in Christchurch in1851, and integral to the foundation of the Anglican settlement. The scheduled church was opened in 1872, and has high heritage significance. It is also listed with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga as a Category I heritage place. See Statement of Significance (Attachment A) for further details.

5.4      St Michael’s Church is a landmark within the central city, and visually prominent on the Durham Street/Oxford Terrace corner. The West Rose window is a principal element of the west façade, directly above the main entrance porch, and visible from the pedestrian focussed paved area of Oxford Terrace.

5.5      The Church is an integral part of the Anglican and school communities it serves. The building also attracts visitors and provides a space for gatherings, social interaction and ceremonies, as well as quiet contemplation and reflection. It is an important heritage building, telling the story of the early settlement of the Anglican colony of Christchurch, and is frequently included in central city heritage tours and heritage activities and events such as the Heritage Festival, architectural tours and the Open Christchurch Festival. 

5.6      The Parish are seeking to repair and restore the stained glass windows of the Church, to conserve these windows as a key heritage feature of the building. The windows were designed and made by some of the most notable and distinguished English artists and craftsmen of the time. In 2021, four of the north windows were restored; the West Rose Window is the next priority for repair.

5.7      The 150th anniversary of the window installation occurs in June 2023. The Parish are seeking to complete the conservation work and to have the window reinstated in time for this anniversary and to celebrate and share the occasion with the parish, school and wider community.

 

IMG_5107

The west Rose Window, directly above the entry porch (BF Smyth, 2022)

The Grant Application

5.8      The applicant is seeking funding to support the repair, conservation and restoration of the damaged stained glass. The eligible costs for the project total $52, 576 and include:

·    Removal of the nine window panels Deconstruction of the individual glass panels

·    Cleaning, repair and replacement of damaged, bowing and leaking areas

·    Complete re-leading of all panels

·    Reinstatement of conserved windows

·    Associated scaffold, site preparation, security and set up costs

Works relating to earthquake damage to the west elevation of the Church are not included in the scope of works seeking grant funding.

5.9      The Rose Window is in a critical condition, with three of its panels in danger of collapse. The poor condition is due to the age of the glass, failing and decaying lead, distortion, cracking and warping of the timber frames. Works undertaken in the 1980s to prevent leaking applied a coating to the glass that has caused further and ongoing damage. This coating has discoloured the glass, is degrading the kiln fired enamel details, and attacking the lead construction. The conservation works require the removal of every segment of glass, cleaning, stabilisation, repairs and replacement and re-leading to put the windows back together again. Specialist conservators are required to undertake the works.

The West Rose window from within the Church, showing the Nine Orders of Angels (image from 2009)

5.10    The Parish are actively seeking funding and undertaking fundraising initiatives. To date they have funded the conservation works to four windows in the north wall, and are applying to the Christchurch Community Trust for a grant to support the restoration of other windows in the Church.

5.11    Letters of support for the project have been provided by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and Conservation Architect Mr D. Pearson.

5.12    A grant for the proposed works is in alignment with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund – Guidelines 2020, see: https://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Culture-Community/Heritage/Heritage-Incentive-Grant-Fund-Guidelines-2020.pdf  The works are within the scope of grant consideration, and the application and grant amount meet the Criteria for ‘Assessment of Applications’.

5.13    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.13.1 Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

5.13.2 It is noted that Tūāhuriri Rūnanga are the Tangata Whenua in this location.

 

St Barnabas Church Hall conservation and upgrade project -

5.14    The applicant for the grant is the Anglican Parish of Fendalton – St Barnabas, who is organising and fundraising for the project. The Church is owned by the Church Property Trustees.

The Project

5.15    Designed by notable Christchurch architect, RSD Harman, the Church Hall is scheduled as a significant heritage item. It is constructed of Halswell stone and concrete blocks faced with river stone in the Jacobean Arts and Crafts style.  The Hall has cultural and spiritual significance as an integral part of the centre of Anglican worship, and parish and community life in Fendalton. It is of high architectural, aesthetic, technological and craftsmanship significance, and its prominence on a corner site fronting Fendalton Road gives it high contextual significance as a landmark in the Fendalton streetscape. Full details are provided in the Statement of Significance (Attachment B).

5.16    The Hall was constructed in 1941, following community fundraising to build a new Parish Hall.  It was the Sunday School for the growing parish until 1965, when it began to serve wider parish and community needs.

5.17    Community use of the Hall has increased since the closure of the Church building in 2011, as the Hall suffered relatively minor damage and has remained open and in use. It currently provides meeting spaces for many local groups and organisations that include: the Girl Guides and Brownies; Alcoholics Anonymous; Elderly Care; mother and baby groups; the Nurses’ Association; Mainly Music; and Youth Groups, gardening clubs, Te Reo classes and musical and singing groups.

5.18    The Parish are seeking to repair, conserve and upgrade the Hall to ensure that it remains protected, functional and ‘fit for purpose’ to serve both current and future users.  The works required include the replacement of the slate roof, and remediation of ‘concrete cancer’ which over time will threaten the structure. Fire and seismic upgrades are also necessary to ensure the long-term retention and ongoing safe community use of the Hall.

Tui 8 (St Barnabas Parish Hall) 2014-12-24 M

St Barnabas Church Hall (M. Vairpiova, 2014)

The Grant Application

5.19    The applicant is seeking funding to support the repair, conservation and upgrade of the Church Hall, including deferred remedial maintenance and improved accessibility for community use. Eligible works include:

·    Replacement of failing slate roof

·    Concrete cancer remediation and repair

·    Seismic upgrade to 67% NBS

·    Fire protection upgrades

·    Electrical and heating upgrades

·    Professional fees

·    Leadlight window conservation

·    Resource consent fees

Interior reconfiguration for functionality, kitchen and toilet facility upgrades, interior repainting and cosmetic works and works covered by insurance payments are not eligible for heritage incentive grant funding.

5.20    The full cost of the project is estimated at $1,908,235. An insurance payment for $134,000 has been received, which relates to earthquake damage requiring repair. The proposed concrete cancer remediation; seismic, fire and accessibility upgrades; replacement roof and interior upgrades are maintenance and upgrade works unrelated to the earthquake damage the building sustained.  

5.21    The eligible costs for the project total $800,884, and the applicant is seeking support for $350,000 of these works. The recommended grant of $87,500 equates to 25% of the grant applied for, and not of the total eligible works. 

5.22    The Parish are actively seeking funding and undertaking fundraising initiatives. They are applying to the Rata Foundation and the Lotteries Community Facilities Fund for grants to support the works to the Hall.

5.23    A grant for the proposed works is in alignment with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund – Guidelines 2020, see: https://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Culture-Community/Heritage/Heritage-Incentive-Grant-Fund-Guidelines-2020.pdf  The works are within the scope of grant consideration, and the application and grant amount meet the Criteria for ‘Assessment of Applications’.

5.24    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.24.1 Waimāero Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board.

5.24.2 It is noted that Tūāhuriri Rūnanga are the Tangata Whenua in this location.

 

23 Mandeville Street conservation and upgrade project grant re-approval

5.25    The applicants for this project are the owners, Mr and Mrs Ling.

5.26    On 3 October 2018 the applicants were awarded a grant of up to $5,136. The grant was for replacement of the existing corrugated iron roof to maintain weather-tightness, and minor repairs and upgrades to the roof structure. With the completion of these works, the heritage fabric and structure of the building will be protected for future generations.

23 Mandeville Street, 2016

5.27    Details of the scope of works, discussion and grant recommendations can be found at: https://christchurch.infocouncil.biz/Open/2018/10/SOC_20181003_MIN_2371.htm#PDF2_ReportName_19344

5.28    23 Mandeville Street was originally one of a set of houses known as the ‘Walker Settlement’. Constructed under the “Workers’ Dwelling Act 1905”, the scheme was intended to provide 5000 affordable houses for workers, and in actuality resulted in just over 600. The houses were designed by the Government Architect, Woburn Temple and were constructed of ferro-concrete, which was unusual for workers’ dwellings at the time. The ferro-concrete was thought to be a warmer and more weatherproof alternative to the more standard timber construction of the time. Only two of the Walker Settlement houses remain, as a record of this affordable housing project.

5.29    23 Mandeville Street is currently operating as the ‘Villa 23’ vegetarian and vegan café, with public access into part of the building. It is a highly visible heritage item in the local streetscape.

23 Mandeville Street, 2021, as ‘Villa 23’

5.30    Full details of the heritage significance of the building are provided in the Statement of Significance (Attachment C).

5.31    The owners were unable to complete the proposed works within the 18 month timeframe for the grant. They were contacted by staff, but did not feel able to request an extension of time for the grant, as they could not confirm a new timeframe to undertake the works. Consequently the grant lapsed.

5.32    The applicants have re-applied for a grant as they are now in a position to be able to progress the works. The project costs have increased, but staff are seeking re-approval of the lapsed grant at the previously approved amount.

5.33    The roof has continued to deteriorate, and the works are now urgent to maintain the weather tightness of the building.

5.34    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.34.1 Waipuna Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

5.34.2 It is noted that Tūāhuriri Rūnanga are the Tangata Whenua in this location.

 

Kinsey Cottage and Darkroom conservation project

5.35    The applicant for the grant is Ferrymead Park Ltd., the Park’s management company, who are organising and fundraising for the project.  The Cottage is owned by the Ferrymead Trust.

The Project

5.36    Kinsey Cottage and Darkroom belonged to Sir Joseph Kinsey, a Christchurch shipping agent and amateur photographer.  The Cottage was built in the early 1900s, and originally located at the rear of Kinsey’s ‘Werrimoo’ property at 99 Papanui Road.  Kinsey Cottage served as a meeting place for Antarctic explorers Sir Robert Falcon Scott, Sir Ernest Shackleton and Herbert Ponting, the expedition’s professional photographer.

5.37    Sir Joseph Kinsey assisted in facilitating Scott and Shackleton’s ‘Terra Nova’ expedition to Antarctica in 1910 to 1913.  The Darkroom in the Cottage was where Herbert Ponting later developed the very first expedition photographs.

5.38    The estate of Sir Joseph Kinsey was acquired by Ferrymead Trust in 1971, when the Cottage was relocated to Ferrymead Park to prevent its demolition.  The Trust are committed to preserving Kinsey Cottage and its darkroom as a significant heritage place, with tangible links to the very first Antarctic expedition images. The darkroom was where these images were developed “capturing some of the most enduring and famous images of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration of our time.”[1]

5.39    The Cottage is open to the public, as an interpretation space with furniture and fixtures providing visitors with an experience of early 20th Century life. The Darkroom is set up with equipment from the period, including images and interpretation relating to Antarctic exploration and photography.

5.40    The applicant is working with the Christchurch Antarctic Office, Christchurch NZ, to enhance the visitor experience at the Cottage, as part of Christchurch’s “Antarctic Gateway City” story.

5.41    The applicant is seeking to undertake deferred remedial maintenance, lead abatement, repair and conservation works, and to improve accessibility with a wheelchair access ramp and hand rail.  The works are required to ensure the building remains weather tight, functional and ‘fit for purpose’ to serve both current and future users.  A second project will follow the physical works to the building, with the development of interpretation, displays and enhanced visitor attractions on the site.

 

Kinsey Cottage at Ferrymead Heritage Park, 2021

The Grant Application

5.42    The applicant is seeking funding to support the conservation and maintenance of the Kinsey Cottage as part of a wider project to conserve and promote the building and its links to Antarctic exploration.  Eligible works include:

·    Exterior repairs and repainting

·    Timber joinery repairs and restoration

·    Provision of improved accessibility

·    Lead paint remediation

Interior repainting and cosmetic works are not eligible for heritage incentive grant funding.

5.43    The full cost of the project is estimated at $24, 285. The eligible costs for the project total $18,385, and the applicant is seeking support for $11,385 of these works. The recommended grant of $5,692 equates to 50% of the grant applied for, and not of the total eligible works. 

5.44    The applicant has already secured funding to complete the accessibility upgrades and timber joinery restoration. This funding application would enable the lead remediation and exterior repainting to be undertaken. 

5.45    Letters of support for the project have been provided by Ferrymead Trust and the Christchurch Antarctic Office, Christchurch NZ (see Attachment D).

5.46    A grant for the proposed works is in alignment with the Heritage Incentive Grant Fund – Guidelines 2020, see: https://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Culture-Community/Heritage/Heritage-Incentive-Grant-Fund-Guidelines-2020.pdf  The works are within the scope of grant consideration, and the application and grant amount meet the Criteria for ‘Assessment of Applications’.

5.47    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.47.1 Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

5.47.2 It is noted that Tūāhuriri Rūnanga are the Tangata Whenua in this location.

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1      The Heritage Incentive Grant Scheme aligns to the Community Outcome “Resilient Communities” – ‘celebration of our identity through arts, culture, heritage, sport and recreation’ and ‘strong sense of community’. It also supports “Liveable City” – ‘21st century garden city we are proud to live in’ and “Prosperous Economy” – ‘great place for people, business and investment’.

6.2      The Heritage Incentive Grant Scheme supports delivery of the overarching strategic principle of “Taking an intergenerational approach to sustainable development, prioritising the social, economic and cultural wellbeing of people and communities and the quality of the environment, now and into the future.” This is because heritage is an intergenerational equity. It contributes to our personal and community sense of identity and belonging, and enhances high levels of social connectedness and cohesion.

6.3      This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031):

6.3.1   Activity: Strategic Planning, Future Development and Regeneration

·     Level of Service: 1.4.2 Effectively administer grants within this Activity (including Heritage Incentive Grants, Enliven Places, Innovation and Sustainability) - 100% compliance with agreed management and administration procedures for grants

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.4      The recommendations are consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies as listed below:

6.4.1   Our Heritage, Our Taonga Heritage Strategy 2019-2029

6.4.2   Heritage Incentive Grants Policy –Guidelines 2020

6.4.3   International Council on Monument and Sites (ICOMOS) New Zealand Charter 2010.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.5      The staff recommendations involve significant decisions in relation to ancestral land and other elements of intrinsic value both for Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions, as well as being relevant to local European history.

6.6      The six papatipu rūnanga hold the mana whenua rights and interests over the district and are partners in the Our Heritage, Our Taonga - Heritage Strategy 2019-2029. Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga, Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Te Rūnanga o Koukourārata, Wairewa Rūnanga, Ōnuku Rūnanga and Te Taumutu Rūnanga are primary kaitiaki for the taonga tuku iho of the district. They are guardians for elements of mātauranga Māori reaching back through many generations and are a significant partner in the strategy implementation.  

6.7      It is noted that Tūāhuriri Rūnanga are the Tangata Whenua in the locations of all four grant applications.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.8      The grants will support the retention of heritage buildings and the embodied energy within them.  Retention and reuse of heritage buildings can contribute to emissions reduction and mitigate the effects of climate change. Retaining and reusing existing built stock reduces our carbon footprint and extends the economic life of buildings.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.9      The four grants will support buildings which are publically visible and accessible.  Works eligible for grant funding include accessibility upgrades, in line with the Heritage Strategy’s principle of ‘Accessibility’.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1      Cost to Implement – the recommendations are for grants of $26,288 to St Michael’s Church; $87,500 to St Barnabas Church Hall; $5,136 to 23 Mandeville Street, and $5,692 to Kinsey Cottage. These recommendations total $124,616.

7.2      Maintenance/Ongoing costs – none.

7.3      Funding Source - The Heritage Incentive Grant fund was an annual fund provided for in the 2018-28 Long Term Plan. Council approved funding to be diverted into this fund from the now closed Central City Landmark Heritage Grant Fund in 2020. The carry forward of the remaining funds was approved for inclusion in the 2021/2031 Long Term Plan, with the resolution to spread these funds over three financial years.

7.4      The impact of these grants (and others put before the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee in this meeting) are as follows:

Total funds  for Heritage Incentive Grants (HIG) for the next 3 years

$1,042,169

Total funds for Heritage Incentive Grants (HIG) for FY22

$347,390

Approved grant to Stone End Bach (50%)

         $1,858

Approved grant to Rosy Morn Bach (50%)

$4,575

Approved grant St Joseph the Worker Church Memorial (50%)

$7,490

Approved grant Rāpaki School (30%)

$71,000

Approved grant to Bays Boat House (20%)

$58,500

Proposed grant to St Michael’s Church (50%)

$26,288

Proposed grant to St Barnabas Church Hall (25%)

$87,500

Proposed grant to 23 Mandeville Street (50%)

$5,136

Proposed grant to Kinsey Cottage (50%)

$5,692

Total Remaining HIG Funds for FY22

$79,351

Total Remaining HIG Funds FY22 –FY24

$774,130

 

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1      The delegated authority for Heritage Incentive Grants decisions is with this Committee.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.2      There are no legal context, issue or implication relevant to these decisions.

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1      The grant scheme only allows funds to be paid out upon completion of the works; certification by Council staff that the works have been undertaken in alignment with the ICOMOS NZ Charter 2010; presentation of receipts and confirmation of the conservation covenant (if required) having been registered against the property title or on the Personal Properties Securities Register. This ensures that the grant scheme is effective and that funds are not diverted or lost.

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

St Michael's and All Angels Church Statement of Significance

49

b

St Barnabas Church Hall Statement of Significance

54

c

23 Mandeville Street Statement of Significance

58

d

Letters of Support for Kinsey Cottage conservation project

63

 

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

 

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a)  This report contains:

(i)   sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii)  adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b)  The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Victoria Bliss - Heritage Conservation Projects Planner

Approved By

Brendan Smyth - Team Leader Heritage

Michael Down - Finance Business Partner

John Higgins - Head of Planning & Consents

Jane Davis - General Manager Infrastructure, Planning & Regulatory Services

  


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 






Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 





Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 






Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 



Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

 

10.  Christ's College FENZ Access Easement In Botanic Gardens

Reference Te Tohutoro:

22/202025

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Russel Wedge, Team Leader Parks Policy & Advisory, russel.wedge@ccc.govt.nz
Barry Woodland, Property Consultant, barry.woodland@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens & Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1      The purpose of this report is for the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee to grant approval for a registered right of way (ROW) easement over an area of land in the Botanic Gardens in favour of Christ’s College Canterbury (Christ’s College). The easement will provide Fire Emergency New Zealand (FENZ) with legal access from a fire hydrant in the Botanic Gardens to the new Christ’s College sports complex via a gate to be constructed in the concrete block boundary wall (refer Attachment A).

1.2      This report has been written in response to a request from Christ’s College who have, in consultation with Council staff and FENZ, established that the Botanic Gardens is the only way for FENZ to gain access to the new sports complex in Christ’s College in the event of a fire. FENZ cannot gain access through the Christ’s College buildings from Rolleston Avenue to the new sports complex building located at the western end of the sports fields. FENZ access to the new sports complex is required for building consent approval.

1.3      At a Council meeting on 10 February 2022 CNCL/2022/00019 approval was granted for a temporary access easement through Hagley Park to enable Christ’s College to construct the new sports complex within the College grounds. This access will be removed once the building is completed.

1.4      The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Although the Botanic Gardens is considered a metropolitan asset, the easement agreement will not affect the public’s enjoyment or access around the Botanic Gardens.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee, acting under the delegated authority of the Christchurch City Council:

1.         Approve pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977, the granting of a pedestrian Right of Way easement with restricted access for only Fire and Emergency New Zealand (FENZ) purposes, to Christ’s College Canterbury over that part of the Local Purpose (Botanic Garden) Reserve known as the Botanic Gardens (Part Reserve 25 in Record of Title 668229) shown as hashed blue area on the plan below at paragraph 5.5, subject to:

a.        The acknowledgement that a public notice is not required in this instance.

b.        A recommendation that the Chief Executive, using the Council’s delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation, consents to the granting of an easement referred to in (1) above.

c.         All necessary statutory consents under, but not limited to, the Resource Management Act and Building Control Act being obtained by Christ’s College.

d.        Christ’s College meet their own and Council’s costs associated with the creation and execution of this easement.

2.         Authorises the Property Consultancy Manager, should the easement be granted with the consent of the Chief Executive, to conclude negotiations with Christ’s College and to finalise the documentation required to implement the easement.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1      To provide FENZ 24 hour access to get hoses from the fire hydrant in the Botanic Gardens, to the manifold inlets/outlets valves on the boundary wall, next to the new gate, between the Botanic Gardens and Christ’s College. The new gate in the wall will enable FENZ access to the new sports complex at the western end of Christ’s College grounds.

3.2      FENZ are unable to gain access for their fire engines from Rolleston Avenue through the arch in the Christ’s College buildings, to the western end of the College sports fields. The fire engines are also unable to travel across the grass surface of the College’s sports grounds to the new sports complex.

3.3      The manifold inlets/outlets valves on the wall will provide additional water from the Christ’s College swimming pool to be used to fight a fire in the Ilex Visitor Centre and Botanic Gardens Nursery should it occur.

3.4      This option is supported by the Friends of the Botanic Gardens, Council staff and Council’s Parks Team (as asset owner).

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1      The easement is not granted – Not Recommended

4.2      The building consent for the new sports complex requires FENZ to have 24 hour access for their fire engines to the site, this can only be achieved via the Botanic Gardens.

4.3      The Botanic Gardens and Ilex Centre would not benefit from the additional source of water available from the Christ’s College swimming pool that can be used for fire-fighting via the new gate in the concrete block boundary wall.

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

5.1      Christ’s College is required to provide 24 hours unobstructed access for FENZ to the new sports complex at the western end of their sports fields. FENZ access to the new sports complex is required before their Building Consent can be granted.

5.2      FENZ is unable to get their fire engines through the arch in the Christ’s College buildings from Rolleston Avenue. The only way FENZ could attend a fire in the new sports complex is through the Botanic Gardens. There is an existing fire hydrant in the Botanic Gardens asphalt path near the entrance driveway to the Botanic Gardens Yard and Ilex Centre that FENZ can use should a fire occur.

5.3      The concrete block wall is between the brick wall behind the herbaceous border and the wooden fence at the entrance to the Botanic Gardens yard. A gate is proposed to be constructed through the concrete block wall and the control panel will be situated next to the gate. The inlet/outlet valves on the wall will be able to provide water via hoses from the hydrant in the Botanic Gardens to the new sports centre. There will also be an additional water supply from the Christ’s College swimming pools that can be used for fire-fighting purposes. The swimming pool water will also be available for fighting a fire in the Ilex Centre.

5.4      FENZ have confirmed the gate in the boundary wall is for FENZ access only and is not an Emergency Exit for the new sports complex. The sports complex’s emergency exits should lead out onto Christ’s College sports grounds. The gate will remain locked and only accessible by FENZ.

5.5      Figure 1. Plan showing easement from Botanic Gardens to boundary wall of Christ’s College.

5.6      An easement is required by FENZ to ensure they have 24 hour access to the new sports centre. The easement is only required for hoses from the existing hydrant in the Botanic Gardens to the concrete block wall. FENZ do not require an easement from Rolleston Avenue down the side of the Museum along the wide pathway next to the herbaceous border to the entrance to the Botanic Gardens Yard, and hydrant. This is the route FENZ would take if there was a fire in the Ilex Centre.

Easement – Statutory Process

5.7      The Botanic Gardens is classified as a Local Purpose (Botanic Gardens) Reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act).

5.8      The Council’s legal team has advised that it would be appropriate for the Council to use s48 (1) (f) of the Act to grant a registered right of way easement to Christ’s College to facilitate the proposed FENZ access to the new Sports Complex.

5.9      Section 48 provides that the Council with the consent of the Minister may grant easements for rights of way and other easements over reserve land. In this case s48(1)(f)

“providing or facilitating access or the supply of water to or the drainage of any other land not forming part of the reserve or for any other purpose connected with any such land” applies.

5.10    It is usual practice for the Council to see compensation as a one-off compensation fee, assessed by an independent registered valuer. The fee is payable to the Council for the privilege of gaining a permanent property interest over Council land. In this case, as the Botanic Gardens and Ilex Centre will benefit from the additional source of water from Christ’s College swimming pool in the event of a fire it is considered that a compensation fee would not be appropriate. 

Community Views and Preferences

5.11    Under s48(2) of the Act it is necessary for the Council to publically notify its intention to grant an easement except where the reserve is unlikely to be materially altered or permanently damaged, and the rights of the public in respect of the reserve are unlikely to be permanently affected (s48(3)).

5.12    Public access through the reserve will not be affected and the reserve will not be permanently damaged. The proposal has been consulted with the Hagley Park Reference Group, and the Friends of the Botanic Gardens. Under s48 (3) of the Act public notification is not required.

Decision Making Authority

5.13    The Botanic Gardens is a metropolitan asset and the decision to grant an easement is delegated to the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee rather than the Community Board.

5.14    The issue is of a metropolitan nature but affects the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board. Although the decision making on the Botanic Gardens and Hagley Park have been delegated to the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee, the Community Board has been informed of the easement request from FENZ through a memo. There was insufficient time for a report to be presented to the Community Board before the report sign-off time closed for reports to the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee.

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1      This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031):

6.1.1   Activity: Parks and Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.8.10.1 Appropriate use and occupation of parks is facilitated - Formal approval process initiated within ten working days of receiving complete application – 95%

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.2      The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.3      The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

6.4      The Council’s Treaty Relationship Team have reviewed the report and proposal and have stated that the area is not of ancestral significance, and do not believe MKT need to be consulted.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.5      There is no impact on climate change due as there is no additional hard surface being created to the park.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.6      The easement and gravel path will not affect accessibility to park users as the location is away from areas the public would use.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1      Cost to Implement – Christ’s College have indicated they will cover the Council’s and their own costs incurred in executing the easement agreement, including the legal costs and registration of the easement on the title and LINZ associated charges.

7.2      Maintenance/Ongoing costs - Parks Unit Operational budgets

7.3      Funding Source - Parks Unit Operational budgets

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1      The general powers of competence set out in section 12(2) “Status and Powers” of the Local Government Act.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.2      The legal consideration is the granting of an easement under s48(1)(f) Reserves Act 1977:

“providing or facilitating access or the supply of water to or the drainage of any other land not forming part of the reserve or for any other purpose connected with any such land.”

8.3      This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1      There is minimal if any risk to the Council in approving the easement for FENZ to attend to a fire should it occur in the Christ’s College new sports complex. The public and users of the Botanic Gardens will not be disadvantaged from enjoying the benefits of the garden if the easement is granted.

9.2      There is a reputational risk to the Council if approval is delayed or declined. The Botanic Gardens and the Ilex Centre will benefit from the additional source of water from Christ’s College swimming pool, should a fire occur.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

FENZ ROw Easement Botanic Gardens Hydrant to Boundary Wall Christ's College

71

 

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

 

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a)  This report contains:

(i)   sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii)  adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b)  The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Russel Wedge - Team Leader Parks Policy & Advisory

Barry Woodland - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Kelly Hansen - Manager Parks Planning & Asset Management

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 

 

11.  Community Applications to the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund

Reference Te Tohutoro:

22/230673

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Sam Callander, Team Leader Community Funding, sam.callander@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, GM Citizens and Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1      The purpose of this report is for the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee to consider applications for funding from the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund from the organisations listed below, noting that the recommendations can be accommodated within the funds available.

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

Amount Recommended

Society of St Vincent De Paul, Christchurch

Pavitt Street Social Housing Project

$300,000

$300,000

Woolston Brass Inc

Band Room

$350,000

$200,000

North Avon BMX Club

Pump Track in Bexley Reserve

$200,000

$200,000

Canterbury Softball

All-weather Artificial Surfaces

$100,000

$100,000

Recommendations for the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund

$950,000

$800,000

 

1.2      Based on the Council approved Capital Endowment Fund criteria, the applications listed above are eligible for funding.  Attachments B – E contain decision matrices and supporting documents that provide detailed information and recommendations on the applications.

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee:

1.         Makes a grant of $300,000 from the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund to The Society of St Vincent de Paul towards construction of the Pavitt Street Social Housing Project

a.        Payment will be released in one instalment of $300,000 on receipt of evidence that satisfactory fundraising has been achieved to make the project viable no later than 30 June 2023, approved by the Head of Community Support & Partnerships Unit.

b.        Reporting is to be submitted 12 monthly and upon completion of the Pavitt Street Social Housing Project.

2.         Makes a grant of $200,000 from the 2021/2022 Capital Endowment Fund to Woolston Brass for Band Room.

a.        Payment will be released in one instalment of $200,000 on receipt of evidence that satisfactory fundraising has been achieved to make the project viable no later than 30 June 2023, approved by the Head of Community Support & Partnerships Unit.

b.        Reporting is to be submitted 12 monthly, and upon completion of the Dampier Street rebuild.

3.         Makes a grant of $200,000 from the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund to North Avon BMX Club for the Bexley Reserve Pumptrack construction costs.

a.        Funding to be released as one instalment of $200,000 on receipt of evidence that satisfactory fundraising has been achieved to make the project viable no later than 30 June 2023, approved by the Head of Community Support & Partnerships Unit.

b.        Reporting is to be submitted 12 monthly, and upon completion of the pumptrack construction.

4.         Makes a grant of $100,000 from the 2021/2022 Capital Endowment Fund to Canterbury Softball for upgrading the softball diamonds to artificial surfaces.

a.        Funding to be released in one instalment of $100,000 conditional on Community Board approval for the upgrade and on receipt of evidence that satisfactory fundraising has been achieved to make the project viable no later than 30 June 2023, approved by the Head of Community Support & Partnerships Unit.

b.        Reporting is to be submitted 12 monthly, and upon completion of the instalment of surfaces.

 

3.   Key Points Ngā Take Matua

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

3.1      In April 2001, Council set up a Capital Endowment Fund of $75 million. This fund was established using a share of the proceeds from the sale of Orion's investment in a gas company. The Fund provides an ongoing income stream which can be applied to specific projects.

3.1.1   Current Council resolutions in respect of the fund can be found on Council’s website: www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/policies/investment-and-fundspolicies/capital-endowment-fund-policy/ 

3.2      On 12 April 2018 the Council resolved to establish criteria for distributing the proceeds of the Capital Endowment Fund (CEF) (CNCL/2018/00057).  On 10 May 2018 Council resolved to utilise all income from the CEF for three years, 2018/19 to 2020/21 (i.e. not use part of the income to inflation-protect the fund). 

3.3      On 13 December 2018 Council established eligibility and assessment criteria for the CEF and an application process.  Assessment criteria are as follows:

3.3.1   Evidence that the proposal is for a specific project or activity projects.  Or evidence of economic or environmental benefits.

3.3.2   Evidence that the project demonstrates a benefit for the City of Christchurch, or its citizens, or for a community of people living in Christchurch.

3.3.3   Evidence that the benefits will be experienced now and in the future.

3.3.4  

3.4      The recommendations align to Council’s Strategic Framework; each application’s alignment is detailed in the respective decision matrix attached.

Decision Making Authority Te Mana Whakatau

3.5      Authority for making grant decisions for the Capital Endowment Fund sits with the Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee.

3.6      Allocations must be consistent with any policies, standards or criteria adopted by the Council.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement Te Aromatawai Whakahirahira

3.7      The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.8      The level of significance was determined by the limited number of people affected and/or with an interest.  It is also due to the fact that the operation of the Capital Endowment Fund is a level of service in the 2021/31 LTP and has been fully consulted on.

3.9      Due to the assessment of low significance, community engagement and consultation included the applicant organisations relevant stakeholders and Council staff and the course of assessing the applications.

Discussion Kōrerorero

3.10    At the time of writing, the balance of the Capital Endowment Fund for 2021/22 is $871,000.

Total Budget 2021/22

Grants Recommended

Balance If Staff Recommendations adopted

$871,000

$800,000

$71,000

 

3.11    Based on the current Council approved Capital Endowment Fund criteria, the applications listed above are eligible for funding.  Attachments B – E contain decision matrices and supporting documents which provide detailed information on the applications.  This includes project details, financial information and a staff comments.

3.12    Any remaining balance of the 2021/22 Capital Endowment Fund will be carried forward to the 2022/23 financial year.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Capital Endowment Fund - funding future years - 2022-23 onwards

77

b

CEF Matrix - St Vincent De Paul Christchurch

78

c

CEF Matrix - Woolston Brass

89

d

CEF Matrix - North Avon BMX Club, Bexley Pump Track

93

e

CEF Matrix - Canterbury Softball

97

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a)  This report contains:

(i)   sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii)  adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b)  The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Sam Callander - Team Leader Community Funding

Approved By

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

John Filsell - Head of Community Support and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 


Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 












Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 





Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 





Sustainability and Community Resilience Committee

30 March 2022

 


 

 



[1] Taken from the grant application form.