Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Thursday 27 January 2022

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

Under the current provisions of the Covid-19 Protection Framework (traffic lights) people holding a current vaccine pass may attend the meeting in person. The meeting will be broadcast live: http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Melanie Coker

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Celeste Donovan

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Sam MacDonald

Councillor Phil Mauger

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

21 January 2022

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dawn Baxendale

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 6996

 

 

Jo Daly

Council Secretary

941 8581

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

27 January 2022

 

 


Council

27 January 2022

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Karakia Tīmatanga................................................................................................... 4 

1.        Apologies Ngā Whakapāha................................................................................. 4

2.        Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga.................................................. 4

3.        Public Participation Te Huinga Tūmatanui............................................................ 4

3.1       Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui.......................................................................................... 4

3.2       Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga...................................................... 4

4.        Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga............................................................ 4

Council

5.        Council Minutes - 9 December 2021...................................................................... 5

Audit and Risk Management Committee

6.        Audit and Risk Management Committee Minutes - 3 December 2021....................... 23

7.        Audit Management Report 2021 and Debenture Trust Deed Audit 2021................... 29

Health and Safety Committee

8.        Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee Minutes - 19 November 2021.................. 111

Staff Reports

9.        Removal of library fines.................................................................................. 117

10.      Draft submission on SH76 Brougham Street upgrade.......................................... 125

11.      Draft submission on Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill. 129

12.      Resolution to Exclude the Public...................................................................... 134

Karakia Whakamutunga

 

 


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

Karakia Tīmatanga

1.   Apologies Ngā Whakapāha  

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation Te Huinga Tūmatanui

3.1   Public Forum Te Huinga Whānui

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2   Deputations by Appointment Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

4.   Presentation of Petitions Ngā Pākikitanga

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

5.     Council Minutes - 9 December 2021

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1750414

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Jo Daly, Council Secretary, jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Dawn Baxendale, Chief Executive, dawn.baxendale@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The Council held a meeting on 9 December 2021 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council receives the Minutes from the Council meeting held 9 December 2021.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Council - 9 December 2021

6

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

  


Council

27 January 2022

 


















Council

27 January 2022

 

 

6.     Audit and Risk Management Committee Minutes - 3 December 2021

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1705506

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Mark Saunders, Committee and Hearings Advisor, Mark.Saunders@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Miles McConway, General Manager Resources, Miles.McConway@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The Audit and Risk Management Committee held a meeting on 3 December 2021 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council receives the Minutes from the Audit and Risk Management Committee meeting held 3 December 2021.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Audit and Risk Management Committee - 3 December 2021

24

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Mark Saunders - Committee and Hearings Advisor

  


Council

27 January 2022

 






Council

27 January 2022

 

Report from Audit and Risk Management Committee  – 3 December 2021

 

7.     Audit Management Report 2021 and Debenture Trust Deed Audit 2021

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1706017

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Len van Hout, Manager, External Reporting and Governance, Len.VanHout@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Miles McConway, General Manager, Resources, Miles.McConway@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Audit and Risk Management Committee Decisions Under Delegation Ngā Mana kua Tukuna

 

(Original Staff Recommendations Accepted without Change)

Part C

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Receives the information and considers the recommendations made by Audit New Zealand in the Audit New Zealand Management Report relating to the audit of the financial statements and annual report for the year ended 30 June 2021 and management’s responses to these.

2.         Notes the contents of the audit engagement letter and limited assurance audit opinion for the Debenture Trust Deed.

 

2. Audit and Risk Management Committee Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Receives the Audit New Zealand Management Report relating to the audit of the financial statements and annual report for the year ended 30 June 2021.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

Audit Management Report 2021 and Debenture Trust Deed Audit 2021

30

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Audit Management Report 2020/21

34

b

CCC Debenture Trust Deed Audit Engagement Letter 2021

72

c

CCC Debenture Trust Deed Audit Opinion 2021

100

 

 


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

Audit Management Report 2021 and Debenture Trust Deed Audit 2021

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1434621

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Len van Hout, Manager, External Reporting and Governance, Len.VanHout@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Miles McConway, General Manager, Resources, Miles.McConway@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The purpose of this report is present the Audit Management Report for the year ended 30 June 2021.  The report has been written in response to the receipt of the Audit NZ report.

1.2       This report will also cover the Debenture Trust Deed Audit.

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Receives the information and considers the recommendations made by Audit New Zealand in the Audit New Zealand Management Report relating to the audit of the financial statements and annual report for the year ended 30 June 2021 and management’s responses to these.

2.         Recommends to the Council that the Audit New Zealand Management Report relating to the audit of the financial statements and annual report for the year ended 30 June 2021 is received.

3.         Notes the contents of the audit engagement letter and limited assurance audit opinion for the Debenture Trust Deed.

 

3.   Content

Audit Management Report

3.1       The final Audit Management Report covers audit activity and matters raised by Audit New Zealand for the period from the interim management (April 2021) to the adoption of the Annual Report (October 2021).

Key Points

3.2       The Report to the Governors of the Council on the audit of Christchurch City Council and group for the year ended 30 June 2021 is Attachment A.

3.3       The report sets out Audit New Zealand’s findings from their audit of the Council for the year ended 30 June 2021.

3.4       There are a number of unadjusted items (compared to one in 2020) within the financial statements of the Parent and the Group.

3.5       The report draws attention to areas where the Council is doing well or where Audit New Zealand has made recommendations for improvement.

Report back on Audit Plan items

3.6       The 2020/21 audit sought to focus on the following matters:

·        Valuation of PPE;

·        Fair value assessment of non-revalued PPE;

·        Provision for holiday pay liabilities;

·        Capital asset additions and work in progress;

·        COVID-19 pandemic;

·        The risk of management override of internal controls;

·        Procurement, contract management and project governance;

·        Prudent expenditure decisions;

·        Operational savings plan;

·        Derivatives;

·        Group issues;

·        Three waters reform and

·        Climate Change.

 

3.7       Overall Audit New Zealand were satisfied with the accounting for these items, or verified that they were treated appropriately.

3.8       Audit NZ undertook a comprehensive review of procurement and their report and recommendations are in Appendix 3 of the 2021 Report to Governors with comments from management.

Update on previous Audit New Zealand Recommendations

 

 

Priority

Urgent

Necessary

Beneficial

Total

Open recommendations (2021)[1]

-

3

3

6

Implemented or closed recommendations[2]

-

-2

-1

-3

New recommendations[3]

-

2

2

4

Open recommendations (2022)[4]

-

3

4

7

 

3.9       Three previous recommendations from Audit New Zealand have now been implemented or closed:

·        To review the system and processes for the dry weather sewerage overflows performance measure to ensure compliance with the non-financial performance measure rules as set out in section 261B of the Local Government Act 2002. (From the 2021 Interim Report to Governors).

·        At each revaluation date going forward, the hedge reserve in equity should be adjusted to the lesser of the following (in absolute amounts): (i) the cumulative gain or loss on the hedging instrument (IRS fair value) from the inception of the hedge; and (ii) the cumulative change in fair value of the expected future cash flows on the hedged item (reference hedge fair value) from inception of the hedge. (From the 2020 Report to Governors).

·        Expense claims submitted by the Chief Executive Officer are approved by the Mayor or Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee. (From the 2019 Report to Governors).

 

3.10    Three previous recommendations from Audit New Zealand are still in progress.

·        Review of procurement function, this was categorised as necessary. (From the 2019 Report to Governors)

·        Ensure the independent review of Masterfile changes by Human Resources is performed on a timely basis, this was categorised as necessary. (From the 2020 Report to Governors)

·        The annual leave payroll report to be reconciled to the annual leave liability balance in the general ledger at balance date, this was categorised as beneficial. (From the 2020 Report to Governors)

 

Key findings from the audit

3.11    As public sector audits have a wider scope than the private sector, Audit New Zealand reviews not only the financial statements of the Council but also its activity and services statements.  See page 24 of their report for a full explanation of the potential issues covered in their review.

3.12    The following areas of interest reviewed by Audit New Zealand have resulted in recommendations to management for comment with a view to enhancement in the future:

3.12.1 Audit New Zealand recommend that Council

·   Undertake a weekly review of the expenditure masterfile changes report and is retained with a signature with date of review, to evidence that the internal control is operating, this is categorised as necessary;

·   Considers our comments on the 2020/21 performance information in preparation for the 2021/22 annual report to ensure compliance with PBE FRS 48 Service Performance Reporting, this is categorised as necessary;

·   Implement the improvements identified from the recent Waka Kotahi audit, this is categorised as beneficial; and

·   Determines what type of transactions do not require a purchase order and can be processed as direct payments, this is categorised as beneficial.

3.13    Staff have provided comments on the recommendations made by Audit New Zealand.

Debenture Trust Deed

3.14    The debenture trust deed covers the lending agreement with LGFA, and Audit NZ undertakes a limited independent assurance review of the records of held at ComputerShare for Council’s borrowing.  ComputerShare engages its own auditors to give assurance over its operations and record keeping.  Audit NZ relies upon this work to give Council its limited assurance.

3.15    The debenture trust audit is separate from the main audit and the cost to Council of the limited assurance audit is $7,000 + GST.  The Audit Engagement Letter is Attachment B.

3.16    The audit field work has been completed and the limited assurance audit report has been received is Attachment C.

 

 

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a  

Audit Management Report 2020/21

 

b  

CCC Debenture Trust Deed Audit Engagement Letter 2021

 

c  

CCC Debenture Trust Deed Audit Opinion 2021

 

 

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Len Van Hout - Manager External Reporting & Governance

Approved By

Leah Scales - Head of Financial Management and Chief Financial Officer

Miles McConway - General Manager Resources

 


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27 January 2022

 







































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27 January 2022

 

 

8.     Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee Minutes - 19 November 2021

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1632314

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Mark Saunders, Committee and Hearings Advisor, mark.saunders@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Miles McConway, General Manager Resources,
miles.mcconway@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee held a meeting on 19 November 2021 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council receives the Minutes from the Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee meeting held 19 November 2021.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee - 19 November 2021

112

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Mark Saunders - Committee and Hearings Advisor

  


Council

27 January 2022

 






Council

27 January 2022

 

 

9.     Removal of library fines

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1711366

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Carolyn Robertson, Head of Libraries & Information, Carolyn.roberston@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to provide information to enable Council to make a decision on the removal of charges for overdue library items and all historical debt related to overdue charges by the end of January 2022.  This report has been written as a result of a Notice of motion passed by the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 November 2021 (FPCO/2021/0000163):

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

             1.         That the Council notes the increasing number of Councils through New Zealand that                      have removed overdue library item fines, including: Auckland Council, Nelson and Upper              Hutt City Councils, and the District Councils in Carterton, Clutha, Masterton, Selwyn,                    South Taranaki, South Wairarapa, Stratford, Waikato and Waimakariri.

             2.         That staff bring a report to Council or a Committee of the Whole enabling a decision to be                        made on the removal of charges for overdue library items and all historic debt related to             overdue charges by the end of January 2022.

 

1.2            The decision in this report is of low of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined by reviewing the impact on those affected and the financial implications. 

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Agrees to the removal of charges for overdue library items and all historical debt related to overdue library charges from 1 March 2022.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       Library fines for overdue items are charged to adult members at 70 cents per day to a maximum of $21 per item.  If the member is referred to debt collection a further $25 is added. Children and young adults 18 years and under, and those with concession membership are exempt from paying fines.  

3.2       Memberships are blocked after a specific period of time if fines are not paid.  Customers are unable to borrow material or access digital resources until payment is made.

3.3       The removal of fines on overdue material for all other library members has the benefits of improving equity of access to ideas, information, and knowledge for those who can least afford it; supporting literacy and fostering the joy of reading for all; retaining library membership and helping them to maintain a lifelong relationship with the library; increasing the borrowing and return of items; and increasing customer satisfaction.

3.4       The library regularly receives feedback from customers on the payment of fines.  This includes financial pressure for those on limited budgets, the impact on their health and wellbeing, their ability to access information for literacy and learning purposes, their perception that the money paid in rates covers all library charges, and an assumption that all public libraries are fine free.

3.5       The trend both in New Zealand and overseas is for public libraries to remove fines.  This includes Auckland Council, Nelson, Dunedin, and Upper Hutt City Councils, and the District Councils in Carterton, Clutha, Masterton, Selwyn, South Taranaki, South Wairarapa, Stratford, Waikato, and Waimakariri.  Christchurch City Libraries is recognised nationally and internationally by peers as a leader in the library world, and yet still charges fines.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       The Library offers a concession membership to those customers who meet the criteria of having a physical or mental disability which impinges on their ability to access library services.  Concession members are exempt from paying fines.  This group makes up 3% of our total membership.  Broadening this type of membership to include customers on some form of benefit or low income has been discounted based on the difficulty of developing sufficient criteria which would be easy to administer, while at the same time respecting the customer’s confidentiality, and the assumption that only customers from low socio-economic areas have difficulties paying fines. 

4.2       Managed accounts are used to help support customers who have had difficulties in managing their membership in the past.  Customers are limited to 5 items. 

4.3       In cases where one member of the family has been referred to debt collection due to an unpaid fine, all other members joined by that same person as guarantor have been limited to two items.  This has reduced the potential to owe large amounts of money. 

4.4       Payment plans are an option customers can use to pay off debt through regular contributions.

4.5       Renewals are available to give customers more time to keep items out on loan and reduce overdue charges.  While the amount of revenue gained from fines has reduced, it is difficult to identify whether this is the result of items being renewed, an increase in the use of eBooks and eAudiobooks which do not attract fines, or a reduction in the timeframes before an overdue charge blocks a customer’s card and the fine is sent to debt collection.  

4.6       A series of reminders are sent to customers when a fine remains unpaid.  These are sent by email, letter, or text, and are followed up by an invoice, and letter outlining the ramifications if a fine is left outstanding before being referred to debt collection. In the last review, timeframes between each part of the debt process were reduced.  This has resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of fines owed.

4.7       The Library offers Library elf, a third party software application, used as a way of receiving regular reminders when items are due back.  More opportunities could be used to promote this application more; however it is only available to those customers who have access to a device, and choose to use the service. 

4.8       The Library considered offering customers separate digital-only membership as a way of providing access to electronic resources while their existing membership was blocked due to having overdue material and/or fines owing.  This was discounted due to the inability to address usage by those customers who do not have access to their devices and rely on access to physical material. 

 

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

5.1       The benefits of removing fines for overdue material has clear linkages with the following Community Outcomes and Council strategic directions as outlined in the LIU Activity Plan 2021-31: Strong sense of community; celebration of our identity through arts, culture, heritage and sport; and an inclusive, equitable economy with broad-based prosperity for all; which together enable active and connected communities to own their future.

5.2       Originally fines were intended to motivate customers to return items to improve access to the collection for other customers.  Instead fines have become a barrier, particularly for those customers who cannot afford to pay.  The administration of fines does not distinguish between those who are responsible for managing their borrowing, and those who are not.  In today’s environment, it is these customers who often need libraries the most.  Through not being able to afford paying their fines, they lose the ability to access both electronic and physical resources.  This leads to a break in the habit of being a library member and in many cases has the flow on effect of impacting on all members of the family.

5.3       With the introduction of self-service kiosks into libraries, customers are encouraged to become more independent by issuing and returning their own books.  The downside of this is that for some families it is easy to mistakenly issue children’s books on adult cards, and then incur fines when the books are returned late.  Other customers are very aware there are no fines on children’s cards, and use these cards for their own borrowing so that no fines are incurred.

5.4       The Library receives ongoing feedback from customers through Hybris, emails, phone, and face to face.  Feedback includes issues around the inability to pay, to understand why they need to pay, and astonishment on how much they need to pay.  This results in many difficult conversations held in public spaces within the library.  In these instances customers are often agitated, loud, and can take their resentment out on library staff.  While staff are trained to handle such instances, these experiences can be challenging, particularly as customers’ personal circumstances can become inadvertently known by others in the library as voices rise.  Library staff do have the ability to waive fines under genuinely exceptional circumstances, and when this happens notes are added to the customer’s record to retain a historical record.

5.5       A selection of feedback from customers includes:

5.5.1   ‘I cannot afford to pay this – I won’t be returning to use the library’. 

5.5.2   ‘I had a customer crying on the phone that she couldn’t pay the fines as she was a solo mother with several children and would rather feed my kids that pay library fines’.  The family has not used the library since. 

5.5.3   Customer lost her job at the same time books were returned very overdue.  She slumped into a dark place mentally, was not functioning normally and was overwhelmed with stress. The fine is still owed. 

5.5.4   ‘These fees are unreasonable – I find it concerning as it stops people from using the library that we all pay for already in our rates.  We live in a busy and complicated world and it is often difficult to remember to renew or get to the library to return things.’

5.5.5   ‘My children were each limited to two books at any one time until I paid off the money I owed.  This disadvantaged their ability to read as much as they did in the past.’

5.5.6   ‘It’s patently obvious that fines aren’t an incentive to return books earlier, they’re actually more of a deterrent from even using libraries – I don’t use the library nearly as much as I could because of the fines’. 

5.5.7   ‘When I first heard the news, I didn’t realise it was just the Wellington area – I thought it was nationwide. Personally I think the fines system in Christchurch is a bit of a rort – is it really necessary? It seems like ‘grabbing for the sake of grabbing’.’  

5.6       Currently 196,111 or 50% of the city’s population are members of the library.  Of these 56% pay fines if items become overdue.  Currently 14% of these customers are unable to borrow any further items or access electronic resources because of the time taken to pay outstanding fines.  With the removal of fines, these existing members would be able to access resources once more, and overall membership and circulation issues would increase as former members become active members again, and other non-users are encouraged to join the library. 

5.7       The trend in both New Zealand and overseas is for public libraries to remove fines for all library customers. As at September 2021, 75% of NZ public libraries were fines free for children and young adults; and 15% were fine free for adults.  Research internationally and nationally has identified being fines free encourages library use, and does not disadvantage anyone. However there is a lack of robust evidence about the impact of removing fines on communities.   Sabrina Unrein noted in her 2020 report Overdue fines: advantages, disadvantages, and how eliminating them can benefit public libraries that evidence about fines-free was either old or small-scale, with little investigation into libraries that have eliminated fines, and how this change has impacted their communities.   Comments from other library networks include

5.7.1   ‘We were very lucky to have a far-sighted council who realised that having a library collection that half the town could not use due to overdue fines was not the way to go.  It was such a relief not having the grief of fines, as we knew so many families just never came back when they had overdues.’

5.7.2   Auckland Libraries and other councils have observed is that overdue fines have not ensured books are returned, and that where fines were stopped return rates increased and so did the number of people borrowing items.  By going fines free, barriers to accessing a community-owned resource was removed and long term use of libraries by our community was encouraged.  Overdue fees were decreasing and an unstable revenue source, that fines created an uncomfortable customer-staff dynamic, and perpetuated a negative stereotype of libraries as punitive. 

5.7.3   In July 2021, Nelson Libraries Manager stated ‘We knew that removing overdue fines for adults would not only bring people back to the library, but also create a culture of inclusivity.  While it’s too early to say definitive numbers, we have welcomed new members who hadn’t used the library due to fear of accruing overdue fees.  It has also been a lot easier for our staff.  There are fewer upset customers and this is a win for both them and us.  There have been a few negative concerns that people would just hold on to their borrowed books and this would impact on access to the collection, especially the popular, newer titles.  However we have not seen any evidence of this.’

5.7.4   Upper Hutt Libraries have noticed some items have taken longer to be returned and the staff have had to put systems in place to remind customers that they need to return or renew items they have out.

5.7.5   Chicago Public Libraries saw a 240% increase in the return of materials within three weeks of implementing its fine-free policy.  Denver Public Library reported that after one year of being fines free, 35% of patrons who had stopped using library services had re-engaged.  In October 2021, New York Public Library eliminated all fines and cleared the debt of all of its patrons, a move designed to remove barriers to access for low-income patrons.  San Francisco, Boston, and Los Angeles County are also fines free.

5.7.6   In the UK, Trafford Libraries reported the number of books issued in their first year of fines free increased by 4%, and in the following year issues increased by 17%.  Oldham Library reported a 6.5% increase in membership compared to the previous year.’ 

5.8       The library will continue to send reminders for overdue items to ensure customers return items and our collections keep circulating.  If an item is not returned after a specific period of time, it is deemed to be lost, and the customer will be invoiced for the replacement cost of the item plus processing fee.  If still no response customers will be referred to debt collection. 

5.9       There are no fines on downloadable digital material such as eBooks, eAudio, and eMagazines. 20% of our total issues relate to downloadable digital formats.   

5.10    If approved, the Library requires four weeks to implement the change.  This allows time to communicate changes to customers, complete complex changes to the Library database and related systems, and implement updated processes.

5.11    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.11.1 All wards/Community Board areas.

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       This report supports the Community Outcomes identified in the LIU Long Term Plan 2021-2031 - Strong sense of community; celebration of our identity through arts, culture, heritage and sport; and an inclusive, equitable economy with broad-based prosperity for all; which together enable active and connected communities to own their future.

6.2       This report impacts on the revenue gained by Libraries in the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031).

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.3       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.4       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

6.5       This is because the report covers the removal of library fines.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.6       The decision does not impact on climate change impact because this report relates to the removal of library fines.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.7       The decision increases access to library resources if fines are removed.  Currently 14% of members are unable to access resources due to their membership records being blocked due to unpaid fines.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to implement for the remainder of FY2022 – Removing the charges for overdue items across the libraries network would impact by approximately $183,000.  This consists of the estimated loss of revenue from March to June of approximately $100,000 and writing off any remaining historical debt which was $82,559 as at 15 December 2021. 

7.2       For future years, revenue of up to $300,000 per year has been removed from the 2022/23 Draft Annual Plan workings with a 0.05% rates impact in 2022/23.  These revenues have continued to trend downwards as the usage of electronic resources increases.

7.3       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – There would be a reduction of up to $40,000 in information, billing and collection costs.  This includes the printing and posting of notices, administration costs relating to the generation, printing, and posting of notices and invoices, and interactions with debt collection agency.

7.4       Funding Source – The current year projected surplus and 2022/23 Draft Annual Plan as above.

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       The statutory power to undertake the proposal derives from Council’s Status and Powers in S12 (2) of the Local Government Act 2002.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.2       There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.3       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       Financial impact on the rest of FY2021.

9.2       Financial impact on rates FY2023 onwards – to replace the $300,000 gained in fines for adult members in FY2021, it would require an equivalent of 0.05% increase in rates.

9.3       Prompt return of library stock – there is the potential for a further reduction in access to some material if customers keep items longer than the normal loan period.  Notices will continue to be sent as reminders to return overdue items.  Holds lists will continue to be monitored and buying patterns changed in order to meet an increase in demand.

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

 

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Elaine Sides - Manager Content

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

Carolyn Robertson - Head of Libraries and Information

Approved By

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

10.   Draft submission on SH76 Brougham Street upgrade

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1660605

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Kirsty Mahoney, Team Leader Asset Planning Transport
Rae-Anne Kurucz, Team Leader Transport

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Jane Davis, General Manager Infrastructure, Planning and Regulatory Services

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to consider and approve the Council’s draft submission to Waka Kotahi, in response to their consultation on the SH76 Brougham Street upgrade project.

1.2       Submissions are due with Waka Kotahi by Friday 28 January 2022.

1.3       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  This recognises that while there may be significant community interest in this project, the specific decision (to approve the draft submission) is of a lower level of significance.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Approve the draft submission to Waka Kotahi on their SH76 Brougham Street upgrade project (Attachment A to be circulated under separate cover).

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       Waka Kotahi has invited feedback on the Brougham Street (SH76) Upgrade Project.  The Council has requested staff to draft a submission on this proposal following a briefing on 14 December 2022, and a further briefing on 25 January 2022.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       The alternative option to the recommendation outlined above is for the Council to not make a submission on this proposal. This is not the preferred option as it is important for the Council to advocate on issues that affect its communities.

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

5.1       Waka Kotahi is currently seeking feedback on its proposal for SH76 Brougham Street as part of the NZ Upgrade Programme announced in 2020.

5.2       The key changes Waka Kotahi is proposing include:

5.2.1   Using the existing road space to create ‘T2’ lanes, to operate at peak times, with parking available in this lane outside of peak times.

5.2.2   An overbridge for pedestrians or people biking or scooting between Collins and Simeon Street.

5.2.3   A shared path along the south side of the road from Simeon Street to Opawa Road, joining up with existing paths like the Little River Link Major Cycle Route.

5.2.4   New plantings and trees, more than doubling the number of existing trees, to safely separate the shared path from the road.

5.2.5   Intersections will be upgraded right along Brougham Street. Traffic signals will be improved, turning arrows added and turning restrictions installed at some places to make it safer to get on and off Brougham Street. The traffic lights at Selwyn Street will allow priority for buses heading to the city centre.

5.2.6   Montreal St will get traffic signals to provide a better connection to the one-way system in the city, as well as adding safe crossing points for pedestrians.

5.2.7   Some smaller side streets will be closed with new cul-de-sacs to reduce short-cutting and support quieter, safer neighbourhoods.

5.2.8   The traffic lights at Colombo Street intersection will also help to prioritise buses, in preparation for future bus improvements.

5.2.9   The Gasson / Burlington Street intersection will have improved crossing facilities for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as turning restrictions to reduce the number of cars crossing the shared path.

5.2.10 A new signalised pedestrian crossing will be added near Wilsons Road.

5.2.11 Opawa Road intersection will be upgraded, with ‘hook turn boxes’ to help create a safe space for cyclists to turn in traffic.

5.3       Council requested staff to draft a submission on the proposal following a briefing held on 14 December 2021.

5.4       Feedback from all Community Boards was sought as part of the drafting of this submission. Two Community Boards provided staff with their views on the proposals, which are included as appendices to the submission. 

5.5       The draft submission was presented to the Council by way of a briefing on 25 January 2022, and the feedback received at the briefing has been incorporated into the submission attached to this report.

5.6       The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.6.1   Spreydon-Cashmere and Linwood-Central-Heathcote

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       This submission supports the Council’s community outcome of ‘a well-connected and accessible city promoting active and public transport’.

6.2       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031):

6.2.1   Activity: Strategic Planning, Future Development and Regeneration

·     Level of Service: 17.0.1.1 Advice to Council on high priority policy and planning issues that affect the City. Advice is aligned with and delivers on the governance expectations as evidenced through the Council Strategic Framework. - Triennial reconfirmation of the strategic framework or as required.

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.3       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.  The submission requests Waka Kotahi to take into account the following initiatives as part of any proposals for this corridor, including:

6.3.1   Kia Turoa tea o / Otautahi Christchurch Climate Resilience Strategy 2021, which has an aspiration of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by 2032, particularly through reduced transport emissions;

6.3.2   Residential intensification through the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) and changes to the Resource Management Act; and

6.3.3   Our Space 2018-2048, which outlines how and where Greater Christchurch can grow.  Work is also progressing on updated spatial planning for the city and the wider Greater Christchurch area through the development of the Otautahi Christchurch plan and the Greater Christchurch Spatial Plan.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.4       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.5       The proposed T2 lanes seek to reduce the number of single occupancy vehicles along Brougham Street, which will help to bring about a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions.  The submission advocates the extension of the T2 lanes out to the Christchurch Southern Motorway to further realise emission reductions and travel choice behaviour change.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.6       The proposal provides safe crossing points for pedestrians and cyclists.  The submission supports this improvement for accessibility and seeks assurance that this will be inclusive for all users, including the young, the elderly and the mobility impaired.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement - - the cost of preparing a submission has been met from existing budgets.

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs - there will be no ongoing costs associated with making this submission.

7.3       Funding Source - existing operational budgets.

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       This consultation is public and open to any person or organisation.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.2       There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.3       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       There are no significant risks associated with this decision.

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a  

Draft Council submission to Waka Kotahi on SH76 Brougham Street upgrade project (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Article I.    SH76 Brougham Street upgrade

SH76 Brougham Street upgrade

https://www.nzta.govt.nz/projects/sh76-brougham-street-upgrade/

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Rae-Anne Kurucz - Team Leader Transport

Kirsty Mahoney - Team Leader Asset Planning

Ellen Cavanagh - Policy Analyst

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Head of Transport & Waste Management

John Higgins - Head of Planning & Consents

Jane Davis - General Manager Infrastructure, Planning & Regulatory Services

  


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

11.   Draft submission on Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/1786339

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Shayne Te Aika, Principal Advisor Treaty Relationship, Shayne.TeAika@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager Pouwhakarae:

Dawn Baxendale, Chief Executive, Dawn.Baxendale@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to submit for Council consideration a draft submission on the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill (the Bill).  Submissions are due with the Māori Affairs Committee on Wednesday 2 February 2022.

1.2       The draft submission supports the Bill, which would enable direct Ngāi Tahu representation on the Canterbury Regional Council.

1.3       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. This recognises that while there may be community interest in the Bill, the specific decision to approve the draft submission is of a lower level of significance as it gives effect to an established Council position.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Approve the draft Council submission on the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill (Attachment A to be circulated under separate cover).

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       The Council regularly makes submissions on proposals relevant to our district.

3.2       Making a submission on this Bill provides an opportunity for our Council to reiterate its position on supporting Ngāi Tahu representation on the Canterbury Regional Council, and to reinforce our strong support for genuine partnership at the regional level. 

3.3       The Council formally set out its position in support of Ngāi Tahu representation on the Canterbury Regional Council in a July 2018 submission on that Council’s Representation Review. 

3.4       This position was restated in a July 2021 letter from the Mayor to Chair Jenny Hughey in relation to the reintroduction of the Bill, confirming the Council’s support for mana whenua representation on the Canterbury Regional Council.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       Alternative options have not been considered as this submission reiterates an established Council position on an issue the Council has formally considered before now.

5.   Detail Te Whakamahuki

Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill

5.1       The Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill would:

5.1.1   enable Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu to appoint up to two members of the Canterbury Regional Council;

5.1.2   give the appointed members the same powers as elected councillors; and

5.1.3   enable the arrangements to be in place following the local body elections in October 2022.

5.2       The appointed members would be additional to the current number of elected members, increasing the maximum number of ECan councillors to 16.

Background on Ngāi Tahu representation on Canterbury Regional Council

 

2010

The Government replaces Environment Canterbury elected members with Government-appointed Commissioners

2012

The Government extends the Commissioners’ term until 2016, and provides for a Ministerial review from 2014.

2015

The Statutory Review of Environment Canterbury is released:  proposes a mixed-model governance structure for the 2016-2019 local government term, with seven elected councillors and up to six Government-appointed councillors.

2016

Environment Canterbury (Transitional Governance Arrangements) Act 2016 comes into force.  This enables two members of the regional council to be appointed on the basis of recommendations by Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu.  The Act is intended only to operate during the 2016 to 2019 local authority election period, to support the transition of ECan back towards full governance.

2018

The same Act requires ECan to review its representation arrangements before the 2019 local elections and this Representation Review is completed in 2018.

ECan confirms its view that the Local Electoral Act does not provide an effective mechanism for ensuring Ngāi Tahu representation.  This view is shared by Ngāi Tahu. The Christchurch City Council submission on this Review confirms its strong support for a legislative model which ensures mana whenua representation.

ECan commits to working with the Government on a representation model that ensures mana whenua is represented around the council table.

2019

ECan and Ngāi Tahu put forward a Local Bill to continue mana whenua representation on the Council.  The Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill fails at its first reading in April 2019.

2019

The transitional governance arrangements expire, and the ability for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu to appoint members to the Council ceases on 18 October 2019.

2020

As an interim measure, ECan appoints Tumu Taiao (Mana Whenua Experts on Council) to provide advice to Council in the interests of mana whenua. Tumu Taiao are appointed by the ten Papatipu Rūnanga Chairs of the Canterbury region. They do not have decision-making powers at Council meetings.

2021

Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill is again introduced.

Proposes direct Ngāi Tahu representation on the Canterbury Regional Council, through enabling up to two Ngāi Tahu Councillors to be appointed to the Council.

2022 / now

The Bill is to be considered by the Māori Affairs Committee, and is currently open for consultation.

 

Submission key points:

5.3       The Council notes the significance of this bill in respect to addressing Māori/mana whenua representation within a Te Tiriti partnership context.  The Council strongly supports a legislative option/model that brings about such representation to ECan, as set out in our 2018 submission.

5.4       Mana whenua representation will provide both significant value and strengthen strategic partnerships within Canterbury, not just for ECan but more widely.

5.5       The passing of the bill will formalise recognition and the full ‘parity of membership status’ for mana whenua members of the Canterbury Regional Council, and it will also address some inadequacies in current arrangements.

6.   Policy Framework Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       This report and the submission are closely aligned to the Council’s Strategic Framework, specifically the commitment expressed in the Framework to building on the relationship with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and the Te Hononga-Council Papatipu Runanga partnership, reflecting mutual understanding and respect.

6.2       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2021 - 2031):

6.2.1   Activity: Office of the Mayor and Chief Executive, and Treaty Partner Relations

·     Level of Service: 4.1.23 Maintain positive Iwi and Mana Whenua relationships - Iwi & Mana Whenua convey that they are satisfied or very satisfied with the relationship and project outcomes

Policy Consistency Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.3       The decision to support the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill is consistent with Council’s own Plans and Policies in respect to strengthening partnerships with Iwi and mana whenua.

Impact on Mana Whenua Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.4       The legislative change, if passed, will significantly and positively impact upon mana whenua representation within Canterbury Regional Council.  The decision to submit in support of the bill lends weight to supporting a regional authority to exercise its commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi, and something we would expect ‘in kind’ in similar matters ahead for this Council.

6.5       Ngāi Tahu (Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and the ten Papatipu rūnanga) support the Bill.

6.6       Drawing on findings of the Waitangi Tribunal, the interim report of the Future for Local Government panel notes that current statutory and institutional arrangements do not provide for adequate Māori representation or input into decision-making at a local government level.

Climate Change Impact Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.7       Not applicable.

Accessibility Considerations Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.8       Not applicable.

7.   Resource Implications Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       The cost of preparing a submission has been met from existing budgets. There are no ongoing costs associated with making this submission.

8.   Legal Implications Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       This consultation is open to the public and any legal person can make a submission to the Select Committee.

Other Legal Implications Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.2       There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.3       This report has not been reviewed by the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       There are no risks identified with making this submission.

 

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a  

Draft Council submission on the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill

https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_116740/canterbury-regional-council-ng%C4%81i-tahu-representation

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Shayne Te Aika - Principal Advisor Ngāi Tahu Relationship

Ellen Cavanagh - Policy Analyst

Elizabeth Wilson - Team Leader Policy

Approved By

Dawn Baxendale - Chief Executive

 


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

12.   Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

27 January 2022

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

13.

Public Excluded Council Minutes - 9 December 2021

 

 

Refer to the previous public excluded reason in the agendas for these meetings.

 

14.

Public Excluded Audit and Risk Management Committee Minutes - 3 December 2021

 

 

Refer to the previous public excluded reason in the agendas for these meetings.

 

15.

Risk and Assurance

s7(2)(c)(ii), s7(2)(e), s7(2)(f)(ii), s7(2)(j)

Prevent Damage to the Public Interest, Prevention of Material Loss, Protection from Improper Pressure or Harassment, Prevention of Improper Advantage

To prevent the use of Internal Audit findings and identified control weaknesses from being used for improper advantage.
To prevent improper use or misinterpretation of risk information.

Due to the nature and sensitivity of this information, it is not anticipated that there be a specific date or event that allows for the release of this information.
The information will be released in full or part as appropriate upon periodical review by the Head of Risk and Assurance to confirm when it is no longer deemed to require public exclusion for the applicable reasons above.

16.

Public Excluded Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee Minutes - 19 November 2021

 

 

Refer to the previous public excluded reason in the agendas for these meetings.

 

17.

CMUA Project Delivery Ltd - Preliminary Design

s7(2)(b)(ii)

Prejudice Commercial Position

Sensitivity regarding the designs and budget information.

31 August 2022

Acceptance of the Design & Construct Contract with BESIX Watpac

18.

Canterbury Water Management Strategy - Zone Committee Appointment Process

s7(2)(a)

Protection of Privacy of Natural Persons

To protect the privacy of the Canterbury Water Management Zone Committee members and the confidence of the appointments process.

The report and the names of the members can be released upon the Council's approval of the extension of the appointments.

 

 



[1] Procurement (N), HR Masterfile (N), Annual Leave (B), Dry Weather Sewerage Overflow (N), Derivatives (B), CE Expense Claims (B)

[2] Dry Weather Sewerage Overflow (N), Derivatives (B), CE Expense Claims (B)

[3] Expenditure Masterfile (B), Performance Reporting (N), Waka Kotahi Audit Follow Up (B), Direct Payments (B)

[4] Procurement (N), HR Masterfile (N), Annual Leave (B), Expenditure Masterfile (B), Performance Reporting (N), Waka Kotahi Audit Follow Up (B), Direct Payments (B)