Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Monday 21 June 2021

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Melanie Coker

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor James Daniels

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Sam MacDonald

Councillor Phil Mauger

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

16 June 2021

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dawn Baxendale

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 6996

 

 

Samantha Kelly

Team Leader Hearings and Committee Support

03 941 6227

samantha.kelly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 

 

 


Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.        Apologies Ngā Whakapāha................................................................................. 4

2.        Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga.................................................. 4

Staff Reports

3.        Otautahi Christchurch Draft Climate Change Strategy............................................ 5

4.        2021-31 Long Term Plan................................................................................... 57   

 

 


Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 

 

1.   Apologies Ngā Whakapāha

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

  


Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 

Report from Hearings Panel  – 19 May 2021

 

3.     Otautahi Christchurch Draft Climate Change Strategy

Reference Te Tohutoro:

21/783094

Report of Te Pou Matua:

Katie Matheis, Committee & Hearings Advisor
Katherine.Matheis@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager  Pouwhakarae:

Lynn McClelland, Assistant Chief Executive, Strategic Policy and Performance
Lynn.McClelland@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Consideration Te Whaiwhakaarotanga

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to present to Council the Officer recommendations, inclusive of Council’s feedback from the Climate Change Strategy Consideration Workshop (Workshop) and briefing, and following the consultation and hearing on the draft Ōtautahi Christchurch Climate Change Strategy (draft Strategy). Attachment A reflects these revisions in a track-changes version of the draft Strategy.

1.2       Council has considered all written and oral submissions received on the draft Strategy, and all other relevant information presented to it, including the Officers’ report and supporting attachments summarising the submissions received during the public consultation (refer to the Hearings Panel Agenda and Attachments link below), and the Officers’ briefing presented to Council during the Workshop (see Attachment B).

Agenda: https://christchurch.infocouncil.biz/Open/2021/05/BLHP_20210519_AGN_7071_AT.PDF

Agenda Attachments:

https://christchurch.infocouncil.biz/Open/2021/05/BLHP_20210519_ATT_7071_EXCLUDED.PDF 

2.   Public Consultation / Summary of Submissions

2.1       Public consultation on the draft Strategy ran from 12 March to 25 April 2021.

Summary of submissions on the draft Strategy

2.2       Council received 154 submissions on the draft Strategy, 113 from individuals and 41 from organisations.

2.3       Overall, submitters approved of the draft Strategy’s framework, with broad support for the four Climate Change Goals (Goals) and ten Climate Action Programmes (Programmes). Notably, many called for bolder action from the Council undertaken with greater urgency.

2.4       The majority of submitters (95) suggested actions that could be included in the Programmes to help achieve the Goals. Many submitters requested that the pathways for achieving the Goals be clearer and include interim targets along the way.

2.5       Many submitters advocated for an increase in climate education efforts and community engagement, citing the need to affect widespread behaviour change around the urgency of climate change issues.

2.6       Numerous submitters called for the reduction of transport emissions to be prioritised, highlighting the importance of active and public transport and encouraging urban density.

2.7       Submitters showed strong support for the Council’s aim to lead by example, and asked that all decisions take climate change into account, including those made by Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs).

2.8       A small minority of submitters (10) did not believe that Council should prioritise climate change either because they disputed the science or felt that central government or other organisations should take the lead. 

Summary of Long Term Plan submissions on climate change

2.9       Public consultation on the draft Long Term Plan (LTP) ran from 12 March to 18 April 2021, running alongside the consultation on the draft Strategy. Council received 163 submissions on climate change issues.

2.10    The LTP submissions also showed strong support for the Council’s prioritisation of climate action and use of a climate change lens across LTP proposals. Many submitters identified climate change as the most important issue faced by the city, and asked that funding reflect this accordingly.

2.11    Consistent with draft Strategy comments, many LTP submitters felt Council needed to act with more urgency, citing Council’s 2019 decision to declare a Climate and Ecological Emergency.

2.12    A number of submitters noted the long-term challenges climate change poses and called for a departure from what they felt was the LTP’s business as usual approach to spending and funding.

2.13    Submitters conveyed support for Council’s focus on both climate mitigation and adaption. While submitters agreed there’s a need to take urgent action to reduce emissions, they felt Council should also focus on planning and budgeting for the impacts of climate change on communities and Council infrastructure.

2.14    Submitters also focused on the need to reprioritise transport funding to incentivise and support active and public transport. Submitters called for shifting away from business as usual initiatives, which are seen as supportive of single occupancy vehicle travel. Submitters did support improvements to urban design and planning, which would encourage healthy lifestyles, community wellbeing, and reduce the need to travel long distances for everyday needs.

2.15    Finally, submitters showed strong support for maintaining, and even increasing, the Sustainability and Biodiversity Funds. These two funds are seen as vital for helping deliver community action on climate change, and have allowed for the acceleration and expansion of work already underway across Christchurch, particularly throughout Banks Peninsula. 

3.   The Hearing

3.1       For the convenience of submitters speaking to multiple consultations, submissions on the draft Strategy were heard alongside submissions on the Draft LTP and Draft Development Contributions Policy between Wednesday 5 May and Friday 21 May.

3.2       Submissions were heard by full Council, chaired by Mayor Dalziel. The hearing was open to the public and livestreamed on the Council website.

3.3       Council heard a total of 61 submissions, 31 from individuals, 23 from organisations and 7 from Community Boards.

3.4       Many of the submitters reiterated the key themes seen throughout the larger set of written submissions, including the issues highlighted below.

Council leadership and bold action

3.5       Many submitters voiced approval for Council showing leadership in climate change and recognised that Council has an important role to play, but asked for bolder action. Submitters commented that:

3.5.1   The Council should act with urgency, be more ambitious in its goal setting, and think on a larger scale.

3.5.2   CCOs should be included in Council’s goals for emissions reductions and sustainability. The draft Strategy’s targets should also apply to Christchurch City Holdings Limited. There’s also an opportunity to reduce emissions by implementing requirements for contractors.

3.5.3   All Council decisions should be looked at through the lens of climate change. It was noted that while Council reports now have a climate change impact section, it’s unclear what this actually means on the ground.

3.5.4   Council should also understand the ways in which it is limited. A small number of submitters voiced scepticism over the severity of climate change and disagreed with Council pursuing these initiatives based on climate change concerns alone.

The need for more detail and specific metrics

3.6       While the submitters indicated that they generally supported the Goals and Programmes, many spoke to the need for more and/or better metrics by which actual change can be tracked and measured. Submitters commented that:

3.6.1   More detail is needed on implementation, including associated risks and challenges. More detail is needed to translate to action on the ground. Actions and targets should be more specific.

3.6.2   There should be transparency in measurement and creative ways in which our progress as a city is shared with the community.

3.6.3   Interim emissions reduction goals and timeframes should be established and reported on. Council needs yearly targets and mechanisms for assessing those targets.

3.6.4   The draft Strategy lacks in measurements and details on how Council will work with central and local government partners to deliver action.

The need for a greater focus on communication and community outreach

3.7       Submitters commented broadly on the need for more community outreach and the importance of effective communication as a means of shifting behaviour and encouraging action. Submitters commented that:

3.7.1   Climate change requires an ongoing conversation with the community and inclusive decision making. It is therefore critical that young people, social entrepreneurs, businesses and organisations, and Ngāi Tahu feel involved. More encouragement and proactive advertising is needed.

3.7.2   Council should engage more with businesses and entrepreneurs, and recognise those who are already engaging in sustainable behaviour and climate-focused decision making.

3.7.3   We need vigorous public education to make people truly aware of the climate challenges we face. Communication should be more aggressive, graphically and in words. Council might consider graphics and animation to communicate the price of inaction.

3.7.4   Behaviour change by all of us is essential to success. Council is important in everyday lives and thus should play a strong role in supporting and promoting behaviour change. Engagement activities should be broadened and include participatory democracy measures.

3.7.5   Social wellbeing and climate grief education should also be a component of engagement and outreach. There are financial stresses, emotional and mental health issues that should be considered. Young people in particular can feel distinctly impacted by climate change issues.

The need to prioritise emissions reduction and changes to transport

3.8       Many submitters voiced the opinion that there should be greater emphasis on emissions reduction, focusing on transport initiatives and noting the benefits of urban density models. Submitters commented that:

3.8.1   Active public transport is key to achieving emissions reductions and any transport redesign should favour walking and cycling. Many submitters encouraged the development of additional cycleways, and a more aggressive approach to emissions reductions through efforts to curb vehicle use. Submitters also noted that people need to feel that existing cycleways and footpaths are safe and accessible. Unless active transport is safe, connected and accessible, people will not be motivated to reduce car usage.

3.8.2   Public transport needs to be improved and work needs to be done to address the stigma around using the City’s bus system. Some submitters voiced support for free buses for students. Others noted that there’s still too much inconvenience due to costs, route connectivity, traffic due to lack of bus lanes, etc. to really encourage use of public transport. Collaboration with Environment Canterbury was encouraged to support better bus networks and look at park and ride options as well as rapid transit.

3.8.3   The plans for the Tarras airport directly conflict with the Council’s long term goals, especially around emissions reductions. Council should cancel plans for the airport’s development.

3.8.4   A more thoughtful approach to urban planning is needed. Many submitters stressed their support for medium and high density, multi-use housing, highlighting the benefits of “15-minute neighbourhoods” where residents can walk or cycle to access everyday needs rather than commute by car. High density, mixed-use housing is more energy efficient and would help preserve productive land/soil.

Funding and resource considerations

3.9       Some submitters raised issues around funding the draft Strategy’s Goals and Programmes, especially given the Draft LTP proposals to reduce community funding in certain areas. Submitters commented that:

3.9.1   Cuts to the Council’s Sustainability and Biodiversity Funds undermine the draft Strategy’s purpose. These funds should be increased not reduced. Separate, stand-alone funding should also be considered.

3.9.2   It seems disingenuous to adopt a Climate Change Strategy without funding attached, and questioned how the draft Strategy’s Programmes would be funded. Funding through the LTP and Annual Plan would be welcome.

3.9.3   Dedicated staff might be needed to advance the draft Strategy’s Goals and Programmes. Additionally, there are already many volunteers on the ground making a difference, but more resources would help augment these existing efforts and community investments. 

4.   Consideration of Submissions

4.1       Council convened on 1 June 2021 for the draft Climate Change Strategy Consideration Workshop to receive a briefing from Officers and consider all submissions received on the draft Strategy.

4.2       Officers’ presentation provided a summary of the submissions, including key themes, immediate next steps, proposed responses/changes, and key priorities to deliver impact. Council raised questions with Officers as part of the briefing.

4.3       Some of the key issues and concerns raised by submitters and addressed by Council during the Workshop are noted below:

4.3.1   Council recognised submitters’ general support for the four Goals and ten Programmes, but noted submitters’ concerns that the draft Strategy’s Programmes lack specifics as to how these goals will be achieved.

4.3.2   There was discussion about how the methodologies and metrics used to measure emissions vary across councils and how the process used to gather and process that data can be very expensive. Additional discussion sought to ascertain whether a combined approach for local councils is feasible. Officers noted that there are ongoing discussions with StatsNZ and the Ministry for the Environment around the possibility of standardisation and assistance for local councils. Council asked whether this can also be raised with the Greater Christchurch Partnership and/or Canterbury Mayoral Forum secretariat.

4.3.3   Council noted the benefits of collaborating with other stakeholders (e.g., Environment Canterbury) to leverage communication channels where possible and ensure consistency of information.

4.3.4   Council asked about the response from the business community and how to achieve better representation and engagement.

4.3.5   Council recognised that many submitters called for more climate education for both youth and adults. Council asked about the role of Enviroschools and climate education. Council and Officers discussed how Enviroschools are doing well and leading in this area, but how there’s still a need for a wider campaign that includes businesses, individuals and communities to increase engagement.

4.3.6   Council asked Officers to elaborate on how internal teams are working together and not doubling up on efforts. Officers outlined the existing teams and managers contributing to climate change initiatives and other opportunities for new partnerships with resource efficiency in mind.

4.3.7   A question was raised regarding the impact to lower socioeconomic families and how the draft Strategy’s Goals and Programmes address this. Officers responded that as they develop actions across the ten Programmes, they will be considering these impacts and will work with partners to develop the appropriate framework to assess any issues that arise.

4.3.8   Council discussed the benefits of aligning the draft Strategy with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, including the potential for additional funding being made available for climate change initiatives and Programmes.

4.3.9   It was noted that there may be additional opportunities to address the issue of food resilience over the next coming months, including through the Annual Plan.

4.3.10 Council discussed at length the emissions goals and transportation specifically. It was noted that there should be additional steps built into the draft Strategy and Programme 7 that go beyond the current next step of completing the Christchurch Transport Plan. Council stated that clearer timeframes were needed for delivering the Transport Plan. 

4.3.11 Council asked whether writing a submission for the Ministry of Transport’s Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM) consultation is an option.

4.3.12 Council further noted that the draft Strategy doesn’t pinpoint all of the transport stakeholders and those who have an invested interest in this area. Council asked about the role these stakeholders play, and indicated a need to identify those who have influence in this area and further outline those roles and responsibilities for transport under Programme 7. Council observed that once it has identified the pathways that will reduce emissions the most, it will be better able to engage with those stakeholders who can aid in these efforts.

4.3.13 Council also discussed various aspects of funding that will be needed to support the draft Strategy’s Goals and Programmes, and noted that funding from other resources should be considered as well. Council and Officers discussed funding for the immediate next steps and Officers specified that in terms of those specific actions, there’s funding available and it’s been scoped out. There are other things that will require further funding, and there’s a need to be clear about the distinction between these.

4.3.14 There was some concern raised by Council regarding the LTP’s proposal to reduce the budget and how this might impact budgeting for the draft Strategy. It was noted that there will be additional opportunities to discuss budgeting for the draft Strategy through the Annual Plan process. Council also indicated a need to understand what was already being done by other organisations around climate change (e.g., Enviroschools) to prevent doubling up on efforts and spending.

4.3.15 Council raised the issue of submitter diversity, and the importance of hearing from under-represented groups, especially those who will be impacted by the draft Strategy’s initiatives. Officers stated that it’s an ongoing consideration—how best to attract a diverse range of submitters. This consideration was one of the reasons the draft Strategy was run alongside the LTP, to leverage its engagement reach.

4.3.16 Council also raised the fact that some submitters provided conflicting evidence with regard to the impacts of climate change and questioned whether action to negate those impacts was truly needed. Council also noted that some of those submitters nonetheless agreed with the draft Strategy’s Programmes because they would lead to healthier lifestyles and community improvements.

4.3.17 Council discussed waste water treatment and questioned why it creates such high emissions. Officers explained that the treatment plan process involves producing nitrous oxide and some methane as well. Work has been commissioned to see how they can reduce nitrogen levels and to explore other opportunities. It is however, very expensive (hundreds of millions of dollars), and when you look at the city as a whole, it’s a small percentage of emissions (0.4%). Council noted that while a cost-benefit analysis may show that tackling this isn’t currently tenable, offsetting may be another option.

4.3.18 Council raised the issue of its CCOs and their impact (citing Tarras airport specifically), asking Officers whether they had a view as to how that might work in terms of the draft Strategy’s framework. Officers responded that placing a CCOs representative on the Climate Leadership Group (Council’s next step under Programme 1) is being considered, but that ultimately, it is up to Council leadership as to what to pursue with the CCOs.

4.3.19 Regarding Programme 4 (adapting and greening infrastructure systems), concern was raised that the draft Strategy identifies things Council is going to do (e.g., rainwater/greywater reuse), but without tangible recommendations to achieve this. There was a question as to whether there are smaller things that could be added as projects to move forward some of these initiatives.

4.3.20 Council noted that some additional information would be needed to determine what existing rules and/or regulations are in place around the ability of individuals to harvest and use rainwater and greywater.

4.3.21 Finally, Council discussed a submission around digital technology and the amount of emissions resulting from digital production and use (e.g., smartphones and tablets). Council discussed whether a policy or explanation around this might be worthwhile. Council noted that even absent that, it could still encourage better use and discourage unnecessary waste. It was also noted that as large data sectors come into New Zealand and Christchurch, there would be opportunities to shine a light on emissions reductions and decarbonisation.

4.4       Council convened again on 8 June 2021 to receive an updated briefing from Officers and discuss those revisions incorporated into the draft Strategy.

4.5       Officers’ outlined the changes made to the draft Strategy to date, discussed additional amendments put forth by Council and answered any remaining questions about the framework, Goals and Programmes.

4.6       Some of the key issues discussed by Council during the briefing are noted below:

4.6.1   Council approved of the initial revisions made to the draft Strategy.

4.6.2   Council requested that the language of the title be changed, revising “Climate Change Strategy” to “Climate Resilience Strategy” to better reflect the intent of the draft Strategy.

4.6.3   Council briefly discussed the alignment of the draft Strategy with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. 

4.6.4   Council discussed the inclusion of language outlining how/when the content of the Programmes would be reviewed and updated.

4.6.5   Council discussed the structure of the Climate Leadership Group, including the addition of youth representation.

4.6.6   Council refined some of the draft Strategy’s language to better reflect its scope where needed (e.g., including Banks Peninsula in Programme 5’s focus area to increase tree cover).

5.   Incorporation of Feedback into the draft Strategy

5.1       The draft Strategy consultation and hearing process allowed submitters to share many insights, comments and suggestions with Council about the draft Strategy’s framework, Goals and Programmes. During the Workshop and briefing, Council and Officers addressed this feedback and discussed what components of the draft Strategy might require revision. As a result of these considerations, Officers have incorporated the following items into the draft Strategy:

5.1.1   Officers introduced the Te Reo name for the draft Strategy: Kia Tūroa te Ao – Ensuring the world endures. The title “Ōtautahi Christchurch Climate Change Strategy” was also changed to “Ōtautahi Christchurch Climate Resilience Strategy.”

5.1.2   The draft Strategy now incorporates language reflecting its alignment with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and its three core elements: economic growth, social inclusion, and environmental protection. A link to the UN Goals has also been added and more information will be included on the Council’s climate webpages.

5.1.3   Added language reflects the consideration of work happening at the national level (e.g., the establishment of the Climate Change Commission) and the potential to leverage those national efforts while developing local responses.

5.1.4   A note has been added clarifying that the content of the Programmes will be reviewed annually and updated as required to respond to new information and account for progress made.

5.1.5   Responding to calls for greater partnership and collaboration, the draft Strategy further details the establishment and role of the Climate Leadership Group, namely to guide work with the community during the action planning of the Strategy. This Group will also include youth representatives to promote youth leadership and voices, in addition to other stakeholders.

5.1.6   The greenhouse gas emissions from Council’s operations in the 2018/19 financial year have been added as well as some contextual information explaining the data.

5.1.7   Council has directed CCOs to work towards being net carbon neutral by 2030, in line with Council’s own target.

5.1.8   The draft Strategy now tasks the Climate Leadership Group with directing the development of the emissions reduction pathways for Christchurch to achieve the net zero emissions targets of Goal 1.

5.1.9   A new focus area has been added to Programme 1 regarding the development of emissions reduction pathways for Council and the wider district. Additional examples of “what’s already happening” have been included under Programme 1.

5.1.10 Programme 1’s next steps now include developing an education and behaviour change programme to support the emissions reduction pathways.

5.1.11 Two additional items have been included in Programme 4’s focus areas, the first regarding options to encourage rainwater collection tanks, and the second regarding waste water treatment emissions.

5.1.12 Programme 5 now accounts for the potential use of exotic plantings to help capture carbon and provide timber for low carbon building materials. A new focus area has also been added to the Programme and calls for increasing the supply of locally sourced native seedlings.

5.1.13 Two additional items have been included in Programme 6’s focus areas, the first addressing Council’s procurement process and suppliers, and the second regarding education around the carbon footprint of carbon electronic devices.

5.1.14 Programme 7 now incorporates language outlining the key stakeholders Council will need to coordinate with in its efforts to address challenging patterns of use and road transport emissions (e.g., Environment Canterbury, the Ministry of Transport, etc.).

5.1.15 Additional examples of “what’s already happening” have been included under Programme 7.

5.1.16 Programme 7’s “next step for Council” adds a date (December 2021) by which the Christchurch Transport Plan will be completed.

5.1.17 An additional example of “what’s already happening” has been included under Programme 10.

5.2       Finally, in response to community feedback on both the draft LTP and draft Strategy, Council has proposed to make some new investments through the LTP that will further support its commitment to climate change and the Climate Resilience Strategy. These include:

5.2.1   New funding for a communications and behaviour change programme;

5.2.2   Increasing the level of funding for Enviroschools Canterbury and allowing more Christchurch schools to access this education programme;

5.2.3   Funding an additional travel plan coordinator to work with schools to design, champion and implement travel plans that encourage students to walk, bike, scooter and bus to school;

5.2.4   Creating a new Environmental and Climate Change Partnerships Fund to support more planting in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula;

5.2.5   Increasing the Biodiversity Fund to support the restoration and protection of native plants and animals in the District; and

5.2.6   Funding for the Coastal Hazards Adaption Planning programme to support proactive work with communities in areas mostly likely to be affected by the impacts of climate change.

 


 

 

2.  Recommendation to Council

 

That the Council:

1.         Receives the track-changes version of the draft Strategy and the information in this report.

2.         Accepts the changes to the draft Strategy (Attachment A) and adopt the finalised version of Kia Tūroa te Ao, Ōtautahi Christchurch Climate Resilience Strategy.

3.         Upon adoption of Kia Tūroa te Ao, Ōtautahi Christchurch Climate Resilience Strategy, revokes the existing Climate Smart Strategy from 2010.

 

Attachments Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Kia turoa te ao - Ōtautahi Christchurch Climate Resilience Strategy Track Changes

15

b

1 June Climate Change Strategy Considerations Briefing - Presentation

41

 

 


Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 

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Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council - Long Term Plan 2021 - 2031

21 June 2021

 

 

4.     2021-31 Long Term Plan

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

21/501467

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Peter Ryan, Head of Performance Management, peter.ryan@ccc.govt.nz
Leah Scales, Head of Financial Management and Chief Financial Officer, leah.scales@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Lynn McClelland, Assistance Chief Executive, lynn.mcclelland@ccc.govt.nz
Miles McConway, GM Resources
miles.mcconway@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The purpose of this report is to present:

1.1.1   an analysis of the submissions made through the LTP consultation process;

1.1.2   the outcome of the Council’s considerations to date; and

1.1.3   recommendations for consideration before the Council adopts the 2021-31 Long Term Plan (LTP).

1.2       The LTP process will be reviewed by the Council’s Audit and Risk Management Committee at its meeting on 16 June 2021.

1.3       The Committee’s opinion will be provided to the Council by way of a memo and verbal update from the Chair of the Audit and Risk Management Committee at the Council meeting.

Information establishing that the 2021-31 LTP is supported by appropriate management sign-offs is set out in Attachments K and L.

1.4       Elected members have received and considered all submissions made on the Council’s proposed 2021-31 LTP.  They spent several days hearing oral submissions and since then have met informally to discuss the Council’s response to the community’s views and preferences, as expressed through the submissions.

1.5       Preparing and adopting a LTP is a matter of high significance.  For this reason the LGA 2002 requires the Council to use the special consultative procedure when consulting with its community (s.93(2)). The requirements of the SCP are set out in s.83 of the Act.

1.6       The consultation process for adoption of the 2021-31 LTP was undertaken in accordance with the Council’s statutory obligations.

1.7       The following attachments are provided to support this report:

Attachment A:  Thematic analysis of the 2021-31 LTP submissions;

Attachment B:  The Mayor’s Recommendations;

Attachment C:  The Staff Recommendations;

Attachment D:  A summary of the rates impact and net debt ratio of the proposed changes to the underlying information relied on by the content of the Consultation Document;

Attachment E:  Changes to the Council’s capital programme;

Attachment F:  Changes to the Council’s operating expenditure;

Attachment G:  Revenue and Financing Policy; 

Attachment H:  Funding Impact Statement;

Attachment I:  Financial Strategy;

Attachment J:  Infrastructure Strategy;

Attachment K:  LTP 2021 – 31 Management Sign-off for Process;

Attachment L:  LTP 2021 - 31 Management Sign-off for Significant Forecasting Assumptions;

Attachment M:  Minor changes and correction of errors to Levels of Service and Schedule of Fees & Charges

Attachment N:  Council-Controlled Organisations to be exempted under s.7 of the LGA 2002;

Attachment O: Auditor’s Report.

Attachment P: Rates Remission Policy 2021

1.8       Following its resolution to adopt the 2021-31 LTP, the Council will set and assess rates for the 2021-22 year.

1.9       Background

The 2021 LTP was developed under the guidance of a formal Letter of Expectation (LOE) issued by Councillors. In summary the LOE directed that the process involve a high level of transparency and co-development between councillors and management. The aim was to develop a forward-looking plan that will position Christchurch strongly to 2031 and beyond.  There was also a clear focus on responding to climate change.

The process was heavily impacted by Covid-19 and lockdown in the first half of 2020. At a financial level CCC lost revenue but faced a need to maintain high levels of investment in infrastructure, while at the same time ratepayers faced their own financial challenges. At a logistical level the need to prepare two Annual Plans (covering pre and post Covid impacts) caused disruption to the LTP process.

At the same time a ‘root and branch’ savings review of budgets was undertaken by the Chief Executive.

By late 2020 councillors had extensively reviewed every aspect of the capital programme, as well as reviewing the plan and budget of every CCC activity. The LTP hit all its major project milestones successfully.

1.10    The draft LTP was adopted on 4 March 2021 and the Consultation Document (CD) went out to the community from 12 March to 18 April 2021. Audit NZ in their review of the CD found that:

‘… for this LTP there was significant involvement by elected members, particularly in the development of the capital programme. The guidance and buy-in from elected members at an early stage was especially important given the financial constraints the Council faced and the hard decisions that needed to be made’ (p.3) and

‘We are pleased to report that there was a robust process for developing and preparing the associated underlying information for the draft LTP. The process was well managed and generally went smoothly in accordance with the project timeline.’  (p. 4.)

Council was keen to listen to community feedback on its draft plan. In all, 2382 submissions were received with a further 301 verbal submissions were heard by Council.

Councillors then considered all community feedback (including that summarised in the Thematic Analysis in Attachment A and, after a series of briefings in late May 2021, guidance was provided to staff on a proposed final LTP, including the Mayor’s Recommendations (Attachment B).

Based on community feedback, this guidance included the reinstatement of some levels of service proposed for reduction, as well as adjustments to the capital programme.

Having listened to all community feedback, councillors directed that the recommended LTP contain no cuts to core levels of service. It includes an expansive capital programme that enables replacement and renewal of city infrastructure, with notable increases to roading and Three Waters.  Importantly, Council’s focus on climate change was also strengthened.

Finally, feedback from the community drove a final rates increase significantly less than that in the draft LTP that went out for consultation. 

Details of financials are set out below.   

1.11    Financial Overview

Following a robust consultation, the recommended 2021/31 LTP includes rates to be levied on 1 July of $587.4 million.

Whilst this is $1.3 million higher than the Draft (reflective of the changes detailed in Attachment F), the rating base growth recently updated is higher than forecast in the Draft. This, and other minor changes, has resulted in a decrease to the proposed 2021/22 rates increase to existing ratepayers from 5.56% to 4.85%.

This results in an increase in residential rates for the average house with a capital value of $508,000 of 4.59%, (down from 5.0% in the Draft) or in dollar terms $2.51 per week ($130.49 per year).

The projected rates increase across all years of the LTP is shown in Attachment D. Generally outer years are higher than the Draft, largely due to an average 1% increase in projected interest rates across the period.  Forecast interest rates ranging from 1.2% to 2.1% were used in the Draft, however over the six month period of the LTP, interest rate forecasts have now moved to a range of 2% to 3.2%. Overall, the cumulative projected rates increase to existing ratepayers over the 10 year LTP period has increased from 47.8% in the Draft to 53.8% in the Final. 

The impact of operational changes from the Draft are detailed in Attachment F. These are a combination of external factors not known at time of Draft and changes reflective of Councillor guidance following the submission process. It should be noted that of the $34.2 million savings identified in the Draft for 2021/22, following feedback from the community, $27.4 million is still included in the recommended Final. 

The Council is still forecast to borrow $7.25 million in the 2021/22 year to cover the loss of revenue incurred due to COVID-19. Whilst this will complete the required COVID-19 borrowing of $33.1 million, this is significantly less than the $86.1 million projected in the 2020/21 Annual Plan. This is due to a projected operating surplus in 2020/21 driven by significant cost savings achieved through the 2020/21 financial year. 

Changes to our planned capital expenditure are detailed in Attachment E.  Essentially our planned programme has increased to $5.77 billion from $5.70 billion in the Draft, with 2021/22 increasing from $585.9 million to $630.6 million. Both changes largely reflect expected carry forwards from 2020/21 of $50 million. The impact of this on our debt servicing costs is incorporated in Attachment F.

The timing impact of the above will result in planned borrowing for 2021/22 increasing from $293 million to $343 million, however the corresponding projected opening debt has been reduced according.  The final LTP reflects a forecast net debt at 30 June 2031 of $2.80 billion compared to $2.73 billion in the Draft, mainly due to the capital programme changes, capital grants for Venues Ōtautahi asset improvements and NZTA capital subsidy reductions.

Our key borrowing ratio, Net Debt to Revenue is 178% in 2021/22, slightly lower than the Draft (180.3%) and well within the Council’s current limit of 300%. The forecast peak of 235.4% occurs in 2027/28, down from 244.2% in the Draft.

Our Debt headroom reaches a low point in 2025/26 of $462.5 million, this is still above the recommended minimum of $400 million in the Financial Strategy. This is an improvement from the Draft which had a headroom low point of $384 million in 2027/28. Both the Net Debt ratio and headroom are shown in Attachment D.

The Local Government Act 2002 requires that each year’s projected operating revenues are set at a level sufficient to meet that year’s projected operating expenses (i.e. a balanced budget). Additionally, however, it provides that revenues may be set at a different level if Council resolves that it is financially prudent to do so. The Council must resolve not to balance its operating budget in any year covered by the LTP, and state the reasons for this and any implications.

·    As noted above, in 2021/22 it is planned to borrow $7.25 million, being the final borrowing requirement relating to COVID-19. Repaying the debt over a five year timeframe is considered a financially prudent response to this event. Normally this would create a balanced budget issue, however significant expected funds from the Crown for the new Multi Use Arena in 2021/22 negate this.

·    There is however a projected unbalanced budget in 2024/25 where the ratio is 99.3% against a benchmark of 100%. This is largely due to depreciation being included as a cost for the balanced budget determination. Council does not rate for depreciation, but for long run average asset renewals. The intention is to continue to steadily increase the level of rating for renewals in line with the Financial Strategy. As a result the balance budget benchmark progressively improves over time, while ensuring rates increases remain affordable.

The second benchmark not met during the LTP period is the Debt Servicing Benchmark (borrowing costs as a percentage of revenue) which is breached for a three year period from 2026/27 to 2028/29. This reflects Council has a reasonably high level of borrowing, largely reflecting that required to fund the rebuild. There is no concern around the ability to service the debt and it is expected Council will manage this perceived breach as we get closer to the period.

Since 2010, the Council has borrowed funds for the purpose of on-lending to CCTO’s, through its subsidiary, Christchurch City Holdings Ltd (CCHL).  As this is an effective source of funding for the Group it is expected the Council will continue to make this available for the foreseeable future. It should be noted, that the funding is limited to “back-to-back” arrangements and conditional on CCHL remaining within its existing borrowing covenants.  The on-lending is reported in the quarterly corporate finance report to the Finance and Performance Committee.

There is currently unallocated funds in the Capital Endowment Fund for 2021/22 of $768,000 after the drawdowns proposed in the Mayor’s recommendations. Low interest rates currently prevent the fund from being able to be inflation protected and also provide sufficient funds for community distribution. As a result it is recommended the fund will not be inflation protected going forward but be reviewed during preparation of the next LTP or if interest rates change significantly.

Attachment M reflects some minor changes to fees and charges compared with what Council previously published in the Draft LTP.

Attachment N is a list of companies and entities that it is proposed will continue to not be treated as Council-controlled Organisations under Section 6 (4) (i) of the LGA 2002.  Section 7 (3) permits an exemption after the Council takes into account the nature, scope and size of the organisations.

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.              Receives the information included in and attached to the staff report;

2.              Notes the recommendations of the Council’s Audit and Risk Management Committee at its meeting on 16 June 2021, provided at the meeting;

3.              Confirms the authority of the Mayor and Chief Executive to sign the letter of representation to Audit NZ;

4.              Receives the Audit report required by s.94(1) of the LGA 2002;

5.              Adopts the Mayor’s recommendations set out in Attachment B;

6.              Adopts the Staff recommendations set out in Attachment C;

7.              Adopts the summary of the rates impact and net debt ratio impact of the Mayor’s recommendations set out in Attachment D;

8.              Adopts the proposed changes to the Council’s capital programme set out in Attachment E;

9.              Adopts the proposed changes to the Council’s operating expenditure set out in Attachment F;

10.          Adopts the Revenue and Financing Policy set out in Attachment G;

11.          Adopts the amended Rates Remission Policy set out in Attachment P;

12.          Adopts the Funding Impact Statement, Financial Strategy and Infrastructure strategy set out in Attachments H, I, and J;

13.          Adopts the minor changes and errors set out in Attachment M;

14.          Resolves not to inflation protect the Capital Endowment Fund going forward with this to be reviewed during the next Long Term Plan or if interest rates change significantly (requires 80% majority).

15.          Agrees that in accordance with section 100 of the Local Government Act 2002, it is financially prudent not to set the Council’s operating revenues at a level sufficient to meet the projected operating expenses in the financial year 2024-25.  The ratio is forecast to be 99.3% in that year;

16.          Notes that the Debt Servicing Financial Prudence benchmark is breached in the three years 2026/27 to 2028/29, but there is no concern around Council’s ability to service the debt.

17.          Agrees to provide debt funding to Christchurch City Holdings Ltd (CCHL) from time to time during the term of the 2021-31 LTP, and to borrow from the Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) for that purpose (back-to-back funding), provided that:

· CCHL remains within its existing borrowing covenants.

· The borrowing and on-lending is in accordance with the Council’s Liability Management Policy.

· Staff report all such arrangements in the quarterly corporate finance report to the Finance and Performance Committee.

18.          Adopts the 2021-31 Long Term Plan comprising the information and underlying documents  adopted by the Council at the meeting dated 23 February 2021 (concluded 4 March 2021 – the draft 2021-31 Long Term Plan), as amended by resolutions 5-13 above and including the Audit report referred to in resolution 4;

19.          Authorises the Chief Financial Officer to make the amendments required to ensure the published 2021-31 Long Term Plan aligns with the Council’s resolutions of 21 June 2021 and Audit report, and to make any other non-material changes that may be required;

20.          Authorises the Chief Financial Officer and General Manager Resources (jointly) to borrow, in accordance with the Liability Management Policy, sufficient funds to enable the Council to meet its funding requirements as set out in the 2021-31 Long Term Plan;

21.          Grants an exemption under s.7 of the LGA 2002 in respect of the Council-Controlled Organisations referred to in Attachment N;

22.          Having set out rates information in the Funding Impact Statement contained in the Long Term Plan 2021-31, (adopted by the above resolutions), resolves to set the following rates under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 for the 2021-22 financial year, commencing on 1 July 2021 and ending on 30 June 2022 (all statutory references are to the Local Government (Rating Act 2002).

a.              a uniform annual general charge under section 15(1)(b) of $138 (incl. GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit;

b.              a general rate under sections 13(2)(b) and 14 set differentially based on property type, as follows:

Differential Category

Basis for Liability

Rate Factor (incl. GST) (cents/$ of capital value)

Standard

Capital Value

0.315596

Business

Capital Value

0.535566

Remote Rural

Capital Value

0.236697

 

c.              a water supply targeted rate under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) set differentially depending on whether a property is connected or capable of connection to the on-demand water reticulation system, as follows:

Differential Category

Basis for Liability

Rate Factor (incl. GST) (cents/$ of capital value)

Connected (full charge)

Capital Value

0.071136

Serviceable (half charge)

Capital Value

0.035568

 

d.              a restricted water supply targeted rate under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) on all rating units with one or more connections to restricted water supply systems of $236.78 (incl. GST) for each standard level of service received by a rating unit;

e.              a land drainage targeted rate under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) on all rating units in the serviced area of 0.041846 cents per dollar of capital value (incl. GST);

f.               a sewerage targeted rate under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) on all rating units in the serviced area of 0.084700 cents per dollar of capital value (incl. GST);

g.              a waste minimisation targeted rate under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) set differentially depending on whether a full or partial service is provided, as follows:

Differential Category

Basis for Liability

Rate Charge (incl. GST)

Full service

Per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit

$196.31

Partial service

Per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit

$147.24

Note:
The full service charge is assessed on every separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit in the serviced area. The partial service charge is assessed on every separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit outside the kerbside collection area, where a limited depot collection service is available (75% of the full rate).

 

h.              a water supply fire connection targeted rate under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) on all rating units receiving the benefit of a water supply fire connection of $122.27 (incl. GST) per connection;

i.                an excess water supply commercial volumetric targeted rate under section 19(2)(a) set for all rating units which receive a commercial water supply as defined in the Water Supply, Wastewater and Stormwater Bylaw 2014, plus land under single ownership on a single certificate of title and used for three or more household residential units, boarding houses, motels, and rest homes of $1.16 (incl. GST) per m3 or any part of a m3 for consumption in excess of the rating unit’s water supply targeted rate allowance, provided that all properties will be entitled to a minimum consumption of 0.6986 cubic metres per day.

The rating unit’s water supply targeted rate allowance in m3 per year is the volume of water equal to the assessed water supply targeted rate divided by $1.16.

For example, if a rating unit is assessed $1,000 for the water supply targeted rate, that rating unit's water supply targeted rate allowance for the year is 862m3 ($1000 divided by $1.16/m3), which is 2.36 m3/day. Liability for the excess water supply commercial volumetric targeted rate is for any consumption in excess of that allocation.

 

j.                an excess water supply residential volumetric targeted rate under section 19(2)(a) set for the following:

· all metered residential rating units where the meter records usage for a single rating unit;

· a rating unit where the meter records usage for multiple rating units, and where there is a special agreement in force specifying which rating unit / ratepayer is responsible for payment, of $1.35 (incl GST) per m3 or any part of a m3 for consumption in excess of 700 litres per day;

Note: In the 2021/22 financial year only residential rating units that were assessed for excess water in the 2020/21 financial year will be assessed for this rate. The rate will be fully assessed and applied from the 2022/23 financial year;

k.              an active travel targeted rate under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(a) of $20.00 (incl. GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit;

l.                a heritage targeted rate under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(a) on all rating units of 0.000077 cents per dollar of capital value (incl. GST);

m.            a special heritage (Cathedral) targeted rate under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(a) of $6.52 (incl. GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit;

n.              special heritage (Arts Centre) targeted rate under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(a) of 0.000205 cents per dollar of capital value (incl. GST);

o.              a Central City Business Association targeted rate under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of $277.78 (incl. GST) per business rating unit in the Central City Business Association Area, where the land value of the rating unit is greater than or equal to $50,000;

p.              an Akaroa Health Centre targeted rate under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of $55.14 (incl. GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit, for rating units located in areas defined by the following valuation roll numbers: 23890, 23900, 23910, 23920, 23930, 23940 and 23961 (the eastern portion of Banks Peninsula);

23.          Resolves that all rates except the excess water supply commercial volumetric targeted rate, and the excess water supply residential targeted rate, are due in four instalments, and set the following due dates for payment:

Instalment

1

2

3

4

Area 1

15 August 2021

15 November 2021

15 February 2022

15 May 2022

Area 2

15 September 2021

15 December 2021

15 March 2022

15 June 2022

Area 3

31 August 2021

30 November 2021

28 February 2022

31 May 2022

 

Where the Instalment Areas are defined geographically as follows:

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Includes generally the Central City and the suburbs of St Albans, Merivale, Mairehau, Papanui, Riccarton, Addington, Spreydon, Sydenham, Beckenham, Opawa and Banks Peninsula.

Includes generally the suburbs of Shirley, New Brighton, Linwood, Woolston, Mt Pleasant, Sumner, Cashmere and Heathcote.

Includes generally the suburbs of Belfast, Redwood, Parklands, Harewood, Avonhead, Bishopdale, Ilam, Fendalton, Hornby, Templeton and Halswell.

 

24.          Resolves that excess water supply commercial volumetric targeted rates, and excess water supply residential targeted rates are due for payment on the following dates

Month in which amounts are invoiced

Due date

July 2021

20 August 2021

August 2021

20 September 2021

September 2021

20 October 2021

October 2021

20 November 2021

November 2021

20 December 2021

December 2021

20 January 2022

January 2022

20 February 2022

February 2022

20 March 2022

March 2022

20 April 2022

April 2022

20 May 2022

May 2022

20 June 2022

June 2022

20 July 2022

 

25.          Resolves to add the following penalties to unpaid rates:

a.              a penalty of 7 per cent will be added to any portion of an instalment not paid on or by the due date, to be added on the following dates:

Instalment

1

2

3

4

Area 1

19 August 2021

18 November 2021

18 February 2022

19 May 2022

Area 2

20 September 2021

20 December 2021

18 March 2022

20 June 2022

Area 3

03 September 2021

03 December 2021

03 March 2022

03 June 2022

 

b.              an additional penalty of 7 per cent will be added on 01 October 2021 to any rates assessed, and penalties added, before 1 July 2021 and which remain unpaid on 01 October 2021;

c.              a further penalty of 7 per cent will be added if any rates to which a penalty has been added under (b) above remain unpaid on 01 April 2022.

 

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Thematic Analysis of the 2021 Long Term Plan Submissions

68

b  

Mayor's Recommendation (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Staff Recommendations

90

d

Rates Impact and Debt Ratio

96

e

Changes to capital programme

97

f

Changes to operational expenditure

99

g

Revenue and Financing Policy

101

h

Funding Impact Statement

126

i

Financial Strategy

143

j

Infrastructure Strategy

162

k

LTP 2021 - Management Sign-off for Process

237

l

LTP 2021 - Management Sign-off for Significant Forecasting Assumptions

245

m

Minor changes and correction of errors to Levels of Service and Fees and Charges

261

n

Council-controlled Organisations to be exempted under S7 LGA 2002

273

o  

Auditor's report (Under Separate Cover)

 

p

Rates Remission Policy 2021

274

 

 

Additional background information may be noted in the below table:

Document Name

Location / File Link

 

Draft Long Term Plan 2021-31 for consultation

 

Long Term Plan 2021–31 : Christchurch City Council (ccc.govt.nz)

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Lerks Stedman - Senior Business Analyst

Bruce Moher - Manager Planning and Reporting Team

Andrew Jefferies - Manager Funds & Financial Policy

Ian Thomson - Senior Legal Counsel

Approved By

Leah Scales - Head of Financial Management and Chief Financial Officer

Peter Ryan - Head of Performance Management

Helen White - Head of Legal Services

Lynn McClelland - Assistant Chief Executive Strategic Policy and Performance

Miles McConway - General Manager Resources

Dawn Baxendale - Chief Executive

  


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