Urban Development and Transport Committee

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Urban Development and Transport Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Wednesday 9 December 2020

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Phil Mauger

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Melanie Coker

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor James Daniels

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Sam MacDonald

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

4 December 2020

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Brendan Anstiss

General Manager Strategy & Transformation

Tel: 941 8472

 

 

Nathaniel Heslop

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 6444

nathaniel.heslop@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

Urban development and transport committee of the Whole - Terms of Reference / Ngā Ārahina Mahinga

 

 

Chair

Councillor Davidson

Deputy Chair

Councillor Mauger

Membership

The Mayor and All Councillors

Quorum

Half of the members if the number of members (including vacancies) is even, or a majority of members if the number of members (including vacancies) is odd.

Meeting Cycle

Monthly

Reports To

Council

 

Delegations

The Council delegates to the Urban Development and Transport Committee authority to:

·                Monitor and make decisions regarding the Council’s Roads, footpaths and streetscapes in accordance with the Council’s Long Term Plan.

·                Monitor and make decisions on the Council’s Transport functions including road operations, parking, public transport, cycle ways, harbours and marine structures in accordance with the Council’s Long Term Plan.

·                Make all decisions in connection with the Major Cycleway Routes programme, including final route selections and anything precedent to the exercise by the Council of its power to acquire any property, subject to:

a.       The Committee and affected Community Boards being briefed prior to any public consultation commencing on any Major Cycleway Route project.

·                Receive regular updates from the Greater Christchurch Partnership Committee, and the Greater Christchurch Joint Public Transport Committee

·                Make all decision in connection with the Lincoln Road (Wrights to Curletts) Project.

·                Make decisions regarding the District Plan.

Bylaws

The Council delegates to the Committee authority to:

·                Oversee the development of new bylaws within the Committee’s terms of reference, up to and including adopting draft bylaws for consultation.

·                Oversee the review of the following bylaws, up to and including adopting draft bylaws for consultation.

o      Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014

o      Marine, River and Lake Facilities Bylaw 2017

o      Stock on Roads Bylaw 2017

o      Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017

Submissions

·                The Council delegates to the Committee authority:

·                To consider and approve draft submissions on behalf of the Council on topics within its terms of reference. Where the timing of a consultation does not allow for consideration of a draft submission by the Council or relevant Committee, that the draft submission can be considered and approved on behalf of the Council.

District Plan Appeals

The Committee is authorised to:

·                Consider and resolve any consent orders requested in respect of any proceedings before the Environment Court regarding any appeal on the Christchurch District Plan.

·                Authorise counsel and Council witnesses to call evidence in support of a compromise position or positions in the alternative for the purpose of endeavouring to agree with the parties in terms of a consent order in respect of any proceedings before the Environment Court arising out of the Council’s decisions on the Christchurch District Plan.

·                Authorise any one or more officers holding the positions listed below to participate in a mediation of any proceeding before the Environment Court arising out of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991.

o      This authority shall include the power to commit the Council to a binding agreement to resolve the proceeding, provided it does not require any Council expenditure not authorised by a Council delegation. Part D - Sub-Part 1 – Community Boards 159 Delegation Date Amended

o      Any authority given under this delegation shall be on such terms and conditions as the Committee considers appropriate.

Authorised positions:

§    Head of Legal

§    Associate General Counsel

§    Corporate Counsel

§    Head of Planning and Strategic Transport

§    Team Leader City Planning

§    Principal Advisors, Planning

§    The exercise of such delegated powers shall be reported to the Council on a six-monthly basis

·                Authorise any two or more officers who, for the time being, hold any of the following positions to jointly consider, and resolve by consent order, any appeal to the Environment Court against a decision of Council on submissions to the Christchurch District Plan, where the appeal relates to an alteration of minor effect or the correction of a minor error.         

Authorised positions:

o      Head of Legal

o      Associate General Counsel

o      Corporate Counsel

o      Head of Planning and Strategic Transport

o      Team Leader City Planning

o      Principal Advisors, Planning

·                Make decisions, on behalf of the Council, in relation to any High Court proceedings arising out of decisions by the Environment Court on the Christchurch District Plan provided such decisions are consistent with professional advice.

Limitations

·                This Committee does not have the authority to set project budgets, identify preferred suppliers or award contracts. These powers remain with the Finance and Performance Committee.

·                The general delegations to this Committee exclude any specific decision-making powers that are delegated to a Community Board, another Committee of Council or Joint Committee. Delegations to staff are set out in the delegations register.

·                The Council retains the authority to adopt policies, strategies and bylaws.

Chairperson may refer urgent matters to the Council

As may be necessary from time to time, the Committee Chairperson is authorised to refer urgent matters to the Council for decision, where this Committee would ordinarily have considered the matter. In order to exercise this authority:

·                The Committee Advisor must inform the Chairperson in writing the reasons why the referral is necessary

·                The Chairperson must then respond to the Committee Advisor in writing with their decision.

If the Chairperson agrees to refer the report to the Council, the Council may then assume decision making authority for that specific report.

 

 


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Karakia Timatanga................................................................................................... 7 

C          1.        Apologies / Ngā Whakapāha........................................................................ 7

B         2.        Declarations of Interest / Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga......................................... 7

C          3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes / Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua........................ 7

B         4.        Public Forum / Te Huinga Whānui................................................................ 7

B         5.        Deputations by Appointment / Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga............................... 7

B         6.        Presentation of Petitions / Ngā Pākikitanga.................................................. 7

Staff Reports

C          7.        Draft Central City Parking Policy................................................................ 15

C          8.        Vacant Sites Programme........................................................................... 47

C          9.        Armagh Street and Colombo Street at the Convention Centre - Parking Management............................................................................................................. 65

B         10.      Transport Bi-Monthly Report to Urban Development and Transport Committee 71    

Karakia Whakamutunga

 

 


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

 

Karakia Timatanga

1.   Apologies / Ngā Whakapāha  

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest / Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes / Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua

That the minutes of the Urban Development and Transport Committee meeting held on Wednesday, 11 November 2020  be confirmed (refer page 8).

4.   Public Forum / Te Huinga Whānui

A period of up to 30 minutes will be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

5.   Deputations by Appointment / Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

6.   Presentation of Petitions / Ngā Pākikitanga

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

Unconfirmed

 

 

Urban Development and Transport Committee

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Wednesday 11 November 2020

Time:                                   9.34am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Phil Mauger

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Melanie Coker

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor James Daniels

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Sam MacDonald

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

 

 

 

11 November 2020

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Brendan Anstiss

General Manager Strategy & Transformation

Tel: 941 8472

 

Nathaniel Heslop

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 6444

nathaniel.heslop@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

Karakia Timatanga: Given by Councillor Chen.

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies / Ngā Whakapāha

Part C

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00017

That the apology received from Councillor Templeton for absence be accepted.

Councillor Cotter/Councillor Scandrett                                                                                                           Carried

 

2.   Declarations of Interest / Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes / Te Whakaāe o te hui o mua

Part C

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00018

That the minutes of the Urban Development and Transport Committee meeting held on Wednesday, 7 October 2020 be confirmed.

Councillor MacDonald/Councillor Daniels                                                                                                      Carried

 

4.   Public Forum / Te Huinga Whānui

Part B

4.1

Road Layout and Cycle Safety

Jane Hossack spoke to the Committee regarding the road layout and cycle safety in Christchurch

 

Committee Comment

1.         The Committee requested a memorandum from staff on requirements for signage in a Traffic Management Plan.

 

 

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment / Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Part B

5.1

Deputation by Pupils of Governors Bay School

Pupils of Governors Bay School spoke to the Committee regarding Item 7.

 

 

5.2      Deputation from Helen Broughton

             Mrs Broughton presented to the Committee on the National Policy Statement for Urban       Development.

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions / Ngā Pākikitanga

Part B

6.1

Jo Dickson presented a petition requesting the Committee fix a planter box at Clearbrook Palms.

 

Committee Comment

1.         The Committee noted two additional planter boxes will require, in due course, a similar repair strategy to that approved by the Papanui-Innes Community Board.

 

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00019

That the Urban Development and Transportation Committee:

1.         Receives the petition.

2.         Requests staff prepare a report and present it to the Urban Development and Transportation Committee in February 2021 identifying:

a.         Funding options for the repair strategy approved by the Papanui-Innes Community Board for Clearbrook Palms; and

b.         Options to manage the ongoing maintenance costs of a handover of a subdivision, with consideration of;

i.       Unique assets or features  not included in our own Infrastructure Design Guide (IDS)

 

ii.      Works completed to a higher standard than Council’s specifications require.

 

Councillor Cotter/Councillor Davidson                                                                                            Carried

 

Attachments

a       Urban Development and Transportation Committee 11 November 2020 Petition received from Jo Dickson to repair planter boxes in Clearbrook Palms  

 

 

7.   Establishment of the Coastal Hazards Adaptation Planning programme

 

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00021 Original Officer recommendation accepted without change

Part C

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Endorse the establishment of the Coastal Hazards Adaptation Planning programme to undertake adaptation planning collaboratively with communities that will be impacted in the future by sea level rise through coastal erosion, coastal inundation, and rising groundwater.

2.         Note that the programme will initially focus on the delivery of an updated Coastal Hazards Assessment and the development of a strategic Options Assessment Framework, and that these will form the basis of district-wide community engagement to understand the nature of the hazards and inform the adaptation planning approach to addressing these.

3.         Agree that adaptation planning will be initiated with the first tranche of communities in the Lyttelton-Mt Herbert Adaptation Area.

Mayor/Councillor Davidson                                                                                                                                  Carried

 

 

Councillor MacDonald left the meeting at 10.17am and returned at 10.23am during discussion on item 7.

 

Councillor Gough left the meeting at 10.21am and returned at 10.25am during discussion on item 7.


 

 

8.   Implementation Plan for the National Policy Statement on Urban Development

 

Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Receives the information in this report.

2.         Notes that changes to the District Plan to implement the intensification provisions in the National Policy Statement on Urban Development will be undertaken with public consultation, and staff will broadly follow the process as set out on the diagram in Attachment A and will bring a report to the Committee on the changes being considered prior to public consultation.

 

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00022

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

 

1.         Receives the information in this report.

2.         Notes that the National Policy Statement on Urban Development requires changes to the District Plan, including removal of minimum parking requirements which must be implemented without consultation by February 2022, and intensification requirements, which will be undertaken in consultation with the public, and which must be notified by August 2022.

3.         Notes that staff will provide further advice on definitions in the National Policy Statement on Urban Development as they apply to the Christchurch District Plan ( e.g. Metropolitan Centres) and the basis for exceptions.

4.         Notes that staff will also provide advice on Council’s desire to restrain ‘over-intensification’, which fails to preserve amenity values for residents.

5.         Request a meeting with local Members of Parliament to raise concerns over the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development in our district.

6.         Writes directly to the responsible Minister expressing our concerns with the National Policy Statement and seeks to collaboratively engage on definition and qualifying matters under the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Councillor Davidson/Councillor Gough                                                                                                           Carried

 

Councillor Keown left the meeting at 10.30am and returned at 10.33am during discussion on item 8.

 

The Mayor left the meeting at 10.40am and returned at 11.22am during discussion on item 8.

 

Councillor Davidson vacated the Chair and left the meeting at 11.26am.

 

Councillor Galloway left the meeting at 11.26am

 

The meeting adjourned at 11.26am and reconvened at 11.39am.

 

Councillor Mauger assumed the Chair for the rest of the meeting.

 

9.   Draft submission on the Selwyn District Plan

 

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00023 Original Officer recommendation accepted without change

Part C

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Approve the draft submission to Selwyn District Council on the proposed Selwyn District Plan (Attachment A).

2.         Approve the draft submission to Selwyn District Council on Plan Change 64 (Attachment B).

Councillor McLellan/Councillor Coker                                                                                                              Carried

 

Councillor Galloway returned to the meeting at 11.48am during discussion on item 9.

 

10. Plan Change 3 to the Christchurch District Plan - Final Approval

 

Committee Resolved UDATC/2020/00024 Original Officer recommendation accepted without change

Part C

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Approve, pursuant to clause 17(2) of Schedule 1 to the Resource Management Act 1991, the changes to the District Plan introduced by its decision on Plan Change 3 – Ferrymead Transmission Corridor to become operative on 26 November 2020.

Councillor Johanson/Councillor Cotter                                                                                                           Carried

 

Councillor Davidson returned to the meeting at 11.55am.

   

 

Karakia Whakamutunga: Given by Councillor Chen

 

Meeting concluded at 11.56am.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 9th DAY OF DECEMBER 2020

 

Councillor Mike Davidson

Chairperson

   


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

 

7.     Draft Central City Parking Policy

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/151207

Report of:

Lorraine Johns, Senior Policy Advisor, lorraine.johns@ccc.govt.nz
Darren Fidler, Principal Strategy Advisor, darren.fidler@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager:

Brendan Anstiss

 

 

1.   Executive Summary / Te Whakarāpopoto Matua

1.1       On 25 February 2020 staff briefed Urban Development and Transport Committee on the proposed development of a central city parking policy and associated policy development process. In particular, staff indicated we would prepare a draft Policy for public consultation following targeted engagement.  This has now occurred and we are seeking agreement to consult publicly on the draft Central City Parking Policy, including hearings, in early 2021. 

1.2       The Central City Parking Policy will replace the Central City Parking Plan 2015.

1.3       The new policy provides an opportunity to:

·        ensure the policy reflects the Council’s Community Outcomes.

·        provide a framework for better parking management

·        address a number of issues on which the existing plan does not provide sufficient guidance, and

·        improve alignment with the Suburban Parking Policy 2019, where appropriate.

1.4       The draft Central City Parking Policy outlines issues, goals, and a series of parking policies. The scope of the Policy covers on-street parking, Council-owned off street parking, and temporary surface parking lots.

1.5       To inform the development of the draft Policy, staff undertook targeted engagement with business, community, and residential interest and advocacy groups and representatives, to better understand their perspectives and the issues they were experiencing. A summary of feedback is attached.

1.6       The decisions in this report are of high significance in relation to the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. The level of significance was determined by the nature and extent of the impact on individuals, and the potential for high public interest.

1.7       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Authorise staff to consult the public on the draft Central City Parking Policy 2020 which provides a framework for better parking management and improves alignment with Council’s Suburban Parking Policy 2019;

2.         Agree that minor editorial changes can be made to the draft Parking Policy prior to finalisation of the consultation draft, if needed and delegate approval for any such minor changes to the General Manager, Strategy and Transformation. 

3.         Agree that a Hearings Panel be convened at the completion of the consultation period to receive and hear submissions on the Draft Central City Parking Policy, deliberate on those submissions, and to report back recommendations to the Council.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations

3.1       The 2015 Parking Plan was focused on earthquake recovery and ensuring short-term parking availability as the rebuild progressed. Five years later, and a decade after the Christchurch Earthquakes, we need to intensify our response to other pressing issues.

3.2       Challenges to which the parking policy needs to respond include the following:

3.2.1   Responding to the increased supply of higher quality off-street parking in a number of new central city parking buildings.

3.2.2   The availability of free or cheap parking encourages commuting to the central city in private vehicles rather than by more sustainable modes.

3.2.3   It is difficult to resolve competing demands for valuable central city on-street space, and trade-offs must be made when prioritising one use over another.

3.2.4   There are concerns that the presence of a large number of temporary surface parking lots in the central city are detracting from the city’s recovery.

3.2.5   We do not have the capacity with current tools to enforce all on-street parking restrictions.

3.2.6   We need to improve the quality of our data to support evidence-based parking decisions.

3.3       This Policy provides a framework to enable the Council to manage parking more effectively, and in a manner which supports our strategic direction. The right parking policy can help ensure community and visitor access, help local businesses to thrive, and ultimately increase the attractiveness of our city to all. A stronger policy direction is now needed to ensure that parking policy aligns with the Council’s priorities and Community Outcomes, and supports a consistent, evidence-based approach across the central city.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered

4.1       An option of retaining the status quo was considered, but discounted. The 2015 Parking Plan filled an important void at the time, but is no longer fit-for-purpose, given changes in the central city and in policy direction since this time.

5.   Detail

5.1       We undertook research and analysis as well as targeted engagement to understand the issues and how parking policy can better contribute to the Community Outcomes we are seeking.

5.2       The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.2.1   All who travel into the central city.

5.2.2   Central ward residents and businesses.

5.3       The following table summarises the parking policy framework:

Policy

Title

Description

1

General prioritisation of on-street space

Policy 1 provides a generalised framework for prioritising on-street space, subject to Policy 2.

2

Considerations to guide a departure from prioritisation under Policy 1

Policy 2 sets out the minimum considerations which should be taken into account when departing from the prioritisation framework in Policy 1.

3

Improving access for those with restricted mobility

The Council will introduce a range of measures to improve the provision of parking for people with restricted mobility.

4

Apply parking management criteria in areas of high demand

In areas of high parking demand, on-street parking will be managed on a case-by-case basis, in accordance with the criteria in this Policy.

5

Consider residents’ exemption parking areas where the criteria are met under Policy 4

When the occupancy criteria are met under Policy 4, the Council would be able to consider the introduction of residents’ exemption parking areas, alongside time-limit restrictions for other vehicles. Each area would be considered on a case-by-case basis, taking account of what other parking options are available for residents.

6

Generally retain existing resident-only parking areas but do not permit new resident-only areas

The Council will not introduce new resident-only parking areas but will generally retain existing ones. In areas of no or low demand, the Council will undertake a review to determine whether resident-only spaces should be retained, reduced, or removed.

7

The Council will not generally provide off-street parking

In areas of high parking demand where issues have not been resolved through restrictions under Policy 4, the Council will generally consider a full range of alternative options rather than spending rates to provide further off-street parking buildings.

8

Deter private business from using on-street parking through the application of restrictions

The Council will continue to prohibit private businesses from using on-street parking to store vehicles on the road, as per the Traffic & Parking bylaw 2017.

9

Support the provision of parking for sustainable alternatives to petrol or diesel vehicles, to encourage greater use of these modes

The Council will support the provision of parking for sustainable alternatives to motor vehicles, to encourage greater use of these modes. Alternatives include bicycles, micromobility devices, electric cars, car share, and motorcycles.

10

Support and adopt advances in parking management technology to improve parking outcomes

The Council will support and adopt advances in parking management technology where possible.

11

Review the role of temporary surface parking lots

The Council will review the role of temporary off-street surface parking, including whether any changes are required in the District Plan.

 

5.4       A small number of minor editorial changes may be needed to the attached draft Policy as it is finalised for public consultation. In particular, a spatial breakdown of parking data is being prepared and will be included in the consultation draft. No changes of substances will be made once the Policy is approved by the Council.

6.   Policy Framework Implications

Strategic Alignment

6.1       The recommendations in this report have the potential to significantly progress action toward all of the Council’s Strategic Priorities as well as our emissions reductions targets.

6.2       The proposed goals of the draft Parking Policy are to:

·        Promote 85% occupancy of parking spaces in the central city at peak times

·        Support GHG emission reduction targets

·        Support high amenity off street parking that makes efficient use of space

·        Support a vibrant, people-centric, central city, and

·        Improve our parking data and information.

6.3       The draft Parking Policy supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.3.1   Activity: Strategic Planning and Policy

·     Level of Service: 17.0.25.1 Advice on efficient & sustainable use of natural resources - Monitor Council's carbon emissions through EnviroMark & CEMARS accreditation, & determine any actions as appropriate - including identification of Council agreed reduction targets Strategic Transport: A strategic vision for transport to guide the planning and delivery of transport programmes.

Policy Consistency

6.4       The recommendations in this report are consistent with council plans and policies. 

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       The recommendations in this report do not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore the recommendations in this report do not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations

6.6       Over time, effective management of parking in the city will promote mode shift and encourage a higher use of public transport and active travel, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions from single occupancy car travel.

Accessibility Considerations

6.7       The draft Policy signals an intention to introduce a range of measures to improve the provision of parking for people with restricted mobility.

7.   Resource Implications

Capex/Opex

7.1       The primary cost to implement the Central City Parking Policy will be staff time.

8.   Legal Implications

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report

8.1       Council has responsibility for local roads under the Local Government Act 1974.  The Local Government Act 2002 governs decision-making processes, including consulting on and adopting this policy. 

Other Legal Implications

8.2       The policy is not a regulatory tool. The Council’s Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides the powers under which the Council acts to regulate and control parking, including making resolutions to provide for residents parking areas.

8.3       This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications

9.1       Not applicable.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of feedback from targeted consultation

20

b

Draft Central City Parking Policy

22

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Central City Parking Policy 2015

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Transport/Improvements-planning/CentralParkingPlan2015.pdf

Suburban Parking Policy 2019

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Transport/Parking/Suburban-Parking-Policy.pdf

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

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09 December 2020

 

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Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

 

8.     Vacant Sites Programme

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/147138

Report of:

Georgie Hackett, Assistant Planner - Urban Regeneration
georgie.hackett@ccc.govt.nz
John Meeker, Principal Advisor – Urban Regeneration
john.meeker@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager:

Brendan Anstiss, GM Strategy and Transformation
brendan.anstiss @ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Executive Summary / Te Whakarāpopoto Matua

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Council’s endorsement of a programme to improve the management of privately owned vacant sites in the Central City.  For the purposes of the programme a vacant site is defined as land that has been cleared and may be in a temporary use as a stepping stone to permanent development. Similar challenges are created by vacant sites in other regeneration priority areas and so the intention is that tools and techniques are relevant citywide.  

1.2       Developing a vacant sites programme is an action in the Central City Action Plan in response to community and councillor concerns about the negative impacts of Vacant Sites as explored in Attachment A.

1.3       The goals of the Vacant Sites Programme are to positively engage with Central City vacant site owners to encourage and support them to:

·   Proceed with plans for permanent development, as economic feasibility allows; or 

·   Achieve a level of site amenity that contributes to the positive experience of the Central City, embracing interim uses and public activation of land in high profile locations, where permanent development is not expected in the short term (within 2 years).

1.4       Given the considerable number and diversity of vacant sites, this multi-year programme will:

·   prioritise engagement and intervention by locality and site type (see Attachment B);

·   actively monitor and report on the extent, state and progress being made on vacant sites;

·   utilise and develop a broad toolkit of tools, techniques and processes (see Attachment C); and

·   draw on expertise and influence from across council, other agencies and the private sector to facilitate permanent development or temporary uses that positively add to the city experience.

1.5       Delivery of the programme will rely on staff time, existing capital budget and will draw on the lessons learned from the Barrier Sites programme.

1.6       The information in this report is of medium significance in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. The level of significance was determined by the moderate number of land/property owners that will be directly affected by the programme.

1.7       The programme will initially be of particular relevance in the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board area.  Learnings from the programme will have wider application on vacant sites across the wider city and district should Council, in time, direct that a wider programme is established.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Endorse the implementation of the Vacant Sites Programme for the Central City, the goals of which are to actively encourage and support owners to:

a.         Proceed with plans for permanent development, as economic feasibility allows; and

b.         Achieve a level of site amenity that contributes positively to the experience of the Central City, embracing interim uses and public activation of land in high profile locations, where permanent development is not expected in the short term (2 years).

2.         Note that:

a.         The Programme’s living ‘toolkit’ of activities to encourage owners to develop or improve the appearance of sites may be supplemented over time. 

b.         A prioritised approach, over the lifetime of the programme, will be used to engage and work with site owners reflecting the prominence of sites, especially those within high footfall areas of the Central City, and owner’s development intentions.

c.         Priority locations will be re-appraised annually, and opportunities outside of identified areas will be considered pragmatically within the programme’s resource limits.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations/ Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       As a key stakeholder and landowner in the Central City, the Council has indicated through the Central City Action Plan that, as part of ongoing effort to create an attractive, vibrant Central City, it will take a leadership role in tackling the negative perceptions and issues created by vacant sites at set out in Attachment A.

3.2       The recommended programme takes a strategic and structured approach to vacant site management, drawing heavily on the experience gained in the Barrier Sites Programme, by:

3.2.1   Extending existing cross council/cross agency collaboration, coordinating the use of existing tools, processes, expertise and responsibilities (e.g. enforcement, Partnership Approvals advice, District Plan changes) that can help stimulate and accelerate action.

3.2.2   Aligning and feeding existing work programmes (e.g. ChchNZ’s Business Attraction, Project 8011) which are seeking to draw in new investment and grow demand for new development.

3.2.3   Focusing on positive engagement with owners encouraging behaviour change and compliance, through advice, support and project funding (as resources allow across public, community and private sectors).

3.2.4   Being innovative by trialling new tools and techniques.

3.2.5   Using learnings from practise and new tools to secure action on vacant sites citywide and feed into improvement to business as usual processes.

3.3       It is important to recognise that this programme relies on a limited number of existing tools (which can be added to) which have few direct obligations on landowners to act.  Current tools do not discourage the holding of vacant land.  It is a lawful activity. 

3.4       The recommendations, in turn,  

3.4.1   set out the programme goals to be clear about what the programme will seek to achieve, and 

3.4.2   highlight that:

·     prioritised areas for action  (drawing on the criteria and subsequent analysis in Attachment B) will be needed reflecting the fact that there is not the capacity to engage owners and support action across over 450 separate sites.

·     acknowledge that priority areas will be the subject of regular review, and that the programme will need to be pragmatic, taking opportunities to secure good outcomes on sites as they present themselves.

4.   Alternative Options Considered

4.1       Alternative Option: Incremental/ad hoc management and enforcement of vacant site issues

4.1.1   Advantages:

·   Staff time is allocated to other priority regeneration matters.

·   The limited capex budget is considered on a case by case basis, or established as a seed fund for amenity improvements/temporary activations, or reprioritised for other uses.

·   Other programmes including Project 8011, ChristchurchNZ’s Business Attraction and Business as Usual processes take a more proactive role in site owner engagement.

4.1.2   Disadvantages:

·   City appearance is only managed through breaches of compliance that are reported. Indeed, many appearance issues are not subject to compliance/enforcement processes.

·   Demand for new development remains weak as owners and investors remain uncertain about the future use of sites and broader vision for given areas.

·   Immediate risks to health, amenity, economic performance, evening economy and residential growth remain un-mitigated.

·   Council may be perceived as complicit by failing to encourage owners to improve the city’s image and fails to deliver on its Action Plan commitment and the ‘Accelerating Momentum’ Strategic Priority.

 

4.2       A further potential option involving changes in rating policies (such as greater use of Land Value rather than Capital Value) was not progressed at this juncture. The wider implications of such changes and their effectiveness in addressing this issue need to be investigated in more detail.  If those investigations present a means to incentivise landowners to improve site amenity (and, for example, encourages more efficient use of land in future development) any rating policy changes would supplement the site specific owner engagement approached intended as set out in the recommendation.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

Vacant Sites: Opportunities and Challenges

5.1       The regeneration of the Central City has gained strong momentum over the last 5 years, delivering new homes, commercial premises, venues and facilities. There is also a pipeline of new development in progress whether under development or in the planning stages.  However, vacant land remains a feature of the Central City. 

5.2       For the purposes of the programme a Vacant Site is defined as land that has been cleared and may be in a temporary use as a stepping stone to permanent development.

5.3       Sites can be vacant for numerous reasons but in simple terms, vacancy is a signal that development for the highest and best use is not feasible.  Factors around this (from a mainly residential perspective) are discussed in the research report  presented to the Christchurch Momentum Committee on 9 October 2020.

5.4       A significant factor in Central Christchurch is that pre-earthquake demand for commercial space has been satisfied, for example, by larger, more efficient buildings, changing business practices, and business relocation to other parts of the city. While some vacant land is committed for development (including that for the Canterbury Multi-Use Arena and numerous planned housing developments), much of the remainder is being held as an asset for the prospect of satisfying slowly growing new demand or to meet a sudden speculative need. 

5.5       The ability to hold land is dependent upon a temporary use that can cover its holding costs, including council rates.  A point to note is that the current rating system charges separately for land and any improvements/buildings. Thus, vacant site owners only pay the land proportion of their rates.

5.6                                    Vacant sites are an asset in our ‘City of Opportunity’, but many - in their current form - present challenges that impede Central City regeneration. Attachment A provides a list of many of the factors that contribute to Central City vacancy and the challenges they pose. 

Extent of Vacant Land and Temporary Uses

5.7       A survey of Central City land use (inside the Four Avenues) in January 2020 indicated that vacant land (including that used for temporary purposes) amounted to 68.6 Hectares across 474 sites - 19% of the Central City’s total area.

5.8       The adjacent graphic illustrates the uses of that land.  Temporary greenspace, concentrated in the East Frame and Avon River Corridor, makes up just under a third of this total, closely followed by temporary car parking and unused vacant land.

5.9       A number of sites are being used for construction related uses – typically adjacent to development sites.  The remainder are in uses as diverse as mobile housing, containerised businesses, a memorial and a licenced bar.

5.10    Temporary off-street surface car parks raise a range of issues in their own right.  In terms of legitimate use, temporary car parks can be classified as follows:

·      Sites approved under transitional arrangements in the Canterbury Earthquake Resource Management Act (Permitted Activities) Order 2011 (extended under the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016).  Use of these sites must cease, or gain a new consent, by 30 June 2021. 

·      Sites with approved Resource Consents (for a defined time period - usually 3 to 5 years).

·      Unconsented sites (or approved sites that are non-compliant with consent conditions).

5.11    As shown in the graphic, a high proportion of temporary car parks are unconsented, with around  3,000 car parks (over 100 sites) having no consent to operate.  A number of sites are approved but not in compliance with conditions, typically those related to landscaping of sites that is aimed at better integrating these uses into their surroundings.

5.12    Some of the specific challenges posed by temporary use of land for car parking is set out in Attachment A.   It should be highlighted that temporary car parking can meet particular needs in parts of the Central City and has provided convenient access for shoppers, workers and visitors as the rebuild has unfolded. However, with gravel lots becoming more conspicuous in the city’s built environment, parking and land use policies need to promote more balanced management of supply in a way that contributes to an efficient and attractive urban experience.  These challenges are being considered in the current Central City Parking Policy Review.

         Programme Goals

5.13    The goals of the Vacant Sites Programme are to actively encourage and support owners to:

·     Proceed with plans for permanent development, as economic feasibility allows, while  

·     Achieving a level of site amenity that positively contributes to the experience of the Central City - embracing interim uses and public activation of land in high profile locations - where permanent development is not expected in the short term (2 years)

5.14    The extent to which the second of the goals is pursued on any given site will depend upon the owner’s intended development timeframes and the prominence or physical state of the site.  These factors will be part of the site specific prioritisation discussed in 5.30 below. 

 

 

 

 

 

Programme Components

5.15    At the heart of the programme is a monitoring function, utilising a map-based information system. Over recent years the Central City Land Use Survey has tracked the progress of development across the Central City, revealing the full extent of derelict buildings and vacant land.  This programme will now track in more detail the characteristics and state of each site, progress in achieving action (whether self-initiated or council supported), and future development intentions.  This information offers a resource to a range of stakeholders and partners about development opportunities or locations for short to medium term installations/activations/events.  The intention is that regular annual reporting and website content will maintain awareness and inform dialogue about changing spatial or operational priorities.  Without compromising owner intentions, the information system will also have a public facing element that highlights where in the development pipeline a site currently sits.  This will make use of the Central City Map  web infrastructure.

5.16    In common with the established Barrier Sites Programme[1], the Vacant Sites Programme will utilise a case management approach, working closely with land owners to tailor responses to individual sites. Forming positive relationships will be a cornerstone of this programme as success will largely depend on voluntary or incentivised action.  Understanding owner needs and tailoring the right mix of obligations, support and incentives to sites will be important in making progress (unless or until firmer obligations are placed upon site owners to act). 

5.17    Cross council and cross agency engagement will be essential in the programme as engagement will need to be efficient, consistent and coordinated.  This will include among other measures,

·   Shared authoring of vacant site information (safeguarding commercially sensitive data)

·   Taking a wide view of problem solving across public, private and community sectors. 

·   Drawing on the case management approach, facilitating the right connections to support site owners.

·   Regular programme oversight sessions to update on progress and drive action.

·   Coordination and timely engagement of subject matter/process experts.

·   Development of a webpage to host or signpost resources, contacts and links from which the wider project team can draw on and direct clients to the right information and contacts. 

5.18    The varying characteristics of vacant sites mean that different techniques, mechanisms and advice will be needed.  As a result the Programme will utilise a living ‘toolkit’.

Toolkit

5.19    The ‘toolkit’ is a collection of tools, techniques and processes that will be drawn upon when considering how to engage with owners.  It is fully expected that other tools will be developed reflecting the fact that this programme will need to be innovative and agile in finding new ways to deliver its goals.  The key to its success is capturing and using learnings to improve practise.

5.20    The tools, listed in Attachment C lie across the VADE spectrum[2]

Voluntary:       provide information and guidance to encourage self-initiated action.

Assisted:          direct engagement and encouragement to pursue action including take-up of advice, support or incentives raise awareness.

Directed:         firmer engagement demanding resolution of specific issues, typically where risks to health or safety exist or where conditions of relevant consents are not being complied with.

Enforced:         (as a last resort) the use of statutory powers to secure an outcome where preceding steps to secure a negotiated outcome have been exhausted.  

5.21    The intention of the programme is to operate within the Voluntary and Assisted part of this spectrum with initial assistance devoted to prioritised areas.  However, as signalled above the unconsented use of land for temporary car parking may be one area where Directed (and potentially Enforced) steps may be used.  The prioritisation of action on unconsented temporary car parks will be addressed in the report already requested by councillors. 

As summarised with examples below, the tools (and potential tools for further investigation) can be grouped under broad categories:

Advice, Guidance and Standards: Ensuring that expectations of owners are clear through policies (and potential changes to policies) including District Plan and parking policies, and through the use of guidelines to inform owners about expectations/options for site improvement. 

Community Capacity Building:  Engaging with stakeholders, owners and local interest groups (e.g. Project 8011 Neighbourhood Planning, Shape your Place Toolkit) to crowd source local priorities, site solutions and community-led action.

 

Development Enabling: Advice and support services for developers and landowners through, for example, pre-application advice, Design Clinics and Partnership Approval facilitation through the development process. There may be cases where Council may have a role in land assembly and strategic land acquisition processes for specific projects.  If such a circumstance arises, this will require a separate report to Council.

 

Financial Tools: Incentives to encourage action including the existing Development Contributions Rebate, Rate Rebate Incentives and, potentially, rating policy changes.

 

Amenity and Activation Projects and Partnerships to improve amenity and activate sites, collaborating with placemaking partners (Gap Filler, Life in Vacant Spaces and The Green Lab), and peer to peer private sector/Business Association link ups to support site improvement.

 

Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement to pursue owners in addressing issues including dust, graffiti, litter or other Health Act nuisances, or cessation of unconsented activities (e.g. parking) in combination with development enabling or amenity improvement advice).

 

 

Programme Priorities

5.22    With over 450 vacant sites across the Central City, and with differing levels of impact that they impose on their surroundings, determining where to act and deploy resources requires a prioritised strategic approach.  

5.23 Staff have undertaken an analysis of differing characteristics of vacant sites to identify spatial and site-specific criteria to help determine priorities.  Attachment B contains the methodology used and mapping of qualifying sites in a ‘heatmap’ style.  Along with resultant priority areas identified, a number of large sites have been highlighted noting their prominence, potential and public ownership.

6.   Policy Framework Implications/ Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment / Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1                The Vacant Sites Programme aligns:

-     With the Strategic Framework 2019-2022, which commits the Council to encouraging a prosperous economy and liveable city under its Community Outcomes.

-     Directly to the Strategic Priority aimed at accelerating the momentum the city needs. Level of Service: 17.0.20 Place-based policy and planning advice to support integrated urban regeneration and planning.

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.2       The preferred approach is consistent with the Central City Action Plan (2020 revision), the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan 2012 (and its Accessible and Liveable City supplements), and the programme will influence District Plan and Transport policies (in so far as they relate to parking). 

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.3       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions. The programme’s main focus is on Central City land under the takiwā of Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga but does not result in significant impacts on Mana Whenua.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.4       Accelerating the redevelopment of the Central City, which lies at the heart of strong public and active transport networks and where people can meet a range of needs in one place, can make more efficient use of existing investment.  

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.5       Increased development in the Central City will improve accessibility. Fewer vacant sites will reduce the amount of gravel on sites and footpaths which can hinder pedestrian movement.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex/ Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement – resourcing will be drawn from existing staff resources and operational or grant funding (see specific grants set out in Attachment C).

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – not applicable.

7.3       Funding source – 2020/21 Annual Plan provision for staff and appropriate grant funding resourcing.  

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report: The Local Government Act 2002.

Other Legal Implications:

8.1   There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision. Should new tools to incentivise development be implemented and approved by elected members in the future, there are statutory processes that would be required, particularly ahead of adopting the relevant Long Term or Annual Plan.

8.2   This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1   Resource availability: Medium

Availability of capital and grant budgets will inform the degree to which the Council can support, incentivise or seed fund site improvement projects.  Prioritisation of areas within the city will assist in focusing resources to key locations. Partnership working across public, community and private sector offers the opportunity to consider capital and maintenance costs of any interventions. 

9.2   Owner Engagement: Medium

In common with the Barrier Sites programme there will be variable willingness among landowners to act with few absolute obligations, beyond those that are enforceable.  As a potential mitigation, land value rating policy options are to be researched that – over the long term and subject to future decision making - could incentivise more efficient land use over the longer term, alongside the current short term rebates, to encourage site amenity or activation improvements.  Both of these impacts would create a financial incentive to act.   

9.3   Management of information relating to this programme across partner agencies:  Medium

There are potential multiple channels of contact for site owners.  The programme needs tight coordination across Council and its agencies.  This risk will be mitigated in a similar fashion to that employed in the Barrier Sites programme as detailed in 5.15-5.17.  The establishment of a central information resource capable of diarised recording of action among programme stakeholders across Council and its partners provides a solid foundation for this.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Vacant Lane Issues

56

b

Attachment B - Vacant Site Prioritisation

58

c

Attachment C - Vacant Sites Toolkit

61

 .

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

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Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

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09 December 2020

 

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Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

 

9.     Armagh Street and Colombo Street at the Convention Centre - Parking Management

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/947038

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Michael Thomson, Transport Engineer, michael.thomson@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

David Adamson, General Manager, City Services, david.adamson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to recommend kerbside parking changes in conjunction with the development of Te Pae (the Convention Centre).  This report has been written following a request from the Crown Agency (Ōtākaro) who are the project managers for the Convention Centre build.  In addition, the adjacent heritage ice cream vendor (commonly known as Ice Cream Charlie) opposite the convention Centre and on the Victoria Square frontage has requested a modification to their authorised ice cream van parking place.

1.2       The decision in this report is low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. 

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Approves that all parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Colombo Street, commencing at its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Cathedral Square, be revoked.

2.         Approves that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Armagh Street, commencing at its intersection with Colombo Street and extending in a westerly direction to its intersection with Oxford Terrace, be revoked.

3.         Approves that all parking and stopping restrictions,   on the north side of Armagh Street, commencing at a point 133 metres east of its intersection with Durham Street North and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 11 metres, be revoked.

4.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017  on the west side of Colombo Street commencing at its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 23 metres.

5.         Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes and controlled by Parking Meters, (including Pay by Plate machines or any approved means of payment), in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the west side of Colombo Street, commencing at a point 23 metres south of its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 11 metres. This restriction is to apply Monday to Thursday from 9:00am to 5:00pm, and Friday to Sunday 9:00am to 8:30pm.

6.         Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved mobility person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.4 of the Land Transport-Road User Rule: 2004, on the west side of Colombo Street, commencing at a point 34 metres south of its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of six and a half metres.  This restriction is to apply at any time.

7.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017,  on the west side of Colombo Street commencing at a point 40.5 metres south of its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of three metres.

8.         Approve that a Loading Zone be created,  in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the west side of Colombo Street commencing at a point 43.5 metres south of its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 24.5 metres. This Loading Zone restriction is to apply at any time.

9.         Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes and controlled by Parking Meters, (including Pay by Plate machines or any approved means of payment), in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the west side of Colombo Street, commencing at a point 68 metres south of its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. This restriction is to apply Monday to Thursday from 9:00am to 5:00pm, and Friday to Sunday 9:00am to 8:30pm.

10.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the west side of Colombo Street commencing at a point 85 metres south of its intersection with Armagh Street and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Cathedral Square.

11.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the south side of Armagh Street commencing at its intersection with Colombo Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 42 metres.

12.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of five minutes, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the south side of Armagh Street, commencing at a point 42 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 12 metres. This restriction is to apply at any time.

13.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes, and be reserved for Buses and Shuttle vehicles only on the south side of Armagh Street, commencing at a point 54 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 44 metres. This restriction is to apply at any time.

14.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017,  on the south side of Armagh Street commencing at a point 98 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street and extending in a westerly direction to its intersection with Oxford Terrace.

15.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to ‘Authorised Vehicles Only’, in accordance with Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, on the north side of Armagh Street commencing at a point 133 metres east of its intersection with Durham Street North and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 11 metres. This restriction is to apply at any time.

16.       Approves that these Parking & Stopping resolutions take effect when signage, & road marking, that evidence the restrictions are in place (or removed in the case of revocations).

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       Ōtākaro have requested the officers recommended parking management changes as detailed on both main road frontages. This will best serve the needs of vehicle servicing and visitor activities associated with the new centre.

3.2       The Council has received a request for a change to the authorised parking from the new owner of the heritage ice cream van (Ice Cream Charlie) that has existed for many years on the north side of Armagh Street, opposite the new Convention Centre. The current authorisation allows the ice cream van to be parked from 9:00am to 11:00pm on any day. Outside these times, the space is restricted to five minute parking.

3.3       The new owner advises that to maintain the quality of the traditional “Vanilla Ice” product, the refrigeration is required to be activated very early in the morning- well before 9:00am. Being authorised to park overnight in addition to the existing authorised times will overcome this operation issue.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       Do Nothing – no change to existing parking.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

5.1       The key stakeholder is the crown agency Ōtākaro, who have requested these changes to serve the new convention centre. Ōtākaro staff have liaised with Crown Plaza hotel management who support the changes. This hotel is the only occupied site immediately adjacent to these two convention centre frontages.

5.2       The current owner of “Ice Cream Charlie” has requested the change for his site, so that the ice cream van can be parked permanently. Ōtākaro was consulted and they have no objection to this change.

5.3       While the decision affects the Central ward, this area is within the “Plan A” area, where kerbside parking and stopping changes are delegated to this committee.

5.4       The team leader Parking Compliance, supports these changes.

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.1.1   Activity: Parking

·     Level of Service: 10.3.1 Provide an appropriate number of parking spaces in the central city, so that occupancy is optimised. - 60-85%

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.2       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.3       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.4       This proposed change has no effect on Climate change.

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.5       The proposed changes support accessibility, specifically in terms of mobility access, passenger service vehicle, and goods vehicle access.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement - $2000

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – included in existing Parking Signs & Markings maintenance budgets, estimated at $500 per annum.

7.3       Funding Source – Existing Approved budgets for new Parking Signs & Markings budgets.

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

Other Legal Implications / Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.1       There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.2       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       There is no identified risk associated with the recommendations.

9.2       The risk of the do nothing option is:

a)    Not meeting the required provision /servicing needs for Te Pae, in terms of Goods vehicles, Passenger Service vehicles, mobility parking, and general parking.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Armagh Street and Colombo Street attachment A for UD&T report October 2020

70

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Michael Thomson - Transport Engineer

Approved By

Stephen Wright - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

PDF Creator


Urban Development and Transport Committee

09 December 2020

 

 

10.   Transport Bi-Monthly Report to Urban Development and Transport Committee

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1248902

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Richard Osborne, Head of Transport, Richard.osborne@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

David Adamson, General Manager City Services, david.adamson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update the Urban Development and Transport Committee on work occurring in the transport portfolio.  The report is staff generated.

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Urban Development and Transport Committee:

1.         Receive the information in the Transport Bi-Monthly Report.

 

3.   Network Performance

3.1       The percentage of network affected by Traffic Management Plans (TMPs) is in a generally long- steady-state, however the quantity of TMPs in 2020 is trending higher than 2019. The higher proportion of strategic route impacts of September and October 2020 are due to the Christchurch Northern Corridor construction.

3.2      

4.   Major Projects

4.1       General

·      The focus for the team has been the development of the 2021-31 Long Term Plan and the completion of administration requirements for the Shovel Ready projects.

·      Alongside this construction has continued on the following projects:

Woolston Village Upgrade

Nor’West Arc Cycleway

South Express Cycleway

LED streetlight upgrade

·      With construction substantially complete on the following significant projects:

Downstream of CNC projects

Victoria Street

Hereford Street

Main North Road PT improvements

4.2       Shovel Ready Projects:

·      Funding agreements between Council and Otakaro (on behalf of the Crown) were signed in late October and the first round of reporting was completed in early November.

·      Projects that are covered under these agreements are:

Coastal Pathway (Crown funding),

MCR South Express (Council, Waka Kotahi and Crown funding),

MCR Nor’West Arc (Council, Waka Kotahi and Crown funding),

MCR Northern Line (Crown funding),

MCR Heathcote Expressway, Section2 (Crown funding),

MCR Rapanui-Shag Rock, Section 3 (Crown funding).

·      The investment of $122.2 million for the projects is split into the following funding amounts:

Crown $87.3 million

Council $16.9 million

NZTA $18.0 million

Council has in addition retained a contingency amount at the programme level to ensure unforeseen costs can be covered. This was a requirement of the funding agreement.

·      Progress updates on individual projects are covered in the report below.

4.3       Capital Regeneration Acceleration Facility (CRAF)

·      Targeted roading and transport improvements: Condition, safety and accessibility assessments of the five areas receiving funding are almost complete. Staff have updated Community Boards on the programme, outlined next steps and asked for feedback on priority work for their areas. Staff are collating this information and will be working with the Community Boards to finalise the list of work for each area early in the new calendar year. Tender documents are being prepared and tenders will be awarded early in the calendar year. Contractors will be ready to commence physical works once the list of work for each area is finalised.

·      Road safety priorities: The list of projects has been finalised and design work has commenced. Once finalised, these will be taken to Community Boards for approval to construct.

·      Public Transport: The CRAF funding allocated to public transport will be determined by recommendations from the Public Transport Futures Business cases. 

4.4       Major Cycleway Routes Programme (MCR)

The status of the 13 MCR routes is:

·      Four open: Little River Link, Papanui Parallel, Quarrymans Trail and Uni Cycle.

·      Two partly open: Heathcote Expressway (Stage 1) and Rapanui to Shag Rock (Sections 1 and 2).

·      MCR Nor’West Arc sections 1A, 1B and 1C along with Section 2A and South Express section 3 are in construction.

The rest are in various stages of development as below:

·      Avon - Otakaro River Route: The early stages of route selection and definition have been undertaken and are pending decisions on implementation of the regeneration plan.

·      Heathcote Expressway Route (Stage 2: the Tannery to Martindales Road is programmed to start construction in financial year 2021). One section of Cumnor Terrace required additional consultation for a proposed one-way treatment.  This consultation closed in late March 2020.

·      Nor'West Arc: Construction is underway for Stage 1 (Cashmere Road to Hillmorton) and some of Stage 2 (Hillmorton to University). Future construction will include Ilam/Middleton/Riccarton intersection and Annex Road.  Section 3 has undertaken route selection and a briefing for the Committee is planned for early December.

·      Northern Line: Detailed design is largely complete. The remainder of the route is with KiwiRail to agree land access, finalise design concerns and programme the works; this is ongoing.

·      Opawaho River Route: Early route assessments are being undertaken. Some limited design funding has been included in the earlier years of the draft LTP capital programme, but final delivery date will depend on decisions around the LTP.

·      Rapanui - Shag Rock Route: Section 3 is the final section for construction, connecting the end of Linwood Avenue to Ferrymead Bridge and the Coastal Pathway.  A report on proposed changes to the route alignment will be presented to the Committee in February 2021.  A briefing was held with the Community Board in early November with positive feedback. Construction will start on the agreed section along the canal in early 2021.

·      South Express: This route is now progressing with detailed design and was approved by the ITE Committee on 22 July 2019.  The first section has been awarded and is underway and tender evaluation is almost complete on the next section.

·      Southern Lights: Scheme design is completed but consultation with the community has yet to be undertaken. This is planned to start financial year 2021.

·      Wheels to Wings: Scheme design is being completed ready for consultation late January 2021. A briefing for the Committee is programmed for early December.

4.5       Central City Projects

·   Colombo Street: The project seeks to provide temporary cycle facilities between Bealey Avenue and Kilmore Street to connect the Papanui Parallel Major Cycleway Route to the cycling infrastructure in the Central Business District.  Consultation was undertaken between 28 September and 27 October 2020, with a drop-in session held on 6 October 2020 at the Salvation Army on Colombo Street.  There were 269 submissions received on the project, and a report has been prepared for the Hearings Panel, who will meet on 23 November 2020 to hear from the project team and submitters.  The Hearings Panel will then make a recommendation to the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board, and Urban Development and Transport Committee in February 2021, and a final decision will be made by Council in March 2021.  If approved, construction is programmed to commence in mid-2021.

·    Hereford Street (Manchester-Cambridge) and Victoria Street: Construction has completed in Victoria Street, with the significant invasive works completed in Hereford Street. Both streets have returned to two-way use with the majority of traffic management removed.  Final minor works will be completed in Hereford Street early in the new-year with tree planting programmed for mid-2021.

·    High Street (Hereford – St Asaph) and Tram Extension – High Street:  Detailed design for these two projects is continuing.  The scheduled completion date for detailed design is November 2020.

·    Wayfinding

The Central City advanced directional signage (ADS) strategy is in scheme design with signage roll out planned to be carried out in packages next financial year.

Hospital gantry package - three wayfinding gantry signs are being installed as part of the ADS strategy this financial year. This has been brought forward to support wayfinding related to the opening of the new hospital building. The three signs are being fabricated and expected to be installed in February 2021.

Pedestrian plinth wayfinding scheme design is complete and installation is planned for FY22.

The cultural and heritage wayfinding prototype (1 cultural marker and 5 interpretation panels) is expected to be delivered and installed this financial year in the Avon Loop.

4.6       Woolston Village Upgrade and Sewer Renewal

·    Construction on site started in late July and is anticipated to be complete by March 2021. The majority of sewer renewal works have been completed, the road construction and landscape teams have been following these works with construction between St Johns Church and St Anne’s School largely complete. Work is now progressing between Maronan Street and 640 Ferry Road, as well as around the intersection of Portman Street.

·    Following a break over Christmas, work will begin in earnest undertaking the road construction and landscape works along the north side of Ferry Road between Portman Street and St Johns Street before switching to the south side of Ferry Road.

·    Contractor and Council staff continue to engage with stakeholders regularly to keep them informed of upcoming works.

4.7       LED upgradeLED upgrade Delivery Project

As at end- October 2020 the project has;

·    Installed over  19,550  luminaires as shown on the adjacent map,

·    Reduced power consumption by over  6,062,039  kWhs per annum,

·    Reduced CO2-e by over  637  tonnes per annum,

·    Delivered over 134,000 start work notices,

·    Received 181 public enquires of which 72% were not opposed to LEDs. Of the remainder;

13 have resulted in lights being dimmed using the smart control system,

7 have resulted in lights being dimmed and tilted,

1 has resulted in a light being tilted,

1 resulted in a luminaire change,

1 resulted in a light being moved,

·    8 lamp failures have occurred, which are covered under the 10 year warranty,

·    Procurement of decorative lights is underway,

·    Two decorative light trials are still to complete.

The majority of the lights on local roads have been upgraded to LED.  The installation of lights on higher volume roads design group is well over half way. The project is programmed to complete all installs by 30 June 2021 which will be achieved by engaging additional resources. The current install rate is over 1150 per month.

4.8       Coastal Pathway

The section of the Coastal Pathway around Moncks Bay was approved for funding as a Shovel Ready project.  Otakaro will be overseeing the funding.  The first tranche of monthly information was submitted to them on 4 November 2020. Works are on track to have a ‘shovel in the ground’ within the required 12 months, with a May 2021 start planned.  Consultation material is to be issued 11 November 2020 seeking feedback on the design, as well as specific aspects (parking changes, bus stop moves, speed limit changes).

4.9       Main North Road PT Upgrade

This project is delivering additional and improved bus priority facilities on Main North Road between Winston Avenue and Sawyers Arms Road. The project is now complete and is in defects liability period.

4.10    Lower Styx and Marshland Bridge, Intersection safety and Bridge Widening

The construction tenders have closed and the design team are currently evaluating tenders. An anticipated start on site is due late December 2020.

The Canal Reserve Drain is now classed as a regional ecologically significant spawning site for indigenous lamprey. Accordingly the construction consent caveats have been allowed for in the Environmental Management Plan.

The co-ordination of interrelating works with Orion 66kV and Christchurch Northern Corridor has been completed.

All of the property purchase is complete and all required consents received. The current estimate for the construction duration on site is 18 months however the project team are investigating options for reducing the construction time frames.

4.11    Christchurch Northern Corridor (CNC)

·    The Alliance is concentrating on completing the motorway for it to be opened for traffic on 17 December 2020.

·    Widening of the Waimakariri Bridge with all bridge spans and new concrete bridge decks in place and final surfacing is completed.

·    Construction of the shared use path and shaping of swales and bunds including planting is 95% complete.

·    Each of the eight new bridges are almost completed. The Belfast Road, Radcliffe and Prestons Road overbridges are now open to traffic.

·    A new pedestrian/cycle underpass at Winters Road and extensions to the existing underpasses at Grimseys Road and Hills Road are now open.

·    There is good progress on QEII Drive with the new pavement on both sides completed and is open to traffic with speed restrictions so as to bed in the new chipseal.

·    Construction of the twin roundabouts at QEII are progressing and the road pavement is now being used by traffic.

·    At the Hills Road end of QEII Drive, construction is progressing on the conversion from two to four lanes through to east of the QEII Drive/Innes Road roundabout.

·    Cranford Street pavement construction and road markings completed including the Cranford/Innes Road intersection.

·    Cranford Street roundabout complete with the tie-in to the new pavement north of Placemakers under construction, and should be completed early December.

·    Construction of the HoV Lane and associated gantries for signage are progressing and are approximately 70% complete, despite the delay to construction due to Covid-19.

·    Planning is underway for a “public day” to be held on 12 December where the public can walk or cycle over the new motorway.

4.12    Downstream Effects projects

·   Construction of the first stage of the project has largely been completed with the following undertaken:

·     Widening of Cranford Street between Innes Road and Berwick Street.

·     New signalised intersections at Warrington/Barbadoes and Warrington/Forfar.

·     Upgraded signalised intersections at Cranford/Westminster, Cranford/Berwick, Sherborne/Edgeware, Bealey/Sherborne and Edgeware/Barbadoes.

·     Installation of the area wide slow speed zone over 38 km of local roads.

·     Installation of 7.2 km of on-street cycle lanes

·     Installation of 13 pedestrian refuges and the installation of a new signalised pedestrian crossing on Cranford Street at English Park.

·     In the process of installing a new signalised pedestrian crossing on Cranford Street just south of Malvern Street.

·     Installation of 14 road narrowing’s to make crossing of the quieter side streets safer for pedestrians.

·     Safety improvements installed at the intersections of Cannon/ Barbadoes, Cannon/Madras, Cannon/Manchester, Cannon/Sherborne, Purchase/Barbadoes, Purchase/Madras, Purchas/Manchester, Purchas/Sherborne, Cranford/Dee and Cranford/Malvern.

·     Construction is continuing on a shared path connecting the Papanui Parallel cycleway and the new shared path beside the Christchurch Northern Corridor. Once it is built there will be separated bike path all the way from the Waimakariri Bridge to the central city.

·   We are aware that these works have been highly disruptive to the community and are very grateful for the community support received to facilitate rapid construction.

·   Discussions are underway with residents on Francis Avenue, Thames Street, Flockton Street and Mersey Street to understand the preferences for different types of traffic management.  Following this a strategy will be developed for trialling options in each of the streets.

·   Information will be sent to residents on McFaddens Road, Weston Road and Knowles Street (both east and west side) before Christmas advising that we will be trialling turning restrictions at Cranford Street in February during which time we will consult with the residents on these changes.

·   Council is considering a decision on the design of Cranford Street (Innes to Berwick) on Thursday 26 November.  

4.13    Innovating Streets for People – Pilot Fund

Christchurch City Council was successful in attracting 90% funding assistance from Waka Kotahi for five projects under the Innovating Streets for People Pilot Fund.  These projects are:

·    Ferry Road (Fitzgerald Ave – St Asaph Street) Cycle Connection

·    St Albans School Safety Improvements

·    Selwyn Street Intersection Improvements

·    Beckenham Loop Neighbourhood Improvements

·    Healthy Families Otautahi Play Streets (x12 locations)

Staff have held initial briefings with each of the Community Boards in which these projects are located, and are currently working with key stakeholders and communities to identify issues, gather evidence and co-design temporary, low cost solutions to trial over the coming months.  Co-delivery of the solutions will be taking place from December 2020, in partnership with the local communities and with the support of Council and Waka Kotahi.  All projects must be implemented by 30 June 2021 under the funding agreement with Waka Kotahi.

Staff presented an update to the Committee on the progress of all Innovating Streets for People funded projects in a briefing held on 11 November 2020.

Council staff are also working with Waka Kotahi in their national Community of Practice, which meets monthly, and with other Councils doing similar projects through national cluster groups, which meet monthly to share knowledge and learnings.

Maintenance

4.14    Additional Smart bins (Clean Cubes brand) will be installed in November 2020 along Hereford Street. Further ones are intended to be added along the Avon River Promenade and the High Street extension, which will largely complete the network for transport’s needs in its highest use area. Council staff and contractors are utilising the web-based system to monitor waste levels. At Riverside the original 2 “normal” bins and 6 wheelie bins, being emptied 3-4 times a day, are now requiring only a single empty. We will optimise our servicing to seasonal demands as far as we can.

4.15    The higher level of service provision remain forefront in the Central city, and we are constantly optimising activities to achieve the best service within existing funding constraints; wet scrubbing, kerb sweeping, litter collection and litter bin maintenance are being adjusted to changing community and business needs.

4.16    Contract management of delivery of core services remains highly focused, ensuring safety and reputational risk are managed.  Potholes, duty of care inspections, incident response, for example, are achieving compliance greater than 95% each period.

4.17    Work continues with the Council’s Customer Service team to address efficiencies for delivery in service timeliness and outcomes for the customer, including notifications.

4.18    CAPEX - Renewals

With good weather we should have achieved the following amount of re-surfacing by the end of November;

·    Asphalt Concrete (AC) – 48.9% (66.6% by Christmas)

·    Chip – 45.5% (64.6% by Christmas)

·    Footpath – 59.6% (69.6% by Christmas)

4.19    Carriageway Resurfacing

·   Over 350 resurfacing sites will be delivered this financial year, approximately 80km being achieved (3.7% of the network, a 28 year cycle).

·   Resurfacing, both in chip seal and asphalt, is now underway. Focus on quality assurance post works is a key issue, i.e. sweeping, removing surplus chip.

·    Pre-seals for this year’s sites are planned to be 90% complete by Christmas (pending favourable weather). Pre-seal repairs are undertaken to the road before it is covered over, ensuring failures are fixed and any humps or hollows are smoothed. The subsequent surfacing will further waterproof these repairs.

·   Best Practice for pre-seals is to leave them for 3 months prior to the sealing over so it can harden and the new surface on top doesn’t push into it.

·   The extra funds allocated this financial year also enable the following years pre-seal to be undertaken before the year of sealing. This work will commence in the New Year; the reseal programme for FY2021/2022 is currently being de-conflicted against other known capital works.

·   Council has a three-year forward programme, which is available in map form on the public website via the following link:

https://ccc.govt.nz/transport/transport-projects/roads-and-underground-services/road-and-footpath-resurfacing-map/

 

·   Staff have worked with the strategic communications team to improve our messaging to the customer and community boards when works are due to proceed. This includes indicating to the customer that pre-seal work is to be done, so that customers understand we will be back to complete final works, i.e. resealing, as there is a reasonable gap in time between the two components.

 

5.   Operations

5.1       Parking Operations and Compliance

The trial of the phone based parking application that commenced on 21 January 2020 has steadily grown since previously reported (1294) with the number of registered users now 2089. The system allows customers to pay for their parking on street or remotely, such as their place of work.

With the CDHB relocating their shuttles from the Lichfield Street car park in late August, the numbers of customer visits have decreased with 30717 in August, 28923 in September and 30703 in October.

The Parking Compliance Team attended to 607 high priority complaints for the 3 month period ending October. These include offences such as blocked vehicle entrances and road safety offences such as broken yellow lines.

5.2       Traffic Operations

Staff are working with Environment Canterbury and NEC Ltd on the delivery of the recently awarded Public Transport Real Time Information tender.  Staff are looking and forming a strategy for the rollout of the new on-street real time bus information infrastructure. 

Since mid-August the team have worked on, and where necessary presented on, over 50 reports and briefings to Community Boards, and in some cases to Council and Council Committees. These covered a range of items from the installation of bus stop infrastructure, safety improvements projects and changes to parking restrictions.

5.3       Travel Demand Management and Road Safety Education

The transport unit runs targeted education programmes to increase active and public travel and safe travel behaviour in the community. Road safety education is prioritised to align to the key risk areas identified in the annual Road Safety Action Plan.

Cycling 

·    Council’s Cycle Safe programme is a two-day course run at schools, targeted at giving Year 6 students the skills and confidence to bike on-road. The team has delivered to 1,240 students from July to October, with 100% school satisfaction.

·    travel demandThe team has received some one-off additional funding from ACC and Waka Kotahi to run additional pilots of intermediate schools cycle skills and a small-scale pilot of adult skills training.

·    A spring cycling campaign was launched in October, including posters across the city with bike guides included. An update to the Bike Easy guide and map will be released in January, in time for the Aotearoa Bike Challenge and featuring all new and planned cycling improvements.

·    A new cycling education video has been filmed for release on social media. It covers key messages on sharing the road as well as courtesy between people cycling and walking on shared paths.

·    The Aotearoa Bike Challenge is confirmed for February 2021 and initial planning is in place. Christchurch has had the highest participation over the last 3 years.

Road Safety Education

·    The annual Kickstart motorcycling took place on 18 October 2020. 486 attended with strong participation in the ‘Have a go’ modules on safe riding. Interest in further training was strong with 80+ sign-ups to the ACC sponsored ‘Ride Forever’ training alone.

·    Crash Bash is a road safety programme for young drivers, produced as a stage performance for secondary school students in years 10-13.  The 2021 theme will focus on the importance of being aware of all road users and their behaviours.  The performance will demonstrate examples of why young drivers need to be fully observant at all times.   The tour to schools across greater Christchurch will commence on 22 February – 25 March.

·    Council are collaborating with Police and NZTA on reinforcing the messages of ‘driving phone free’ and targeted community education for high-risk drivers.

School Travel Planning

·    School travel planning is a practical approach to work with schools to increase active travel rates and road safety. Schools that are currently engaging on travel plans include Hornby High, Hornby Primary, Whārenui, Roydvale, Heaton Intermediate, Halswell, Waitākiri, Villa Maria College and St Albans. The team are investigating running year 7 road safety sessions at Heaton Intermediate in the first few weeks of term 1 in 2021, at the request of the school.

·    Walk or Wheel Day will be held on 3 March 2021. 44 schools took part in 2020, we are hoping to beat that. First call for registrations went out 21 October and we already have 28 schools signed up.

Workplace and community travel planning (Greater Christchurch Partnership project, led by Council)

·    Council leads the Greater Christchurch Partnership’s workplace and community travel planning activity. Recent activity has been with PWC and ongoing work with the CDHB to support new staff on commuting options. Broader activity with the CDHB is amongst the planned activity for the coming months.

·    A pilot of community travel planning in the Avonhead area is planned for late November, in support of the #3 line (formerly the ‘Purple Line’) increasing to a 10 minute frequency on weekdays. This is to pilot a new approach to travel planning, and to raise awareness and use of this improved service. The key part of the service is individualised advice and encouragement. Active travel options will also be covered in this.   

6.   Strategic Transport

6.1       Public Transport Futures Business Case

The Greater Christchurch PT Futures programme involves the development of three related business cases on behalf of Waka Kotahi, Environment Canterbury, Christchurch City Council, Waimakariri and Selwyn District Councils:

 

·    Foundations Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) and Rest of Network Indicative Business Case (IBC): these business cases have been combined into a short – medium term investment plan across all of the partner agencies, with individual Council’s being briefed on these in early November (Christchurch City Councillors were briefed on 11 November 2020). Next steps are for the PT Joint Committee to consider the business case in early December and recommend that all partners endorse the strategic approach and consider the recommended programme being accommodated within LTPs and the RLTP. It will be important that investment is co-ordinated between the partner agencies to ensure that infrastructure investment aligns with frequency improvements and vice versa

·    Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) IBC: identification of preferred route(s) and mode(s) for future MRT, the staging of delivery, and triggers for investment. The strategic case for investment is close to completion with problem statements and project objectives currently being finalised. Waka Kotahi is working through the procurement of the remainder of the IBC. The project team is working with the Christchurch Spatial Plan team to align the analysis of growth areas, route analysis and value uplift to catalyse development.

 

6.2       Greater Christchurch Mode Shift Plan and Travel Demand Management Business Case

The Greater Christchurch Mode Shift Plan (2020) outlines an integrated and intergenerational approach to planning for urban growth and seeks to ensure that development is managed in a manner that protects environments, improves transport links, creates liveable areas and sustainably manages population growth. The mode shift plan is the first step towards achieving our vision and will be integrated into the wider strategic planning of Greater Christchurch 2050. The document identifies three levers to deliver mode shift:

 

1.    Shaping urban form

2.    Making public and active modes more attractive

3.    Influencing transport demand and travel choices

 

A business case to outline investment required on the third lever has been completed and is with NZTA for approval. The TDM Business Case’s scope includes a proof-of-concept TDM programme, comprising of six focus areas. The focus areas all reflect wider projects that will already deliver some mode shift by way of levers 1 and/or 2, listed above. In each case, complementary behaviour change activity has been identified as necessary to deliver further mode shift. These additional interventions are costed within the scope of the TDM Business Case. The mix of focus areas also reflects the variety of transport challenges across Greater Christchurch, both for travel within Christchurch City and districts and to/from the city through main arterials. Each focus area includes a specific suite of behaviour change interventions targeting both origins and destinations such as schools, households and workplaces and corridors along core public transport routes.

 

In the short term, the packages of activity for each focus area serve to accelerate mode shift for their associated projects.  Longer term, ongoing learnings from each focus area’s delivery will inform the behaviour change component to be included in future infrastructure and service improvement projects: it is envisaged that behaviour change activities will be included in the scope of such projects, to ensure that this critical component is fully supported.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

<enter document name>

<enter location/hyperlink>

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

Approved By

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

   

 



[1] The Barrier Sites programme was transferred to the Consenting and Compliance Group in April 2020 reflecting the tools to drive action lie primarily with teams in that group. Engagement with building owners and staff across council is now facilitated by the Partnership Approvals team.      

[2] The VADE spectrum originates from a compliance framework that encourages behaviour change before resorting to divisive, costly enforcement.