Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Thursday 10 December 2020

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Catherine Chu

Councillor Melanie Coker

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor James Daniels

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Sam MacDonald

Councillor Phil Mauger

Councillor Jake McLellan

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

4 December 2020

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dawn Baxendale

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 6996

 

 

Jo Daly

Council Secretary

941 8581

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Karakia Timatanga................................................................................................... 5 

1.        Apologies / Ngā Whakapāha................................................................................ 5

2.        Declarations of Interest / Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga................................................. 5

3.        Public Participation / Te Huinga Tūmatanui.......................................................... 5

3.1       Public Forum / Te Huinga Whānui........................................................................................ 5

3.2       Deputations by Appointment / Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga.................................................... 5

4.        Presentation of Petitions / Ngā Pākikitanga.......................................................... 5

Council

5.        Council Minutes - 12 November 2020.................................................................... 7

6.        Council Minutes - 26 November 2020.................................................................. 23

7.        Council Minutes - 3 December 2020.................................................................... 27

Community Board Monthly Reports

8.        Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council........ 33

9.        Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council............................... 37

10.      Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council...... 45

11.      Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council.............. 49

12.      Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council November 2020.............................................................................................................. 53

13.      Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council for November 2020.... 57

14.      Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council........................ 63

Community Board Part A Reports

15.      Lyttelton Master Plan Project Funding............................................................... 67

16.      2J Riccarton Rd - Surrender of easement over reserve - Nurses Chapel................... 73

17.      North Hagley Park Proposed Changing Rooms..................................................... 79

Minutes Reports

18.      Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee Minutes - 23 November 2020..................................................................................................................... 99

Audit and Risk Management Committee

19.      Audit and Risk Management Committee Minutes - 2 December 2020..................... 103

20.      Council Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2020...................................... 111

21.      Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 Report......................................... 461

 

Regulatory Performance Committee

22.      Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A Report – Policy and Practices 2019/20............... 519

Staff Reports

23.      Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan non-comprehensive review............. 525

24.      City Mall - Change of Legal Status..................................................................... 571

25.      New Brighton Master Plan - regeneration delivery report.................................... 579

26.      Streamlining Councils Property Disposal Process............................................... 599

27.      Old Municipal Chambers - Final approval to proceed and lease............................. 611

28.      Greater Christchurch Public Transport Business Case......................................... 689

29.      Te Pae Pīkari / Youth Advisory Committee Terms of Reference............................. 747

30.      Citizens' War Memorial - gifting proposal from Church Property Trustees.............. 753

31.      Otakaro Regeneration Company Due Diligence Report Findings........................... 875

32.      Hearings Panel report to the Council on the Lease and Licence of 99 Cathedral Square to Christ Church Cathedral Reinstatement Ltd....................................................... 931

33.      Hearings Panel report to the Council on the Akaroa Treated Wastewater Options... 935

34.      Appointment of Council Recess Committee 2020/21.......................................... 1029

35.      Resolution to Exclude the Public.................................................................... 1032  

Karakia Whakamutunga

 

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

Karakia Timatanga

1.   Apologies / Ngā Whakapāha  

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest / Ngā Whakapuaki Aronga

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation / Te Huinga Tūmatanui

3.1   Public Forum / Te Huinga Whānui

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2   Deputations by Appointment / Ngā Huinga Whakaritenga

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

4.   Presentation of Petitions / Ngā Pākikitanga

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

5.     Council Minutes - 12 November 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1425823

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Jo Daly, Council Secretary, jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Dawn Baxendale, Chief Executive, dawn.baxendale@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

For the Council to confirm the minutes from the Council meeting held 12 November 2020.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council confirm the Minutes from the Council meeting held 12 November 2020.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Council - 12 November 2020

8

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

6.     Council Minutes - 26 November 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1495939

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Jo Daly, Council Secretary, jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Dawn Baxendale, Chief Executive, dawn.baxendale@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

For the Council to confirm the minutes from the Council meeting held 26 November 2020.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council confirm the Minutes from the Council meeting held 26 November 2020.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Council - 26 November 2020

24

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

7.     Council Minutes - 3 December 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1527931

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Jo Daly, Council Secretary, jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Dawn Baxendale, Chief Executive, dawn.baxendale@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

For the Council to confirm the minutes from the Council meeting held 3 December 2020.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council confirm the Minutes from the Council meeting held 3 December 2020.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Council - 3 December 2020

28

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

8.     Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1402508

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Tori Peden – Chairperson, Tori.Peden@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, GM Citizens & Community, Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for October and November 2020.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board held meetings on 19 October and 2 November 2020.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Stop Control Signs - the Board approved that a Stop Control be placed against Stevensons Steep at its intersection with St Davids Street, Lyttelton.

·   Stop Control Signs – the Board approved that a Stop Control be placed against Bruce Terrace at its intersection with Beach Road, Akaroa.

·   Young Elected Members Hui – the Board approved the attendance of Board members Tori Peden and Scott Winter at the 2020 Young Elected Members’ Hui being held at the Lower Hutt Events Centre, from 19 – 21 November 2020.

·   Proposed Plan Change 4: Short-term accommodation – the Board decided to make a written submission to the proposed change to the Christchurch District Plan relating to short-term accommodation in residential, papakāinga and rural zones, outlining the importance of enabling accommodation in rural parts of Banks Peninsula.

·   Paragliding Sites – the Board approved the grant of licences to Christchurch Paragliding Ltd, Parapro Ltd and Cloudbase Paragliding NZ Ltd for two reserves sites on Banks Peninsula – one on Governors Bay Road, Allandale and one at the Lyttelton Recreation Ground.

·   Little River Electric Vehicle Charger P60 Parking Restriction – the Board approved parking and traffic controls to allow for additional electric vehicle charging in Little River.

Funding Approvals

·   The Board allocated a grant of $2,875 from the ring-fenced Shape Your Place Toolkit funding in its 2020/21 Discretionary Response Fund to Little River Railway Station Trust towards architect’s design plans for the Railway Station Front Entrance Doors.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Lyttelton Master Plan Project Funding

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of this report will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 10 December 2020.

5.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum and Deputations                    

5.1       The Board received Public Forum presentations and Deputations on the following issues:

                   ·   Unsealed Portion of Pages Road, Lyttelton

                   ·   Boat Safety at Naval Point

              ·   Commercial paragliding for visitors to Banks Peninsula.

Reserve Management Committees

5.2       The Board received minutes from the following Reserve Management Committee meetings:

·    Lyttelton Reserve Management Committee – 10 August 2020

·    Okains Bay Reserve Management Committee – 6 October 2020

Briefings

5.3       The Board received briefings about the following projects/issues:

          ·   Former Godley House Site – Parks Unit Update

·    Banks Peninsula Roading Contract

·    Diamond Harbour Wharf Upgrade

·    Little River Playground Renewal

·    Lyttelton Pedestrian Facilities

6.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

6.1       The Board adopted its Community Board Plan at the 20 July meeting.  Regular reporting will be provided to the Board and a review will be undertaken and reported to the Board in February 2021.

7.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

7.1       Park Terrace Road Hazard – the Board requested that staff follow up on concerns that were raised around a fire hydrant on Park Terrace, Lyttelton which was considered a hazard because it was projecting above road level.  It had been reported through the SnapSendSolve system but it has not been repaired.

7.2       Akaroa Area Water Restrictions Board members requested that staff provide an update on current and historical (from last year) flow levels in Akaroa streams, and an update on education and communications plans leading into the summer season for potential water restrictions in the Akaroa area.

The Board also requested information on barriers to installing rainwater tanks, such as resource consent issues and costs, as well as enabling people to install tanks through the use of subsidy.

7.3       Diamond Harbour Water Supply – the Board requested an update from staff on the chlorination of water in Diamond Harbour, and whether this is related to the wider city Water Safety Plan, specifically when the chlorine will be removed, as the community was originally told that this would be a temporary measure, but had not received any updates.

7.4       Unsealed Portion of Pages Road – the Board requested a report from staff detailing the process to add the unsealed portion of Pages Road in Lyttelton to the Council’s Asset Register, the work and any costs involved to do so and any other information required to enable the Board to make a decision.

7.5       State Highway 75 Issues – after receiving a reply from Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency, to its concerns about SH75, the Board decided to invite a representative to discuss the issues in person.

7.6       Dog Exercise Area – the Board requested a briefing from staff on creating a dog exercise area at 150 Old Sumner Road, including engagement with the Lyttelton Port Company to discuss shared usage of the area.

7.7       Busy Days in Akaroa – the Board requested that additional cleaning and servicing be carried out on Akaroa public toilets on busy weekends as occurred previously for double cruise ship days, after it was reported that Labour Weekend was extremely busy with several community activities, a large number of visitors and boats in the town and parking at a premium.  It was noted that it was likely to be the same at Show Weekend. 

7.8       Cemeteries Briefing – the Board requested a briefing on options to convert the three Akaroa cemeteries to a memorial site after a request from the volunteer Akaroa Cemeteries Group which is interested in creating memorials in the three Akaroa cemeteries.

7.9       Boy Racer Activity – the Board requested a briefing from staff on the possible introduction of “no cruising” zones in local areas badly affected by boy racer activity after hearing that the issue of boy racers in Lyttelton was becoming very serious with many residents, especially children, being traumatised by the activity, particularly that being carried out at Naval Point.  Resident’s quality of life was being affected and there appeared to be no reduction in the activity.  Other areas such as Allandale were also being affected, with damage to parking areas.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Liz Carter - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

9.     Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1401457

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Kelly Barber, Chairperson,
kelly.barber@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board report for November 2020.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board held meetings on 2 November 2020 and 16 November 2020. Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Approval of Mobility Parking Spaces on Leaver Terrace

·   Approval of no stopping restrictions at the following locations:

·     Intersection of Parkwood Place/Queenspark Drive

·     Sinclair Street

·     New Brighton Road

·   Approval of bus Stop Relocation on Bower Avenue

·   Granting a Licence to Occupy at Pump Station to the University of Otago for vertical ground motion monitoring of the Christchurch coastline

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board included in this agenda for the Council’s consideration.

5.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Ascot Community Centre
Expression of Interest for the management of the building closes on the 30 October 2020.  A number of groups have made inquiries about the Centre.  Staff will advise the Community Board and the community when the selection process is completed.

5.2       Burwood Park Tennis Club
Staff are meeting with representatives from Burwood Park Tennis Club to look at ways that the Clubrooms can become more accessible to the local community of Dallington.

5.3       Disc Golf in Coastal-Burwood
Staff are meeting with Christchurch Disc Golf to discuss next steps for disc golf courses in other part of the ward including progressing options for a course at Rawhiti Domain.

5.4       Aranui Be Well Event
On Thursday 15 October 2020 the Aranui Community Trust held an ‘Aranui Be Well’ afternoon.  A selection of health providers set themselves up on the footpath in Hampshire Street to make the most of passing afterschool foot traffic.  It was estimated that over 300 people participated in the activities, received giveaways and completed the available health checks.  The checks included blood pressure, prostate advice, can breathe (asthma awareness), free face mask making and healthy eating awareness and samples.  The feedback was 100 percent positive and the Trust is likely to promote the event again.



















5.5       Aranui Community TrustAranui Community Trust (ACTIS)
ACTIS, in partnership with the Council, is in the final stages of being ready to activate the Aranui/Wainoni Community Centre.  The formal Partnership Agreement is ready to be signed once it has the final tick of approval from the ACTIS Board, who are fully in support of the next steps.  The next step, in the New Year, is to appoint an Activator for the Community Centre.  This role is an exciting one and enables many development opportunities for local people.  The Activator will be responsible for coordinating users, developing programmes and finding opportunities to use the space in many different ways- based on what residents have said they would like to have happening in this space.









 

5.6       The Bridge South Brighton Trust
Since 2016 The Bridge South Brighton Trust has been converting the old Baptist church on the corner of Bridge Street and Estuary Road into a multi-activity community centre called the Bridge Hub where locals can meet at the café, event hall, Wellness Centre or community office space.
With grants from Christchurch City Council, Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board, Department of Internal Affairs Lotteries Fund, Rata Foundation, Transpower and many others we’re pleased to announce that the last hurdle has been funded by the New Zealand Government’s “Shovel Ready Fund.” This will enable the Trust to complete the refurbishment through to opening mid-2021.
Find out more at their annual general meeting on 24 November 2020, 7 to 8.30pm at the South Brighton Community Centre, Beatty Street. Contact us at thebridgehub@gmail.com or visit the website thebridgehub.org.nz


 

5.7       https://pips.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bumps-and-bubs.jpgPregnancy – Infancy – Parenting - Support (PIPS)
PIPS held their annual general meeting on 21 October 2020. PIPS provides free, non-judgemental, client focussed, practical and emotional support during pregnancy and early parenting. Services provided include a ‘friendly ear’ drop in service. Information and referrals. Maternity, baby clothes and a range of equipment. Pregnancy tests, course and cloth nappies. ‘Bumps and Bubs’ takes place on Tuesdays during term time from 10.30 to 12pm. This peer support facilitated group is designed to bring people together, encourage positive parenting, break isolation and promote positive well-being and local connections whilst getting to know other parents. The group received a grant from the community board to support this initiative. For further information visit their website https://pips.co.nz/.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.8       On Ya Bike New Brighton
This event was held on Sunday 11 October 2020 in New Brighton as part of the Biketober events calendar.  The event was organised by New Brighton Residents’ Association with support on the day from a number of community groups and businesses.  The event received funding from the Community Board Discretionary Fund and several Board members were involved with guided bike tours.  Within New Brighton Mall there was a series of activities including Sports Suzie (pictured below) as well as pedalmania by the basketball court. 

https://scontent.fakl5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/121111587_666944447287794_3711287721751222725_o.jpg?_nc_cat=107&ccb=2&_nc_sid=b9115d&_nc_ohc=DhRM5Hv1LrMAX9VNLir&_nc_ht=scontent.fakl5-1.fna&oh=e95900ef1a79e544c1468b4f2fbdafae&oe=5FBC4F90


 

5.9       He Waka Tapu – Te Waka Opening
Community Board members were invited to attend the opening of a new whare – Te Waka at He Waka Tapu on Pages Road on Thursday 22 October 2020.  This new facility will provide the community with access to a team of caring and skilled nurses, whanau support workers, counsellors and job placement staff.














































5.10    Pukeko Centre – Sod Turning Event
On Monday 19 October 2020, Councillor Phil Mauger representing the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board attended an informal sod turning ceremony for the stage two development of the Pukeko Centre Sports Hall.  This is a significant milestone for the project and once completed the Sports Hall will cater for a wide variety of users including Parafed Canterbury programmes, indoor bowls, indoor sports training, as well as neighbouring Parkview School.






















6.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

6.1       Updates against outcomes of the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Plan will be presented to the Board every six months with the first update being presented to the Board at its March 2021 meeting.

7.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

7.1       Dual Road Access – Sutton Place

The Board received a memorandum from staff in relation to dual road access for Sutton Place, Dallington.

7.2       Christchurch Youth Council

The Board met with the Christchurch Youth Council to establish a way to engage with the Christchurch Youth Council going forward.

Staff have since received feedback from the Christchurch Youth Council and they are “dead keen on strengthening our relationship with the Board in the future.” The Board are exploring the possibility of a youth night being held at He Puna Taimoana, to improve youth access to the facility.

 

 

7.3       Local Government Official information Meetings Act (LGOIMA) – Elected Member Official Information Training and Protocol

The Board received guidance from staff on official information under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act (LGOIMA) and outlining the protocols for Elected Members when dealing with information requests.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Anna Langley - Community Development Advisor

Jacqui Miller - Community Recreation Advisor

Katie MacDonald - Community Support Officer

Heather Davies - Community Development Advisor

Sarah Harrison - Support Officer

Cindy Sheppard - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

10.   Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1318839

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

David Cartwright, Community Board Chairperson, david.cartwright@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board report for November 2020.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held a meeting on 16 November 2020.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   225-227 Memorial Avenue – Proposed Line Markings at Existing Bus Stop: The Board approved the installation of bus stop line markings to the existing bus stop beside 225 to 227 Memorial Avenue including the associated no stopping restrictions before and after the bus stop.

·   Heaton Street beside Elmwood Park – Proposed No Stopping Restriction at Existing Bus Stop:  The Board resolved to approve the installation of no stopping restrictions to form the entry and exit tapers to the bus stop on Heaton Street adjacent to Elmwood Park.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi- Harewood Community Board 2020-21 Discretionary Response Fund:  The Board approved the allocation of $2,000 from its 2020-21 Discretionary Response Fund towards Community Liaison and Events.

·   Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2020-21 Youth Development Fund Applications: The Board granted funding totalling $500 from its 2020-21 Youth Development Fund to two student towards participating in the Spirit of Adventure sailing trip in Auckland.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no Part A reports being presented.


 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Jeffreys Reserve Suction Tank

The detail design phase of the project is 90 percent complete, but further work is currently ‘on hold’ while a similar project, the new Ben Rarere Pump Station, is at the tender stage.  The tender for this project closes on 27 November 2020.

Improvements from the new Ben Rarere Pump Station design will then be adopted into the Jeffreys Pump Station design.

 

It is planned that the Jeffreys Reserve design will restart in early December 2020 with the project likely to go out for tender in late January/February 2021.

 

                      Two of the four wells have been connected to the network and this will meet the current              demand.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Kapuatohe Dwelling and Cottage Re-opening

On Monday 1 November 2020 the Board hosted the re-opening of the historic Kapuatohe Dwelling and Cottage in Belfast.

Both buildings were open for local residents to look through and hear about the restoration work that had been carried out before they are privately tenanted.  The adjacent museum was also open.

Amongst the guests were a number of former Dwelling residents including one lady who resided there in 1931 and a gentleman who lived there in 1949. 

A light afternoon tea of scones and cucumber sandwiches was served using period tea sets.

 

6.2       Celebrate Bishopdale 2020

Weather permitting, the Board hosted Celebrate Bishopdale 2020 event will be held on Saturday 22 November 2020, between 11am and 2pm at Bishopdale Park.

In addition to the on-stage entertainment, the event has a number of stalls and activities which make it a great family day out.

 

6.3       Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Service Awards 2020

The Board is hosting its bi-annual Community Service Award ceremony at the Mona Vale Homestead on Thursday 25 November 2020 where six recipients will be presented awards in recognition of their services to the community.

 

6.4       Bishopdale Village Green

The community project group co-ordinating and working on the revitalisation of the Bishopdale Mall area have completed work on the Bishopdale Village Green …for now. The group is made up of a representative from the Bishopdale Centre Association, Bishopdale Community Trust, Council's local Community Development Advisor and two members of the Enliven Bishopdale Group.

The last of the school panels went up before labour weekend, the checkerboard and seating is all in and the initial plantings in the Village Green have been done.

The next step in working towards revitalising the area is refreshing the seats in the mall itself and this is scheduled for November, subject to weather and workloads of volunteers.

The group are looking to have a celebration to acknowledge all of the great work, support and sponsorship that has gone into the project to date. They are currently looking at a date around early December, everyone will be invited to attend.

 

The before and after pictures of the Village Green space here shows just what has been done at a glance.  And the space is being well used by the community daily.

 

In the New Year the group will be looking at their next project in the area so keep watching this space!

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.5      

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       A status update on the progress against the outcomes for the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Plan will be reported back to the Board at its 15 February 2021 meeting.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Bronwyn Frost - Support Officer

Margaret Henderson - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Maryanne Lomax - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

11.   Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1361223

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Mike Mora Chair Waipuna/Halswell Hornby Riccarton Community Board

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receives the Community Board report for November 2020.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held meetings on 3 and 17 November 2020.  Decisions made under delegation were:

3 November 2020

·   Re-electing Mike Mora as the Board Chairperson.

·   Electing Helen Broughton as Deputy Chairperson

·   Approving a grant of $2,000 from its 2020-21 Discretionary Response Fund to Sydenham Junior Cricket Club towards the Administration and Coaching Project.

Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Racecourse Road commencing at its intersection with Epsom Road and extending to the north west for f 21 metres. 

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north west side of Bibiana Street commencing at its intersection with Kinsella Crescent and extending to the north east for 25 metres. 

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Rawnsley Terrace commencing at its intersection with Porter Street (north) and extending to the north west for 8 metres.

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Rawnsley Terrace commencing at a point 29 metres north west of its intersection with Porter Street (north) and extending to the south west for 28 metres.

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north west side of Rawnsley Terrace commencing at a point 62 metres west of its intersection with Porter Street (north) and extending to the south west for 9 metres. 

 

 

17   November 2020

·   Approving a grant of $1,335 from its 2020-21 Discretionary Response Fund to Halswell Community Church towards the Community Family Fun Day event.

·   Revocation of two redundant bus stops along Blenheim Road (20 and 250), between Wharenui Road and Wainui Street including the removal of two Ooh Media shelters.

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Kennedys Bush Road and west side of Rock Hill Road, commencing at the west approach to the Kennedys Bush Road / Rock Hill road roundabout, from a point 10 metres west of the traffic island nose, extending east then north for a 45 metres;

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Kennedys Bush Road, commencing from a point 18 metres west of the eastern boundary of Number 348 Kennedys Bush Road, extending west for 19 metres;

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Kennedys Bush Road, commencing from a point 44 metres west of the eastern boundary of Number 348 Kennedys Bush Road, extending west for a 21 metres; and

·   Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Kennedys Bush Road and east side of Rock Hill Road, from a point 21 metres west of the eastern boundary of Number 347 Kennedys Bush Road, extending west then north for 2 metres.

·   Approving that a Stop control be placed against Maddisons Road on its approach to the intersection with Barters Road.

·   Approving that a Stop control be placed against Branston Street on its approach to the intersection with Amyes Road.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board included in this agenda for Council consideration.

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of Te Hāpua Summer Pool Opening Hours was considered by the Council at its meeting on 12 November 2020.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

       Nothing to report.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Riccarton Community Day

Riccarton Community Day was held on Saturday 24th October. This year's event brought an exciting new change, it was decided that the event would be held across four different locations all within walking distance. Harrington Park, Paeroa Reserve, Best Start Riccarton and Riccarton Community Church. Participants were able to walk around the different locations and experience a wide range of activities. Some of the more popular ones were cupcake decorating, face painting, free sausage sizzle, skate school, cultural food and some amazing performances.

 

6.2       Community Service and Youth Service Awards 2020 Function

The Board’s Community Service and Youth Service Awards for 2020 were successfully hosted on Friday 30 October 2020 at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre. Board members presented four Youth Service Awards and eleven Community Service Awards as a way of recognising the valued service occurring in the community.

Glenda Martin from Volunteering Canterbury, was the guest speaker and gave an inspiring speech on the positive impact volunteers have in the community.

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7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board presented its Community Board plan priorities to the Council at a briefing on 17 November 2020.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

Nothing to report.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Matthew Pratt - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

12.   Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council November 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1412945

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Alexandra Davids, Chairperson
Alexandra.davids@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, Citizens and Community
mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for November 2020.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held a meeting on 2 November.  At this meeting Sunita Gautam, elected by the Central Ward, was sworn in and welcomed to the Board.

Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Approval of a Covered Indoor Training Facility within the Sydenham Park.

·   Use of Council Land for Hang Gliding and Paragliding Activities.

·   Approved Discretionary Response Fund contribution grants to:

·      Mt Pleasant Memorial Community Centre towards the Earthquake Memorial Exhibition.

·      Sumner Bays Union Trust towards the food forest coordinator role.

·      Sydenham Junior Cricket Club towards administration and coaching.

·      Ōpāwa Baptist Church towards the ‘No Show’ Show Community Event.

·   Approved Youth Development Fund contribution grants for youth:

·      To attend the Torpedo 7 Get2Go National Final in the Great Barrier Island.

·   Received the Electoral Officers report on the Central Ward By-election.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       2J Riccarton Road – Nurses’ Chapel Surrender of Easement over Reserve.

4.2       North Hagley Park Proposed Changing Rooms

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Te Pou Toetoe: Linwood Pool

5.1       Te Pou Toetoe: Linwood Pool continues to grow into its site.

5.2       The Board received feedback to the recent consultation on what programmes and use of the facility the community would like to see at the complex on Monday 16 November 2020.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum

6.1       The Board had the following Public Forum presentations at its 2 November meeting:

6.1.1   Mecca Place Tree Shading - Josh Hosking, a local resident, spoke on behalf of residents of Mecca Place regarding the shadowing of houses by a stand of Pine Trees on the boundary of Cuthberts Green Reserve. Mr Hosking has been in contact with Council staff who have explained the challenges of thinning the trees or having them removed.

·     The Board will attend a site visit shortly and have asked staff to provide a shade diagram.

6.1.2   Notification of Council Consultations - Elizabeth Graham, a local resident, discussed the short notification time that Council consultations have and the digital exclusiveness of these consultations.

·     The Board asked for staff advice on non-digital ways the Council, through the library and customer services, could provide information for the community on upcoming and current local area and city wide Council consultations.

Briefings

6.2       The Board received briefings on 4 and 16 November about the following projects/issues:

·      Te Ara Ihutai Coastal Pathway Group Update.

·      Te Ara Ihutai Coastal Pathway – Update on the project and pre-consultation.

·      Cave Road Signal Mast Lights

·      Friends of Laura Kent Reserve.

·      Ferry Road Mast Plan – WL6 Pocket Park and Pedestrian Bridge.

·      Christ Church Cathedral Resource Consent Application.

·      Linwood Avenue School –Site Visit to observe the usage of the parking slipway.

·      Major Cycleway Route   Rapanui Shagrock Section 3.

·      We are Richmond Community.

·      Te Pou Toetoe Community Engagement Update.

·      Community Board 2021/22 Meetings Schedule.

Submission/Comment

6.3       The Board provided comment on the Christ Church Cathedral Resource Consent Application.  The Board is named as a party to be consulted under Clause 17(2) of the Christ Church Cathedral Reinstatement Order.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board adopted its Community Board Plan at the 20 July 2020 meeting.  Regular reporting will be provided to the Board and a review will be undertaken and reported to the Board in early 2021.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Notification of Council Consultations – The Board wish to advocate to the Council on the need to meet the challenges for community members who do not have regular internet access to fully participate in Council’s consultations.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Liz Beaven - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

13.   Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council for November 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1413110

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Emma Norrish – Chair of the Papanui-Innes Community Board
Emma.Norrish@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson - General Manager, Citizens and Community
Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for November 2020. 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

3.1       The Papanui-Innes Community Board held meetings on 4 and 20 November. Decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board noted the information provided in the Innes Road Zebra Crossing improvements.

·   The Board requested information from staff regarding the processes, restrictions and protocols for resource consents under the Resource Management Act (RMA).  

·   The Board convened a meeting of its Submissions Committee to consider submitting on the Christchurch City Council’s Draft Community Housing Strategy and the District Plan: Change 6 – Home Base variation.

·   The following grants were approved from the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board’s 2019‑2020 Discretionary Response Fund towards transport costs for students for civic education purposes:

·     $7,000 towards the cost of the Board Project Youth Recreation.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

4.1       There were no Part A recommendations from the Board to the Council.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Community Facilities   

5.1       St Albans Community Centre

·   The rebuild is underway and on target. Completion is targeted for late February with the official opening in March 2021. 

Infrastructure Projects underway

5.2       Transport Projects in St Albans, Edgeware and Mairehau

·   The current projects in these areas are nearly all completed. Regular monthly briefings are provided to the Board to mark progress.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Participation in and Contribution to Decision Making

Report back on other Activities contributing to Community Board Plan      

6.1.1   Northcote Stakeholders Update: The Northcote stakeholders are made up of representatives from St Silas Church, Te Ora Hou - Neighbourhood Links, C.C.C. Community Development, Kainga Ora, Northcote School, Potters Way Church, C.C.C. Papanui-Redwood Libraries), Police, Northgate Community Services Trust, Papanui Baptist Freedom Trust and the Salvation Army

Neighbourhood Links Building 

·     Further activation by Northcote Stakeholder Community Groups includes:

Tuesdays: Potters Way Church

·     Are running a Sharing Pantry at the Neighbourhood Links office next to Redwood Library every Tuesday from 10am to 4pm. There are pop-up sausage sizzles and always time for a cuppa and a chat.

·     The Potters Pantry is extremely popular. The Potters Kitchen has given out $150,000 worth of food over past year (initially at Manse Place and more recently at Neighbourhood Links).

Wednesdays: Papanui Baptist Freedom Trust

·     As from 21 October the Papanui Baptist Freedom Trust are commencing (free) weekly programmes on Wednesdays at the Neighbourhood Links Centre. There will be a variety of activities: jigsaw puzzles, card and board games, basic tech help, arts and crafts, sewing repairs, bike maintenance and gardening tips on a revolving basis. There will also be ongoing tea, coffee and snacks and anyone is welcome to pop in.

Northcote School

·     The Breakfast Club is now operating five days per week and in Term 3 a total of 1,667 student breakfasts were enjoyed by the school tamariki. The Breakfast Club is organised and supported by staff and volunteers from local community organisations.

The Neighbourhood Links/Toho Paddington Reserve event ‘Colour our Community’ 

This event was held on Friday 16 October at Paddington Reserve from 3.30pm and attended by approximately 130 tamariki and their whānau. There was a sausage sizzle, Canterbury Cricket held a jump and catch class, and when the sausages were all eaten they then held the colour run. The children thoroughly enjoyed the event and the feedback from parents is they would love another one. It was advertised it as a whānau event and there was a large turn-out of parents and even some grandparents.

Te Ora Hou have been holding the Hapori Takaro initiative at Paddington Reserve every Friday from 3:30pm which features games and activities for the children.

6.1.2   Recreation Funding

Sport Canterbury is managing Tū Manawa Active Aotearoa fund on behalf of Sport NZ in our region.

Tū Manawa Active Aotearoa provides funding for programmes or projects delivering play, active recreation and sport experiences for tamariki and rangatahi out of school hours.  This fund targets those people who are not active and/or living with a disability in higher deprivation communities and girls and young women.  For more information check out https://www.sportcanterbury.org.nz/T-Manawa-1

The Kiwisport Fund has ceased.  A partnership application has been successful between some regional sport associations and the Northwest Cluster.  The regional sport associations and the Northwest Cluster organisations will co-design the sport and recreational activities to be delivered.

6.1.3   Neighbourhood Trust Light Party

Papanui-Innes community staff attended another successful Light Party organised by the Neighbourhood Trust and held at the St Albans Baptist Church.

The theme this year was Noahs Ark and children dressed in an array of colourful costumes. Approximately 800 members of the community attended. The activities that were provided included food stalls, face painting, a black light disco, bands, inflatable playground, pets and animals, a sausage sizzle and a café for the adults.

6.1.4   Shirley Community Trust Light Party

Papanui-Innes community staff attended the Shirley Community Trust Light Party which was held at the Emmett Street Community Church. The event was well attended by the local community and the theme of “Under the Sea/Beach” provided the children with the opportunity to dress up.

There were 12 activities for the young ones to be involved in with prizes, entertainment and a sausage sizzle. The event was well attended and children had the opportunity to be photographed in their costume and a copy of the image given to them as a reminder of the day.

 

6.1.5   Whakaoho

Staff attended the Whakaoho event at Papanui Youth Development Trust on Sunday 1 November 2020. The event was a great success with youth dancers, youth performers and a tight rock band providing entertainment for the audience. Food trucks, rope climbing, bouncy castles, sandstone carving and face painting were also available.

The range of youth performers and local organisations volunteering at the event highlighted the depth and breadth of the collaborative youth sector in Papanui.

6.1.6   Shirley Shine

Unfortunately Shirley Shine had to be cancelled due to the torrential rain.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

Activity

Detail

Timeline

Strategic Alignment

Project Title

As much detail as required or entered previously. Length will change depending on current status of the activity

Ongoing, Completed, or Date

Board Priority

Community Outcome

Interagency Meetings

Both wards held a joint meeting on 17 November 2020. 

Ongoing

Ensure vulnerable communities are supported.

10 Shirley Road activation

The Board have requested a landscape plan to incorporate ideas from consultation.

Ongoing

Improve and support community facilities and amenity in the Papanui-Innes Wards.

St Albans Community Centre rebuild

The build is well underway.  Time Capsule contents were collected Friday 20th from the local school and kindy.

Ongoing

Improve and support community facilities and amenity in the Papanui-Innes Wards.

 

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       nil

 

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Elizabeth Hovell - Community Board Advisor

Lyssa Aves - Governance Support Officer

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

14.   Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1412746

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Karolin Potter, Chairperson, karolin.potter@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Customer and Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for October and November 2020.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held meetings on 20 October and 3 November 2020.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Tree Removals – The Board approved the removal and replacement of a healthy and structurally sound tree located within Palatine Reserve and on the riverbank outside and opposite Palatine Reserve, Huntsbury for a water main renewal project.

·   Submissions – The Board decided to provide submissions on the Council’s Proposed Plan Change 4: Short-Term Accommodation and the Draft Community Housing Strategy.

·   Easements Over Utility Reserves – The Board approved the granting of a right to drain sewage, right to convey water, telecommunications, electricity and right to drain water easements over utility reserves in 55R Worsleys Road.

·   Discretionary Response Fund – The Board approved the following grants from its 2020-21 Discretionary Response Fund:

·    $2,000 to Junior Cricket Club towards the Administration and Coaching Project.

·    $3,500 to the Traffic Management Plan for the Hoon Hay Fiesta and the Pacific Series 2020.

·   Youth Achievement and Development Fund – The Board approved the following grants from its 2020-21 Youth Achievement and Development Fund:

·    $500 to Blake Mullaly Bamford towards participation in the Mind, Body and Soul 21 day course.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board included in this agenda for Council consideration.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Dyers Pass Road Safety Improvements Project       

5.1       The Board received a briefing on the Dyers Pass Road Safety Improvements Project, which includes installing three kilometres of guardrails to reduce the severity of crashes. The work is expected to be completed in June 2021.

Heathcote Stormwater Management Plan

5.2       The Board received a briefing and provided feedback on the Council’s draft Heathcote Stormwater Management Plan.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum Presentations – The Board received public forum presentations on the following issues:         

6.1       Youth Achievement and Development Fund (YADF) – Two YADF recipients updated the Board on the recent event they participated in.

6.2       Pedestrian Safety – A resident raised concerns with pedestrian safety in the area around Worsleys Road. The Board requested staff advice on the matter.

6.3       New Reserve – A resident discussed opportunities to improve a new reserve in the Cashmere Estate subdivision. The Board requested staff advice on the matter.

6.4       Worsleys / Hoon Hay / Cashmere Roads Intersection – The Cracroft Residents’ Association spoke about the importance of the Worsleys / Hoon Hay / Cashmere Roads Intersection Improvements Project to the local community. The Board requested staff advice on the construction start date.

6.5       Local Organisations – A number of local organisations, including SHARP Trust, th’Orchard, Suburbs Rugby Football Club, Spreydon Youth Community Trust and Southern Districts Cricket Club, provided updates on their recent and upcoming activities.

Correspondence – The Board received the following correspondence:

6.6       Opawa Public Library – The Library thanked the Board for supporting its recent rebuild.

6.7       Brougham Street and Collins / Simeon Streets Intersection – Addington School copied the Board into a letter to Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency regarding the safety of the Brougham Street and Collins / Simeon Streets Intersection. In addition to longstanding safety issues, the barrier around the pedestrian island was recently hit by a vehicle while children were at the island.

Additional Community Issues

6.8       Age-Friendly Spreydon-Cashmere – The Board received a briefing from the Age-Friendly Spreydon-Cashmere Committee, and provided feedback on new priorities to optimise opportunities for health, participation and security to enhance quality of life as people age.

6.9       Networking Breakfast with School Principals – The Board recently hosted its first networking breakfast with Principals in the Board area. This was a valuable opportunity for Principals to network with each other and the Board, share information and advocate for key local issues. The Board plans to continue to host breakfasts quarterly.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       At its 18 August meeting, the Board adopted its Community Board Plan 2020-22. A six-monthly report will be provided in February 2021.

7.2       The Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson presented the Board Plan to Councillors at Long Term Plan briefings on 15 September and 17 November 2020.

7.3       The presentations included an overview of why the outcomes sought in the Board Plan are important to the community and identification of where significant outcomes are not reflected in proposed levels of service.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Hoon Hay Fiesta – The Hoon Hay Fiesta, held on 12 November 2020, was a great success with several hundred people attending. The event featured community stalls, stage performances from local schools and special guests, a bouncy castle, face painting and have-a-go activities. Over the years, staff have supported the community to grow capacity and take more ownership so that the community now runs the event itself.

IMG_0617   IMG_0623

 

8.2       Beckenham Neighbourhood Association – The Board’s ‘Off the Ground’ Fund supported the Beckenham Neighbourhood Association to host a community consultation and barbeque at Beckenham School. Several hundred comments and suggestions were collected from children and adults towards planning the Better Beckenham Innovating Streets traffic project.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Amy Hart - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

Report from Banks Peninsula Community Board  – 2 November 2020

 

15.   Lyttelton Master Plan Project Funding

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1428057

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Kristine Bouw, Project Manager, kristine.bouw@ccc.govt.nz
Janine Sowerby, Senior Planner, janine.sowerby@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Brendan Anstiss, GM Strategy & Transformation, Brendan.anstiss@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Banks Peninsula Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original officer recommendation accepted without change

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve the transfer of funds within the Lyttelton Master Plan Programme from the Lyttelton Pedestrian Linkages project (Action M3) to support the priority upgrade of the Lyttelton Information Centre toilets.  

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

Lyttelton Master Plan Project Funding

68

 

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

Lyttelton Master Plan Project Funding

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1121097

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Kristine Bouw, Project Manager
Janine Sowerby, Senior Planner

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Brendan Anstiss, GM Strategy & Transformation

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is seek the approval of the Board to reallocate funds within the Lyttelton Master Plan Programme from the Lyttelton Pedestrian Linkages project (Action M3) to support the priority upgrade of the Lyttelton Information Centre toilets, and to make a recommendation to Council. 

1.2       This report has been written in light of requests from the community, and is identified in the  Community Board Plan as a priority to improve facilities, and specifically toilets, within the Lyttelton town centre.

1.3       The decision in this report is of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined by the level of impact on people affected by the recommended decision.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board recommends to Council that it:

1.         Approve the transfer of funds within the Lyttelton Master Plan Programme from the Lyttelton Pedestrian Linkages project (Action M3) to support the priority upgrade of the Lyttelton Information Centre toilets.  

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       The Lyttelton Master Plan was adopted by Council on 21 June 2012. It is one of the nine master plans prepared by the Council in conjunction with the local communities as a part of the Suburban Centres Programme. Only two of the remaining Lyttelton Master Plan actions are funded for delivery by the Council: the reinstatement of London Street paving (Action M4) and Lyttelton Pedestrian Linkages (Action M3) projects. The London Street paving project relates to a small section of London Street in front of the future site of the Lyttelton Museum and is scheduled to be delivered later this year.

3.2       The Lyttelton Pedestrian Linkages project was developed in order to enable public use of existing private right of ways (ROWs) in the block bounded by Norwich Quay and Oxford, London and Canterbury Streets and to provide new pedestrian laneways and associated active frontage where possible.

3.3       Following preliminary staff investigations, Action M3 is not considered a viable project due to potential legal complications and cost associated with enabling public use of the existing, private ROWs and the cost of provision of new public ROWs, relative to the funding budgeted.

3.4       Lyttelton Master Plan Programme funding was provided in the 2018- 2028 LTP as follows, with $650,000 of the total $737,000 funding specific to Action M3 (Lyttelton Pedestrian Linkages):

FY18/19

FY19/20

FY20/21

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

FY24/25

FY25/26

FY26/27

FY27/28

51

111

148

427

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.5       Staff are recommending the reallocation of this funding to support public toilet upgrades in Lyttelton, recognising current issues with the condition of public toilets and future needs associated with the anticipated return of cruise ship passengers to Lyttelton.  Early project scoping indicates that the budget would be able to support upgrades to the toilets at the Lyttelton Information Centre on Oxford Street.  Staff have discussed the proposed budget reallocation with the Parks Asset Management Team, which is supportive of this project.

3.6       The reallocation of these funds is aligned with the Banks Peninsula Community Board Plan 2020-22 priorities for funding in the 2021-31 LTP: bringing public toilets up to an acceptable standard to cater for increasing visitors and mitigate environmental consequences. The Board Plan also recognises as a priority, through the development of a Destination Management Plan, the need for improved infrastructure to support local residents and additional cruise ship visitors with the new cruise ship terminal in Lyttelton.

3.7       Action C4: New public amenities in the town centre of the Lyttelton Master Plan would further support this amendment, as it recognises that public toilets are an essential convenience that enhance amenity in the town centre. Whilst it is concerned more with the provision of a second, directly accessible public toilet at the western end of London St (achieved with the location of one on Albion Square), it also notes that the Council has to be responsive to a range of current issues to do with public toilet provision.  An upgrade of the existing public toilets at the Lyttelton Information Centre in anticipation of returning cruise ship passengers is consistent with this.

3.8       The District Plan includes a ‘Lyttelton Master Plan Overlay’ showing the indicative location of

future pedestrian laneways. This overlay supports Action M3 and will remain in the District Plan.  This enables Action M3 to remain a live project, potentially deliverable by the private sector. The funding reallocation does not preclude the Council considering decisions to achieve laneways in the future.

3.9       The Lyttelton Information Centre has also specifically identified the need for upgrades to the existing toilets due to ongoing operational issues and support for the return of cruise ships to Lyttelton.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       Maintain the status quo – do nothing to improve toilet facilities in Lyttelton.

4.2       The advantages of this option include: The funding remains available for alternative Lyttelton Master Plan-related use.

4.3          The disadvantages of this option include: The provision of sufficient toilet facilities in Lyttelton town centre would not be achieved, although the funding is available to be reallocated.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

5.1       No specific community consultation on this matter has taken place. However, the provision of adequate public toilets was consistently supported in submissions made during the three phases of community engagement and consultation as the Lyttelton Master Plan was developed in 2011.  The provision of adequate toilet facilities is also identified as a priority in the Community Board Plan, which was subject to community consultation earlier this year.

5.2       The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.2.1   Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       The recommendation of the report is consistent with the following Community Outcomes:

6.1.1   Resilient communities: Safe and healthy communities;

6.1.2   Liveable city: Sustainable suburban and rural centres;

6.1.3   Healthy environment: Healthy water bodies; and

6.1.4   Prosperous economy: Great place for people, business and investment; and Modern and robust city infrastructure and community facilities.

6.2       The recommendation will also help achieve the Council’s Strategic Priority Accelerating the momentum the city needs and is consistent with the Christchurch Visitor and Infrastructure Strategies.

6.3       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.3.1   Activity: Community Development and Facilities

·     Level of Service: 4.1.27.2 Community development projects are provided, supported and promoted. - Community Board plans are developed and implemented.

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.4       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies, specifically the Lyttelton Master Plan; Objective 3.3.12 of the Christchurch District Plan concerning the provision of infrastructure of social, economic, environmental and cultural benefit and the Public Toilets Policy.

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.5       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.6       There are no climate change impact considerations associated with this decision.

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.7       There are no accessibility considerations associated with this decision. The existing toilet facilities are accessible and the proposed toilet facilities will look to improve accessibility to the toilet facilities at the Lyttelton Information Centre.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement –$650,000 budgeted in the 2018-28 LTP for Action M3

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – The ongoing costs for maintenance of the Lyttelton Information Centre facilities are anticipated to be cost neutral

7.3       Funding Source – proposed to be through the reallocation of funding within the Lyttelton Master Plan Programme.

Other / He mea anō

7.4       Not required

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       The Community Board has a delegation to approve site selection and to approve the final design of new local community facilities.  This includes public toilets.  This delegation is subject to the limit that any financial decisions are subject to the maximum of what is approved in the current LTP/Annual Plan and associated cost centre budgets.

8.2       The Community Board is not in a position to exercise this delegation unless there is an associated cost centre budget.

8.3       There are some staff delegations to authorise the transferring of budgets between activities but given that there is no associated cost centre budget that has been approved by Council, it requires Council to reallocate the funds.

Other Legal Implications / Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.4       This report been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       The decisions in this report are not expected to incur a significant risk.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no appendices to this report.

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Lyttelton Master Plan

https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/plans/suburban-centres-master-plans/lyttelton-mater-plan/

Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Plan 2020-22

https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/how-the-council-works/elected-members/community-boards/banks-peninsula/

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Kristine Bouw - Project Manager

Janine Sowerby - Senior Planner

Approved By

Darren Moses - Manager Capital Delivery Community

Carolyn Ingles - Head of Urban Regeneration, Design and Heritage

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 2 November 2020

 

16.   2J Riccarton Rd - Surrender of easement over reserve - Nurses Chapel

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1381016

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Sarah Stuart, Property Consultant, sarah.stuart@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community, Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original staff recommendation adopted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approves the surrender of the easement right attached to the Nurses’ Chapel Reserve land as identified in the ‘Schedule of Existing Easements to be Surrendered’ on LT plan 547692.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

2J Riccarton Rd - Surrender of easement over reserve - Nurses Chapel

74

 

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

2J Riccarton Rd - Surrender of easement over reserve - Nurses Chapel 

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1213517

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Sarah Stuart, Property Consultant, sarah.stuart@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to ask the Community Board to recommend to the Council that it surrender the easement right described in the ‘Schedule of Existing Easements to be Surrendered’ on LT plan 547692, hereon referred to as “the easement”. 

1.2       This report has been written to facilitate the Canterbury District Health Board’s (CDHB) creation of two Bus Super Stops in Tuam Street that requires Council to surrender its easement rights over CDHB land.  The easement rights are attached to the Nurses Chapel Reserve land owned by Council.

1.3       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined by considering the impact of the surrender of the existing easement on local residents, users of the reserve and the reserve itself.  The attachment of the easement rights to the Reserve land is a legacy issue of no physical/practical relevance so the impact of the easement surrender is imperceptible.

1.4       This is a procedural matter for which there are no staff delegations due to the reserve status of the land.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Recommend the Council approve the surrender of the easement right attached to the Nurses Chapel Reserve land as identified in the ‘Schedule of Existing Easements to be Surrendered’ on LT plan 547692.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       There is no staff delegation to surrender an easement over reserve land.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       The alternative option is to retain the easement. This would hinder the CDHB’s ability to create the Bus Super Stops in Tuam St and subsequently vest them in Council as legal road.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

5.1       The CDHB wants to create two Bus Super Stops in Tuam St that will later be vested in Council as legal road.  The stops are circled yellow below.

                                  

5.2       The plans below show the approximate location of the easement to be surrendered in order for the land to form part of the Bus Super Stop.

5.3       Three parcels of land have rights over the easement area.  Two of these parcels are owned by CDHB (Titles 657425 and 914465).  The other parcel (657424) is owned by Council as historic reserve, and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

5.4       The Council reserve land houses the historic Nurses Chapel.  It has beneficial rights over the easement area which is physically removed from the reserve and has no practical relevance to it.  The easement remains on the title as a legacy issue on subdivision from the main CDHB site.  The reserve (chapel) and its location in relation to the easement are below: 

5.5       The Easement Instrument 6987595.1 provides a right of way on foot, and the rights to convey water and other liquids, drain water, convey electricity, telecommunications, computer media, and gas.  These rights are associated with the hospital tunnel that runs under Tuam St and Oxford Tce (diagram below), for which CCC has granted CDHB a Licence to Use Subsoil.

5.6       The survey Plan LT 547692 that defines the Super Stops cannot be actioned until the easement relating to the hospital tunnel is surrendered, excerpt below.  (When the bus stops become legal road there will be no need for the ‘tunnel’ easement over the subject area because it is not possible to have an easement on legal road.)

5.7       The view of the CDHB is that the easement must be surrendered before the LT plan can be used to create the Bus Super Stops.  The views of the wider community are not known because the matter has not been notified.

5.8       The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.8.1   Central Ward – Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       Surrender of the easement will enable the creation of Bus Super Stops supporting the community outcome of a well-connected and accessible city promoting public transport.

6.2       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.2.1   Activity: Public Transport Infrastructure

·     Level of Service: 10.4.4 Improve user satisfaction of public transport facilities. - >=7.4

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.3       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.4       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.5       Surrender of the easement will enable the creation of Bus Super Stops.  The flow on effect of an efficient public transport system is a reduction in carbon emissions from private cars.

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.6       There are no accessibility impacts.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement - Included as part of the Parks Unit Planning operational budget (costs to be recovered from CDHB).

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – None.

7.3       Funding Source - Parks Unit Planning operational budget (costs to be recovered from CDHB)

Other / He mea anō

7.4       Not applicable.

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       Reserves Act 1977

8.2       Local Government Act 1974

Other Legal Implications / Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.3       There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.4       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       There would be minor reputational risk to the Council if the recommendation in this report is not adopted.  The existing easement serves no useful process and retaining the redundant easement would impede the creation of the Bus Super Stops which will enhance the city’s public transport system. The overall risk rating is assessed as medium, based on the likelihood of a minor impact.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

 Not applicable.

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Sarah Stuart - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Russel Wedge - Team Leader Parks Policy & Advisory

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 30 November 2020

 

17.   North Hagley Park Proposed Changing Rooms

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1500764

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Derek Roozen, Senior Network Planner Parks, Derek.Roozen@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community, Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendations to Council

 

 (Original staff recommendations accepted without change).

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Agrees that officers commence public consultation on:

a.         The proposed changing rooms building illustrated in Attachment A to this report and located in North Hagley Park, as shown on the plan in Attachment B to this report; and

b.         A variation to the existing ground lease to the North Hagley Community, Sports & Recreation Trust Board in accordance with clause 6.1 of the lease.

2.         Accepts the advice that the public consultation meets the requirements of section 78 of the Local Government Act 2002 and follows a process similar to, although not dictated by, that specified in section 54 of the Reserves Act 1977.

3.         Authorises the Property Consultancy Manager, should the proposed building and lease variation proceed to be consented to by both the Council and the Minister of Conservation, to implement the variation to the deed of lease.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

North Hagley Park Proposed Changing Rooms

80

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A – Proposed building plans

86

b

Attachment B – Building location plan

90

c

Attachment C – Letters of support

91

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

North Hagley Park Proposed Changing Rooms

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/959204

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Derek Roozen, Senior Network Planner Parks  Derek.Roozen@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens & Community  Mary.Richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to request the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to recommend to the Christchurch City Council to approve a proposed new changing rooms building to be built in the ground area leased to the North Hagley Community, Sports & Recreation Trust Board (“the Trust”) in North Hagley Park by way of a variation to this lease, and for a public consultation process to commence on this.  This report has been written to initiate the process of response to the application submitted by the Trust.

1.2       The decisions in this report are of low to medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined by consideration of (1) the importance of Hagley Park to the city in terms of its heritage landscape value and access by the public for recreation, (2) the proposed addition of a new building on the Park, and (3) the potential to address the current lack of changing room facilities in North Hagley Park.

1.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects this assessment.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommends the Christchurch City Council:

1.         Agrees that officers commence public consultation on:

a.         The proposed changing rooms building illustrated in Attachment A to this report and located in North Hagley Park, as shown on the plan in Attachment B to this report; and

b.         A variation to the existing ground lease to the North Hagley Community, Sports & Recreation Trust Board in accordance with clause 6.1 of the lease.

2.         Accepts the advice that the public consultation meets the requirements of section 78 of the Local Government Act 2002 and follows a process similar to, although not dictated by, that specified in section 54 of the Reserves Act 1977.

3.         Authorises the Property Consultancy Manager, should the proposed building and lease variation proceed to be consented to by both the Council and the Minister of Conservation, to implement the variation to the deed of lease.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       To facilitate the commencement of the required process to respond to the application by the Trust, including public consultation, in order for the Christchurch City Council (“the Council”) to be well informed for a decision to approve the proposed changing rooms building in North Hagley Park.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       To not support the recommendation that the Council agree to the proposed changing rooms building.  This option means a privately funded community changing rooms facility in North Hagley Park is not able to be realised.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

5.1       A charitable trust (the North Hagley Community, Sports & Recreation Charitable Trust), comprising three clubs already using North Hagley Park for sport and recreation purposes (the Christchurch High School Old Boy’s Rugby Football Club (“HSOB”), the Christchurch Pétanque Club and the United Croquet Club), purchased in 2016 the building assets of the United Bowling Club that had decided not to renew its lease in North Hagley Park.

5.2       In 2017 the Council granted a ground lease, subject to section 54 of the Reserves Act 1977 (“Reserves Act”), to the board of that trust (the lessee being the North Hagley Community, Sports & Recreation Trust Board (“the Trust”)) to occupy the former ground area of the Bowling Club for a total term of 33 years.

5.3       The leased land is made up of a number of component areas.  These include the buildings, car park and a greenspace area, the latter comprising what was the former bowling greens and an adjacent grassed area.  The annual rent is calculated on the sum of the areas containing the buildings, the grassed area and half of the car park area (this car park area is shared with the United Croquet Club in its capacity as the holder of a separate lease for its croquet grounds adjacent and to the north), and this area totals 5,387.5 square metres.

5.4       From that time, discussions have been held between the Trust and Council officers as to potential site options for a changing rooms facility proposed to be erected by the Trust on, or beside, it’s leased area.  The driver for this is that HSOB’s current changing rooms are off Hagley Park and it would be advantageous to that club to have a new facility located near to its playing fields and shared clubrooms in North Hagley Park.  A stated benefit of such a new facility on the Park is that it will also be available for use by other sport and recreation clubs and associations using the playing fields on North Hagley Park.  Another benefit is that the proposed facility will be able to be used in support of events and other activities compatible with, and within, the leased area.  The lease and the Trust's rules embodied in its Trust Deed provide for activities in the leased area that enhance or promote the lease's permitted use (that is, “Clubrooms, storage facilities and playing areas for Sports and recreation activities and any use incidental or ancillary thereto”).  The facility may also be able to be used when there are approved events on adjacent areas of North Hagley Park.

5.5       The Trust has now made application for a proposed changing room facility, including showers and toilets, to be built on one of the former bowling greens (Greenspace Area A) in its leased area.  Attachment B shows the proposed building location and footprint, which is 299.82 square metres in area.  For the purpose of simplification this is taken to be 300 square metres.  Attachment A gives the plans for this development.  Council officers advise that the internal layout is indicative only and will be subject to subsequent adjustment, as necessary, and finalisation through the building consent process that will include liaison with Parks Unit operations.

5.6       The proposed new building complies with the District Plan rule for a maximum of 300 square metres for the footprint of a new single building on Hagley Park, and falls within the District Plan limits for building and impervious surface total areas for North Hagley Park.

5.7       The Trust proposes to meet the cost of building and maintaining this facility and to make it accessible for community sports and recreation users on North Hagley Park.  It will also wish to use it for activities within its leased area that are consistent with both the lease conditions and the Trust Deed rules.

5.8       The proposed building, if approved, will mean that there will need to be a recalculation of the area upon which the annual rent is calculated, as indicated in paragraph 5.3 of this report above.  The increase in area will be the sum of the building footprint of 300 square metres and the surrounding hard surface area estimated by Council officers to be approximately 400 square metres, totalling an additional approximate 700 square metres to the 1,187.50 square metres currently applied in the rent calculation.

5.9       In addition, the Trust proposes to develop a formed, though not sealed, pathway directly between the facility and the adjacent playing fields, as shown on the location plan provided in Attachment B.  This will require a cut being made in the boundary hedge.

5.10    The manager and primary user of the proposed facility will be HSOB, which has been the party that has in particular sought the establishment of this facility.  The Trust overall supports and endorses HSOB’s desire for changing room facilities to be installed in North Hagley Park for access by organised group users of the Park.  The members of the Trust, other than HSOB, and other sports group users of the Park have provided letters of support, which are included in Attachment C.

5.11    Council officers recommend that public consultation is commenced to obtain community views and preferences, and this is specified in section 8 of this report.  To date, the Trust has liaised with its member sport and recreation clubs and associations using the playing fields in North Hagley Park, and attended meetings of the Hagley Park Reference Group to inform this group of its plans, most recently as 15 October 2020.  The outcome from this meeting was that the proposed plans were well received.

5.12    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

5.12.1 Central Ward / Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board.

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       The Trust is a current occupier of Hagley Park, with a ground lease for existing clubrooms and green space granted subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

6.2       There is capacity in the lease for a variation to be made to allow a changing rooms building to be built within the leased area.

6.3       The Hagley Park Management Plan 2007 provides for the erection of new buildings or structures where such provision is necessary for the use of Hagley Park for both informal and formal outdoor recreation, and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public (refer Policy 17.1 in the management plan).

6.4       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.4.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.8.5 Satisfaction with the range and quality of recreation opportunities within parks. - Resident satisfaction with range and quality of recreation facilities within Parks: >= 85%.

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.5       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies. In particular, these are the Hagley Park Management Plan 2007 and the Christchurch District Plan.

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.6       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.7       The decision will not contribute to climate change.

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.8       The proposed changing room facility will improve access to North Hagley Park for clubs and other groups using the park for sport and recreation activities by meeting an existing need for such a facility.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement – For processing the application, this includes Council officer time and public consultation costs, which are met by current operational budgets.  For the building erection itself, the Trust has indicated that it and/or its affiliate organisations will meet the cost of this.  The Trust will have ownership of the building.

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – None for the Council.  The Trust has indicated that it and/or its affiliate organisations will meet the costs of maintenance of the facility.

7.3       Funding Source – Refer to paragraph 7.1 above

Other / He mea anō

7.4       The Trust will be independently responsible for, and for meeting the cost of, building consent application.

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       Clause 6.1 of the lease granted to the Trust in 2017 under the Reserves Act 1977 provides for a variation that will allow part of Greenspace Area A in the leased area to be used as the site for the proposed building, and for that building area portion (see Attachment B) to be removed from the leased area not subject to rent and added to the area that is.

8.2       Public consultation under section 54 of the Reserves Act on the proposed building and lease variation is not required, although the prior written consent of both the Council and the Minister of Conservation is.  The power of the Minister to give consent is delegated to the Council’s Chief Executive.

8.3       The proposed development on the former bowling green site is considered to be of low to medium significance for Hagley Park.   In accordance with section 78 of the Local Government Act 2002 (“the LGA”), the Council is required to consider the views and preferences of those persons interested or affected by that proposed development before coming to a decision.

8.4       The community will be able to gives its views and make its preferences clear when given the opportunity to submit.  Council officers recommend that public submissions be received over at least one calendar month, followed by the hearing of submitters as required.

8.5       With respect to the delegations to community boards to decide on matters that are inherently local (refer Part D Sub Part 1 of the Delegations Register), legal advice is that this matter to hand is clearly a metropolitan one to be decided on by the Council, and was previously treated as such by the Council with the granting of the ground lease to the Trust.  However, this advice further stipulates that the correct process to follow is for this report to go to the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board as a Part A item (that is, where the Council holds the delegation but the Community Board is making a recommendation).

Other Legal Implications / Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.6       Current passage for players between the leased area and the playing fields is via the northern open end of Shared Area G (see Attachment B).  The amount of people traffic will increase with the erection of the proposed building on the identified site, including through Shared Area G.  With respect to player passage through this shared area, the Trust has needed to obtain the agreement of both the Hagley Park Tennis Club and the United Croquet Club, both of which are also users of this area that is primarily in place for green waste management. 

8.7       The Trust, in its application, has proposed a more direct and formally developed accessway between the changing rooms and the playing fields, requiring a cut through the existing hedge.  This will require approval by the Council in addition to agreement by the aforementioned two clubs with shared rights of use of Shared Area G.  It is acknowledged that both clubs have provided letters of support for the Trust’s application (see Attachment C); however, both will still need to explicitly and formally agree in writing to this proposed pathway.  If they do, Council officers recommend that this accessway not be included as part of the area leased to the Trust and contributing to the rental calculation; also, that the surface of the accessway not be an impervious one – that is, not sealed.

8.8       There are no other legal contexts, issues or implications relevant to this decision.

8.9       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.  It has, however, been prepared with reference to legal advice sought, and received, from the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       A resolution against recommending that the Council agree with the proposal and for it to go out for public consultation potentially risks an opportunity to meet an identified recreation facility need in North Hagley Park with non-Council funding, and the public consequently does not get to have a say on it.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a  

Attachment A – Proposed building plans

 

b  

Attachment B – Building location plan

 

c  

Attachment C – Letters of support

 

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

<enter document name>

<enter location/hyperlink>

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Derek Roozen - Senior Network Planner Parks

Approved By

Kelly Hansen - Manager Parks Planning & Asset Management

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

 

18.   Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee Minutes - 23 November 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1526993

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Megan Pearce, Manager Hearings and Council Support, megan.pearce@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Dawn Baxendale, Chief Executive

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee held a meeting on 23 November 2020 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council receives the Minutes from the Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee meeting held 23 November 2020.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee - 23 November 2020

100

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Megan Pearce - Manager Hearings and Council Support

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

19.   Audit and Risk Management Committee Minutes - 2 December 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1526476

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Mark Saunders, Committee and Hearings Advisor, mark.saunders@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Diane Brandish, General Manager Finance and Commercial (Acting)

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

The Audit and Risk Management Committee held a meeting on 2 December 2020 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council receives the Minutes from the Audit and Risk Management Committee meeting held 2 December 2020.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Audit and Risk Management Committee - 2 December 2020

104

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Mark Saunders - Committee and Hearings Advisor

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

Report from Audit and Risk Management Committee  – 2 December 2020

 

20.   Council Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1526061

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Len van Hout, Manager, External Reporting and Governance
len.vanhout@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Diane Brandish, General Manager Finance and Commercial (Acting), diane.brandish@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Audit and Risk Management Committee Consideration / Te Whaiwhakaarotanga

 

1.         The Committee had received a memorandum from staff updating it further on the status of the 2020 Audit of the Council’s financial statements and Annual Report.

2.         The draft Representation Letter available at the meeting was considered and discussed as to it being draft and was expected to be updated appropriately for the Council meeting.

3.         The draft Representation Letter and draft Summary Annual Report were available at the meeting; the former was considered and discussed as to it being draft, and there was not time to review the latter, though it was expected to be updated appropriately to reflect the Annual Report for the Council meeting.

4.         Andy Burns and Karina Page of Audit New Zealand were available to the Committee at the meeting, and the former spoke to the progress of the Independent Auditor’s Report.

5.         The Committee broadly accepted the Staff Recommendations, resolving the salient aspects to them in more detail, and recommending relevant authorisations, as part of their recommendation to the Council that, subject to there being no further material changes to the 2020 Annual Report as presented to the Committee (which would be confirmed in time for the Council meeting), the 2020 Annual Report be adopted.

6.         The Committee thanked staff for their work on the Annual Report.

7.         The Committee were provided by Management with oversight and explanation of the internal management sign off matrix in terms of the process for sign off, and considered the exception report, including in respect of comments on systems for legislative compliance, with interest in the background to these.

8.         When the 2020 Annual Report is considered by the Council it will have been updated appropriately following the Committee’s consideration, including adding the Independent Auditor’s Report, and the Representation Letter will have been finalised.

 

Secretarial Note: Attachment C to the staff report to the Committee (the 2020 Annual Report) has been updated, including in respect of the Independent Auditor’s Report, in accordance with the Committee consideration, and in its updated form is now Attachment A to this report to the Council. Staff confirm there have been no further material changes to the 2020 Annual Report as presented to the Committee, implying that the Committee’s proviso to its recommendations in that respect can be removed for the Council’s resolutions.

 

Attachments B, C, D and E have been added to this report following the Committee meeting for the Council’s consideration in accordance with the Committee consideration outlined above.

 

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

 

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Notes the sign off process by Council staff attesting to the completeness of the information included in the financial statements.

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee recommends the Council

2.         Notes that the Audit and Risk Management Committee have reviewed the draft Annual Report and are satisfied that proper processes have been followed to ensure that the Annual Report and associated financial statements have been prepared correctly.

3.         Adopts the 2019/20 Annual Report for the Christchurch City Council subject to receiving the independent auditors report.

 

3. Audit and Risk Management Committee Decisions Under Delegation / Ngā Mana kua Tukuna

 

Part C

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Notes the sign off process by Council staff attesting to the completeness of the information included in the financial statements.

2.         Receives the draft Letter of Representation required by Audit New Zealand along with the internal management sign off matrix.

3.         Notes that this report will be considered by the Council on the Council’s public agenda once the Committee makes its recommendations in relation to the adoption of the 2020 Annual Report.

4.         Authorises the Acting General Manager, Finance and Commercial to make any changes as required by Audit New Zealand and / or correct errors in publishing the 2020 Annual Report prior to presentation at Council.

5.         Resolves that the internal management sign off matrix, and the exception report, only be released in full or part as appropriate upon periodical review by the Acting General Manager, Finance and Commercial, when, and to the extent, there are no longer any reasons under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 to withhold the information.

 

4. Audit and Risk Management Committee Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Notes that the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

a.         Has reviewed the draft 2020 Annual Report and notes that it will receive an unmodified audit report with an Emphasis of Matter.

b.         Has reviewed the Statement of Compliance on page 7 of the 2020 Annual Report.

c.         Has reviewed the draft Letter of Representation required by Audit New Zealand along with the internal management sign off matrix.

2.         Adopts the 2020 Annual Report for the Christchurch City Council.

3.         Receives the Independent Auditor’s Report for the year ended 30 June 2020.

4.         Adopts the 2020 Annual Report for the Christchurch City Council with the inclusion of the Independent Auditor’s Report for the year ended 30 June 2020.

5.         Authorises the Acting General Manager, Finance and Commercial to finalise the 2020 Summary Annual Report on the basis of the 2020 Annual Report and to make changes as required for publishing.

6.         Authorises the Acting General Manager, Finance and Commercial to produce and publish the 2020 Annual Report and 2020 Summary Annual Report within the statutory timeframes.

7.         Authorises the Mayor and Chief Executive to sign the Statement of Compliance on page 7 of the 2020 Annual Report.

8.         Authorises the Mayor and Chief Executive to sign the Audit New Zealand Letter of Representation for the 2020 Annual Report.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

Council Draft Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2020

114

 

No.

Title

Page

a

CCC Annual Report 2020

120

b

Memorandum – Audit Update to the Audit and Risk Management Committee

396

c

CCC Annual Report Summary 2020

398

d

CCC Annual Report Letter of Representation 2019-20

450

e

CCC Summary Annual Report Letter of Representation 2019-20

457

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

Council Draft Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2020

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/299196

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Len van Hout, Manager, External Reporting and Governance

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Diane Brandish, Acting General Manager, Finance and Commercial

Confidentiality

Section under the Act:

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

Sub-clause and Reason:

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

Plain English Reason:

The information to be used as the basis for the finalisation of the Council's 2020 Annual Report remains subject to change. The Committee has a responsibility to consider and review the Annual Report before adoption by the Council and to hold it in confidence before it is finalised for adoption, and it is in the public interest that the Committee can review the Annual Report before it is publicly available.

Report can be released:

31 December 2020

The information included in, and attached to, the staff report will be available on the public agenda for the 10 December 2020 meeting of the Council.

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The purpose of this report is to present the draft 2019/20 Annual Report for the Christchurch City Council to the Audit and Risk Management Committee.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Notes the sign off process by Council staff attesting to the completeness of the information included in the financial statements.

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee recommends the Council

2.         Notes that the Audit and Risk Management Committee have reviewed the draft Annual Report and are satisfied that proper processes have been followed to ensure that the Annual Report and associated financial statements have been prepared correctly.

3.         Adopts the 2019/20 Annual Report for the Christchurch City Council subject to receiving the independent auditors report.

3.   Key Points

Accounting Standards

3.1       The Council adopted PBE IFRS 35 – Consolidated Financial Statements when preparing the 2019/20 financial statements.  The result is the inclusion of the Ōtautahi Community Housing Trust within the consolidated group structure for financial reporting purposes.

Critical Judgements and Assumptions

3.2       The critical judgements, decisions and assumptions used in the preparation of the annual report are detailed in a separate paper to be considered at this meeting.

Audit Process

3.3       The field work for the 2019/20 audit has been completed by Audit New Zealand.  The last of the major matters included:

3.3.1   review of the consolidation of the Ōtautahi Community Housing Trust into the group results of Council for 2019 and 2020; and

3.3.2   review of the Vbase valuation of properties. 

3.4       Audit New Zealand requested that the statements of service performance with measures impacted by COVID-19 be restated.  This resulted in seven measures moving from Achieved to Not Achieved.

4.   Summary Result

Operating results – Parent surplus of $149.1 million (2019: $166.9 million)

4.1       Impacts on revenue

Revenue Type ($million)

2020

2019

Movement

 

Rates

530.3

496.2

34.1

6.9%

Reason: From an increase in rates and number of rating units.

Subsidies and grants

179.2

68.2

110.9

162.5%

Reason: Largely due to increase in grants from central government under the accelerator facility.

Development contributions

31.8

30.1

1.7

5.7%

Reason: In line with previous year.

Other

243.8

393.5

-149.7

-38.0%

Reason: Reduction of CCHL special and ordinary dividends.

Finance

24.9

32.3

-7.4

-23.0%

Reason: Decrease in investment rates and reclassification of borrower note income.

Total revenue

1,010.0

1,020.4

-10.4

-1.0%

 


 

 

4.2       Impacts on expenditure

Expense Type ($million)

2020

2019

Movement

 

Depreciation and amortisation

244.7

235.0

9.7

4.0%

Reason: Additional depreciation on capitalised assets.

Finance Costs

91.2

94.1

-2.8

-3.0%

Reason: Decrease in debt financing rates.

Personnel Costs

204.2

195.4

8.8

4.5%

Reason: Increase due to change in base salaries including living wage changes.

Other

291.5

272.2

19.2

7.1%

Reason: Increase in grants and legal fees.

Gains and Losses

32.8

56.5

-23.7

-42.0%

Reason: Reduced losses on disposal of property, plant and equipment ($15.5 million), gains on disposal of investment property or held for sale assets ($2.7 million), reversal of losses due to ineffectiveness of cash flow hedge ($0.8 million), losses on the de-recognition of cash flow hedge relationships ($3.0 million) and reduced losses taken to the income statement from the fair value of financial instruments of ($17.9 million).

Total expenses

864.5

853.3

11.2

1.3%

 

Tax credit

3.7

-0.2

3.9

1860.6%

Reason: restate opening balance for deferred tax for depreciation on buildings.

Surplus

149.1

166.9

-17.8

-10.6%

 

Non-operating results – Parent surplus / (loss) of $1.468 billion (2019: ($0.139) billion)

4.3       The non-operating result of the Council has been affected by three valuations.

4.3.1   An unrealised increase in the valuation of property plant and equipment of $1.422 billion, arising from the valuation of three waters assets;

4.3.2   An unrealised increase in the valuation of subsidiary companies of $118 million, primarily in the valuation of Christchurch City Holding Limited following growth in underlying investments and Vbase Limited with increases in the value of the town hall and arena properties; and

4.3.3   A decrease in valuation of interest rate derivatives of $72 million, primarily due the sharp decline in interest rates.


 

Financial position – Parent net assets of $12.5 billion (2019: $10.9 billion)

4.4       The increase in net assets of $1.610 billion is broken down into

4.4.1   An increase in total assets of $1.807 billion

Asset / Liability Type ($million)

2020

2019

Movement

 

Property, plant and equipment

11,566.0

9,933.3

1,632.7

16.4%

Reason: made up of a valuation increase in three waters of $1.422 billion and net capital expenditure of $441.0 million, less depreciation of $230.2 million.

Intangible assets

90.4

84.6

5.8

6.8%

Reason: Increase made up of net capital expenditure of $20.3 million less amortisation of $14.6 million.

Investment in CCOs

3,009.4

2,833.0

176.4

6.2%

Reason: Increase made up of a valuation increase in subsidiaries of $118.1 million, increase in investment in CCOs of $7.3 million, increase in CCO loans and advances of $46.1 million, an increase in non-CCO loans and advances $12.1 million, and increase in investment in debt securities of $9.8 million.

Cash

266.4

276.5

-10.1

-3.7%

Reason:  Reduced cash as a result of timing of expenditure

Other financial assets

33.5

14.6

18.9

129.4%

Reason: Advances to OCHT for housing development.

Other receivables

96.3

112.8

-16.5

-14.6%

Reason: Decrease in assets held for sale.

Total assets

15062.1

13,254.8

1,807.0

13.6%

Borrowings

2,341.9

2,136.6

205.4

9.6%

Reason: a mix of new borrowing $134.1 million and the valuation of the interest rate swaps contracts $71.7 million plus the de-recognition of hedging relationships $3 million, reversal of ineffectiveness $0.8 million and a decrease in the financial lease liability of $2.6 million

Other liabilities

207.5

223.1

-15.6

-7.0%

Reason: Reduction in payables and provisions.

Total liabilities

2,549.4

2,359.6

189.8

8.0%

Net assets / Ratepayers funds

12,512.7

10,895.2

1,617.5

14.8%

 

Prudential reporting

4.5       These ratios and benchmarks enable the reader to determine that the Council is prudently managing its revenues, expense, assets, liabilities and general financial dealings.

4.6       Council has met all but two of these benchmarks in 2020.

4.7       The ratios that were not met are:

4.7.1   Rates (revenue) affordability; Actual $530m, Quantified Limit $527m (breach $3m or 0.5%). This ratio compares Quantified Limit as per the 2018-28 Long Term Plan with actual rates revenue.  The value of rates received increased due to an increase in rating units between the date the rates were forecast in the Long Term Plan and the actual date rates were struck.

4.7.2   Debt servicing benchmark; Actual 10.2%, Benchmark 10% (breach 0.2%). This ratio compares borrowing cost to revenue; as borrowing costs exceed 10% of revenue the benchmark has not been met. The benchmark for the ratio is based on the population growth in Christchurch City compared to the national average.  If the growth rate is above the national average the benchmark is 15% and if below it is 10%.  Council remains within its other debt covenants and can service the current level of debt.

Audit opinion

4.8       The Council is anticipating receiving an unmodified audit report for the parent and group from Audit New Zealand.

4.9       The Audit Report will include an emphasis of matter on the uncertainty of valuations in a post-COVID-19 environment.

5.   Background

Preparation of Annual Report

5.1       The Annual Report of the Christchurch City Council has been prepared and will be adopted at the 10 December 2020 meeting of Council.

5.2       The Annual Report comprises four sections: The Council, Groups of Activities, Financial Statements and summary information from Council-controlled organisations.

5.3       The Council section gives background information on the Council and high level summaries of what we have achieved.

5.4       The Group of Activities (GOA) reports in the Annual Report includes sections on “what we do”, “what we did”, “how did we measure up”, “how much did it cost” and “what next” for each activity.

5.4.1   These sections are prepared by the individual business units in conjunction with the Business Partnership Unit and Finance Business Partners.  Once completed, a comprehensive review and sign off process is done by General Managers.

5.4.2   The “how did we measure up” information has been prepared by the Performance Management team and reviewed as part of the comprehensive sign off review.  The performance measure are linked back to the targets set as part of the 2018-28 Long Term Plan.

5.5       The Financial Statements have been prepared in line with generally accepted accounting practice and in accordance with the relevant Public Benefit Entity accounting standards.

5.5.1   The financial statements have undergone a review for completeness and a comprehensive signoff matrix has been completed by relevant staff.

5.6       The summary information from Council-controlled organisations is sourced from the financial statements and annual reports of these entities that go through their own review and audit processes.

Preparation of Summary Annual Report

5.7       A summary annual report has been prepared for users of the Council’s financial statements and will be adopted at the 10 December 2020 Council meeting.

5.8       The summary is a simplified view of the two major areas of the Annual Report namely the Group of Activities reports and financial statements.

5.9       It also includes an extract from the prudential reporting section of the Annual Report.

Signoff Matrix

5.10    As mentioned in paragraph 5.5.1, a comprehensive sign off matrix is prepared for the Annual Report (Attachment A). A summary highlighting the exceptions is attached as Attachment B.

Audit Representation Letters

5.11    Separate audit representation letters are required for the full annual report and the summary annual report and these will be presented to the Council meeting on 10 December 2020.

5.12    These audit representation letters are provided by Council in connection with the audit of the financial statements and activities and services statements of Christchurch City Council (the City Council and group) for the year ended 30 June 2020 for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the information presented. The audit is carried out by Audit New Zealand on behalf of the Auditor General.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a  

Signoff Matrix for 2019/20 Annual Report

 

b  

CCC Sign Off Matrix Exception Report 2020-10-22

 

c  

Draft 2019/20 Annual Report for Council (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

<enter document name>

<enter location/hyperlink>

 

 

 

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Len Van Hout - Manager External Reporting & Governance

Approved By

Bruce Moher - Head of Financial Management

Diane Brandish - Acting General Manager Finance and Commercial (CFO)

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

Report from Audit and Risk Management Committee  – 2 December 2020

 

21.   Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 Report

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1526023

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Piers Lehmann, Head of Asset Management, piers.lehmann@ccc.govt.nz
Lisa Roberts, Infrastructure Decisions Ltd, lisa@infradecisions.co.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

David Adamson, GM City Services, david.adamson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Audit and Risk Management Committee Decisions Under Delegation / Ngā Mana kua Tukuna

 

Original Staff Recommendations Accepted without Change)

Part C

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Note the Executive Summary of the 2020 Asset Management Maturity Assessment Report.

2.         Note the positive trend for the centrally led improvement in asset management maturity since the 2018 assessment demonstrated by the average score increase of 5% across the organisation.

3.         Endorse the Asset Management Unit’s work on implementing the Asset Management Maturity Assessment report’s recommendations.

4.         Note the recommendations in the report will inform the review of the current Asset Management Improvement programme and the development of the 2021 Asset Management Improvement Programme to align with the latest recommendations.

5.         Recommend that the next Asset Management Maturity Assessment is undertaken in the 2022/23 Financial Year in time for the next LTP cycle.

 

2. Audit and Risk Management Committee Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 Report.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 Report

463

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 (AMMA) Report - Final November 2020

465

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 Report

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/391659

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Piers Lehmann, Head of Asset Management, piers.lehmann@ccc.govt.nz
Lisa Roberts, Infrastructure Decisions Ltd, lisa@infradecisions.co.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

David Adamson, GM City Services, david.adamson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The Asset Management Maturity Assessment is funded through the Risk and Audit Unit, as part of the Risk and Audit team’s programme of work.

1.2       This report aims to provide visibility and a level of assurance to the Audit and Risk Management Committee, that Council are managing the risks associated with our significant asset portfolio. The assessment also provides insight to the Asset Management Unit and Asset Management Governance Board, on improvements made and areas where opportunity and value remains available for prioritising the future focus of the improvement programme.

1.3       The assessment tool used is part of the NZ Treasury Investor Confidence Rating tool box (see weblink below) for asset management assessments of government agencies and is based on the maturity framework in the International Infrastructure Management Manual (IIMM).

1.4       Previous assessments have been carried out in 2016 and 2018.  Overall the trend continues to be positive as asset management maturity within Council is increasing.

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Audit and Risk Management Committee:

1.         Note the Executive Summary of the 2020 Asset Management Maturity Assessment Report.

2.         Note the positive trend for the centrally led improvement in asset management maturity since the 2018 assessment demonstrated by the average score increase of 5% across the organisation.

3.         Endorse the Asset Management Unit’s work on implementing the Asset Management Maturity Assessment report’s recommendations.

4.         Note the recommendations in the report will inform the review of the current Asset Management Improvement programme and the development of the 2021 Asset Management Improvement Programme to align with the latest recommendations.

5.         Recommend the Council receive the information in this report.

6.         Recommend that the next Asset Management Maturity Assessment is undertaken in the 2022/23 Financial Year in time for the next LTP cycle.

 

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a  

Asset Management Maturity Assessment 2020 (AMMA) Report - Final November 2020

 

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Treasury NZ Investor Confidence Rating Fact Sheet

https://www.treasury.govt.nz/sites/default/files/2018-11/icr-factsheet-2018.pdf

Treasury NZ Investor Confidence Rating – Asset Management Maturity webpage.

https://www.treasury.govt.nz/information-and-services/state-sector-leadership/investment-management/review-investment-reviews/investor-confidence-rating-icr/investor-confidence-rating-asset-management-maturity

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Wendy Walker - Senior Asset Management Governance & Strategy Advisor

Approved By

Piers Lehmann - Head of Asset Management

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

Report from Regulatory Performance Committee  – 2 December 2020

 

22.   Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A Report – Policy and Practices 2019/20

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1519320

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Lionel Bridger, Acting Team Leader Animal Management lionel.bridger@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Leonie Rae, GM Consenting and Compliance
leonie.rae@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1. Regulatory Performance Committee Consideration / Te Whaiwhakaarotanga

 

1.         The Committee considered the report on the Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A that relates to the Council’s administration of its Dog Control policy and practices.

2.         Lionel Bridger responded to queries from the Committee.  The total number of disqualified owners was noted as only one. This was due to numerous factors, including that some issues relate to welfare, and the length of prosecutions that require good evidence control.

3.         Discussion was held about capacity within the Animal Management team to administer the Dog Control Act Section 10A policy and practices.

 

2. Regulatory Performance Committee Recommendation to Council

 

Original Staff Recommendation Accepted Without Change

 

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A Report – Policy and Practices 2019/20.

2.         Adopt the 2019/20 Annual Report to Local Government, as set out in Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Report Title

Page

1  

Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A Report – Policy and Practices 2019/20

520

 

 

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A Report – Policy and Practices 2019/20

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1277349

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Mark Vincent – Manager Animal Services

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Leonie Rae – General Manager Corporate Services and Consenting & Compliance

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The purpose of this report is to meet the requirements set out in Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996, providing information by the Territorial Authority to Local Government that covers the Policy and Practices delivered for the reporting period year ending 30 June 2020.

2.   Executive Summary / Te Whakarāpopoto Matua

2.1       This report is for information purposes and supports the requirements of Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996, relating to the Council’s administration of its Dog Control policy and practices by providing information in respect of the 2019/20 Dog Registration period relating to:

2.1.1   the number of dogs registered in the territorial authority;

2.1.2   the number of probationary and disqualified owners within the territorial authority;

2.1.3   the number of dogs classified as dangerous and menacing within the territorial authority;

2.1.4   the number of infringement notices issued;

2.1.5   the number of complaints for the year;

2.1.6   the number of prosecutions taken by the Council.

2.2       In accordance with the Dog Control Act 1996, the Council is required to give public notice of this report, by means of a notice published in daily newspapers

3.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Regulatory Performance Committee recommends that the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the Dog Control Act 1996, Section 10A report – Policy and Practices 2019/20.

2.         Adopt the 2019/20 Annual Report to Local Government, as set out in Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996.

 

4.   Context / Background / Te Horopaki

Decision Making Authority / Te Mana Whakatau

4.1       Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996, requires the Territorial authority to report on dog control policy and practices.

1)    A territorial authority must, in respect of each financial year, report on the administration of—

a)  its dog control policy adopted under section 10; and

b)  its dog control practices.

2)    The report must include, in respect of each financial year, information relating to—

a)  the number of registered dogs in the territorial authority district:

b)  the number of probationary owners and disqualified owners in the territorial authority district:

c)  the number of dogs in the territorial authority district classified as dangerous under section 31 and the relevant provision under which the classification is made:

d)  the number of dogs in the territorial authority district classified as menacing under section 33A or section 33C and the relevant provision under which the classification is made:

e)  the number of infringement notices issued by the territorial authority:

f)   the number of dog related complaints received by the territorial authority in the previous year and the nature of those complaints:

g)  the number of prosecutions taken by the territorial authority under this Act.

3)    The territorial authority must give public notice of the report—

a)  by means of a notice published in—

i.     1 or more daily newspapers circulating in the territorial authority district; or

ii.    1 or more other newspapers that have at least an equivalent circulation in that district to the daily newspapers circulating in that district; and

b)    by any means that the territorial authority thinks desirable in the circumstances.

4)    The territorial authority must also, within 1 month after adopting the report, send a copy of it to the Secretary for Local Government.

 

Christchurch City Council’s Policies (Section 10A (1a))

4.2       The Council adopted the “Control of Dogs” Policy (“the policy”) in September 2016. The Policy has provisions relating to the control of dogs in public places, which are enforceable under the Christchurch City Council Dog Control Bylaw 2016.

4.3       The objectives of the policy are to:

·   set the framework for Dog Registration Fees and Classification of Owners;

·   identify mechanisms for promoting responsible dog ownership and interaction with dogs;

·   set the framework for Issuing of Infringement notices and Impounding of Dogs;

·   specify the requirement for neutering of dogs classified as dangerous or menacing; (sections 32(1) (c) and 33E (b));

·   provide adequate opportunities to fulfil the exercise and recreational needs of dogs and their owners;

·   set the framework for categories of Dog Control;

·   Notify areas where specific dog control status has been designated for reasons such as public health, safety and hygiene and protection of wildlife, animals and stock;

·   Identify the matters to be covered by bylaws.

Christchurch City Council’s Practices (Section 10A (1b))

4.4       To satisfy the requirements of section 10A of the Dog control Act 1996, the following information is provided.

4.5       Dog Registration

4.5.1   The total number of dogs recorded on the Councils dog registration database for the period was 40,002 compared to 39,127 last year. 

4.6       Probationary and Disqualified Owners

4.6.1   The Council recorded 11 owners recorded as probationary owners and 1 owner as disqualified over the period.

4.7       Dangerous Dog Classifications

4.7.1   The Council classified 8 dogs classified as dangerous under section 31 of the Dog control Act 1996, adjusting the total number of dogs on the dangerous dog register to 60.

4.8       Menacing Dog Classifications

4.8.1   The Council has two separate menacing dog classifications:

·     Section 33A (1) (b) (i) of the Dog control Act 1996, provides for dogs to be classified as menacing (based on the dogs aggressive behaviour). For the period, 28 new dogs were classified as menacing, adjusting the total number of dogs classified in this category, on the Council’s register to 230.

·     Section 33C of the Dog Control Act 1996, provides for dogs to be classified as menacing (based on the dogs breed or breed type). For the period, 10 new dogs were classified as menacing, adjusting the total number of dogs classified in this category, on the Council’s register to 140.

4.9       Infringement Notices Issued

4.9.1   The Council issued 1,494 infringement notices for breaches against the Dog Control Act 1996.

4.10    Dog related complaints

4.10.1 The Council investigated 578 priority one complaints (dogs attacking persons, stock, poultry, domestic animals and protected wildlife or traffic hazards relating to wandering stock on roads).

4.10.2 The Council received 7613 complaints relating to dogs barking, wandering, fouling, rushing and unregistered dogs.



4.11    Prosecutions

4.11.1 The Council took 1 prosecution resulting in a conviction where the dog owner was disqualified from owning dogs for four years.

 

4.12    Statistical Summary

Total number of registered dogs

40,002

 

 

Total number of probationary owners

11

 

 

Total number of disqualified owners

1

 

Total number of dogs classified as dangerous (live records only)

 

S.31 (1)(a) Section 57A conviction

S.31 (1)(b) Sworn evidence

60

S.31 (1)(c) Owner admits in writing

 

 

 

Total number of live dogs classified as menacing

S.33A Observed or reported behaviour (deed)

230

S.33A Breed characteristics (breed)

140

S.33C Dogs listed in schedule four.

 

 

Number of infringement notices issued (not waived or cancelled)

1494

Number of dog related complaints -

 

Dog attacks on people, stock, poultry, domestic animals or protected wildlife 

578

Dog rushing, intimidating people or domestic animals. 

365

Dogs barking, roaming or fouling (covers self-generated bylaw, roaming dogs and miscellaneous matters)

5976

Unregistered dogs

1272

Number of prosecutions taken

1

 

 

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

There are no attachments to this report.

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Mark Vincent - Manager Animal Services

Approved By

Tracey Weston - Head of Regulatory Compliance

Leonie Rae - General Manager Consenting & Compliance and Corporate Services Groups

 


Council

10 December 2020

 

 

23.   Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan non-comprehensive review

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1065058

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Derek Roozen, Senior Network Planner Parks, Derek.Roozen@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens & Community, mary.richardson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to obtain the Council’s approval to release the draft amended Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan (Attachment A) for public consultation.  Planned amendments to the plan are shown as tracked changes. The Council’s Executive Leadership Team has determined that this is a metropolitan matter to be considered by the Council and not delegated to a community board.

1.2       The decision in this report is of low to medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  This level of significance reflects the high level of interest from a number of mountain bike clubs, as well as other users of tracks within, and near, Montgomery Spur Reserve.  A community driven proposed new mountain bike track is the focus of the management plan amendments.

1.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects this assessment.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Approves a non-comprehensive review of the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan 2010 to proceed.

2.         Determines that written suggestions on the proposed amended plan would not materially assist in its preparation.

3.         Approves the release of the draft Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan attached to this report for public consultation in accordance with section 41(6) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       A non-comprehensive review is required to be undertaken of the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan to enable the development of a community proposed mountain bike track in the reserve.

3.2       The proposed mountain bike track is consistent with the overall intent and direction of the current management plan, and this new track will serve to meet a clear need, including addressing safety concerns over conflicts between recreation users on adjoining tracks.  However, the track is not specifically provided for in the current management plan.

3.3       To resolve this situation it is recommended to add this proposed track to the management plan through a non-comprehensive review. 

3.4       No other significant amendments need to be made to the plan.  This review does not require written suggestions for preparation of the plan.

3.5       The powers of the Council to review reserve management plans is delegated to community boards.  In this case, however, the Executive Leadership Team (ELT) considers that the decision-making implications extend beyond the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and therefore the decision-making remains with the Council.

3.6       The Council’s Executive Leadership Team, at its meeting on 8 June 2020 (Item 7), supported Council officers:

3.6.1   Undertaking a non-comprehensive review of the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan.

3.6.2   Reporting to the Council to seek its approval for:

a.     The proposed non-comprehensive review of the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan being a metropolitan matter to be dealt with by the Council.

b.     A non-comprehensive review process, as provided for in subsection 41(9) of the Reserves Act 1977, to be followed.

c.      The release of the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan with the draft amendments for public consultation for two calendar months in accordance with subsection 41(6) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       The alternative option is to not proceed with the non-comprehensive review of the management plan. This is not recommended as it will prevent the draft amended management plan being released for public consultation, and there will be no opportunity for the public to submit on a plan that contemplates a further mountain bike track in Montgomery Spur Reserve.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

5.1       The land, comprising 126.6 hectares, that makes up Montgomery Spur Reserve was vested in the Christchurch City Council as scenic reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977 in 2005.

5.2       The current Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan was approved by the Council on 27 May 2010.

5.3       Council officers have identified that since then, and with the development of the Taramea Mountain Bike Track (see the indicative landscape development plan across pages 38-39 of the amended management plan in Attachment A) in Montgomery Spur Reserve in 2013, there has been a significant increase in the use of that track and the nearby Rapaki Track.  The Rapaki Track is used by riders to enter and exit the Taramea Mountain Bike Track, which is now one of the most popular mountain bike tracks on the Port Hills.

5.4       To address user conflict safety issues and to maximise enjoyment for all users, mountain bike clubs are proposing to build a new mountain bike track connecting to the Taramea Mountain Bike Track.  Currently, the speed of some mountain bikers riding quickly down Rapaki Track causes conflict with other track users, resulting in an impact on overall track user safety.  If approved, the proposed new track would mean that mountain bikers can ride completely clear of the busy Rapaki Track, increasing the enjoyment of all recreation users in the area.  The proposed new mountain bike track alignment is shown on the indicative landscape development plan on pages 38-39 of the amended management plan in Attachment A.

5.5       The proposed review of the management plan will consist of amendments to recreation policy and the indicative landscape development plan so that these specifically refer to the proposed new track.  It does not warrant, at this time, a full review of the management plan to be undertaken, although the opportunity will be taken to correct outdated and inadequate references.  A non-comprehensive review of the management plan is considered appropriate and sufficient to resolve the matter to hand.

5.6       The Council’s Parks Unit, supported by ELT, considers that, due to the area affected extending beyond the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board area and also being used by visitors from all over the city, the decisions to publicly consult on the proposed amendments to the management plan, and then approve or not approve the amended management plan, should remain with the Council as metropolitan decision-making matters.

5.7       A non-comprehensive review means that only parts of the management plan will be amended to reflect the changed circumstances outlined in paragraphs 5.3 and 5.4 of this report above, and that the Council is able to follow the parts of the procedure set out in section 41 of the Reserves Act that it chooses.

5.8       Council officers recommend as a minimum following the public notification procedure outlined in subsection 41(6) of the Act, which entails public consultation on a draft management plan for a minimum of two calendar months.

5.9       Community views and preferences will be obtained on the proposed new mountain bike track through this public consultation.  The draft amended management plan shows on the contained indicative landscape development plan (Appendix 7.7 of the management plan) the route of this track and its connection with existing or already approved, and yet to be constructed, tracks.

5.10    Council officers propose that public consultation commences on Saturday 12 December 2020 and concludes on Friday 26 February 2021, or for it to run for an alternative period with this being approximately two and a half calendar months in duration to account for the Christmas/New Year statutory holiday period.

5.11    A Council hearings panel will be required, as per the Council’s delegations register, to hear and determine any submissions or objections.

5.12    Public consultation information will be provided via:

5.12.1 Public notices in The Press and the Southern View newspapers.

5.12.2 Have Your Say page on the Council’s website.

5.12.3 Public information drop-in meeting or meetings.

5.13    The decision affects the following community board areas:

5.13.1 That of the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board, within which Montgomery Spur Reserve sits, and the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board.  The adjacent Rapaki Track is on the boundary between the two community board areas.  Both community boards have an interest in the measures to be taken to address user conflict issues on the Rapaki Track.

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       The Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan provides for the development of tracks for recreation purposes, such as walking, running and mountain biking, with these tracks to connect with others in areas outside Montgomery Spur Reserve.

6.2       At the time of preparation and approval of the management plan in 2010 there had been the intention to focus on development of one new mountain bike track in Montgomery Spur Reserve.  It is clear now, though, that the in-place Taramea Mountain Bike Track will be better able to provide an enhanced strategic value for recreation purposes with the addition of the proposed connecting mountain bike track.  The proposed amendments to the management plan will serve to allow it to further meet the recreation opportunity objectives for the Port Hills.

6.3       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.3.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.8.5 Satisfaction with the range and quality of recreation opportunities within parks. - Resident satisfaction with range and quality of recreation facilities within Parks: >= 85%.

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.4       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.5       The decision on just adding reference in the management plan to the proposed new mountain bike track does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

6.6       Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd were advised of the proposal via the Council’s Ngāi Tahu Partnership Team.  There has been direct correspondence and a meeting concerning the proposal with this team.

6.7       Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd have advised that the information and reasoning provided by Council officers is accepted with no concerns raised.  They have, however, requested that when track development works commence an Accidental Discovery Protocol with respect to archaeological sites is to be followed at all times. 

6.8       Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd, Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke and Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri will be directly provided with consultation information when the public consultation commences.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.9       The decision will not contribute to climate change.

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.10    The proposed new mountain bike track will improve public recreation access to Montgomery Spur Reserve, and the adjoining public areas, in terms of enhancing mountain biking opportunities and linkage to other tracks, as well as serving to reduce conflict between the different recreation users of the Rapaki Track.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi

Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement - Council officer time and public consultation costs involved in reviewing the management plan will be met by current operational budgets. 

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – not applicable.

7.3       Funding Source – Existing Council budgets.

Other / He mea anō

7.4       The Regional Parks Team will ensure all necessary regulatory consents are obtained prior to any track works commencing.

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       Advice from the Council’s Legal Services Unit is that construction of a new mountain bike track in the Montgomery Spur Reserve requires both (a) approval of the construction work itself and (b) review of the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

8.2       The legal consideration is that the proposed mountain bike track needs to be specifically contemplated in the Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan.  Currently it is not.

8.3       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.  It has been prepared with reference to legal advice from the Legal Services Unit.

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       Not approving the public release of the amended management plan will mean that the proposed mountain bike track will not be able to be developed.  This will result in the loss of an opportunity to improve the network of inter-connected recreation tracks within, and near to, Montgomery Spur Reserve, and to address user safety concerns on the Rapaki Track.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft amended Montgomery Spur Reserve Management Plan 2010

531

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

 

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Author

Derek Roozen - Senior Network Planner Parks

Approved By

Kelly Hansen - Manager Parks Planning & Asset Management

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

24.   City Mall - Change of Legal Status

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1124449

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Michael Thomson, Transport Engineer, City Services
michael.thomson@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

David Adamson, General Manager City Services,  david.adamson@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek approval to commence a Special Consultative Procedure (SCP) to change the legal status of the City Mall to enable a change in controls on motor vehicle movements, giving a better level of service for pedestrians and cyclists. 

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to identified safety concerns within City Mall and the adjoining mall entry road of Oxford Terrace.

1.3       The decision in this report is of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected, the level of community interest but the low level of impact to those people.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Approves a Special Consultative Procedure be initiated on the proposal to change the legal status of the City Mall from a declared Pedestrian Mall to a Shared Zone, in line with the adjoining Oxford Terrace Shared Zone. Refer to attachment A for more details.

2.         Approves the appointment of a hearings panel to hear submissions on the proposal, deliberate on the submissions and report to the Council with their recommendations.

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       Issues have arisen from when the one way southbound Shared Zone on Oxford Terrace was first established (the only legal way for motorists to enter the City Mall). These include

·        motorists entering the Shared Zone and Pedestrian Mall at non-permitted times.

·        parking activity which has included obstructing the tram.

·        motorists driving against the one way requirement.

3.2       In addition to non-compliance of motorists in regard to driving and parking behaviour, the NZ Police have raised concerns about the safety of groups of people congregating within the Oxford Terrace (the Promenade) Shared Zone during evenings outside bars, and potential conflict with motor vehicles being driven through the area.

3.3       The Council is installing a number of retractable and fixed bollards at the entrance to Oxford Terrace at the Hereford Street intersection to mitigate these potential and actual issues with motor vehicle use. The automated bollards will retract at times of permitted access and outside these times, will retract for authorised entering vehicles.

3.4       When the pedestrian mall (named City Mall) was declared under section 336 of the Local Government Act 1974 in 1981, the Council approved the permitted times of access to be 5am -10am and 4pm -11pm on any day.  This was due to the operational requirements of businesses within Cashel Street that do not exist at this location anymore. City Mall is defined as the section of Cashel Street, between Oxford Terrace and High Street. It is also defined as the section of High Street, between Cashel Street and Hereford Street.

3.5       These permitted entry times for City Mall meant that the permitted access times to the redeveloped Oxford Terrace (post- earthquakes) had to match the existing City Mall times.  Access to Oxford Terrace at the Hereford Street intersection was approved by Council in April 2018. This was because Oxford Terrace is the only legal way to access City Mall by motor vehicles

3.6       The effect of these traffic access restrictions made at various times in the past is that, if no change is made, the retractable bollards will have to remain down, allowing motor vehicle access at the high risk times during the evenings (4pm to 11pm daily).

3.7       This report seeks approval to consult on changing the times of access within the City Mall, by revoking the pedestrian mall status and creating a shared zone. Under section 336 of the Local Government Act 1974 the pedestrian mall can only be revoked by following an SCP.

3.8       Following the consultation process, if the changes proposed are approved by Council, the City Mall times of access can be changed.  That means the bollards at Hereford /Oxford can remain up to prevent access to the area at potentially high risk times.

3.9       Other benefits that can be achieved by changing the Pedestrian Mall to a Shared Zone are as follows:

a)    Confirming a 10 km /h speed limit for the entire Shared Zone area

b)    Confirming the permitted use of cycles

c)    Facilitating a legal status of the existing mall area, which will allow changes in the future, without the need for a variation in the Special Order of Council.

3.10    Disadvantages of this proposal :

a)    Goods vehicles will not be allowed between 4pm and 11pm as currently permitted, which could inconvenience some businesses; and

b)   Apart from trams, emergency vehicles and authorised vehicles, and goods vehicles between 5am to 10am, no other vehicles will be allowed entry.

c)    Cost of staff and elected member resources to conduct the Special Consultative Procedure, supply and installation of changed signage within the current City Mall area.

 

 

4.   Alternative Option Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       Retain the pedestrian mall in City Mall and keep the status quo.

Advantages:

·    Businesses in the area can still have evening deliveries with access by goods vehicles in the evenings between 4pm and 11pm; and

·    There is no need for a consultation process; so staff and Councillor time and expenses, can be directed to consultation on other matters.

·    Saving re the estimated $3000 spend for removal of existing signage and installation of new Shared Zone signage

Disadvantages:

·    The 30 km/h speed limit in City Mall is less safe for pedestrians;

·    The inability to restrict access to high use public areas on Oxford Terrace also makes it less safe for pedestrians; and

·    There are features that are inconsistent with Oxford Terrace.

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

5.1       The reasons for the report in the above section provide the relevant detail.

5.2       The Community views will be sought by way of the SCP.  It is proposed that these views are considered by a Hearings Panel in March 2021. The report of the Hearings Panel will be submitted to the Council for a final decision.

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

6.1.1   Activity: Active Travel

·     Level of Service: 16.0.10 Improve the perception that Christchurch is a walking friendly city. - >=85%

Policy Consistency / Te Whai Kaupapa here

6.2       The decision is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies, being the Pedestrian Strategy and the Cycling Strategy.

Impact on Mana Whenua / Ngā Whai Take Mana Whenua

6.3       The decision does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Mana Whenua, their culture and traditions.

Climate Change Impact Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Āhuarangi

6.4       The proposal supports active travel through walking and cycling.

Accessibility Considerations / Ngā Whai Whakaaro mā te Hunga Hauā

6.5       The recommendations to consult on this issue will potentially support a better level of service  and access for both pedestrians and cyclists.  While the times of access for Goods vehicles is reduced, the area will have 5 hours for permitted access with many loading zones /short term parking spaces on roads immediately adjacent.

7.   Resource Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Rauemi Capex/Opex / Ngā Utu Whakahaere

7.1       Cost to Implement – estimated at $3,000 for removal of existing signage and installation of new Shared Zone signage.

7.2       Maintenance/Ongoing costs – The estimated cost of $200 per annum will be required for the maintenance of the signs and markings.

7.3       Funding Source

a)    The additional signage costs will be covered through the Hereford Street upgrade project.

b)    The retractable bollard installation is funded as a specific line item in the current year’s annual plan within the New Construction category

Other / He mea anō

7.4       No other funding source required.

8.   Legal Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā-Ture

Statutory power to undertake proposals in the report / Te Manatū Whakahaere Kaupapa

8.1       Section 336 of the Local Government Act 1974 provides for Council, by using the special consultative procedure, to ‘declare a specified road or part of a specified road to be a pedestrian mall’, and also to use the same process to revoke a pedestrian mall (subsections (1) and (8). 

8.2       Unlike other SCPs, section 336 provides for a power of appeal to the Environment Court following the declaration being made (unless the declaration gives effect to the provisions of an operative district plan under the Resource Management Act 1991, which is not the case here).  The statement of proposal for this consultation needs to include information on the right of appeal (section 339(9)).

8.3       The other changes proposed are not matters that need to be consulted on by way of an SCP, but are also included in this consultation (although the right of appeal will not extend to those other matters.)  The power to make the resolutions for these changes comes from the Council’s Traffic & Parking Bylaw 2017, clauses 7, 16, & 20.

Other Legal Implications / Ētahi atu Hīraunga-ā-Ture

8.4       There are no other legal issues or implications relevant to this decision.

9.   Risk Management Implications / Ngā Hīraunga Tūraru

9.1       The recommendations of this report seek to mitigate risk to the general public.

 

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

City Mall shared zone statement of proposal Attachment A

576

 

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Michael Thomson - Transport Engineer

Jennie Hamilton - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Stephen Wright - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

25.   New Brighton Master Plan - regeneration delivery report

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1194277

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Martin Kozinsky, Assistant Planner, martin.kozinsky@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Brendan Anstiss, GM Strategy & Transformation, brendan.anstiss@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Brief Summary

1.1       The purpose of this report is to respond to the Council resolution of 9 July 2020 in regard to the Notice of Motion from the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board regarding the regeneration and development of New Brighton (Council Resolution CNCL/2020/00087).  In particular, it addresses resolutions 6 and 7 regarding the timing, delivery responsibility and budget for remaining public sector projects under the New Brighton Master Plan and whether there are any further legislative mechanisms that can enhance delivery certainty and timing for development.

1.2       The full resolution is provided at Attachment A.

1.3       Of the remaining public sector projects in New Brighton, seven are public realm projects for Council delivery.  These are able to be delivered, budget permitting, using standard legislative mechanisms.  The remainder are with ChristchurchNZ for delivery.  Further details are provided below. 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information on delivery of the New Brighton Master Plan in response to the Council’s request for further details on timing, delivery responsibility, budgets and potential legislative mechanisms.

2.         Note that work is progressing to implement the New Brighton Master Plan and that staff of the Council and ChristchurchNZ will continue to provide updates on momentum to the community board and relevant committees.

2.   Background

2.1       The master plan provides a framework for decision making across a range of public and private sector projects, aiming to revitalise the seaside suburb through consolidating the commercial area, developing precincts, reinforcing connections between the river and sea, and enhancing circulation of pedestrians and cyclists (refer link below).  Development Christchurch Ltd (DCL) has held the mandate for leading and delivering the overall New Brighton Master Plan (with specific project accountability held by Council, DCL or the private sector).  Council staff are advised that DCL has now completed a transition process, with its responsibilities for New Brighton now part of the new Urban Development Unit of ChristchurchNZ.  It is therefore timely to update Council on how the remaining aspects of the regeneration of New Brighton are proposed to be delivered.

2.2       A copy of this report has been provided to the Waitai/Burwood-Coastal Community Board. Staff are available to respond to any queries from the Community Board.

3.   Master Plan project sequencing

3.1       A table outlining the responsibilities for the New Brighton public sector projects is provided at Attachment B). These public sector projects are a combination of public realm enhancements (for Council delivery) and facilitating private sector revitalisation of the commercial core (for ChristchurchNZ delivery), noting these projects are interrelated.  A report from ChristchurchNZ providing a programme update is provided at Attachment C

3.2       ChristchurchNZ will continue the leadership role previously performed by DCL with respect to New Brighton.  They will also lead the engagement with the private sector and the commercialisation consistent with the Master Plan.  Council will work closely with ChristchurchNZ in delivery of the core public realm projects.

3.3       There are seven public realm projects in the New Brighton Master Plan awaiting delivery by the Council. Five of these are streetscape (or pedestrian mall) upgrades, with the balance relating to land purchase and construction to extend Oram Avenue including the development of new public open space and toilets.  Approximately $12.7M is allocated in the current 2018-2028 Long Term Plan (LTP) to deliver these projects, which aim to improve the public realm and physical amenity of the New Brighton commercial centre.

3.4       The funding in the 2018-2028 LTP for the remaining public realm projects under the New Brighton Master Plan is shown in Figure A.  Budgets and timing may be reconsidered through the development of the draft 2021-31 LTP, noting that Council have previously expressed support for continuing the momentum in delivering public sector projects (which will address the relatively high priority that the centre was accorded through the recent regeneration ‘heatmap’ process).  Any changes to the quantum or timing of capital projects will be for Council to make through the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.  If changes are made through the LTP process we will update the content and timing of the works programme detailed in this paper and the Master Plan (the information in this report was extracted in early November 2020 and may be subject to ongoing change). 

3.5       Work on Action A3 New north-south corridor (Oram Ave extension) has commenced and all remaining projects are currently sequenced to occur in the last three years of the LTP.

Figure A – current LTP

CPMS ID

Project

20/21

21/22

22/23

23/24

24/25

25/26

26/27

27/28

37865

New Brighton MP Streetscape Enhancements A2, A4, A5

$1,277,698

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45165

New Brighton Public Realm Improvements

$1,200,000

$1,500,000

 

 

 

$1,151,997

$3,326,116

$4,956,336

4.   Delivery certainty and timing: further legislative mechanisms to enhance redevelopment

4.1       Several legislative mechanisms are available to enhance delivery certainty and timing of redevelopment in New Brighton, noting that the Global Settlement Agreement restored a normalised relationship between the Council and the Crown and this may influence the acceptability of some mechanisms.

4.2       The Public Works Act (PWA) provides the standard legislative mechanism and pathway for Councils to acquire land, be that via agreement or via compulsory acquisition.  Most of the Council’s land acquisitions are completed by agreement with the vendor, and the Council rarely uses its PWA powers. Should the Council deem it necessary to use the PWA to compulsorily acquire land, the procedure entails a minimum 12 month process assuming there are no objections to the Environment Court.   The Council’s preference remains to work collaboratively with private property owners through a willing seller / willing buyer approach.

4.3       The Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016 (GCRA) has previously been identified as a possible mechanism to implement actions in the Master plan, namely through the preparation of a Regeneration Plan and/or land acquisition.  However, as discussed by elected members when considering the original Notice of Motion, the use of mechanisms under the GCRA was not considered appropriate for the following reasons:

4.3.1   Regeneration Plan:

·   A regeneration plan will not in itself achieve the outcomes sought and potentially duplicates what has been defined through the Master Plan;

·   It would be difficult to prepare and finalise a regeneration plan before the expiry of the GCRA in June 2021 ;

·   Actions of the Master Plan that might be a good fit with a GCRA regeneration plan approach have already been implemented, for example, the commercial area has been consolidated during the District Plan review in 2015;

4.3.2   Land acquisition:

·   Land acquired under the GCRA would be subject to the Minister’s agreement and the land would be Crown owned, which may not be necessary or an optimal process. [Note a Regeneration Plan is not required in order to acquire land under the GCRA]; and

·   The Minister would consider the fact that the Council already has the ability to use the PWA, in deciding whether or not to agree a GCRA process for land acquisition.

4.4       The new Urban Development Act 2020 (UDA), sets up a framework for transformational urban development to contribute to sustainable, inclusive and thriving communities. This legislative mechanism offers another potential pathway to enhance delivery certainty and reduce the timing of redevelopment in the regeneration of New Brighton.

4.4.1   The UDA has established a process to progress a new type of urban development project – called a specified development project (SDP). Kāinga Ora determines whether to initiate the SDP process or is directed to do so by the relevant Ministers. Any party (e.g. iwi, developers or councils) can propose a development project. The UDA outlines a clear process and provides Kāinga Ora with a range of powers (including land acquisition) to enable, lead or facilitate an SDP.

4.4.2   It is not presently known whether Kāinga Ora is considering use of its UDA powers to undertake any SDPs in Christchurch, or the view of Kāinga Ora if the Council or another stakeholder would be to propose an SDP in New Brighton.  It is also uncertain the extent to which the current revitalisation process in New Brighton would be facilitated by an SDP process although staff of both ChristchurchNZ and the Council remain very open to exploring these possibilities with Kāinga Ora staff in due course.

 

Attachments / Ngā Tāpirihanga

No.

Title

Page

a

Council resolution 9 July 2020 - CNCL/2020/00087

583

b

Public sector projects identified in the New Brighton Master Plan

584

c

New Brighton Regeneration Project Update - ChristchurchNZ

585

  

 

In addition to the attached documents, the following background information is available:

Document Name

Location / File Link

New Brighton Master Plan

https://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Plans-Strategies-Policies-Bylaws/Plans/suburban-plans/NewBrightonCentresMasterPlan.pdf

New Brighton Regeneration Project (DCL)

https://developmentchristchurchlimited.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/online_nb-booklet_final-2017.pdf

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance / Te Whakatūturutanga ā-Ture

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

 

 

Signatories / Ngā Kaiwaitohu

Authors

Martin Kozinsky - Assistant Planner

Miranda Charles - Senior Planner Urban Regeneration

Approved By

Carolyn Bonis - Team Leader Urban Regeneration

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

  


Council

10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

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10 December 2020

 

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Council

10 December 2020

 

 

26.   Streamlining Councils Property Disposal Process

Reference / Te Tohutoro:

20/1376237

Report of / Te Pou Matua:

Angus Smith, Property Consultancy Manager, angus.smith@ccc.govt.nz

General Manager / Pouwhakarae:

Leonie Rae, General Manager Corporate Services, leonie.rae@ccc.govt.nz

 

 

1.   Purpose of the Report / Te Pūtake Pūrongo

1.1       The purpose of this report is to:

1.1.1   Note the changes to the process to be used for reviewing and determining the future use of properties that are no longer used for the purpose for which they were originally acquired.

1.1.2   Seek a decision on the criteria to be adopted for determining retention of a property.

·     This report has been written to follow up on a briefing to Council on 27 October.

1.2       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance was determined on the basis that this is largely a general report implementing a process.

1.3       Any significance issues related to an individual property will be attended to through the Annual Plan/Long Term Plan process and any related decisions throughout the process.

1.4       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report exceeds this assessment.

 

2.   Officer Recommendations / Ngā Tūtohu

That the Council:

1.         Note the process changes for reviewing the future use of properties that are no longer used for the purpose they were originally acquired to make the required retention or disposal

2.         Endorse the following criteria to be used to identify properties for consultation purposes:

a.         Is the full property still required for the purpose for which it was originally acquired?

b.         Does the property have special cultural, heritage or environmental values that can only be protected through public ownership?

c.         Is there an immediate identified alternative public use / work / activity in a policy, plan or strategy?

d.         Are there any strategic, non-service delivery needs that the property meets and that can only be met through public ownership?

e.         Are there any identified unmet needs, which Council might normally address, that the property could be used to solve?  and, Is there a reasonable pathway to funding the unmet need?

3.         Note that the list of properties for disposal will be approved by the Council before it is released for consultation purposes.

4.         Note that any decisions to dispose of a property or retain a property for a new funded purpose will be made by the Council after consultation through the Long Term or Annual Plan process.

 

3.   Reason for Report Recommendations / Ngā Take mō te Whakatau

3.1       Council has a growing property portfolio that supports the delivery of services and public works.  Owning property comes at a cost and it is good practices to review the portfolio from time to time to ensure that it is still fit for purpose.  From recent review it is clear that Council has some property that is no longer fit for purpose.

3.2       Continuing to own property without an agreed purpose or use has operating / holding, foregone capital, and potential social costs.  It also contributes to poor community outcomes and is an unwise use of public assets / money, particularly in times of financial challenge.

3.3       The current process for decisions on property that is no longer used for the purpose they were originally acquired or meet needs is slow, expensive and can lead to suboptimal results (e.g. decisions to retain land without any clear purpose or budget for maintenance and other costs).  These issues are set out in more detail below.

3.4       This report presents and recommends a different process.  In essence it is proposed to establish decision making criteria and incorporate retention and disposal decisions in the LTP/AP process.  Existing Council delegated authorities would then be applied to implement any decisions.

 

4.   Alternative Options Considered / Ētahi atu Kōwhiringa

4.1       In considering the issues above the following alternatives were considered to determine the future use of a property including disposal:

·   Retain the Status Quo.  This option is not considered desirable because it is slow, expensive and produces sub-optimal results such as decisions to retain property without a defined purpose and maintenance budgets.

·   Change delegations to allow staff to Determine by Default.  Under this option if a service unit determined that a property was no longer needed, and there were no other immediate purposes, officers would have the delegation to dispose of the property.  This option lacks sufficient governance oversight to be viable as the primary process, however, there may be opportunities to use it for decision making related to low risk / low value decisions.  A delegation change proposal allowing staff to make these decisions for properties valued at under $250,000 is being prepared and will be the subject of a separate report.

·   Agreed Framework – In this option, staff would have delegated authority to make decision where they were consistent with Council approved criteria.  Decisions on proposals that fall outside of the criteria would need to be referred to elected members. While this option is likely to be a significant improvement on the current process, the preferred option is considered better as it allows for public consultation and governance input.  

 

5.   Detail / Te Whakamahuki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Property Portfolio

5.1       Council owns 10331.6 hectares (approx. 63 Hagley Parks) of land for the delivery of services or public works.

5.2       A unit of Council is the internal titular asset owner responsible for the planning, budgeting and delivery of the service associated with the particular properties.  The composition of the Council’s current property portfolio is shown in Figure 1.

 

Figure 1 Composition of Council’s Property Portfolio by Use, Number of Properties and Proportion of total Portfolio

5.3       Council’s property portfolio is growing in response to population growth, relocation of development and in response to specific needs.  Despite some significant disposals, such as transfers to the Crown (earthquake recovery), Otautahi Community Housing Trust (capitalisation) and Development Christchurch Ltd (regeneration purposes), the total portfolio has grown by nearly 8% over the last 9 years (Figure 2).  The portfolio will grow by another 600 hectares (approximately 6%) when the Residential Red Zone land is transferred to Council (noting that these figures were prepared before the recent transfer of Southshore and Brooklands RRZ). 

Figure 2    Growth in Christchurch City Council’s Land Holdings since 2011

 

Corporate Real Estate Portfolio

5.4       When a property is no longer required for the purpose for which it was originally purchased, or to deliver an activity or service, it is internally “transferred” to the Corporate Real Estate Portfolio.  This portfolio holds both properties that support the delivery of other services (e.g. some service centres, some board rooms, storage facilities), properties purchased for a specific use but not yet developed, and properties that no longer used to deliver a  service or public work. 

5.5       Officers have researched 124 properties in the Corporate Real Estate portfolio that currently doing not have an operational purpose and identified a preliminary list of 84 properties worthy of further investigation, including analysis against the criteria, if approved, proposed in this report.  These 84 properties comprises a small portion of the council property portfolio (Figure 3).

Figure 3    Proportion of Council’s Property Portfolio Recommended for Review

Current Review Process

5.6       The current process is that when a property ceases to be held for the purpose of delivering the activity or service for which it was originally purchased then business units, Community Boards and possible stakeholders are asked to assess and identify community needs and develop options to for alternative public uses.

5.7       This is generally done on a semi regular basis, dictated by the number of properties that are no longer required for their original purpose.

5.8       A period of six months is provided to establish the alternative public uses and options.

5.9       The results are collated into an options report, which would usually incorporate as one of the options sale.

5.10    The Council then resolve future use based on staff and Community Board recommendations.

5.11    The Community Boards are tasked with identifying and recommending to the Council whether the properties in their area are:

·   Held - retained for a strategic purpose.

·   Sold - declared surplus for disposal.

·   Used – for or to identify an alternative public use. Retaining the property for an alternative public use needs:

·     To be rationalised,

·     A clearly identified need,

·     To be supported by a sound and robust business case,

·     Supporting Council strategies,

·     Established funding in the Council’s annual and long term plans

·     To have an identified sponsor i.e. end asset owner (titular internal owner) / sponsor and budget provision within the LTP.

5.12    Under the new process the Community Boards over 2016 - 2019 considered a list of properties in their wards that are no longer being utilised for the original intended purpose for which they were purchased. This resulted in the following:

5.13    There were 68 properties in the property review process. This process involved engagement with the Community Boards in the form of two workshops, in some cases field trips and a couple of reports resulting in recommendations to the Council.

Figure 4    Results from 2016 Properties for Review Process

 

5.14    The current process for determining the future of properties is slow, expensive, not effective and creates a tension between local and City wide interests: 

·   The Properties for Review process started in 2016, with final decisions not made until 2020.  Through this process we presented 68 properties that Units indicated were not required for the original purpose.  Through the process 15 (22%) were declared surplus, 5 (7%) were identified as being required and included in operational portfolios, and, effectively, no decision was made on 48 (71%).  

·   Conservatively it involved 14 reports and 14 workshops, with an estimated cost in excess of $200,000. 

·   Local decisions that mean rates-funded holding costs (rates, insurance, maintenance) for properties that do not have a current or firm future purpose creates a tension with the ongoing priority to ensure rates are affordable and sustainable.   The majority of properties held for unspecified purposes or future reviews do not have budgets for maintenance apart from a small fund for reactive works in the Property department.  The lack of scheduled maintenance on these sites is a source of irritation for some neighbours.

·   Finally local decisions to retain properties are separate from and independent of funding decisions, meaning that land can be retained without budgets for desired future uses and holding costs, and independent of service unit plans and strategies.

 

Recommended New Process

5.15    The recommended new approach is shown in Figure 5.

5.16    Key aspects of this new process are:

·   There are multiple opportunities for elected member input including in setting the retention criteria (see the callouts in Figure 5), approving the draft list for consultation via the Long Term and Annual Plans, and approving the final list for inclusion in the approved Long Term and Annual Plans.

·   Only properties that meet the criteria will be put forward.

·   The community will have an opportunity to have their say on property disposal proposals through the Long Term and Annual Plan consultation processes. 

·   Local interests can be considered, through Community Board input, as well as whole of City considerations, through full Council making final decisions.

·   Decisions to retain property will be made as part of the financial planning process so Council can set aside funding for holding and/ or development costs.  Equally a decision to dispose at this time will result in more accurate revenue budgets. 

·   The process will run annually through the Long term or Annual Planning process.

Figure 5                  Proposed disposal process (inclusive of Elected Member Review Opportunities)

5.17    Officers are recommending that the criteria listed below are used to determine if a property should be considered for disposal.

Criteria

Reason

Is the full property still required for the purpose for which it was originally acquired?

Over time service delivery needs change and properties are no longer required.  This can be driven by technical obsolescence, development of alternative facilities, alternative delivery model, or cessation of a service.  Some of these decisions may be straightforward, such as a pump station site that is no longer required.  Others are more complex, such as community facilities with reduced need when alternative facilities are developed.  In the more complex situation, consideration will be given to how the property sit within wider network plans.

 

For some properties, the original purpose may be able to met with less land.  In those cases, it may be prudent to dispose of excess land.

 

If the answer to this criteria is no, then move to the next criteria for the property or part of property not required.  If yes, then do not include on the disposals list.

 

Generally once a service unit makes the decision that a property is no longer needed for its original purpose, funding is redirected to other service delivery needs.   A key consideration for the remaining criteria is funding availability.

 

Does the property have special cultural, heritage or environmental values that can only be protected through public ownership?

Some properties may have cultural, heritage or environmental value over and above their utility value.  By themselves these values do not always justify retention, as there are other mechanisms, such as covenants and community ownership, which allow for them to be protected.

 

If the answer to this criteria is no, then move to the next criteria.  If yes, then Council should retain the land.   If this decision is made at portfolio review stage, then officers should make a bid for funding to support retention. 

 

Is there an immediate identified alternative public use / work / activity in a policy, plan or strategy?

In its Long Term Plan (LTP), Council, provides high level forward plans relating to activities and services.   More detail sits in the network, activity and asset management plans, policies and strategies that are the foundation of the LTP.  Together these documents identify future public works or activities.  If a work or activity is not identified in these documents, then it is unlikely that it will be funded or proceed.

 

If the answer to this criteria is no, then move to the next criteria.  If yes, then the property should be included in the relevant activity portfolio and, if needed, officers should make a bid for funding for the alternative public use / work / activity.

 

Are there any strategic, non-service delivery needs that the property meets and that can only be met through public ownership?

 

 

Sometimes property meets a need other than utility or the protection of important values.  For instance, Council could own land as a buffer to facilities or activities that have negative externalities such as waste treatment plants.  In those cases, there may be strategic reasons why Council would want to retain ownership of the property.  Alternatively, Council could decide to sell the property with covenants to avoid reverse sensitivity issues.

 

If the answer to this criteria is no, then move to the next criteria.  If yes, then Council should retain the land.  If this decision is made at portfolio review stage, then officers should make a bid for funding to support retention. 

 

Are there any identified unmet needs, which Council might normally address, that the property could be used to solve?

 

And

 

Is there a reasonable pathway to funding the unmet need?

 

While generally Council has identified need and planned to address these, from time to time issues arise that justify ad hoc solutions.  Before committing property assets to help meet these needs, Council should also consider funding.

 

If the answer to this criteria is no, then list on the potential disposals list.  If yes, then Council should retain the land.  If this decision is made at portfolio review stage, then officers should make a bid for funding to support retention. 

 

Listing a property on the potential disposals list does not mean that Council considers that the property is surplus.  Further consultation is required and a formal decision made by full Council. 

 

 

 

5.18    The criteria would be applied at the portfolio review stage by officers and we would recommend that these criteria also guide Councillors during their consideration of the Long Term and Annual Plans. 

Discussion

 

5.19    The advantages of the proposed process are that it is:

·   Based on Council approved criteria that can be consistently applied;

·   Allows for the public and Community Boards to provide community comment through a formal consultative process;

·   Allows for decisions about the future of properties to be tied to funding decisions, reducing the possibility of Council holding land without holding budgets; and

·   Quicker and less expensive than current processes.

5.20    The disadvantages are:

·   Local wishes may not be able to funded at a city wide level. 

·   Retention or disposal discussions for specific parcels may receive less attention as part of a wider discussion on priorities and constraints, compared to stand alone decisions

 

 

 

5.21    The decision affects the following wards/Community Board areas:

·   The process itself affects all the Community Boards as it changes the way Boards engage in the retention and disposal of property. The fundamental elements and checks are still in place so that Community Boards views and preferences are taken into consideration.

6.   Policy Framework Implications / Ngā Hīraunga ā- Kaupapa here

Strategic Alignment /Te Rautaki Tīaroaro

6.1       There is no specific strategy. The proposals set out in this report and decisions sought are to create general alignment with the Councils strategies as related to the “Principles relating to local authorities” as set out in section 14 of the Local Government Act. Namely to:

·   conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner;

·   give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner;

·   be consultative and understand the views and preferences of effected parties;