Waipuna

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Tuesday 27 August 2019

Time:                                   4.30pm

Venue:                                 Hao Room, Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre
341 Halswell Road, Halswell

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mike Mora

Helen Broughton

Natalie Bryden

Vicki Buck

Jimmy Chen

Catherine Chu

Anne Galloway

Ross McFarlane

Debbie Mora

 

 

21 August 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Pratt

Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

941 5428

matthew.pratt@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board – Community Board Plan 2017-2019

 

Community Outcomes and Priorities

 

1.        Strong Communities

Outcomes for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board area:

1.1          A range of social and recreational initiatives which build and develop community wellbeing.

1.2          Culturally inclusive and celebrates diversity.

   

Our Board Priorities are to:

Community

1.3          Support and encourage the involvement of children and young people in all aspects of community life including decision making.

1.4          Support and advocate for initiatives that address poverty issues and improve the well-being of families and individuals.  

1.5          Support and advocate for activities for older adults in the ward to reduce social isolation.

1.6          Advocate for culturally inclusive practices, where diversity is supported. 

1.7          Consider disability access across all projects.

1.8          Ensure partnerships are created and strengthened with community organisations, schools and the University of Canterbury.

1.9          Foster the development of leadership and celebrate this across the wards.  

Community Board Engagement

1.10       Advocate for the promotion and accessibility of the Community Board and its members so as to enhance more active participation and transparency in the Board’s decision-making.

1.11       Supporting and enabling consultation to gain clear views from the community.

Social Wellbeing

1.12       Advocate for safe, well-run and attractive social housing and strategies that reduce homelessness in the city. 

1.13       Support the creation of safe, accessible and connected places for people to meet in the community.

1.14       Support local events and activities that bring communities together.  

1.15       Support innovative projects that enhance social wellbeing.

 

2.        Liveable City

Outcomes for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board area:

2.1       Residents feel safe in their communities and neighbourhoods.

2.2       Residents have ready access to parks and greenspace for recreational facilities and activities.

2.3       The cultural, natural and built heritage is acknowledged, valued and enhanced.

2.4       Children are provided with fun and safe environments.

2.5       Community facilities are provided that meet the needs of communities. 

2.6       A safe, efficient and sustainable transport and local roading network.

 

Our Board Priorities are to:

Roading and Transport

2.7       Work with schools and community groups to ensure safe crossings and road networks near schools and along key transit routes. 

2.8       Support public transport and cycling initiatives that promote increased usage.

Planning

2.9       Advocate for improvements to parks, greenspace and recreational facilities. 

2.10    Advocate for the protection of the quality of residential living. 

2.11    Monitor the issues of green field subdivisions and increasing intensification across the ward. 

2.12    Advocate for the community facing the challenges of growth. 

2.13    Advocate and make decisions on effective traffic management measures that contribute to meeting the needs and connectivity of local communities.

2.14    Monitor planning issues and support community concerns through appropriate channels.

Community Facilities and Playgrounds 

2.15    Ensure the new Riccarton Community Centre and the Hornby Library and Customer Services and South West Leisure Centre meet the needs of the community.

2.16    Advocate for the timely provision of local facilities to meet the needs of growing local communities.

2.17    Ensure that usage of Council facilities is being optimised.

2.18    Advocate for the provision of quality playgrounds throughout the wards. 

Heritage

2.19    Support and advocate for the enhancement and protection of local heritage assets.

  

3.        Healthy Environment

Outcomes for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board area:

3.1       A commitment to protect and improve the local environment.

3.2       Climate change and environmental sustainability is considered by the Community Board in its decision making, including for all new facilities.

 

Our Board Priorities are to:

3.3       Support and advocate to maintain clean drinking water and high standards of air quality.

3.4       Monitor pollution issues, quarrying effects and compliance of consents. 

3.5       Support local communities on land use, and air and water quality issues and where appropriate, advocate for and represent any community concerns arising.

3.6       Monitor and respond on parks and tree issues raised by the community.

3.7       Encourage and support the implementation of local sustainable greenspace use initiatives, for example, food forests and community gardens.

3.8       Support and advocate for initiatives aimed at addressing climate change. 

 

4.        Prosperous Economy

Outcomes for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board area:

4.1       Strong local business communities.

4.2       An environment where innovative projects are trialled and supported.

4.3       Has a strong social enterprise sector.

 

Our Board Priorities are to:

4.4       Continue to liaise with local business networks.

4.5       Support initiatives that promote a wide range of innovative practices. 

4.6       Foster social enterprise initiatives. 

4.7       Advocate for Council rate increases to be kept as low as possible.   

4.8       Support the provision of more affordable and social housing. 

 

 

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C          1.        Apologies................................................................................................. 6

B         2.        Declarations of Interest.............................................................................. 6

C          3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................ 6

B         4.        Public Forum............................................................................................ 6

B         5.        Deputations by Appointment...................................................................... 6

B         6.        Presentation of Petitions............................................................................ 6

Staff Reports

C          7.        Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund - Application - Halswell United Association Football Club........ 25

C          8.        Proposed Road Names - 117 Kennedys Bush Road........................................ 29

C          9.        Proposed Road Names - 32 Carrs Road........................................................ 33

C          10.      Proposed Bus Passenger Shelters - Halswell and Riccarton Wards.................. 37

A          11.      Templeton Cemetery and Sports Park Development Plan - Preparation.......... 49

A          12.      Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre - Building Scope............................................................................................................. 75

C          13.      Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Area Report - August 2019............................................................................................................ 123

 

B         14.      Elected Members’ Information Exchange................................................... 192 

 

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda, no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board meeting held on Tuesday 13 August 2019,  be confirmed (refer page 7).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

 

4.1

Graeme Dingle Foundation - Programme Update

Chris Davis, General Manager, Canterbury Region, Graeme Dingle Foundation, will update the Board on the current programmes the Foundation provides in Hornby schools.

 

4.2

Drinkable Rivers

Claire Newman, on behalf of Seed the Change, will addressed the Board in relation to the Drinkable Rivers initiative and in particular, the Corfe Reserve area. 

.

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter(s) covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

Unconfirmed

 

 

Waipuna

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Tuesday 13 August 2019

Time:                                   4.31pm

Venue:                                 Hao Room, Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre
341 Halswell Road, Halswell

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mike Mora

Helen Broughton

Natalie Bryden

Vicki Buck

Jimmy Chen

Catherine Chu

Ross McFarlane

Debbie Mora

 

 

13 August 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Pratt

Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

941 5428

matthew.pratt@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00082

That the apologies received for absence from Anne Galloway, and for lateness from Vicki Buck, be accepted.

Mike Mora/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

 

Jimmy Chen declared an interest in Item 10 in regard to the funding application from the Hei Hei Community Development Trust.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00083

That the minutes of the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board meeting held on Tuesday 23 July 2019, be confirmed.

Natalie Bryden/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                          Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

4.1

Hornby Community Patrol

Ann Smith, Secretary, Hornby Community Patrol, provided the Board with an update on the activities of the Hornby Community Patrol in the Halswell and Hornby wards.

After questions from members, the Chairperson thanked Ann Smith for her presentation. 

 

Jimmy Chen left the meeting at 4.41 pm.

 

Vicki Buck arrived at 4.42pm.

 

Jimmy Chen returned to the meeting at 4.42 pm.

 

4.2

Halswell Playcentre

Lynette Park on behalf of Playcentre Aotearoa, and Karen White on behalf of the Halswell Playcentre, addressed the Board on the possible use of the site where the Halswell Rugby League Club Rooms is presently situated at Halswell Domain.

The Halswell Playcentre is wanting to build a new facility to cater for role growth and the space limitations at its present site. 

After questions from members, the Chairperson thanked Lynette Park and Karen White for their presentation.

 

 

4.3

Halswell Residents’ Association

David Hawke and John Bennett, on behalf of the Halswell Residents’ Association, addressed the Board regarding the BottleO Halswell liquor license application and extended thanks to the Board for its support throughout the hearing and subsequent appeal process.

On behalf of the Board, the Chairperson thanked David Hawke for his dedication and tireless work regarding this matter. 

 

4.4      Gilberthorpes Road/Parker Street Intersection

             Ross Houliston, local resident, addressed the Board with his concerns regarding  safety issues at the Gilberthorpes Road/Parker Street intersection.

             The Chairperson thanked Ross Houliston for his presentation and noted that the concerns raised would be passed on to staff.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

5.1      Halswell and Hornby Wards - Speed Management Plan

Denis Cunneen, local resident, addressed the Board in relation to the Halswell and Hornby Wards – Speed Management Plan.

Mr Cunneen raised concerns about vehicle speeds in Hindess Street and other local roads in Oaklands and sought the introduction of a 40 kilometres per hour speed limit throughout this area.

The Chairperson thanked Mr Cunneen for his presentation.

 

Item 9 of these minutes records the Board’s decision on this matter.

 

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.

 

7.   Correspondence - Greater Hornby Residents' Association

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00084 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part B

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decided to:

1.         Receive the correspondence from the Greater Hornby Residents’ Association regarding traffic related issues in the Hornby area and to refer the matters raised to staff for consideration and response.

Mike Mora/Helen Broughton                                                                                                                                Carried

 

8.   Nga Puna Wai Sports Hub - Deed of Lease

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00085 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

1.         Grant a lease to Sport Canterbury to manage and operate the Nga Puna Wai Sports Hub building (Te Kohanga), being the premises comprised in Computer Freehold Register CB/42C/1204, on the following terms and conditions:

a.         A term of twenty years with no guaranteed rights of renewal.

b.         At a rental of $1.00 per annum.

c.         Undertake the process to seek tenants for the administration offices and café space to support the operation of the community sports hub.   

d.         Responsibility for meeting all outgoing costs relating to Te Kohanga and apportioning costs as appropriate, to any sub lessees.

e.         Other lease terms and conditions in accordance with the Council’s normal lease practices.

2.         If the above recommendations are approved, to:

a.         Grant approval for Sport Canterbury to enter into sub-leases for the administration space at Te Kohanga  for a one-year term with rights of renewal, at the agreement of the head lessee and sub lessee  for a lease term not to exceed a further 19 years less one day; and an annual rental to meet the operating costs for each sub lease with the following sports partners:

i.          Athletics Canterbury

ii.         Canterbury Hockey

iii.        Canterbury Rugby League

iv.        Tennis Canterbury

v.         Touch Canterbury

3.         Note that any sub lease of the café tenant is to be reported to the Community Board for approval.

4.         Grant delegated authority to the Manager Property Consultancy to conclude and administer all necessary lease negotiations and documentation.

Mike Mora/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

 

9.   Hornby and Halswell Wards - Speed Management Plan

 

Staff in attendance spoke to the accompanying report.

 

The Board also took into consideration the deputation from Dennis Cunneen (Item 5.1 of these minutes refers).

 

Community Board Decided HHRB/2019/00086

Part B

3.         That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board write to the New Zealand Transport Agency requesting that it consider reviewing the 80 kilometres per hour speed limit on Halswell Road (State Highway 75) between Augustine Drive and Dunbars Road, with particular regard to the Speed Management Guide and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, and in the context of safe and appropriate speeds in respect of achieving consistency and credibility in the setting of speed limits.

 

Ross McFarlane/Debbie Mora                                                                                                                               Carried

 

Community Board Decided HHRB/2019/00087 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that the speed limits on the following roads be revoked and set as identified in the agenda report in Attachment A, and detailed in clauses 1a.-1xx. below, including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps.

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 60 kilometres per hour on Cashmere Road commencing at a point 80 metres south of its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in an easterly direction to a point 190 metres west of its intersection with Kaiwara Street.

b.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Cashmere Road commencing at a point 80 metres south of its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in an easterly direction to a point 190 metres west of its intersection with Kaiwara Street be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

c.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 60 kilometres per hour on Hendersons Road commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction to a point 200 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road.

d.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Hendersons Road commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction to a point 200 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

e.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Cashmere Road commencing at its intersection with Kennedys Bush Road and extending in a north easterly direction to a point 280 metres south west of its intersection with Happy Home Road.

f.          Approve that the permanent speed limit on Cashmere Road commencing at its intersection with Kennedys Bush Road and extending in an easterly direction to a point 300 metres east of its intersection with Kennedys Bush Road be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

g.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Cashmere Road commencing at a point 300 metres east of its intersection with Kennedys Bush Road and extending in a north easterly direction to a point 280 metres south west of its intersection with Happy Home Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

h.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Hoon Hay Valley Road commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south westerly direction to a point 800 metres south west of its intersection with Cashmere Road.

i.          Approve that the permanent speed limit on Hoon Hay Valley Road commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south westerly direction to a point 800 metres south west of its intersection with Cashmere Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

j.          Revoke all existing permanent speed limits on Sutherlands Road (entire length).

k.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Sutherlands Road (entire length) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

l.          Revoke all existing permanent speed limits on Kennedys Bush Road (entire length).

m.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Kennedys Bush Road (entire length) be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

n.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on Sabys Road commencing at a point 50 metres south west of its intersection with Quaifes Road and extending in a south westerly direction to its intersection with Trices Road (Selwyn District boundary).

o.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Sabys Road commencing at a point 50 metres south west of its intersection with Quaifes Road and extending in a south westerly direction to its intersection with Trices Road (Selwyn District boundary) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

p.         Revoke all existing permanent speed limits on Candys Road (entire length).

q.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Candys Road (entire length) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

r.          Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Quaifes Road commencing at a point 770 metres north west of its intersection with Sabys Road and extending in a north westerly direction to a point 100 metres southeast of Whincops Road.

s.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Quaifes Road commencing at a point 100 metres south east of its intersection with Whincops Road and extending in a north westerly direction to its intersection with Whincops Road.

t.          Approve that the permanent speed limit on Quaifes Road commencing at a point 770 metres north west of its intersection with Sabys Road and extending in a north westerly direction to its intersection with Whincops Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

u.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Whincops Road commencing at its intersection with Quaifes Road and extending in a southerly direction to a point 120 metres south of its intersection with Quaifes Road.

v.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on the Christchurch City Council sections of Whincops Road commencing at a point 120 metres south of its intersection with Quaifes Road and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Longstaffs Road.

w.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on the Christchurch City Council sections of Whincops Road commencing at its intersection with Quaifes Road and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Longstaffs Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

x.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on Downies Road (entire length).

y.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Downies Road (entire length) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

z.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on the Christchurch City Council sections of Longstaffs Road commencing at its intersection with Whincops Road and extending in a northerly direction to its intersection with Hodgens Road.

aa.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on the Christchurch City Council sections of Longstaffs Road commencing at its intersection with Whincops Road and extending in a northerly direction to its intersection with Hodgens Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

bb.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on Fountains Road (entire length).

cc.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on Fountains Road (entire length) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

dd.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Marshs Road commencing at its intersection with Whincops Road and extending in a north westerly direction to a point 100 metres north west of its intersection with Whincops Road.

ee.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Marshs Road commencing at a point 100 metres north west of its intersection with Whincops Road and extending in a north westerly direction to its intersection with Springs Road.

ff.        Approve that the permanent speed limit on Marshs Road commencing at its intersection with Whincops Road and extending in a north westerly direction to its intersection with Springs Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

gg.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on the Christchurch City Council sections of Hodgens Road (entire length).

hh.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on the Christchurch City Council sections of Hodgens Road (entire length) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

ii.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on John Paterson Drive (entire length).

jj.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on John Paterson Drive (entire length) be set at 40 kilometres per hour.

kk.       Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 60 kilometres per hour on Halswell Junction Road commencing at its intersection with Denali Street and extending in a north westerly direction to a point 121 metres southeast of its eastern most intersection with the Christchurch Southern Motorway (State Highway 76).

ll.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Halswell Junction Road commencing at its eastern most intersection with the Christchurch Southern Motorway (State Highway 76) intersection and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 121 metres.

mm.   Approve that the permanent speed limit on Halswell Junction Road commencing at its intersection with Denali Street and extending in a north westerly direction to its eastern most intersection with the Christchurch Southern Motorway (State Highway 76) be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

nn.      Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Springs Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a northerly direction to a point 100 metres south of its intersection with Boston Avenue.

oo.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Springs Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a northerly direction to a point 100 metres south of its intersection with Boston Avenue be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

pp.      Revoke all existing permanent speed limits on the Christchurch City Council sections of Springs Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a south westerly direction to its intersection with Hodgens Road.

qq.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on the Christchurch City Council sections of Springs Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a south westerly direction to its intersection with Hodgens Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

rr.        Revoke all existing permanent speed limits on the Christchurch City Council sections of Marshs Road commencing at its intersection with Springs Road and extending in a north westerly direction to its intersection with Main South Road (State Highway 1).

ss.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on the Christchurch City Council sections of Marshs Road commencing at its intersection with Springs Road and extending in a north westerly direction to its intersection with Main South Road (State Highway 1) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

tt.        Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Shands Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a north easterly direction to a point 170 metres north east of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76).

uu.      Approve that the permanent speed limit on Shands Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a north easterly direction to a point 170 metres north east of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

vv.       Revoke all existing permanent speed limits on Shands Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a south westerly direction to its intersection with Marshs Road.

ww.    Approve that the permanent speed limit on Shands Road commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (State Highway 76) and extending in a south westerly direction to its intersection with Marshs Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour.

xx.       Approve that the permanent speed limit on any roads developed and vested with Christchurch City Council within the land parcels legally described as Section 2 SOP 498740 (197 Halswell Junction Road) and Lot 2 DP 33729 (57 Murphys Road), or subsequent subdivision of those land parcels, be set at 40 kilometres per hour (Note - In accordance with Clause 3.4(3)(a) of Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, this will override a default permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour that would otherwise apply as a result of the identified land parcels being located within the existing Christchurch City Area Urban Traffic Area).

2.         Approve that the speed limit changes listed in clauses 1a. to 1xx. above, come into force following the date of Council approval plus the installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and the removal of any redundant infrastructure.

Mike Mora/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

10. Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - 2019-20  Strengthening Communities Fund - Applications

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00088 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

1.         Approve its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund grants as detailed in the following schedule:

No

Organisation Name

Project

Recommendation

59262

Canterbury Fiji Social Services Trust

Collective operational and programme costs

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $30,000 to Canterbury Fiji Social Services Trust from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund.

58907

Deans Avenue Precinct Society Inc.

Our Neighbourly Neighbourhood

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,000 to Deans Avenue Precinct Society from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards delivering the Neighbourly Neighbourhood initiatives.

59061

Hei Hei Broomfield Community Development Trust

126 On The Corner

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $7,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Hei Hei Broomfield Community Development Trust towards overhead costs.

59437

La Vida Youth Trust

La Vida Youth Trust Programmes

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $34,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to La Vida Youth Trust comprising:
- $10,000 towards After School programme workers' wages,
-  $15,000 towards the 24/7 Youth Worker wages and
- $9,000 towards the Community Worker wages.

59243

Oak Development Trust

Connect 2020, Older persons Gathering 2020, Lets Cook for Women

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $4,200 to Oak Development Trust from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards the Connect 2020 event, older persons gatherings and the Lets Cook for Women programme.

59173

Anglican Diocese of Christchurch - Hornby, Templeton and West Melton

Time for You

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $600 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Anglican Diocese of Christchurch - Hornby, Templeton and West Melton towards costs in running the monthly Time For You programme.

59220

Avonhead Community Trust

Whole village

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $3,000 to Avonhead Community Trust from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards the activities and events for children and young people.

59468

Avonhead Tennis Club Incorporated

Junior Tennis Expenses

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Avonhead Tennis Club Inc. towards Junior Tennis Expenses

59479

Burnside Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Junior Rugby Administration and Development

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $2,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Burnside Rugby Club towards Junior Rugby Administration and Development.

59373

Canterbury African Council

Arabic language and culture classes

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,500 to the African Council from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards delivering the North African culture and language community education programmes.

59199

Canterbury Tamil Society Incorporated

Academy of Tamil Language and Arts

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $4,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Canterbury Tamil Society towards the Tamil Academy operating costs.

59476

Christchurch High School Old Boys’ Rugby Football Club

Rugby Development Officer

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $3,500 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Christchurch High School Old Boys’ Rugby Football Club towards a Rugby Development Officer.

59411

Christchurch Zhonghua Chinese Society

Programme Delivery

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $5,000 to the Christchurch Zhong Hua Chinese Society from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards delivering their cultural support programmes.

59357

Church Corner Toy Library

Wages for librarian (Co-ordinator/Grants Officer)

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,500 to Church Corner Toy Library from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards the Librarian/Co-ordinator wages.

59494

FC Twenty 11

FC Twenty 11 Coaching, equipment, operating costs

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $6,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to FC Twenty 11 towards football development wages, equipment and operating costs.

59235

Greater Hornby Residents’ Association Incorporated

Fun Day at Denton Park 30 November 2019

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,500 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Greater Hornby Residents’ Association towards the cost of delivering the Community Fun Day.

59108

Halswell Playcentre

Rent

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $3,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Halswell Playcentre towards rent costs.

58888

Halswell Residents' Association Incorporated

ANZAC Day commemorations, administration and community engagement

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $2,500 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Halswell Residents' Association towards administration costs, ANZAC Day commemoration and community engagement expenses.

59302

Halswell Scout Group

Insurance for Halswell Scout Group Building and equipment, and first aid training for leaders

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,780 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Halswell Scouts towards building insurance and first aid courses.

59033

Halswell Toy Library Incorporated

Halswell Toy Library

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $2,200 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Halswell Toy Library towards wages.

59059

Hearts St Peters Netball Club

Recognition and retention of coaches and volunteers

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $400 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Hearts St Peters Netball Club towards volunteer recognition.

59342

Hornby Community Care Trust

Hornby Community Network/Luncheon Meeting/Hello Hornby Event / Community Market Days

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $2,660 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Hornby Community Care Trust towards the Hello Hornby event and Community Workers Network Luncheon.

59347

Hornby Community Patrols Incorporated

General Funding

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,500 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Hornby Community Patrol towards administration costs.

58950

Hornby Good Companions Club

Bus Trip Allowance

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $700 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Hornby Good Companions Club towards the cost of older adults bus trips.

59267

Hornby Netball Club

Netball Development Officer wages

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $8,000 from its 2019/20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Hornby Netball Club towards Netball Development Officer wages.

59063

Hornby Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Hornby Rugby Moving Forward

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $5,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities to Hornby Rugby Football Club towards their Hornby Rugby Moving Forward project.

59135

K2 Youth Development Trust

Kiwi Can, Stars and Project K Delivery

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $18,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to K2 Youth Development Trust towards wages.

59380

Lions Club of Halswell District Incorporated

Carols in The Quarry and Heritage Week display

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant $2,850 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Community Fund to Lions Club of Halswell District towards event associated costs and a Heritage Week display.

59174

Nepal New Zealand Friendship Society of Canterbury

Integrated community activities and radio programme

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $5,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Nepal New Zealand Friendship Society towards hall rental for their weekly activities and the fees associated with broadcasting the Nepalese Radio shows.

59397

Revathi Cultural Association

Annual show

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $1,000 to the Revathi Cultural Association from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards delivering their annual show.

59100

Riccarton Community Church

Riccarton Community Street Party

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $2,500 to the Riccarton Community Church from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards road closure and entertainment costs associated with the Riccarton Street Party.

59422

Riccarton Leagues Club

Operational costs

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $7,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Riccarton Leagues Club towards staff and volunteer training and operating costs.

59085

SEEDS RUR Trust 

Young 1's and Shufflebumz

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $14,000 to SEEDS RUR Trust from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards wages costs for the Young 1's and Shufflebumz programme.

59218

SHARP Trust

Halswell After-School and Holiday Programme

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $6,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to SHARP Trust towards salaries and volunteer expenses.

59004

Spreydon Youth Community Trust (SYCT)

Spreydon Youth Community (SYC) Programme (Halswell group)

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $3,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Spreydon Youth Community Trust towards wages and overhead costs.

59008

Templeton Residents’ Association

Administration Costs

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $2,270 to Templeton Residents’ Association from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund towards administration costs.

59453

The Link Community Trust

Christians Against Poverty (CAP) and Halswell Community Choir

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $820 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Link Community Trust towards the overhead costs for the Halswell Community Choir.

59105

Westmorland Residents’ Association

Annual community picnic February 2020

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $750 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Westmorland Residents’ Association towards the costs of running its annual community picnic.

59256

Westside Community Trust

Community Connections Programme

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $12,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Westside Community Trust towards:
1. Salary for the Community Development Worker $9,000
2. The costs of delivering the Community Connections Programme $1,500
3. Cost of delivering the Sockburn Community Fun Day $1,500

59481

Yaldhurst Tennis Club Incorporated

Ground rent and grounds preservation and upkeep

That the Waipuna-Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $500 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities to Yaldhurst Tennis Club towards the upkeep and rental cost of the courts.

59426

Youth South West Christchurch Trust

24-7 Youth Workers at Hornby High and associated programmes

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve a grant of $16,000 from its 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to Youth South West Christchurch Trust towards wages for 24/7 Youth Workers.

 

2.         Approve the transfer of the remaining unallocated sum of $90,663 in the 2019-20 Strengthening Communities Fund to the Board’s 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund.

Helen Broughton/Jimmy Chen                                                                                                                              Carried

 

 

11. Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund - Applications - Community Board Projects - Community, Youth Service and Garden Pride Awards, Culture Galore 2020, Community Board Promotional Material, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Off the Ground Fund, Community Leadership Opportunities, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Edible Garden Awards, Summer With Your Neighbours, ANZAC Day 2020, Ward Enhancement Project

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00089 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

1.         Approve an allocation of $8,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards its Community and Youth Service Awards and Community Pride Garden Awards.

2.         Approve an allocation of $12,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards Culture Galore 2020.

3.         Approve an allocation of $1,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards Board promotional material.

4.         Approve an allocation of $1,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards its 2019-20 Off the Ground Fund.

5.         Approve an allocation of $6,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards community leadership opportunities.

6.         Approve an allocation of $4,500 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards its Edible Garden Awards.

7.         Approve an allocation of $4,500 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards Summer With Your Neighbours 2019-20.

8.         Approve an allocation of $1,500 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards the expenses for 2020 Anzac Day events.

9.         Decline to make an allocation from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund towards its Ward Enhancement Project.

Mike Mora/Natalie Bryden                                                                                                                                     Carried

 


 

 

12. Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund - Applications - Halswell United Association Football Club, Hornby Toy Library, Hornby Rugby League Football Club, Westside Community Trust

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2019/00090 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

1.         Approve a grant of $3,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund to the Halswell United Association Football Club towards junior portable goals.

2.         Approve a grant of $2,200 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund to the Hornby Toy Library towards librarian wages.

3.         Approve a grant of $4,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund to the Hornby Rugby League Football Club towards creating a half court and installing a safety gate at the facility.

4.         Declines the funding application from the Westside Community Trust towards purchasing a gazebo for their ICONZ and IFG groups camping trips.

Mike Mora/Helen Broughton                                                                                                                                Carried

 13.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

Board members exchanged information on the following:

·    Lynfield Avenue – nine bedroom boarding house approved

·    Selwyn District Council – proposed Plan Change re quarrying

·    Westlake Reserve – permanent barrier - update requested

·    Land drainage areas – fencing/barriers – vehicle access and damage occurring – consistency needed

·    Ensign Street - Medical Centre/Chemist - crossing facility – pending Notice of Motion

·    State Highway 1, Templeton – opposite Cookie Time – area clean-up  needed

·    Main South Road at Harvard Avenue – a staff response back to Board on 27 August 2019.

   

Meeting concluded at 5.50pm

 

CONFIRMED THIS 27TH DAY OF AUGUST 2019

Mike Mora

Chairperson   


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

7.     Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund - Application - Halswell United Association Football Club

Reference:

19/931634

Presenter:

Karla Gunby, Community Development Adviser

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider an application for funding from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

Amount Recommended

00059767

Halswell United Association Football Club

Football Development Manager Wages

$15,000

$3,000

 

1.2       There is a current balance of $78,354 remaining in the Discretionary Response Fund.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve a grant of $3,000 from its 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund to the Halswell United Association Football Club towards wages for its Football Development Manager.

 

3.   Key Points

Issue or Opportunity

3.1       The Halswell United Association Football Club is seeking a contribution towards the wages of its Football Development Manager.

Strategic Alignment

3.2       The recommendation is strongly aligned to the Strategic Framework and in particular the strategic priority of the Physical Recreation and Sport Policy and Strengthening Communities Strategy. 

Decision Making Authority

3.3       The Community Board has the delegated authority to determine the allocation of the Discretionary Response Fund for each community.

3.3.1   Allocations must be consistent with any policies, standards or criteria adopted by the Council.

3.3.2   The Fund does not cover:

·     Legal challenges or Environment Court challenges against the Council, Council Controlled Organisations or Community Board decisions.

·     Projects or initiatives that change the scope of a Council project or that will lead to ongoing operational costs to the Council (though Community Boards can recommend to the Council that it consider a grant for this purpose).

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

3.4       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.5       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.6       Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

Discussion

3.7       At the time of writing, the balance in the 2019-20 Discretionary Response Fund is as below.

Total Budget 2019/20

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$194,054

$115,700

$78,354

$75,354

 

3.8       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application received is eligible for funding.

3.9       A Decision Matrix (refer Attachment A) provides information on the application including organisation, project and financial details, and a staff assessment.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Decision Matrix - Halswell United Association Football Club

27

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Matthew Pratt - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

PDF Creator


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

8.     Proposed Road Names - 117 Kennedys Bush Road

Reference:

19/855853

Presenter:

Paul Lowe, Principal Advisor Resource Consents

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider and approve the proposed road names arising from the subdivision at 117 Kennedys Bush Road.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated resulting from the naming request received from the subdivision developer.

1.3       This report relates to a subdivision at 117 Kennedys Bush Road.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve the following new road names:

1.         117 Kennedys Bush Road (RMA/2018/2135)

a.         Legal Road - Lot 106

Hoyle Way

b.         Access Lot 108

Terrier Lane

c.         Access Lot 110

Ruston Lane

d.         Legal Road - Lot 113

Spalling Road 

e.         Legal Road - Lot 114

Napper Place

3.   Background

Introduction

3.1       Road naming requests have been submitted by the developer for the subdivision at 117 Kennedys Bush Road (RMA/2018/2135). Preferred names and alternative names have been submitted by the developer.

3.2       The recommended road and/or right-of-way names have been checked against existing road names in Christchurch and bordering districts, for duplication, alternative spelling, or other similarities in spelling or pronunciation to avoid the potential for confusion. The recommended names are considered sufficiently different to existing road names.

3.3       The recommended road and/or right-of-way names have been checked against the Australia and New Zealand Standard AS/NZA 4819:2011 Rural and urban addressing. The recommended names are considered to be consistent with the Standard unless otherwise stated below.

3.4       Under the Roads and Right-of-Way Naming Policy, the names considered must be requested by the developer. There is not an ability to consider alternative names without first checking whether there are any duplications or similarities with other road and right-of-way names.

3.5       Consultation has been undertaken with Land Information New Zealand who have raised no concerns with the proposed road names.

3.6       The requests have been accompanied by an explanation of the background to the names which are summarised below.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

3.7       The decisions in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.8       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.9       Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

Proposed Names

3.10    The proposed names the subject of this application, are shown in Attachment A.

3.11    These have been taken from the area with historical links to Halswell Quarry and referenced in either the: Divine Rock: The Quarrymans Gift, Greg C Smith 1993 or A Short History of Halswell, Graeme C Penney 2006.

3.12    The preferred names for each legal road or access lot with alternatives, is set out below: 

Road - Lot 106

Hoyle Way – Lew Hoyle succeeded Ned Patterson as Quarry Manager in 1938 and acted in this capacity until 1972. He was also very active in the Halswell community in scouts, bowls and on the Halswell School Committee 1965 to 1973.

Access Lot 108

Terrier Lane – Terrier was a model of truck (Leyland) used in the Quarry from 1935.  This ties in with equipment and brand themes used in the neighbouring Quarry View Subdivision.

Access Lot 110

Ruston Lane – a rock face diesel shovel.

Road - Lot 113

Spalling Lane - Spalling was a 16 pound hammer used to split and shape stone to be used for building material or landscaped walls etc.

Road- Lot 114

Napper Lane - Napper a 1½ pound hammer used to split and shape stone to be used for building material or landscaped walls etc.

Alternatives

Dray Lane – Horses pulling drays were a means of transporting quarry materials, more so once the tramway was abandoned.

Bucyrus Lane - Ruston and Bucyrus was a brand of mechanical shovel used in the Quarry. (Bucyrus pronounced Boo-Cy-Rus).  Bucyrus is a City in Ohio U.S.A. Ruston-Bucyrus Ltd was an engineering company established in 1930 and jointly owned by Ruston and Hornsby based in Lincoln, England and Bucyrus-Erie based in Bucyrus, Ohio.

3.13    Note

·    If an alternative name is selected, the name needs to be amended to reflect the road type.

·    Murhill Street (incorrectly referred to as a ‘Road’ in the attached consented plan) has already been named in an earlier decision for an adjoining subdivision.

·    In time, Lot 113 is expected to continue east over Lot 118 and into the adjoining property hence why Lot 114 has been named under the road type ‘Place’. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Subdivision Plan - 117 Kennedys Bush Road – Proposed Road Names

32

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Katie Akacich - Resource Consents Support Officer

Paul Lowe - Principal Advisor Resource Consents

Approved By

John Higgins - Head of Resource Consents

Carolyn Gallagher - Acting General Manager Consenting and Compliance

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

PDF Creator


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

9.     Proposed Road Names - 32 Carrs Road

Reference:

19/869688

Presenter:

Paul Lowe, Principal Advisor Resource Consents

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider and approve proposed road names for the Awatea Park Subdivision at 32 Carrs Road.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated arising from receiving road naming requests from the subdivision developer.

1.3       This report relates to the Awatea Park Subdivision at 32 Carrs Road.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve the following new road names:

2.1       Awatea Park (RMA/2018/840), 32 Carrs Road

·    Ensete Road (continuation of existing road)

·    Dianthus Place

·    Snapdragon Lane

3.   Background

Introduction

3.1       Road naming requests have been submitted by the developer for the Awatea Park  Subdivision (RMA/2018/840). Preferred names, and an alternative name, have been proposed (refer Attachment A).

3.2       The recommended road names have been checked against existing road names in Christchurch and bordering districts, for duplication, alternative spelling, or other similarities in spelling or pronunciation to avoid the potential for confusion. The recommended names are considered sufficiently different to existing road names.

3.3       The recommended road names have been checked against the Council’s Roads and Right-of-Way Naming Policy dated 2 November 1993. The recommended names are considered to be consistent with this policy.

3.4       The recommended road names have been checked against the Australia and New Zealand Standard AS/NZA 4819:2011 Rural and urban addressing. The recommended names are considered to be consistent with the Standard unless otherwise stated below.

3.5       Under the Roads and Right-of-Way Naming Policy the names to be considered must be requested by the developer. There is not an ability to consider alternative names without first checking whether there are any duplications or similarities with other road and right-of-way names.

3.6       Consultation has been undertake with Land Information New Zealand who have raised no concerns with the proposed road names.

3.7       The requests have been accompanied by an explanation of the background to the names which are summarised below.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

3.8       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.9       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.10    Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

Proposed Names

3.11    There are two roads and one right-of-way that require naming.  The proposed names follow the same botanical theme as the other road names approved for the Awatea Park subdivision.

3.12    Road 1 is an extension of an existing road and as such the existing approved name of Ensete Road, is proposed to apply to this extension.

3.13    Road 2 is a small cul-de-sac and the following names, in order of preference are proposed:

•  Dianthus Place (preferred) - Dianthus is the genus of 300 species of hardy annual, biennial or perennial flowering plants and are native mainly to Europe and Asia and parts of Africa. Common names are Pinks and Sweet William.

  Daphne Place - Daphne is a genus of between 70 and 95 species of deciduous and evergreen shrubs native to Asia, Europe and North Africa. They are noted for their scented flowers and often brightly coloured berries.

•  Freesia Place - Freesia is a genus of herbaceous perennial flowering plants that have a pleasant fragrance and often used in bouquets and beauty products.

3.14    The right-of-way is a U-shaped private lane that serves 16 properties, and the following names in order of preference are proposed:

•  Snapdragon Lane (preferred) – Snapdragons are plants who are so called because of their flowers resemblance to the face of a dragon when squeezed. They are native to rocky areas of Europe, the United States, and North Africa.

•  Lilac Lane – Lilac is the common name of the genus Syringa which are woody plants in the olive family and are native to woodland and scrub in south eastern Europe and eastern Asia. They are noted for their scented flowers.

•  Orchid Lane – Orchid is the common name for the family Orchidaceae, which contains more than 22,000 species of attractively flowered plants that are distributed throughout the world.

3.15    The proposed names follow an existing theme within the Awatea Park Subdivision of using plant names. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Awatea Park Subdivision - Proposed Road Names - Plan

36

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Katie Akacich - Resource Consents Support Officer

Paul Lowe - Principal Advisor Resource Consents

Approved By

John Higgins - Head of Resource Consents

Carolyn Gallagher - Acting General Manager Consenting and Compliance

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

PDF Creator


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

10.   Proposed Bus Passenger Shelters - Halswell and Riccarton Wards

Reference:

19/811228

Presenter:

Brenda O’Donoghue, Passenger Transport Engineer

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider for approval, the installation of three bus passenger shelters at existing bus stops in the Halswell and Riccarton wards. 

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       This report is staff generated. The bus stop locations chosen by staff for shelters to be installed are typically the bus stops where the average weekday passenger boardings meet a demand threshold of more than 20 people boarding a bus per weekday. This means staff are targeting the bus stops that are most used by people accessing public transport.

2.2       The proposed bus passenger shelters associated with this report have received no objection by the owners or occupiers of the adjacent properties.

2.3       The relevant Community Board for the area that the proposed shelters are to be located, has the delegated authority to approve the installation of bus passenger shelters.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve the installation of a bus passenger shelter at the following locations:

a.         Richmond Avenue, beside Knights Stream School (in accordance with agenda report Attachment A).

b.         Opposite 79 Caulfield Avenue, beside Caulfield Reserve (in accordance with agenda report Attachment B).

c.         139 Waimairi Road (in accordance with agenda report Attachment C)

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The recommendations in this report are consistent with the anticipated outcomes of the Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure in the Council’s Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Install three bus passenger shelters at existing bus stops (preferred option, refer Attachments A, B and C)

·     Option 2 – Do nothing, no shelters are installed.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (preferred option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Protection from the weather,

·     Seating provided within the shelter, and

·     Increase the visibility and legibility of public transport.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increase in the number of bus passenger shelters to be maintained by the Council.

5.   Context/Background

5.1       A bus passenger shelter is proposed for the bus stop locations presented in this report, due to the average weekday passenger boardings (ave. pax/weekday) meeting the demand threshold of more than 20 daily passenger boardings per weekday, as indicated in the following list.

·   25 average passengers during a weekday - Richmond Avenue, beside Knights Stream School.

·   80 average passengers during a weekday - opposite 79 Caulfield Avenue.

·   120 average passengers during a weekday - 139 Waimairi Road.

5.2       The location of the bus stops, and hence the proposed shelters, relative to their surrounding locality, are indicated in the following figures.

Figure 1: Bus stops, Richmond Avenue by Knights Stream School and opposite 79 Caulfield Avenue

Figure 2: Bus stop by 139 Waimairi Road

5.3       Council staff propose to install a shelter at the locations outlined in the attached bus passenger shelter plans (refer Attachments A and B). 

5.4       Environment Canterbury (ECan) is responsible for providing public transport services. The Christchurch City Council is responsible for providing public transport infrastructure. The installation of the shelters are supported by ECan.

5.5       Under Section 339 of the Local Government Act 1974, the Council may erect on the footpath of any road, a shelter for use by intending public transport passengers or small passenger service vehicle passengers provided that no such shelter may be erected so as to unreasonably prevent access to any land having a frontage to the road.  The Council is required to give notice in writing to the occupier and owner of property likely to be injuriously affected by the erection of the shelter, and shall not proceed with the erection of the shelter until after the expiration of the time for objecting against the proposal or, in the event of an objection, until after the objection has been determined.

5.6       Staff confirm the shelters will not prevent vehicular or pedestrian access to any land having a frontage to the road.

5.7       Consultation has been carried out with the affected properties. The consultation for the proposed shelters occurred during July 2019. Only a shelter where the owner or occupier of the adjacent property has provided feedback indicating no objection or where there was no response received to the consultation is included within this report. Further information about the bus passenger shelter consultation can be found in Section 7.

Strategic Alignment

5.8       All recommendations in this report, except for “Option 2 – Do nothing” supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

5.8.1   Activity: Public Transport Infrastructure

·     Level of Service: 10.4.4 Improve user satisfaction of public transport facilities - >=7.3

5.9       The Council’s strategic framework is a key consideration in guiding the recommendations in this report. The recommendations in this report help achieve the Community Outcome of a well-connected and accessible city through improved satisfaction of public transport facilities for people who choose to undertake their commute by public transport.

Decision Making Authority

5.10    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations. The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of bus passenger shelters.

5.11    Where no objection to the shelter has been presented by the owner or occupier of an affected property, staff present a decision making report directly to the relevant Community Board.

5.12    Where an objection has been presented by the owner or occupier of an affected property, staff present a decision-making report to a hearings panel, who will then make a recommendation to the Community Board. The Community Board will then determine the outcome of the objections in accordance with section 339 of the Local Government Act.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

5.13    The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

5.14    The level of significance was determined by consideration of the criteria set out in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and the requirements as set out in section 339 of the Local Government Act:

5.14.1 The section 339 Local Government Act requirements for engagement are “The Council shall give notice in writing of its proposal to erect any shelter under this section to the occupier and, if he is not also the owner, to the owner of any land the frontage of which is likely to be injuriously affected by the erection of the shelter”.

5.15    The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects the significance and engagement assessment.

 

6.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

6.1       The following options were considered and are presented for consideration in this report:

·   Option 1 – Install three bus passenger shelters at existing bus stops (refer Attachments A, B and C)

·   Option 2 – Do nothing, no shelters are installed.

Options Descriptions

6.2       Preferred Option: Option 1 – Install three bus passenger shelters at existing bus stops

6.2.1   Option Description: Install three bus passenger shelters at the following bus stops:

·     Richmond Avenue, beside Knights Stream School

·     Opposite 79 Caulfield Avenue, beside Caulfield Reserve

·     Beside 139 Waimairi Road

6.2.2   The proposed bus passenger shelter to be installed at the three bus stops will be a Council shelter type.  The image below is an example of what the shelter is likely to look like.

Figure 3: Example of shelter type

6.2.3   Option Advantages

·     Protection from the weather,

·     Seating provided within the shelter, and

·     Increase the visibility and legibility of public transport.

6.2.4   Option Disadvantages

·     Increase in the number of bus passenger shelters to be maintained by the Council.

6.3       Option 2 – Do nothing, no bus passenger shelters are installed. 

6.3.1   Option Description: No bus passenger shelters are installed at the locations identified in section 3 of this report.

6.3.2   Option Advantages

·     Option 2 has no clear advantages.

6.3.3   Option Disadvantages

·     It is inconsistent with the Council's Plans and Policies.

Analysis Criteria

6.4       Staff assess each site based on the statutory requirements as set out in section 339 of the Local Government Act: “The Council may erect on the footpath of any road a shelter for use by intending public-transport passengers or small passenger service vehicle passengers, provided that no such shelter may be erected so as to unreasonably prevent access to any land having a frontage to the road

6.5       Staff undertake geometric, road safety and bus stop best practice design assessments for each proposed shelter location. Examples of this include:

·   The shelter will not restrict nearby driveway or intersection sightlines.

·   The shelter can be located at an appropriate location relative to the bus stop, which makes it a logical place for passengers to wait within the shelter.

·   That a 1.5 metre (minimum) continuous accessible path of travel for pedestrian movement is maintained in front of the shelter.

·   Does not adversely impact the underground utilities.

·   Determine if other existing bus stop infrastructure needs to be relocated to ensure the location is accessible to the people who use the bus stop as well as the people who walk past the bus stop.

·   Determine if other accessibility and operational improvements are needed to be made to optimise the usability of the bus stop, for example extending the footpath to the kerb to ensure there is a hardstand for customers boarding or exiting the bus, or marking the bus stop to the recommended bus stop length.

Options Consideration

6.6       Option 1 is consistent with the Council’s approved Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure (2018-2028).

6.7       Option 2, the “Do Nothing” option is inconsistent with the Council’s approved Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure (2018-2028):

6.7.1   Inconsistency – The “Do Nothing” option does not support improved user satisfaction of public transport facilities. 

6.7.2   Reason for inconsistency – Passengers are not provided with shelter when waiting for a bus

6.8       Amendment necessary – Install bus passenger shelters as per Option 1 of this report.

7.   Community Views and Preferences

7.1       The properties listed below are those specifically affected by this option due to the proximity of the property to the proposed shelter. The consultation period for the proposed shelters occurred during July 2019. The consultation notice and a feedback form were emailed directly to known representatives of the relevant organisations. 

·   Richmond Avenue - Knights Stream School and Ministry of Education

·   Opposite 79 Caulfield Avenue, beside Caulfield Reserve - Christchurch City Council, Parks Unit

·   139 Waimairi Road - University of Canterbury

7.2       None of the organisations contacted have objected to the shelter proposal.

8.   Legal Implications

8.1       There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.2       This specific report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit however the report has been written using a general approach previously approved of by the Legal Services Unit, and the recommendations are consistent with the policy and legislative framework outlined in the Decision Making Authority section of this report.

9.   Risks

9.1       Should the Community Board proceed with the ‘Do Nothing’ option, the existing passenger waiting facilities remain, leading to no improvements to the level of service for passengers waiting for a bus. This may reduce patronage on wet days, as passengers may choose another mode of travel as there is no shelter provided at the bus stop.

10. Next Steps

10.1    Approval is required by the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board.

10.2    If approved, the recommendations will be implemented approximately two months after the Community Board’s approval.

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

11. Options Matrix

Issue Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1

Option 2 - (Do Nothing)

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

$36,000 for the shelter supply and installation, in addition to other bus stop remedial work, plus $1,000 for the planning, consultation and preparation of this report

$1,000 for the planning, consultation and preparation of this report.

Maintenance/ Ongoing

Transport and City Streets, Operations Expenditure budget, includes maintenance of bus stop infrastructure, as and when it is needed.

Not applicable

Funding Source

Traffic Operations, Capital Expenditure budget for bus stop, seating and shelter installations.

Impact on Rates

No impact

Environmental Impacts

Public transport is a key provision to support mode shift, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, traffic congestion and traffic crashes. Measures that promote the use of public transport helps the Council provide a healthy environment and a liveable city, as per the Council’s strategic framework vision.

Not improving the passenger waiting facilities at bus stops does not help the Council achieve its vision to support mode shift and the associated benefits to the environment, improved social, community and accessibility impacts.

Social & Community Impacts

This option helps to achieve the Council’s desired Long Term Plan outcome of improved user satisfaction of public transport facilities, through providing sheltered waiting areas for customers commuting by bus.

Accessibility Impacts

Improvements to bus stops has a positive impact to public transport customers. The placement of the shelter considers the accessibility needs of those waiting for a bus and ensuring the path for those moving past the bus stop is unimpeded.

 

Statutory Criteria

Criteria

Option 1

Option 2 - (Do Nothing)

Impact on Mana Whenua

No impact

Alignment to Council Plans and Policies

This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Richmond Avenue - beside Knights Stream School - Bus Passenger Shelter Plan - For Board Approval

46

b

Opposite 79 Caulfield Avenue - beside Caulfield Reserve - Bus Passenger Shelter Plan - For Board Approval

47

c

139 Waimairi Road - Bus Passenger Shelter Plan - For Board Approval

48

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Brenda O'Donoghue - Passenger Transport Engineer

Approved By

Stephen Wright - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

Richard Osborne - Acting General Manager City Services

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

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Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

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Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

11.   Templeton Cemetery and Sports Park Development Plan - Preparation

Reference:

19/495809

Presenters:

Eric Banks, Senior Network Planner Parks
Kelly Hansen, Manager Parks Planning and Asset Management

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       To seek Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board approval in principle to retain Council-owned land at Templeton for use as a cemetery and sports park, and to make a recommendation to the Council to progress the preparation of a draft development plan for the site.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       For health and humanitarian reasons, local authorities have statutory obligations to ensure residents are provided with appropriate burial options.  Cemetery capacity within the city is limited and future provision of burial requirements needs to be planned for.

2.2       One identified gap in the current sports facilities network is a shortage of large hub parks (minimum 30 hectares) that can accommodate multiple sports and recreation activities and large scale tournaments and events in one location.

2.3       Council-owned land at Templeton could provide a suitable site for both activities, particularly if the land area were to be augmented with adjacent land.

2.4       The Waipuna/Halswell Hornby Riccarton Community Board has the delegated authority to make a retention decision for an alternative use for the Templeton land subject to conditions being met. The satisfaction of those conditions are set out in this report. 

2.5       This is a significant project given the potential scale and timeframes for development, and the ability of the proposal to satisfy the Council’s statutory obligations for generations.  The Council’s 2018-28 Long Term Plan budgets $3.3m for the first stage of cemetery development.

2.6       Two options are considered: one utilising Council-owned land at Templeton, with possible land augmentation; the other to further investigate alternative sites for future burial provision and a sports park.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Retain 173 Maddisons Road (being titles 815230, CB32K/153 and CB32K/152) in principle, for use as cemetery and sports park, with reference to delegated authority contained within Council Resolution CNCL/2018/00158, noting conditions at 3. a. to f. of that resolution, have been considered and met within the body of the agenda staff report.

2.         Recommend to the Council that:

a.         Staff be requested to prepare a draft development plan for a cemetery and sports park on Council owned land at 173 Maddisons Road, and to investigate options for augmenting the area of land available.

b.         A hearings panel is appointed to hear any submitters who wish to be heard.

 

4.   Context/Background 

Issue or Opportunity

4.1       The Council has a statutory requirement to provide for the burial needs of the community under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964. 

4.2       Existing cemeteries have limited remaining burial capacity, estimated at nine to ten years. This capacity estimate can quickly be reduced at any time by unexpected situations, e.g. the recent unexpected development of the Muslim area at Memorial Park Cemetery, a pandemic, a natural disaster, or the accidental discovery of significant cultural remains.  This could potentially result in the Council not meeting agreed levels of service of five years capacity. Therefore, it is important to plan increased burial capacity now.

4.3       Sites that meet criteria for future burial space in the city are very limited. The Cemeteries Master Plan 2013 outlines the intention to investigate a cemetery site in the south west area of the city to cater for future burials. 

4.4       The Council is also preparing a Sport Facilities Network Plan that identifies sport facility needs across the district for the next 30 years. Staff are working closely with various sports codes, some of which are doing their own strategic facility planning in response to the changing needs of their sports. One identified gap in the current sports facilities network is a shortage of large hub parks (minimum 30 hectares) that can accommodate multiple sports and recreation activities and large scale tournaments and events in one location. The south west of Christchurch is an urban growth area where existing fields and facilities are already under extreme pressure. There is an identified need for an additional large sports park to service increasing demand in this area.

4.5       The Council owns approximately 115 hectares of fee simple land at 173 Maddisons Road, Templeton (refer Attachments A and B).  The land is held for 'Farming Purposes' and is currently leased for that purpose on a roll over basis. It is zoned Rural Urban Fringe in the District Plan. Part of the site was utilised for local waste water disposal until Templeton was connected to the city's network several years ago. 

4.6       To satisfy statutory requirements of the Burial and Cremation Act and to enable future sports needs to be met, the Parks Unit is proposing to develop the site for a cemetery (approximately two thirds of site) and a sports park (one third of the site).

4.7       The current Long Term Plan budget of $3.3m from 2020 to 2023 is expected to fund the first stage of cemetery development.  Subsequent stages, including the provision of a full range of burial types will be subject to demand and future budget but it is likely the cemetery would be developed over a period of time in the order of 30 to 40 years.  Development sequencing will be determined by the consultation and design outcome, the conditions of the adjacent proposed quarry consent and future budget provision.  It is expected that the areas to be developed in the latter stages will continue to be grazed in the short to medium term.

4.8       There is currently no funding allocated towards development of a sports park. This will be subject to future Long Term Plan processes.

5.   Land Suitability

5.1       The land is suited to both cemetery and sports use, with no comparable alternatives within the city boundaries.

5.2       Unlike most of the rural areas within the city, the site is not subject to a Groundwater Protection Zone or a Drinking Water Protection Zone (Regional Land and Water Plan). 

5.3       Investigations to date indicate a suitable soil type composed of a mixture of soil/clay and shingle that is well drained.  Further test bores now being undertaken will help determine which areas of the site would be best suited to cemetery use and which areas to sports use.  Previous soil testing has indicated all sample contamination levels are well within the criteria for the protection of human health under recreational land use and excavation activity exposure scenarios.

5.4       The site is located in an area of the city which is well beyond the extent of predicted sea level rise.

5.5       The location is ideal as there has been a population shift westward since the earthquakes and further residential development in the vicinity is proposed.

5.6       As a cemetery, the large size of the site has the advantage of being able to cater for a wider range of burial types and increasing diverse cultural needs than currently provided in the district, screen surrounding land uses, partition interior layout, develop in stages to suit demand and adjacent land developments, incorporate and provide for other uses such as cycle and pedestrian links and appropriate recreation use. The site can potentially provide for the city’s burial needs for at least 60 years.

5.7       As a sports park, the large size of the site has the advantage of meeting the need for a large hub and tournament venue identified in our network planning process, it serves a residential growth  area with high demand for sports facilities, it is sufficiently large for shared-use sport, recreation and community activities.

5.8       The southern motorway, and its soon to be completed extensions, will provide quick and easy access to Templeton from the city. For both a cemetery and sports park, the location and the size allow for flexible access options. The large size also provides the potential for greater economies of scale compared with developing multiple smaller sites which would need to be acquired.

5.9       In addition to providing for burial needs, the cemetery area would possess a significant number of open space related values.  A number of green features would be used for this purpose and to maintain and enhance the rural qualities of the area.  Screen planting of varying degrees would be a feature of some of the boundaries, internal planted divisions employed to separate different burial areas within the interior, and green/natural burial (treed) areas and stormwater detention ponds included.

5.10    Walking and pedestrian pathway links, seating, appropriate play spaces, contemplation areas and memorial and cultural/artworks could all be features of what would become the main city cemetery.

5.11    The land is currently zoned Rural Urban Fringe (District Plan) and resource consent will be required for the development. No significant issues have been identified that would prevent consent being granted for a cemetery. It is expected that an approved development plan for the site will result in appropriate zoning changes at the next Plan review. Planning requirements for a sports park will be addressed separately from the cemetery.

5.12    No other Council uses for the land have been identified by other Council Units.

6.   Proposed Roydon Quarry

6.1       Fulton Hogan have applied for consent to develop a quarry adjacent to the proposed cemetery and sports park (refer location plan at Attachment B).  The proposal is to extract, process and transport gravel from the site over a number of years.

6.2       The Community Board’s submission on the quarry consent application included recommendations for increased mitigation of the impacts of the proposed quarry on the adjacent Council land including more screen planting, increased separation, shield bunding and to stage the quarry development such that a minimum distance is maintained between the quarry site and development of the Council land.

6.3       Particularly because of the quarry development, but also to assist in achieving compatibility with Council spatial planning considerations, the design process for the cemetery and sports park will focus on transport and access issues from an early stage, including requesting an Integrated Transport Assessment. At this stage, no major issues are anticipated.

7.   Land Augmentation

7.1       Although the land area is sizeable, there may be opportunities to purchase additional adjacent land and connect to other existing Council-owned land to further enlarge and enhance the value of the site for cemetery, sport and recreation use.

7.2       Through acquisition of some of the adjacent land there is potential to increase burial capacity by up to 25 per cent thereby reducing the need to seek new cemetery land in the future.  It would also allow for enhanced landscaping.

7.3       With appropriate land purchase, Globe Bay Reserve, a currently undeveloped recreation reserve of approximately 3.4 hectares, could be incorporated into the proposed development making much better use of this site than currently.

7.4       Land purchase would link the cemetery and sports park to existing residential areas providing improved access, particularly for neighbouring pedestrians and cyclists, as well as for Major Cycle Route users.

7.5       Any land purchases would only occur on a willing seller/willing buyer basis. Draft plans developed for consultation would only show a potentially extended area with the support of current landowners.

Strategic Alignment

7.6       Current levels of service specify a minimum of two years capacity be maintained across the District.  Each subsequent year requires an additional year’s capacity up to five years capacity in 2021.

7.7       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

7.7.1   Activity: Parks and Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.4.2 Parks are provided managed and maintained in a clean, tidy, safe, functional and equitable manner- (Provision) - Minimum thee year future internment capacity.

7.8       The Cemeteries Master Plan 2013 outlines the intention to investigate a cemetery site in this area of the city to cater for future burials.

7.9       The proposal is not inconsistent with the Greater Christchurch Urban Development Strategy and the Canterbury Regional Policy Statement.  Future planning will determine compatibility of the sports use proposal and any recourse required.

7.10    Community Outcomes 

7.10.1 Safe and healthy communities. The proposed development will provide a safe and managed facility for the city’s burial needs. It will also provide sufficient land in a controlled environment in the case of an emergency pandemic. Alternative options for burial locations around the city, if able to be developed, would be more difficult to achieve sufficient space and separation from neighbours.

7.10.2 Healthy Environment. Size of land area, depth to groundwater, absence of waterways through the site mean that environmental impacts are much more easily limited compared with other sites.

7.10.3 Healthy Environment. Planting, particularly native bush as part of green and natural burial area will contribute to “Unique landscapes and indigenous biodiversity”, e.g. as an ecological stepping stone.

7.10.4 Prosperous Economy.  Use of this site compared with alternatives which might utilise land with greater soil productivity or be of greater use to commercial or industrial uses will provide greater opportunity for achieving objectives related to a prosperous economy.

Decision Making Authority

7.11    Under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and the Local Government Act 2002, the Council has the decision-making authority to make land available to establish cemeteries.  Under the Local Government Act 2002, the Council has the decision-making authority for any decision to make land available for the development of any type of park.

7.12    On 10 July 2018, the Council delegated to the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board the following decisions in terms of the land at 173 Maddisons Road, as follows:

3.      Retention of the properties set out in resolutions 1. and 2. above is conditional on staff and the Council engaging in a process that identifies an alternative strategic or public use that:

a.  Can be rationalised;

b.  Satisfies a clearly identified need;

c.  Is supported by a sound and robust business case;

d.  Supports Council strategies;

e.  Has established funding in the Council’s Annual and Long Term Plans,

f.   Has an identified sponsor, namely an end asset owner (titular internal owner/sponsor) who supports retention for the alternative public use and holds an appropriate budget provision within the Council’s Annual and Long Term Plans.

4.      That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board be delegated authority to make a retention decision for an alternative use so long as all of the conditions set out in resolution 3. above, are met to its satisfaction.

7.13    The Community Board therefore needs to make a retention decision about the parcel of land at 173 Maddisons Road, before it can recommend to the Council that staff prepare a draft development plan.

Previous Decisions

7.14    The outcome of the Council’s 2017/2018 Property Review Process included Council approval (2 August 2018) to retain 173 Maddisons Road which removed the property from short term disposal.  The retention is subject to identifying a strategic or public use as outlined in the resolution at Attachment C and included in the Property Review Process section below.  The Community Board had indicated at its workshop in 2017 the land should be held “for long term strategic reasons some of which the possibilities might be cemetery, amalgamation, regional sports fields".  Links to the Council resolution and Community Board workshop are included at Attachments C and D.  The Property Review section below addresses the conditions for retention.

7.15    The Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board has received a briefing of the proposal at a Seminar on 26 March 2019 and will receive an update prior to the consideration of this report.

7.16    Quarry submission.  Staff of the wider project team have been involved in the provision of information indicating the potential impact of the proposed Roydon Quarry works on the adjacent Council held land with respect to the intended cemetery.  This information was included in the Council submission on the quarry application (led by the Community Board).

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

7.17    The decisions in this report are at the low end of high significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

7.18    The level of significance was determined by the significant size and budget of the proposed development, the limited alternative options for providing for the Council’s statutory requirements under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964, the predicted long life of the cemetery, and being of metropolitan significance given it will eventually cater for the whole city.

7.19    Given the significance of the matter, the Council will embark on a comprehensive public engagement process to prepare a draft development plan.  Once the draft development plan is completed, formal consultation will be undertaken with the wider community.  It is envisaged that a hearings panel will hear any oral submissions on whether to proceed with this land as a cemetery and the draft development plan.

 

8.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

8.1       The following reasonably practicable options were considered and are assessed in this report:

·   Option 1 Preferred.  Retain the land at 173 Maddisons Road for cemetery and sports park use and progress with preparation of a draft development plan for the site.  During stakeholder engagement investigate the potential inclusion of adjacent land parcels currently held in private and Council ownership within the draft plan.

·   Option 2.  Do not retain the land at 173 Maddisons Road for cemetery and sports park use and request staff to further investigate and report back on alternative options for future cemetery and sports park provision.

Since a possible cemetery was first suggested for this site, several options have been considered for the city’s future burial needs.  Two existing cemeteries have been considered for extension but it would be expensive to acquire the land, and to develop, and both are likely to be very difficult to gain consent for.  In both cases the land area would provide a fraction of burial capacity that the Templeton land affords.

Other land in the north west of the city was considered but a cemetery is incompatible with the nearby airport.  There is Council owned land in Hasketts Road but running gravels prevail and it is a small land area.  Private land in Buchanans Road and West Coast Road is very stony.  Also Pound Road and other land in Hasketts Road is very close to the Ruapuna Motorsport Park.  Sizeable land parcels in other parts of the city are subject to flooding and/or high ground water levels. In addition, some other land is better suited to other uses such as that containing versatile soils, close to residential areas etc. (opportunity cost).

Potentially some arrangement could be made with adjacent local authorities to provide burial capacity for the city but this would be dependent on a robust agreement to control and manage, ensuring future capacity, a fees and charges agreement and require close legal scrutiny to ensure the Burial and Cremation Act was being complied with.  Given the population differences between the city and the adjacent districts,this is an unlikely situation.  Control and management of cemetery sites afforded by ownership is the most assured way of ensuring statutory compliance.

Another related potential option could be to purchase land outside the district but in the vicinity of the city boundary.  Again, land purchase would be required and the advantages of purchasing land not too distant from suitable land already in Council ownership are not obvious.

In summary, there are no comparable alternatives that would afford anywhere near the same benefits as the Templeton site, individually or collectively.

8.2       The following option was considered but ruled out:

·   Do nothing.  Local authorities are legally required to ensure the burial needs of the community are provided for.  Current city burial capacity is limited and there is a need to plan for the future.

Options Descriptions

8.3       Preferred Option: Retain the land at 173 Maddisons Road for cemetery and sports park use and progress with preparation of a draft development plan for the site.

8.3.1   Option Description: Prepare a draft development plan for cemetery and sports use utilising the Council owned land at 173 Maddisons Road.  During stakeholder engagement, investigate the potential inclusion of adjacent land parcels currently held in private and Council ownership within the draft plan.   Additional land parcels would be incorporated into the cemetery and sports park development as described in the Land Augmentation section 7 and other sections of this report.  Additional budget would be required for land purchase.

8.3.2   Option Advantages

·     Provides a high level of certainty that the Council will be able to satisfy its statutory obligations of cemetery provision and to cater for the future sports needs of the District.

·     Provides a high level of certainty that the Council will be able to achieve its Community Outcomes, levels of service and performance measures and community expectations for the fulfilment of the budget provision in the Long Term Plan.

·     There are no other sites in the city which can match the benefits provided by this site, not least of all the land already being in Council ownership.

·     Inclusion of some of the adjacent land parcels with the development would provide additional advantages including-

          - a potential 25 per cent increase in burial capacity reducing the need to seek new cemetery land in the future.

          - improved access to the cemetery, particularly for pedestrians and cyclists, e.g. link to the Major Cycle Route.

          - the ability to provide screen planting adjacent to residential areas and buffers to other adjacent land uses as required without compromising burial capacity.

          - a better ability to cater for cultural burial areas that require more space than traditional burials, and better able to offer natural burials requiring more space (as opposed to only green burials with standard plot size/configuration) and in so doing better contribute to the Council’s ecological objectives (indigenous biodiversity).

          - links to and better utilisation of the existing Council-owned Globe Bay Reserve.

8.3.3   Option Disadvantages

·     Nil

8.4       Option 2 – Do not retain the land at 173 Maddisons Road for cemetery and sports park use and direct staff to further investigate and report back on alternative options for future cemetery and sports park.

8.4.1   Option Description: Do not plan for cemetery and sports use of the land at Templeton but instead, direct staff to further investigate and report back on alternative options for future cemetery and sports park.

8.4.2   Option Advantages

·     Land is still available for other possible use.

8.4.3   Option Disadvantages

·     Existing city cemeteries are not easily extendable being either confined by development, or requiring land purchase at rates which would result in a very high cost per plot achieved, or the adjacent land is subject to poor ground conditions or other restrictions.  Many of the benefits listed above, including capacity provided or burial type able to be offered, would not be achievable with small extension areas.  Other land parcels of any size which could potentially be purchased suffer other encumbrances such as incompatible zoning rules, soil/ground conditions, or accessibility issues.

·     Less certainty that the Council will be able to satisfy its statutory obligations of cemetery provision and to cater for the future sports needs of the District.

·     Less certainty that the Council will be able to achieve its Community Outcomes, levels of service and performance measures and community expectations for the fulfilment of the budget provision in the Long Term Plan, as described under Strategic Alignment in section 7.

·     Likely less able to cater for cultural burials that require more space than traditional burials, and could struggle to provide natural burials (requiring more space) which would also contribute less to the Council’s ecological objectives (indigenous biodiversity).

·     All costs relating to potential purchase, planning, construction, maintenance and operations would be greater.

Analysis Criteria

8.5       Demand: Ability to cater for projected burial capacity requirements and demand for burial types is indicated in the Cemeteries Master Plan 2013.


 

8.6       Financial

8.6.1   Cost to implement:  Lower cost/economies of scale in the long term with a single large cemetery site and sports park rather than multiple additional sites (which would be required sooner with the Council only land option).

8.6.2   Maintenance/ongoing: as above. Potential interim grazing/maintenance costs prior to site development if additional land is purchased depending on arrangements  with current property owners (possession timing, potential leases etc.), but a grazing leases(s) could potentially return a cost neutral or even positive result, particularly if farming /grazing lease for Council land extended to include additional land areas.

8.6.3   Funding source: both report options would require budget over and above that already provided in the Long Term Plan.

8.6.4   Impact on rates: Purchasing additional land at Templeton or at alternative sites would both require additional funding.  However, long term the cost of purchasing additional land to extend the site at Templeton would be more economic than pursuing multiple other sites for the same capacity.

8.7       Environmental Impacts:  These will be assessed pre-consenting phase but indications for the Templeton site are that they will be low impact given low existing ecological values and low groundwater levels.  Development features including the planting of native bush areas in the cemetery may even provide environmental benefits from significant treed/bush areas.

8.8       Social and Community benefits: Option one presents a high level of certainty of achieving long term burial capacity, the ability to provide for a wide range of burial options for the city, and enables buffering for residents. If the Templeton site is expanded with adjacent land purchase the ability to provide increased capacity and improved buffering against other adjacent land uses, (e.g., proposed quarry) would be further enhanced. The ability to provide the above cemetery related benefits in addition to providing a sports park on the same site is much more likely if land augmentation is also considered with the Templeton option.

8.9       Accessibility impacts: With option one, the ability to access the proposed Council developments for residents and other cyclists is much improved with the addition of adjacent land.  Accessibility is unknown for Option 2.

8.10    Future generation impacts.  With option one, the cemetery and sports park are proposals for long term facilities.  In a few years, the cemetery will become the main operating cemetery for the city and in several years it will effectively become the only operating cemetery for the city (other than 2nd interments).  There is less certainty involved with the other as yet unknown potential land options of Option two.

8.11    Impact on Mana Whenua: None indicated by rūnanga to date.  They will be engaged throughout the process.  Again, option one has greater certainty in this respect.  Initial indications from the rūnanga are the location and ground characteristics of the Templeton site are not of particular interest or concern to Mana Whenua.  The same cannot be said for the other multiple unconfirmed sites of option two. 

8.12    Alignment to Council Plans and Policies: See Strategic Alignment above.

Options Considerations

8.13    A resolution in principle to retain the land for cemetery and sports use needs to be made before a draft development plan can be prepared.

8.14    The cost considerations between the options are relative rather than quantitative because this report is seeking approval to prepare a development plan. Once a draft plan has been prepared, costs and timing can be more fully estimated/proposed.  Further, the relative costs and other criteria comparisons have been made considering the overall objective of city wide burial provision.  For example, expenditure to provide for future burials needs to be made regardless of the location in which they are provided.

8.15    So that, in terms of financial cost, the total amount expended at the site in the long term with the Preferred option (use of Templeton land) will be less than the alternative option of seeking other (likely multiple) sites to provide the burial numbers (and potentially a greater range of burial type).  Several smaller sites would have many disadvantages as mentioned, including greater cost to develop for burial purposes and therefore less able to achieve levels of service and Community Outcomes.

8.16    Options to explore additional land purchase adjacent to the Templeton land will be undertaken in a sensitive manner with landowners approval and on a willing seller - willing buyer basis.  The plan consulted on would show development utilising adjacent land being conditional on subsequent Council approval and completion of property transactions. Following development plan approval, Council approval would be sought to progress any land purchases of the private land indicated on the development plan. 

8.17    If the additional land use were to include Globe Bay Reserve, the Council would need to complete a separate Reserves Act process if a change from its current classification of recreation reserve is required, depending on the proposed development.

9.   Community Views and Preferences

9.1       Communications, along the lines of a proposal in its early stages, have gone out to local residents and the proposals have been picked up by the media.  An introductory meeting was held with the Templeton Residents’ Association at their June 2019 meeting where the concept of a cemetery and sports park was discussed for the Council owned land at 173 Maddisons Road.  Initial comments from the residents’ association were generally positive with no specific objections.  Early communications were initiated partly because of the publicity relating to the quarry submission and its relationship with the proposal to develop the adjacent Council land.

9.2       Staff will engage with the community in the preparation of a development plan, including local residents, cultural groups, rūnanga, cemetery practitioners, and other key stakeholders.

9.3       Once a draft development plan has been prepared with community input, the Council will carry out a formal public consultation process.  The consultation will specifically seek the views of the public on whether this land should be used for a cemetery and sports use, as well as preferences in relation to the draft development plan.  

10. Legal Implications

10.1    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

10.2    This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

10.3    The legal considerations relate to the subsequent processes that will be used to advance the cemetery development.  There is a “go/no go point” at the consultation phase when the Council consults with the public on the draft development plan, and the Council seeks the views of the public as to whether this land should be used for a cemetery. 

10.4    Depending on the outcome of engagement and the final development plan, a number of legal processes are likely to be required potentially including property transactions, possible change of reserve use, consenting and plan changes.  Any decisions on the development plan will be subject to these additional processes.

11. Property Review Process

11.1    This section addresses the conditions outlined in the report to the Council mentioned in the Decision Making Authority and Previous Decisions sections above, and as outlined in a copy of the Council resolution included at Attachment C. 

11.2    The first recommendation of this report asks the Community Board to exercise its delegation to retain the Council-owned land at 173 Maddisons Road for cemetery and sports purposes.

11.3    The following conditions listed in section 12.5 above are each addressed:

11.3.1   - a. the proposal outlined within this report provides a rational alternative use for the land by describing a specific use, the implications of proceeding and of not proceeding, advantages and disadvantages of alternatives, states there are no other requests to use the same land.

11.3.2   - b. the need to use the land for cemetery and sports use is outlined in the report, including the statutory requirements to provide burials and land suitability reasons why this land should be used for those purposes.

11.3.3   - c. the proposal and the process through to implementation are outlined in the report.  Burial and sports facilities are required to be provided.  The Long term Plan provides long term budget for burial provision and in this case, a specific budget to develop a new cemetery which will be utilised for the first stage of this development.  Operational budget is required to continue to be provided on an ongoing basis to support the operation of cemetery space (regardless of location).  The main area of the proposal utilises land held in Council ownership therefore minimising land purchase requirements.  The first stage of development is provided in the Long Term Plan, development costs and implementation details will be developed as the project progresses.

11.3.4   - d. the proposal supports Council strategies and statutory obligations as outlined in this report.

11.3.5   - e. the first stage of cemetery development is provided in the current Long Term Plan of $3.3m, with the first stage of construction budgeted for in FY22.

11.3.6   - f. the Head of Parks Unit supports this proposal as a means of achieving the Council’s Community Outcomes and statutory obligations and will request an internal transfer of the land at 173 Maddisons Road to the Parks Unit following approval of the development plan.  The Lon Term Plan provides a long term budget for burial provision and in this case a specific budget to develop a new cemetery which will be utilised for the first stage of this development.  Operational budgets are required to continue to be provided on an ongoing basis to support the operation of cemetery space (regardless of location).

11.4    The Legal Services Unit have advised that if the Community Board agrees with this analysis, it will be an in principle decision given that the Council will carry out a consultation process on the draft development plan in due course.

12. Risks

12.1    Potential opposition to the proposed use of the site for cemetery and sports park.

12.2    There is a low risk that resource consent will not be given for the proposed development.

12.3    There is a risk that a plan change may not be successful for the sports park, if required.

13. Next Steps

13.1    A summary of the proposed project timeline is shown in the table below -

August/September 2019

Board/Council report to approve preparation of development plan

October  - March 2020

Community engagement

February – May 2020

Prepare draft development plan

June 2020

Board/Council seminar on draft plan

July - September 2020

Public consultation on draft plan

November 2020

Report to Hearings Panel

February 2021

Approval of final plan

March – July 2021

Implement any planning requirements

August 2021

Ready to start capital implementation including detailed design, consenting, tender and construction

 

 


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

14. Options Matrix - Refer also to Analysis Criteria, Option considerations and Option advantages and disadvantage sections

Issues Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – Templeton land

Option 2 – other land

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

Lower long term

Greater long term

Maintenance/Ongoing

Lower

Greater

Funding Source

Both require additional Long Term Plan budget beyond currently funded initial development stage

Both require additional Long Term Plan budget beyond currently funded initial development stage

Impact on Rates

Main area already in Council ownership. One site proposed for future development.

Most likely would require use of land not currently in Council ownership and in multiple sites therefore purchase costs and development, maintenance and operational costs all potentially significantly greater.

Environmental impacts

Greater potential for contribution to indigenous biodiversity

Less potential for contribution to indigenous biodiversity

Social and community benefits

Provides greater range of burial types, better access, improved buffering, better access and recreation facilities

Range and extent of these features would be diminished or possibly not possible for some features

Accessibility impacts

Access to the Templeton site is/will be good.  Land augmentation would improve this especially for locals, pedestrians and cyclists

Access for locals, pedestrian and cyclists unknown but likely multiple sites would provide less accessibility

Future Generation Impacts

This is a long term project. Future generations will have better facilities, greater burial choice and potentially cheaper plot charges with this option.

As yet unknown likely multiple smaller sites would provide less certainty for future generations.

 


 

 

Statutory Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – Templeton land

Option 2 – other land

Impact on Mana Whenua

Taumutu rūnanga and Tūāhuriri rūnanga have expressed an interest in being engaged with this project as it develops but initial indications are no significant issues with the Templeton location

Other options spread over multiple sites in other areas of the city are much more likely to result in issues being raised/be of significance to Mana Whenua.

Alignment to Council Plans & Policies

Greater ability to achieve objectives e.g. Cemeteries Master Plan, Biodiversity Strategy, Parks Access Policy, Cemeteries Master Plan, Physical Recreation and Sport Strategy. See also Strategic Alignment section.

Less ability to achieve objectives as above.

Statutory criteria

Better able to satisfy Burial and Cremation Act through provision of burial choice and long term certainty of burial capacity. See also Decision Making Authority section.

Less able to satisfy Burial and Cremation Act through provision of burial choice and long term certainty of burial capacity. See also Decision Making Authority section.


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council Land, 173 Maddisons Road, Templeton

64

b

Templeton Land - Location Plan

65

c

Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Wards - Council Property Review Process 10 July 2018 Report

66

d

Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - Workshop on Property Review Process

74

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Eric Banks - Senior Network Planner Parks

Kelly Hansen - Team Leader Recreation & Planning

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Brent Smith - Acting General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

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12.   Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre - Building Scope

Reference:

19/800903

Presenters:

Peter MacGibbon, Project Manager
Nigel Cox, Head Recreation Sport and Events 

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board’s recommendation to the Council on the location for the new Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre, approve the component schedule for the facility, and to instruct staff to commence the concept design process.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       In December 2018, the Council approved Kyle Park as the preferred location for the Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre.  The reserve classification of Kyle Park and the Kyle Park Management Plan for the affected area has since been changed.  This allows the siting of the proposed facility and formal approval on the eastern end of Kyle Park.

2.2       The Council undertook community consultation in July/August 2019 regarding the features and spaces that could be incorporated into the facility.

2.3       The recommended component schedule, listing features and spaces for inclusion was developed in consideration of community consultation responses, the Strategic Framework Community Outcomes, identified benefits, demographics, Councils wider network needs, and project budget.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Confirm the eastern end of Kyle Park, as shown outlined in yellow in the agenda staff report Attachment A, as the location for the Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre.

2.         Approve the recommended on-budget scope option for the Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre.

3.         Note that if additional funding becomes available or efficiencies are identified in the concept design process then desirable components identified in the agenda staff report Attachment B would be prioritised and included within the scope of the project. 

4.         Approve staff to proceed with procurement and development of a concept design for the Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre.

5.         Report to the Council through the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board with the concept design and updated cost estimate for approval.

6.         Report to the Council through the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board with options for the disposal of the current Hornby Library building.

 

 

4.   Context/Background

Issue or Opportunity

4.1       In December 2018, the Council approved Kyle Park as the preferred location for the Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre.  The reserve classification of Kyle Park and the Kyle Park Management Plan for the affected area has since been changed.  This allows the siting of the proposed facility and formal approval on the eastern end of Kyle Park.

4.2       The Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre project provides the opportunity to increase services to the surrounding community through the provision of a variety of features and spaces. The scope for the facility now needs to be confirmed by the Council to inform the concept design.

Previous Decisions

4.3       On 6 February 2017, the Council resolved in part (CNCL/2017/00025) that the Council:

3.      Note that to ensure that the new facility is affordable within planned capital and operating expenditure, decommissioning of the superseded facility, namely the Hornby Library, and disposal of the Council’s interests following the normal procedure will be required.

4.4       On 13 December 2018, the Council resolved (CNCL/2018/00323):

1.    Approve Kyle Park (Option 1) as the preferred location for the new Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre.

2.    Note its previous resolution, CNCL/2017/00213 (24 August 2017) approving a co-located configuration for the facility.

3.    Note that the costs to resolve landfill issues at the project site on Kyle Park will be covered by the existing project budget.

4.    Note the proposed use of Kyle Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification and the Kyle Park Management Plan 1993; and in order to be implemented, will first require a partial change in reserve classification to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve and a change to the Management Plan.

5.      Note the proposed use of Kyle Park is inconsistent with the District Plan zoning of Open Space Community Parks; and in order to be implemented, will first require Resource Consent.

4.5       On 9 July 2019, the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved under delegation in part (HHRB/2019/00074) to:

2.      Approve under section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977, the change of reserve classification from ‘Recreation Reserve’ to ‘Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve’ for that part of Kyle Park being part of Lot 1 DP78681 and shown outlined in yellow and marked "A" on Attachment A to the agenda report to facilitate the development of a community building on that land.

3.      Approve under section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977, the changes to the Kyle Park Management Plan detailed in Attachment B to the agenda report. 

Decision Making Authority

4.6       The Council remains the decision maker for the site selection, scope, concept design and contractor selection for the facility.

Facility Location

4.7       In December 2018, the Council approved Kyle Park as the preferred location for the facility.  Staff identified the eastern end of the park, as shown in Attachment A, as the preferred location on Kyle Park due to:

 

4.7.1   The relatively low use of this area of the park including the lack of formal sport, and

4.7.2   The reduced excavation required, including contaminated material, by making use of the current hollow in the east end of the park.

4.8       In July 2019, the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board approved changing the reserve classification of the eastern end of Kyle Park and changing the Kyle Park Management Plan allowing the facility to be built there.  The Acting Chief Executive consented to the changes as the delegate for the Minister of Conservation. 

Scope Development

4.9       The process used to develop the scope for the Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre was:

4.9.1   A list of features and spaces desirable to have in the facility was prepared with consideration given to the libraries and aquatic network plans, the Citizen Hub Strategy and the 2017 consultation.

4.9.2   In July/August 2019, the Council undertook community consultation specifically regarding the preferred features and spaces in the facility. The themes and responses are included in the community view and preferences section of this report.  

4.9.3   The recommended on budget scope was developed by the project team taking into account the following:

·     The Council network of facilities and the relevant facility plans

·     The Strategic Framework Community Outcomes

·     Identified benefits

·     The 2017 and 2019 community consultation responses

·     Demographics

·     Discussions with key groups (such as the schools)

·     Space configuration constraints (how the spaces would interact and work together)

·     Requirements to facilitate the integration of Council services within the building

·     The cost of the various components

·     The available budget.

4.10    Some desirable components items have not been included in the recommended on-budget option because they couldn’t be accommodated within the available budget. If additional funding becomes available or efficiencies are identified in the concept design process then desirable components would be prioritised and included within the scope of the project.   Attachment B includes further detail including consultation related comments and reasoning as to why these items are desirable.

4.11    Some components have been excluded as they are not affordable within the available budget, Attachment B includes further detail including consultation related comments and reasoning as to why these items are excluded.

Demographics

4.12    The population of the areas surrounding the proposed Hornby facility are projected to increase significantly by 2043.  The proposed Hornby facility will provide easy access to a range of library, recreation and sport and community facilities for a large population.

4.13    The New Zealand Deprivation Index (based on Census 2013) highlights the Hornby area as having higher levels of deprivation, with other developed areas in the south west in the middle to lower end of the scale.  This facility should offer a range of activities that are affordable/free and easily accessible.

4.14    The proportion of people who identify as Asian, Pacific peoples and Maori ethnicity are higher in the Hornby area than the average for Christchurch.  Accommodating for a diverse range of people at the Hornby facility is important to encourage participation in aquatic recreation and group activities and sport.

4.15    Wigram, Halswell West, and Halswell South will see significant growth in those aged 65+ years.  These areas will also see significant growth in those aged 0 to14 year olds.  It is important that the facility is accessible to those less able who will be using the facility, but also accommodates younger people.  Working with Environment Canterbury to get a bus service past the facility will assist with this.

Strategic Alignment

4.16    Staff considered five of the Strategic Framework Community Outcomes most relevant to the proposed facility and are using these as key drivers for the project.  These Community Outcomes are:

·      Strong sense of community

·      Active participation in civic life

·      Safe and healthy communities

·      Celebration of our identity through arts, culture, heritage, and sport

·      Valuing the voices of children and young people

4.17    Further, the following Strategic Priorities are particularly relevant:

·      Enabling active citizenship and connected communities

·      Maximising opportunities to develop a vibrant, prosperous and sustainable 21st century city.

4.18    This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.18.1 Activity: Recreation, Sport, Community Arts & Events

·     Level of Service: 7.0.2.2 Provide well utilised facility based recreational and sporting programmes and activities. - The number of participants using multipurpose recreation and sport centres, outdoor pools and stadia at least 4.32 million.

4.18.2 Activity: Libraries - Level of Service: 3.1.2.5 Maintain visits per capita of national average or better, per annum, for level 1 New Zealand public libraries.

4.18.3 Activity: Citizen and Customer Services - Level of Service: 2.6.1 7- 13 walk in customer service hubs.  Number, locations and hours to be determined by population growth and demand.

4.18.4 Activity: Community Development and Facilities - Level of Service: 2.0.1 Provide a range of well utilised community facilities, including voluntary libraries.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

4.19    The decisions in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

4.20    The level of significance was determined by reviewing community interest and the potential impacts to local sports clubs, conversely the project deliverables involve maximising community usage of the site for all citizens.

 

5.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

5.1       The following reasonably practicable options were considered and are assessed in this report:

·   On-budget scope

·   Do nothing

Options Descriptions

5.2       Preferred Option: On-budget scope

5.2.1   Option Description: To construct the proposed Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre on the east end of Kyle Park as outlined in yellow in Attachment A, incorporating the recommended on-budget component schedule in Table 1 below.

5.2.2   Proposed Scope and Size:  Table 1 below outlines the recommended on-budget component schedule for the facility.  Attachment B includes further detail including consultation related comments and rational for inclusion.

5.2.3   Desirable Components: Attachment B outlines a number of desirable components that are not included in the recommended scope because they couldn’t be accommodated within the available budget. If additional funding becomes available or efficiencies are identified in the concept design process then desirable components would be prioritised and included within the scope of the project.  

5.2.4   Excluded Components: Attachment B outlines a number of excluded components that are not affordable within the available budget. 

5.2.5   Future Proofing:  There are opportunities to allow for future expansion of the building to meet the ongoing needs of the growing community.  The design team will consider this further through the concept design process.

 

Table 1: Recommended On-Budget Component Schedule

COMPONENT

APPROXIMATE BUILDING AREA

COMMENT

General

 

 

Foyer, Customer Services Area and Espresso bar

455m2

Including reception, Espresso bar with associated seating, public toilets, baby change, parenting room and wind lobby/s

Staff work room and staffroom

165m2

Staff workstations, staffroom and toilets for onsite staff

Internal infrastructure spaces

45m2

I.T. room, electrical room, plant, storage

Pools

 

 

Multi-purpose lane pool

810m2

25m x 20m (8 lanes) x 1.4m to 2m deep, ramped access.

Learn to swim pool

300m2

15m x 10m, ramped access

Toddlers pool and wet deck

230m2

7m x 8m pool with beached access and wet deck with small water toys

Family spa pool

70m2

5m x 7m, ramped access

Changing Rooms

260m2

Male and Female change rooms plus 4 to 6 Family Change/Accessible change rooms, toilets and showers

Ancillary pool spaces

435m2

Stores, Water Treatment, Pool Control, First Aid, Cleaners, Plant Room

Library

 

 

Library Collections Space

645m2

Including digital collections and public access computers

Creative activities room

100m2

Flexible room/s with a range of creative equipment and various seating options

Multi-purpose study/ meeting/breakout rooms

35m2

Seating for around five people each

Collection handling/ workroom

70m2

Workroom for managing the collection including storage

External

 

 

Parking

 

Approximately 120 carparks, bus parking, cycle parking

Landscaping

 

 

Enabling work and infrastructure

 

Site works, drainage, water, I.T. and other services

 

5.2.6   Indicative Timeframe: The Council and the Community Board have indicated a desire to deliver the facility in a timely manner.  An indicative programme is set out in Table 2 below assuming the recommendations in this report are approved.  The project team will review the programme during the concept design and once a contractor is engaged, when more information is available.

 


 

 

Programme Item

Date Complete

Client design team engaged

November 2019

Contractor engaged

Mid 2020

Ground work commences

Early 2021

Building construction commences

Mid 2021

Table 2: Indicative Programme

5.2.7   Cost: Quantity Surveyors Aecom prepared a cost estimate for the project based on the component schedule in Table 1 and including the building and foundation solutions, car parking, landscaping, professional fees, and contingencies.  Aecom’s cost estimate is $35,730,000 compared to the budget of $35, 768,576.

5.2.8   Foundations: Kyle Park tops an old uncontrolled landfill.  Tonkin & Taylor suggest that commonly used driven piles would be most suitable as the foundations under the building.  Appropriate design of the fill required under the carpark will mitigate settlement from the landfill in this area.

5.2.9   The usual Resource Consent processes will determine how contamination on the site is managed.

5.2.10 The cost of the foundation work is included in the cost estimates within this report.

5.2.11 Construction Procurement: Internal workshops were held in early 2018 and in 2019, and market sounding undertaken, to inform the preferred contract type for the construction.  This indicated a NZS3916 Design and Construct (design and build) contract was preferable.

5.2.12 Operational Expenditure: The Council has made a provision in the LTP for replacements and renewals (R&R) for the new facility. This will be refined and updated as part of the next LTP process to ensure it sufficient to keep the facility current and operational over its useful life.

5.2.13 Option Advantages

·     This option maintains a balance between the budget, the community wishes, the Community Outcomes and the Council’s existing network of facilities.

·     This option delivers the key components needed for the facility to work while considering the need to allow for future growth and need.

5.2.14 Option Disadvantages

·     Desirable components are left out of the facility to keep within the budget. 

·     Given the post-earthquake growth in the area, the new facility will be close to capacity on opening.

5.3       Do Nothing Option

5.3.1   Option Description: To not construct the proposed facility.

5.3.2   Option Advantages

·     The capital and operational budgets could be spent elsewhere or saved.


 

 

5.3.3   Option Disadvantages

·     This option would miss opportunities to make significant gains in terms of the Community Outcomes for this area of the city.  This community has significant needs for the facility in terms of both growth and deprivation. 

6.   Community Views and Preferences

6.1       In early 2017, the Council undertook community consultation regarding potential sites for the facility.  This consultation also asked how respondents would envisage using the facilities, providing information on desired features and spaces.  The responses were in the form of general comments.

6.2       In July/August 2019, the Council undertook community consultation specifically regarding the preferred features and spaces in the facility.  The main themes from the consultation question ‘what difference will this facility make to you personally?’ were:

6.2.1   The strongest message we received in response to this question was that this new facility will provide the community a place to go that is accessible and easy to get to for the local community and there will be no need to travel outside of the area.  (98 submissions)

“Having a facility like this in my local area I would be more motivated to be more active and more about my health and well-being”.

“Having a pool that I can take my kids to without a long drive, being able to walk there will be huge. Same with a library. Will be going to both on a weekly basis”.

6.2.2   Another strong theme that the community told us was that this facility will give them both health and fitness opportunities and improve their quality of life and well-being.

“Personally, this would be my go to happy place as it combines my love of books with my love of the water. It would have a large room so people can do fitness such as yoga/pilates together or have community meetings and be involved in Hornby. It would also have a coffee shop. This is heaven on Earth for the community”.

 

‘It will create a quiet space where I will be able to study for my masters close to my home. Having library, pool, a fitness centre and a cafe would allow me to look after my physical, social, and emotional well-being in one place while I study, especially since I don't have internet access at home”.

 

6.2.3   Another key theme that was strong was that this facility will create a place where the community can come together, a fun place to hang out with friends and also a place where they can meet other people.  We also heard that this will also be a place where families can do things together.

“I am moving into this area next year and it would be a great place to get to know people in the area. It would be good for my children to have somewhere to go and something to do”.

“This facility would make a huge positive impact on my family and I'm sure will be used by all my children and grandchildren as a gathering place and contribution towards our health and creativity”.

“These facilities will help me and my friends to get together more often if we would like to group study after school since it's only a few steps away from Hornby High School. We hold group studies at the CBD in Turanga library but not often because it's kind of far away. The commute takes about 45mins - 1hour depending on the traffic. This takes away time from our study time. We could only study from 4 pm - 5:30 pm because some of my friends have curfews :D”

“I could make friends and play games with them”

6.2.4   We also received feedback about how a hydrotherapy pool would be welcome and well used by the elderly, disabled and sporting communities.  Currently many people travel to use the hydrotherapy pool at Rolleston.

6.2.5   General comments

·    Hydroslide - if not able to be built now then plan for later

·    Create an outdoor space which can be lit as not near any residential properties eg basketball court/seating

·    outdoor playground

·    Creative space

·    Community garden space

·    Pool design to allow for an area to be sectioned off to give privacy to women only swim classes (as at Pioneer)

·    Wide range of cultures and communities need to be considered in the design

·    Close proximity to schools need to be considered and what their needs are

·    Long time coming - needs to be built as quickly as possible

·    Consider art in the design

·    Safe access to the facility

·    Pedestrian access from the mall - railway underpass in urgent need of upgrade to make it safe

·    Hydrotherapy pool for aging population, disabled community and sports people

·    Great space - Community at the heart

·    Excited Hornby are getting this facility for their community

·    Toilet directly off the main pool area for children/adults with special needs

·    Plenty of changing room space

·    Seating around the pool

·    Really good to have study spaces/computer to be mandatory

·    What opportunities are being considered for social services support within this facility?

·    Automatic doors to make it wheelchair friendly

·    Large multi-purpose room that can be divided off

·    Don’t make it too small

·    Office space for community organisations

·    Keep the prices down

·    Indoor sports facility

·    Child minding services

                                                                         

6.2.6   A full copy of the community comments is included as Attachment C and a graph summarising the consultation selections is included as Attachment D

7.   Legal Implications

7.1       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.2       This report has not been reviewed or approved by the Legal Services Unit.

8.   Risks

8.1       There is a low risk that the community expectations for the facility will not be meet. The treatment of this risk is to provide good communication and provide for future expansion.

9.   Next Steps

9.1       Following approval of the recommended component schedule, the procurement of a client-side design team will progress commencing concept design.  The design team will consult with the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board, Tuahiwi (via Matapopore), and specific community groups regarding the design.  The concept design will be reported to the Council through the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A  - Kyle Park Area Proposed for HLCSSWL

85

b

Atachment B - Component Schedule HLCSSWL

86

c

Attachment C - Feedback from Kyle Park HLCSSWL Survey

89

d

Attachment D - Consultation Summary Graph HLCSSWL

122

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Peter MacGibbon - Project Manager

Approved By

Nigel Cox - Head of Recreation, Sports & Events

Brent Smith - Acting General Manager Citizens & Community

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

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27 August 2019

 

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27 August 2019

 

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13.   Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Area Report - August 2019

Reference:

19/871679

Presenter:

Matthew Pratt, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

This report provides information on current initiatives and issues within the Community Board’s area and to provide the Board with a strategic overview and inform sound decision making.

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decide to:

1.         Receive the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Area Report for August 2019.

2.         Receive the information contained in the staff memorandum regarding the Main South Road at Harvard Avenue.

3.         Receive the information contained in the staff memorandum regarding the proposal for a Peace Garden at Harrington Park. 

4.         Receive the minutes of the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board’s Submissions Committee meeting held on 10 July 2019 to complete a Board submission on the Council’s Draft Integrated Water Strategy.

5.         Receive the minutes of the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board’s Submissions Committee meeting held on 7 August 2019 to complete a Board submission on the Council’s Our District’s Emissions Target.

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Memos/Information/Advice to the Board

3.1.1   The Board continues to receive strategic, technical and procedural advice mainly through an ongoing programme of Board Seminars and/or Workshops generally held at the conclusion of the Board’s twice monthly ordinary meetings.

3.1.2   Main South Road – Opposite Harvard Avenue

At its meeting on 30 October 2018, the Board inter alia, decided (HHRB/2018/00139):

7.      That staff will investigate the option of a right turn bay on the Main South Road opposite Harvard Avenue and respond back to the Board within six months.

Furthermore, at its meeting on 29 January 2019, the Board received a petition from local businesses requesting access to their Main South Road properties via a turning lane at Harvard Avenue.

The Board agreed to receive the petition and refer the matters raised to staff for investigation.

A memorandum from staff (refer Attachment A) responding back to the Board on these matters, is included for the Board’s consideration.

3.1.3   Harrington Park – Proposed Peace Garden - Update

At its meeting on 26 June 2019, the Board decided to:

1.            Refer the proposal received from the local Riccarton community for a Peace Garden at Harrington Park to staff for consideration and response back to the Board and the community representatives.

A memorandum from staff (refer Attachment B) is provided as an update to the Board.

 

3.2       Board area Consultations/Engagement/Submission Opportunities

3.2.1   Submissions Committee – Meeting Minutes 10 July 2019

Presented for record purposes (refer Attachment C) are the minutes of the Board’s Submissions Committee meeting on 10 July 2019 to prepare and complete a Board submission to the Council on its Draft Integrated Water Strategy.

3.2.2   Submissions Committee – Meeting Minutes 7 August 2019

Presented for record purposes (refer Attachment D) are the minutes of the Board’s Submissions Committee meeting on 7 August 2019 to prepare and complete a Board submission to the Council on its Our District’s Emissions Target.

 

3.3       Board Reporting

3.3.1   Board members are invited through the issued weekly meetings schedule, to forward to local staff, any items they would like highlighted for inclusion in the Board’s monthly Newsletter, Newsline releases and the monthly report to the Council.

 

4.   Community Board Plan – Update against Outcomes

4.1       The next quarterly update will be included in the Area Report to the Board meeting on
24 September 2019.


 

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Other partnerships with the community and organisations

5.1.1   Staff have collaborated with the University of Canterbury Students’ Association and the Electoral Commission to hold an "enrol for coffee" event at the University.  Students were provided with a free coffee voucher if they enrolled on the electoral roll or could prove they were on the roll.

 

5.2       Community Facilities      

5.2.1   Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Facility

The Hornby facility survey took place between 22 July 2019 and 12 August 2019.

The survey asked participants to pick the four features most important to them in the proposed Hornby facility from a list of 13 features. It also provided an opportunity to feedback thoughts in a comments box.


 

The options were:


A separate report from the Project Team regarding the project scope is being presented to the Board for consideration on 27 August 2019.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Deans Avenue Precinct Society - Meeting with Police

The Deans Avenue Precinct Society hosted a recent meeting with Superintendent Lane Todd from the New Zealand Police, supported by local Community Governance Team staff. 

Superintendent Todd provided an update on ongoing security arrangements around the Al-Noor Mosque and the work Police are doing in dealing with cruising drivers who are causing issues for local residents.


6.2       126 On The Corner, Hei Hei - New Building

The long-awaited new building has arrived and alterations have begun on the new facility at 126 On The Corner. 

I like this oneThe Trust purchased the building to provide more activities for the community. Work is continuing using volunteers to get the building ready for opening, including removing walls, installing fire walls, plastering, painting, building a deck and a ramp. Unexpected costs have meant that there will be a delay in opening the facility. 

 

 

6.3       Hornby Community Activator - Update

The Hornby Community Activator, Satali Auvae, has been in her position since the end of March 2019. 

This position was created with the help of the Council’s Community Resilience and Partnership Fund.  The aim of the position is to connect groups/organisations, profile current projects and activities in Hornby as well as making use of spaces available in the area. 

Satali has been talking to organisations, groups and individuals in the Hornby community, listening and capturing their voices on how to create a more positive and connected Hornby community. 

At the July Hornby Community Workers Network, Satali fed back her responses and is seeking further feedback from the community over the coming months. This feedback will start to give direction on the focus of her role and initiatives that the community could focus on.


 

 

6.4       Hornby Community Patrol - Update

On 18 June 2019, the Hornby Patrol joined three other Christchurch Patrols to celebrate 25 years of community patrolling.

Approximately 120 patrollers and guests joined the Hornby, Christchurch North, Christchurch South and City Sumner Patrols at The Atrium, Hagley Park. The event was sponsored by the Christchurch City Council.

During the formalities Ann Smith, the Hornby Secretary, was presented with a Gold Shield from CPNZ for her services to Community Patrolling.

The Hornby Community Patrol was determined to raise funds for the purchase of a new vehicle for this event and did so, thanks to grants from local businesses, fundraising and support from the Council. 

Hornby Community Patrol is still the “eyes and ears” for the police but also supports a range of police driven projects. These include supporting natural disasters, engraving tradies tools with their drivers licence number, making car number plates safe by replacing the normal screws with anti-theft ones, reporting of graffiti, attendance at training days facilitated by police and supporting police applicants. The placing of police applicants into patrols has reduced the average age of a patroller from 65 years to 40 years. Hornby currently has twenty police applicants as members and five have graduated from the Police College in the last two years.

 

6.5       Westlake Clean-Up Event

The Hurutini Student Council are working with Council staff to plan their clean-up project at Westlake Park to be held on Wednesday 11 September 2019 from 10am.

The event was piloted last year, when the Hurutini Student Council identified Westlake Park as an area they wanted to help enhance. The clean-up included a litter sweep of the entire area, seed planting, educational talks on the resident bird and aquatic wildlife and tips and advice on how to reduce plastic waste.

This year’s Westlake clean-up hopes to build on this, adding in more stations and attracting a larger mix of people from local schools and the community to support the event.

 

6.6       The Breeze Walking Festival

Planning is underway for this event which will be held from 28 September to 13 October 2019.

 Over these two weeks, there will be fifty walks across Christchurch, Waimakariri and Selwyn Districts including five signature walks, sunrise and sunset walks, the popular pre-school and whanau focused and some new walks.

There are three walks planned in the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton wards being The Great Ōtākaro Avon River Walk, starting on the corner of Homestead Lane and Ilam Road, Sister City Gardens Stroll at Halswell Quarry and Riccarton House to Mona Vale Homestead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.7       University of Canterbury Students’ Association

The new home of the University of Canterbury Students’ Association, Haere-roa, was officially opened on 2 August 2019.  It includes the traditional student welfare and advocacy spaces, an outdoor amphitheatre overlooking the Avon River, as well as club, meeting, hospitality, office and event spaces.

A key feature of the building is the new Ngaio Marsh Theatre. As well as being used for performances and concerts, it is a space for UCSA's 160 clubs and societies. The community will also be able to book the space when students are not on campus.

 


 

                     

7.   Updates from Other Units

7.1       Parks Update – August 2019

Winter sports turf maintenance is currently under way.

 

The Meteorological Office has predicted cold temperatures ranging from low to mid-teens, with intermittent rainfall during the month. It is typical at this time of year that growth rates decrease region-wide due to the increase of frosts, but this has not occurred this winter.

 

Scheduled Parks Maintenance Programme for August 2019

Activity

Frequency per month

Ornamental Mowing

2

Amenity Mowing

2

Informal Mowing

0

Winter Sport Mowing

4

Winter Cricket Block Maintenance

2

Winter Sport Line Marking

3

Chemical Weed Control

1

Ornamental Garden Maintenance

2

BBQ Clean

2

Drinking Fountain Clean

4

 

Scheduled Parks Maintenance Programme for September 2019

Activity

Frequency per month

Ornamental Mowing

4

Amenity Mowing

3

Informal Mowing

0

Winter Sport Mowing

2

Winter Cricket Block Maintenance

0

Winter Sport Line Marking

1

Chemical Weed Control

1

Ornamental Garden Maintenance

2

BBQ Clean

2

Drinking Fountain Clean

4

 


 

Upper Riccarton Domain

The playground equipment has been removed with the grassed area now reinstated to its former condition. All temporary fencing has been removed from site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nga Puna Wai

A ‘No fishing’ sign has been erected at the footbridge from Warren Crescent into the Nga Puna Wai area in response to concerns about people fishing for eels in this upper section of the Heathcote River. Since installing the sign, no further complaints have been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Denton Park

The mulch pile behind the velodrome has been scheduled for removal and use for roadside landscaping. There has been an issue of persons unknown dumping extra material at the same site, therefore signage is being erected indicating that no mulch material is to be dumped.

 

West Broken Run

Planting has begun along the banks of the drainage reserve. This will eliminate the safety issues with mowing along the steep banks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


New Staff

A number of new staff commenced their employment with the Council on 5 August 2019 and will be part of either the newly formed Parks Gardens Maintenance Officers (PGMO) teams, or an expanded Ranger Team. The staff have completed their induction prior to being in the field from 12 August 2019.

8.   Community Board Funding Update

8.1       A summary is provided for information on the status of the Board’s 2019-20 funding as at July 2019 (refer Attachment E).

8.2       Youth Development Fund – under the Board's delegated authority, the following allocations were made in July and in early August 2019:

·    $500 to Emma Thornley towards competing in the Softball Test Series in Germany and the Czech Republic.

·    $1,000 to Villa Maria College on behalf of fourteen students towards competing in the National Big Sing Finale in Dunedin.

·    $500 to Paris Chin towards representing New Zealand at the Rhythmic Gymnastics Junior World Championships 2019 in Moscow, Russia.

·    $300 to Samantha Irvine towards representing Canterbury in the Under 23 New Zealand Basketball National Championships 2019 in Porirua.

The following allocation was made on 5 August 2019:

·    $800 to Christchurch Boys' High School on behalf of eight students towards participating in the ASB Polyfest 2020 in Auckland.

The following allocations were made on 8 August 2019:

·    $400 to Hornby High School on behalf of six students competing in the South Island Secondary Schools Netball Tournament in Nelson.

·    $400 to Hornby High School on behalf of six students towards competing in the South Island Secondary Schools Basketball Tournament in Greymouth.

·    $500 to James Clelland towards attending Space Camp in Huntsville, USA.

8.3       Local Response Fund – under the Board's delegated authority, the following allocation was made in July 2019:

·    $1,000 to the University of Canterbury Muslim Students Association towards a camera and associated costs for an empowerment project.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Staff Memorandum - Main South Road at Harvard Avenue

134

b

Staff Memorandum - Harrington Park Proposed Peace Garden

169

c

Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Submissions Committee Minutes - 10 July 2019

172

d

Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Submissions Committee Minutes - 7 August 2019

185

e

Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Funding Update - August 2019

190

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Peter Dow - Community Board Advisor

Matthew Pratt - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Noela Letufuga - Support Officer

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

27 August 2019

 

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14.   Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.