Christchurch City Council

Supplementary Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Thursday 29 August 2019

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

27 August 2019

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Mary Richardson

Acting Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8999

 

 

Samantha Kelly

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 6227

samantha.kelly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

29 August 2019

 

 


Council

29 August 2019

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

11.      Resolution to Include Supplementary Reports....................................................... 4

12.      Hagley Oval proposed amendments to the District Plan - feedback to Regenerate Christchurch..................................................................................................... 5

13.      Drinking Water Supply Update........................................................................... 15  


Council

29 August 2019

 

 

11. Resolution to Include Supplementary Reports

1.      Background

1.1          Approval is sought to submit the following reports to the Council meeting on 29 August 2019:

12.   Hagley Oval proposed amendments to the District Plan - feedback to Regenerate Christchurch

13.   Drinking Water Supply Update

1.2          The reason, in terms of section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, why the reports were not included on the main agenda is that they were not available at the time the agenda was prepared.

1.3          It is appropriate that the Council receive the reports at the current meeting.

2.      Recommendation

2.1          That the reports be received and considered at the Council meeting on 29 August 2019.

12.   Hagley Oval proposed amendments to the District Plan - feedback to Regenerate Christchurch

13.   Drinking Water Supply Update

 

 


Council

29 August 2019

 

 

12.   Hagley Oval proposed amendments to the District Plan - feedback to Regenerate Christchurch

Reference:

19/976830

Presenter(s):

David Griffiths - Head of Planning and Strategic Transport
Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of the report is for the Council to approve the draft staff feedback letter to Regenerate Christchurch, which is included as Attachment A. This letter has been revised since last considered by the Council, as requested by the Council at its meeting on 22 August (CNCL/2019/00186):

Approves providing the amended feedback to Regenerate Christchurch on the Proposal to amend the District Plan, under section 71, the detail of which will be signed off by the Council at the meeting of Thursday 29 August 2019.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       Regenerate Christchurch is seeking that the Minister uses section 71 of the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016 (GCR Act) to amend the District Plan. The Council has an opportunity to provide its views to Regenerate Christchurch, as the proponent of these changes, under section 66 of the GCR Act and will have another chance to provide written comments following public notification of the proposal, if the Minister decides to process the request.

2.2       The Council received a proposal under section 65 of the GCR Act from Regenerate Christchurch on 24 July 2019, to amend the District Plan to provide for the use of Hagley Oval as a major sports facility with provision for permanent floodlights. For further details on the draft Proposal and its implications, see Item 27 on the Council’s agenda of 22 August 2019. The Council has 30 working days to provide its views on the proposed changes, which are due on 4 September.

2.3       The Council considered the draft feedback on 22 August 2019 and requested that changes be made on the basis of the questions and discussion, so that it could reconsider this feedback on 29 August 2019. Staff have amended the letter accordingly, and this is included as Attachment A.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Approves the attached amended feedback on the Proposal to change to the District Plan (Attachment A), which will be sent to Regenerate Christchurch as per the Council’s resolution of 22 August (CNCL/2019/00186).

2.         Delegates to the Manager Hearings & Council Support, the power to approve the composition of the membership of the Hearings Panel to include any persons who are non-elected members, should the Hearings Panel need to proceed during the period when no elected members are able to act following the triennial local body elections. 

 

 

Next Steps

3.1       Following receiving feedback from strategic partners, Regenerate Christchurch will, as per statutory process:

3.1.1   Depending on the feedback received, finalise the Proposal and submit it to the Associate Minister.

3.1.2   The Minister must decide whether to proceed with the Proposal within 30 working days of receiving it, and if she does decide to proceed, must publish a notice inviting written comments.

3.1.3   The Minister will then make a decision on the Proposal no later than 30 working days after the date specified in the published notice, having taken into account written comments and having particular regard to the views of strategic partners.

3.2       At the same time, Council staff are working with Regenerate Christchurch to prepare for any required processes (including consultation) under the Reserves Act 1977. This could involve new leasing arrangements, which would likely be needed should the Minister approve the section 71 Proposal.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft CCC statement of views on Hagley Oval Proposal

7

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Katie McFadden - Senior Policy Analyst

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

David Griffiths - Head of Planning & Strategic Transport

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

  


Council

29 August 2019

 

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Council

29 August 2019

 

 

13.   Drinking Water Supply Update

Reference:

19/957264

Presenter(s):

Helen Beaumont

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       To update the Council on steps taken to ensure the continuing safety of drinking water in the city, and progress on delivering a new Water Safety Plan.

1.2       To provide advice on the future regulatory framework for drinking water announced by government earlier this month, in response to the Havelock North Inquiry.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       For many years the Council has provided untreated drinking water from confined aquifers safely and securely.  It has had a record of bacterial compliance with the New Zealand Drinking Water Standards (DWSNZ), and there is no evidence of elevated levels of water-borne disease in Christchurch as compared with cities with chlorinated drinking water supplies.  

2.2       This has relied on constant vigilance over the supply of drinking water and a commitment to a higher level of monitoring than required by DWSNZ, together with continuous improvement of the Council’s network, including wells, pump stations, reservoirs and infrastructure and management systems.

2.3       The Council undertakes a number of preventative measures to manage risks including maintaining network water pressure, strict hygiene procedures and backflow prevention.

2.4       In response to losing secure bore water status in December 2017 the Council resolved, in January 2018, to temporarily chlorinate the Christchurch city water supply for up to one year.  The purpose was to meet Drinking Water Standards, in the absence of secure status, while the Council undertook a programme of fast tracking the remediation of below-ground wellheads. 

2.5       The Drinking Water Assessor signed off the Christchurch City Water Safety Plan in March 2018. This confirmed the management process for a safe and secure supply of drinking-water in Christchurch.

2.6       In December 2018, the Ministry of Health announced a new framework for developing Water Safety Plans. The Council agreed on a voluntary basis to develop new Water Safety Plans in accordance with the guidelines issued in January 2019.  Council has revised four Water Safety Plans for Banks Peninsula water supplies in accordance with these guidelines.

2.7       In August 2019, the Ministers of Health and Local Government announced preliminary decisions on the establishment of a new regulatory framework for drinking water.  This announcement included the decision to remove ‘secure status’ from DWSNZ, making residual disinfection (usually chlorine) mandatory. At the same time they announced that exceptions/exemptions would be allowed in special circumstances, and that is what Council is preparing for.

2.8       The new standards and regulatory frameworks mean that we need to take an even more proactive approach to risk assessment and management at each point in the drinking water supply network.

2.9       The Council remains committed to providing a water supply in the Christchurch city urban zone that is safe to drink, in accordance with the New Zealand Drinking Water Standards.  We continue to oppose the imposition of mandatory use of residual chlorine as a disinfectant and intend to seek an exemption under the proposed new framework.

2.10    The steps being taken by the Council to meet the new standards and to maintain and improve the security of its water supply network are set out in this report.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council notes the report and advice from staff contained within it.

 

4.   Context/Background

4.1       The Council has provided untreated water from confined aquifers safely and securely for many years and is committed to maintaining constant vigilance over its supply of drinking water.

4.2       This relies on managing the risk of contamination and incorporates continuous improvement of the Council’s water supply network – including the wells, pump stations, mains and sub-mains, reservoirs and associated equipment – and management systems.

The Council’s Current Improvement Programme

4.3       To date 77 of the Council’s wellheads at 148 operating water supply bores have been remediated, with work in progress on 53. Five are currently at the design stage and 13 will be abandoned.  By the end of September 2019 sufficient progress will have been made to supply the whole of the city with water from wells that have been upgraded and certified as secure by an independent expert.

4.4       The well-deepening programme for the Northwest supply zone is nearly completed with the last two wells drilled at Wrights Road to be commissioned in November this year. This programme was already underway before the results of the Havelock North Inquiry were known.

4.5       The Council has an ongoing programme of works for reservoir renewals and repairs. Improvements to 19 of the Council’s 95 reservoirs and tanks have been completed. Works are scheduled at another six reservoirs this year and a further nine next year.

4.6       Work has been started on reconfiguring eight supply zones into 14 more evenly sized zones and lowering the pressures in the east and central parts of the city (to bring them in line with other zones).  A larger number of evenly sized zones with consistent operating pressures will deliver a number of benefits:

4.6.1   Optimal pressure management

4.6.2   Reduced pipe burst frequency

4.6.3   Reduced water leakage

4.6.4   Reduced pressure transients and improved stability of supply.

4.7       Work is also underway on increasing the Council’s audit of backflow prevention devices to ensure safety at customer connections, particularly at commercial sites.

4.8       Further improvements planned include:

4.8.1   the accelerated renewal of pipes and pump stations

4.8.2   the development of a ‘smart network’ that will improve real time monitoring of the water supply to give better operational control.

         The Council’s Risk Management Approach

4.9       The Council is currently taking preventative measures to manage the risks identified in the distribution network in accordance with our Water Safety Plan. These include:

4.9.1   Installing and maintaining high quality infrastructure

4.9.2   Ensuring network water pressure is maintained within safe operating limits

4.9.3   Network controllers on duty 24 hours a day / 7 days a week to manage operations and respond to incidents

4.9.4   Strict hygiene procedures for any work on the network and an approved installer programme

4.9.5   Backflow prevention programme

4.9.6   Using chlorine when necessary to protect public health.

4.10    On the advice of Dr Humphrey, Medical Officer of Health (Canterbury), the Council resolved on 25 January 2018 to temporarily disinfect its water supply in the Christchurch city urban zone by adding chlorine for a period of up to 12 months.

4.11    Chlorine was initially introduced to each pump station as a temporary measure, in response to the wellhead security concerns, at a level of 1.0 milligram per litre (mg/l) after a one minute contact time, on the advice of an independent expert.  Upon review a dosing level of 0.5mg/l was agreed where the first consumer was in excess of 2 minutes away from the point of chlorination.

4.12    Since then Council staff have varied the dosage according to the progress of the wellhead remediation works and an assessment of risk at each pump station. The regime today is as follows:

4.12.1       Water extracted through wellheads certified as secure by an independent expert and approved by  the Drinking Water Assessor is chlorine-free

4.12.2       Water extracted through wellheads certified as secure by an independent expert but not yet approved by the Drinking Water Assessor (in the audit phase) is dosed at 0.2 mg/l

4.12.3       Water extracted through wellheads that are not certified as secure is dosed at 0.5 mg/l

4.12.4       Water extracted through wellheads at the Main Pumps pump station is being dosed at 0.5 mg/l until the ultraviolet disinfection treatment is fully operational.    

4.13    As at 19 August 2019 approximately 30 per cent of the water delivered to the network has no chlorine treatment, 25 per cent is dosed at 0.2 mg/l and 45 per cent dosed at 0.5 mg/l.

4.14    The Council also brought forward funding previously allocated to infrastructure repairs and renewals for the purpose of accelerating the wellhead improvement programme.                                           

4.15    The wellheads remediation work is on track to supply the whole city with water from wells that have been upgraded, and certified as secure by an independent expert, by the end of September 2019.  The network controllers will only have to use wells that are not yet secure if there is a significant additional demand for water (due to an event such as a major fire or a mains break) or if there is an infrastructure failure or power outage affecting our pump stations. Remediation work will continue on a small number of wells over the summer period and replacement wells developed over the next two years.

Changing Regulatory Environment

4.16    The Havelock North inquiry has resulted in a much lower tolerance for risk across suppliers, expert assessors and the regulatory agencies. The Government has recently announced proposals for strengthening the regulatory arrangements for drinking water. These arrangements will significantly strengthen compliance, monitoring and enforcement of drinking water regulation.

4.17    The Council agrees with the findings of the inquiry and is well aware of the very high standard of care and diligence that should apply to the Council’s drinking water supply.  The Council remains opposed to mandatory residual disinfection, as it is confident that it will be able to supply safe drinking water without permanent chlorine treatment. 

4.18    There are important differences between the situation that existed in Havelock North and the Council’s approach to drinking water safety. For example, the Council has:

4.18.1    An up-to-date Water Safety Plan (WSP) for each community water supply to identify and manage risks to public health, four of which have been developed and submitted under the new framework

4.18.2    An excellent groundwater source and a well deepening programme for the Christchurch supply

4.18.3    An accelerated wellhead remediation programme underway and pending completion of that programme, and interim procedure to shut down flood-prone, below-ground wells in storm events

4.18.4    A good relationship with Environment Canterbury

4.18.5    Full bacterial compliance for all distribution zones.

4.19    The Council has a lengthy record of bacterial compliance with the New Zealand Drinking Water Standards. There is no evidence of elevated levels of water-borne disease in Christchurch compared to cities such as Auckland and Wellington which have residual chlorine disinfection. 

4.20    The tightening of the regulatory environment for drinking water supply is reflected in the recently revised Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand (2018) and the new framework for Water Safety Plans (2018).

4.21    Council staff are working with the Canterbury District Health Board to develop a Water Safety Plan for the Christchurch city urban zone under that new framework.  This will be submitted for approval by 30 September 2019.  

4.22    Working collaboratively, both organisations are undertaking a rigorous risk assessment of the network and the current and future steps for managing this risk. Given the lower tolerance for risk under the new regulatory framework it is possible that the new Water Safety Plan would stipulate residual chlorine disinfection where there are unacceptable risks within the distribution network. This may be due to risks at one or more reservoirs and/or where we have poor condition mains and sub-mains that could be vulnerable to contamination.

4.23    The Medical Officer of Health and the Drinking Water Assessor for the Community and Public Health division of the CDHB have recently raised concerns as to whether there is an effective barrier against contamination within the network, due to factors such as high leakage rates and excessive pipe breakages.   Their advice was that until a new Water Safety Plan is submitted to the Drinking Water Assessor for approval the risk of contamination within network remains unquantified.  The Medical Officer of Health’s preference is for the entire network to be protected by residual chlorine, with the ideal level being at least 0.2 mg/l until the WSP approval is completed.

4.24    Until the end of June the standard practice was to have the wells inspected and signed off by an appropriate expert and then seek the agreement of the DWA before discontinuing the chlorine treatment. The Drinking Water Assessor is no longer providing that agreement.  In the absence of that agreement the  Council will need to maintain a minimal chlorine dose of 0.2 mg/l at wellheads certified as secure by an expert in wellhead security but not by the Drinking Water Assessor.  Wellheads that had previously been certified as secure by both an expert in wellhead security and the Drinking Water Assessor will continue to be chlorine-free.

Exemptions under the New Regulatory Arrangements for Drinking Water

4.25    The recently announced regulatory policy proposals would introduce residual disinfection. However, they include the ability for the regulator to exempt suppliers from requirements to use residual disinfection in the distribution system, if the supplier can demonstrate that all risks to the safety of the water are being managed appropriately. It is the Council’s intention that it put itself in the best position to seek such an exemption.

Conclusion

4.26    The Council’s objective has always been to provide and maintain a water supply in the city that is safe to drink, free of residual chlorine, and which meets the Drinking Water Standards.  Council was required to introduce chlorination on a temporary basis it undertook an accelerated programme of improvements to its network. Since that decision was made the bar has been raised significantly in respect of the acceptability of risk as assessed through compliance with those standards and the new framework for Water Safety Plans.

4.27    The Council remains committed to its obligation under s.69A of the Health Act, which is “to protect the health and safety of people and communities by promoting adequate supplies of safe and wholesome drinking water from all drinking-water supplies”.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Helen Beaumont - Head of Three Waters & Waste

Approved By

Mary Richardson - Acting Chief Executive