Waihoro

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Tuesday 7 May 2019

Time:                                   5pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

1 May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Turner-Bullock

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 8233

christopher.turner@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

Part A             Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C          1.        Apologies................................................................................................. 4

B         2.        Declarations of Interest.............................................................................. 4

C          3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................. 4

B         4.        Public Forum............................................................................................ 4

B         5.        Deputations by Appointment....................................................................... 4

B         6.        Presentation of Petitions............................................................................ 4

C          7.        Briefing Opawaho Heathcote River.............................................................. 11

Staff Reports

C          8.        Selwyn Street Reserve Landscaping............................................................ 13

A          9.        40km/h variable speed zone extension – Hoon Hay Road................................. 27

C          10.      Waihoro Spreydon-Cashmere 2018/19 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme............................................................................................................. 35

 

B         11.      Elected Members’ Information Exchange..................................................... 41 

 

 


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Tuesday, 2 April 2019  be confirmed (refer page 5).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes will be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

 

OR

There will be no public forum at this meeting

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

 

Waihoro

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Tuesday 2 April 2019

Time:                                   5pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

2 April 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Turner-Bullock

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 8233

christopher.turner@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

Acknowledgements

Part C

The meeting observed a minute silence in memory of the victims of the Al Noor mosque and the Linwood Majid Islamic Centre terrorist attack of Friday 15 March 2019.

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

Community Board Decision

There were no apologies.

 

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2019/00015

Community Board Decision

That the minutes of the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Friday, 15 March 2019 be confirmed.

Lee Sampson/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                               Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

4.1      Evelyn Jean Ponga - Youth Achievement and Development Scheme Grant Recipient

Part B

Ms Evelyn Ponga addressed the Board and updated them on her attendance at the Big Sing 2018 National Choir competition 29 August to 2 September 2018 in Wellington as part of the Villa Maria College Con Brio choir. Evelyn thanked the Board for the grant it made towards her participation. She advised that the Villa Maria Choir had received a silver award.

 Evelyn and her friend Amelia sung to the Board. 

The Chairperson, on behalf of the Board, thanked Evelyn for her update. 

 

4.2      Chloe Hurst- Youth Achievement and Development Scheme Grant Recipient

Part B

Ms Chloe Hurst addressed the Board and updated them on her attendance at the Australian Scout Jamboree 2019 in Adelaide from January 4 to January 14 2019. Chloe outlined her experiences at the Jamboree and also presented a slideshow of photographs.  She expressed her thanks to the Board for the contribution it made towards her attendance at the Jamboree.

The Chairperson, on behalf of the Board, thanked Chloe for her presentation. 

 

4.3      Ray Spring - St Martins Community Centre and Library Facility

Part B

Mr Ray Spring addressed the Board on his ideas for use of the St Martins Community Centre and Library Facility. Mr Spring said that St Martins has a high proportion of older residents and the community would be better served by a reading room in the community centre, where people could call in and interact with each or engage in an activity such as chess.

Following questions from the Board, the Chairperson thanked Mr Spring for his presentation.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.

 

7.   Correspondence

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2019/00016 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part B

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the correspondence report dated 02 April 2019

Helene Mautner/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                          Carried

 

8.   Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board ANZAC Day 2019 Commemoration Report

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2019/00017 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the information in the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board ANZAC Day 2019 report.

2.         Decides to hold an ANZAC Day Commemoration at 10 am on 25 April 2019 at the Sydenham Cemetery.

3.         Decides to request that a public notice be placed in the Press advertising the Board’s ANZAC Day 2019 Commemoration and inviting local residents to attend.

4.         Allocates $400 from its 2019/20 Communicating with Communities fund for the purchase of a floral wreath to be laid as part of the Board’s Commemoration at Sydenham Cemetery and a floral wreath be laid at the Returned Servicemen Association’s dawn Service at Victoria Park.

Tim Scandrett/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                             Carried

 

 

9.   Waihoro Spreydon-Cashmere 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund Report - Spreydon Youth Community Trust

 

Board Consideration

The Board noted the merits of the Weekly Youth programme and agreed that a grant of $2,000 would be appropriate.

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $1,800 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to Spreydon Youth Community Trust towards the Weekly Youth Programme.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2019/00018

Part C

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $2,000 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to Spreydon Youth Community Trust towards the Weekly Youth Programme.

Phil Clearwater/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                          Carried

 

10. Waihoro Spreydon-Cashmere 2018/19  Discretionary Response Fund Report - Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $2,800 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi towards the Outdoor Table Tennis Table for Senior's and the Community.

 

 

The Board decided that the matter of the application by Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi lay on the table until staff have investigated the location for the Outdoor Table Tennis Table and its availability to be used by the wider community.

 

 

11. Spreydon-Cashmere 2019/20 Board Projects Fund Report

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2019/00019 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Nominate Community Awards for $6,000 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

2.         Nominate Edible Garden Awards for $3,500 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

3.         Nominate Neighbourhood Week – Let's get together this summer for $4,000 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

4.         Nominate Off the Ground Fund for $2,500 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

5.         Nominate Youth Achievement and Development Scheme for $9,000 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

6.         Nominate Communicating with the Community for $3,000 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

7.         Nominate Community Events for $8,000 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

8.         Nominate Community Events Fund Project for $8,000 as a Board project to be considered for funding from the Board’s 2019/20 Discretionary Response Fund.

Karolin Potter/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                               Carried

 

 

 

12. Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

 

The Board shared the following information:

·   The need for disability access to be considered as part of all Council decision-making was discussed. In particular it was noted that the slope of many footpaths seems to be designed to suit motor vehicles but can be an impediment for pedestrians, especially those with a disability.

·   It was noted that the Basketball Court lights and other facilities on Hoon Hay Park have now been installed. Staff advised that an opening event is being arranged.

·   Recorded its sorrow as a result of the terrible and tragic events of 15 March 2019     and extended its deepest regrets, sympathy and love to the whanau of the members of the Muslim community that were killed and wounded. The Board understands that there would be no one of the Muslim community of New Zealand and beyond unaffected by this profound tragedy and we and all New Zealanders will never forget them and these times

·   The Board also expressed its heartfelt appreciation to all those involved in the dreadful events of 15 March including the extraordinarily brave members of the Muslim community at the two mosques, their selfless neighbours and passers- by who helped initially, the police and ambulance staff, hospital and Christchurch City Council staff and many, many others all of whom were brave, kind, selfless and enormously hard working on the day and the days that followed.

·   The bus stop on Spencer Street near the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church has meant here is a lot less parking available for church goers on Sunday. 

·   The Board noted that the former Masonic Lodge on Cashmere Hill (corner Hackthorne Road and Dyers Pass Road) is for sale at present.

 

·   Residents have pointed out the increased distances that people, including older adults, now have to walk to catch buses and asked that consideration be given to the placement of benches on the footpath in between bus stops in areas where there are limited bus stops such as Thorrington.

 

·   Residents have advised that there is increased truck movement on Worsleys Road due to the removal of waste material from the formation of the Curletts Basin.  The Board requested staff provide information on this.

 

 

 

   

Meeting concluded at 6.31pm.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 7th DAY OF MAY 2019

 

Karolin Potter

Chairperson

   


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

7.     Briefing Opawaho Heathcote River

Reference:

19/460303

Presenter(s):

Faye Collins, Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Adviser

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The Board will be briefed on the following:

Subject

Presenter(s)

Unit/Organisation

Opawaho Heathcote River

Katie Noakes

Waterways Ecologist,  Asset Planning -Water & Wastewater, Three Waters & Waste

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Notes the information supplied during the Briefing.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

8.        Selwyn Street Reserve Landscaping

Reference:

18/1108850

Presenter(s):

Will Rolton (Junior Project Manager)

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to approve the landscape plan for the renewal of Selwyn Street Reserve.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following a seminar with Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board 8 August 2018, with public consultation undertaken October 2018.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by Selwyn Reserve being a small neighbourhood park with a localised catchment of users.   It has a low impact on the wider city and other Council activities.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the above assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve the landscape plan as shown in Attachment B (LP373701 dated 05/02/2019).

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.0.3.0 Overall customer satisfaction with the presentation of the City’s Parks - Community Parks presentation: resident satisfaction =70 %

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Landscape enhancement (Preferred Option)

·     Option 2 – Daylighting a piped section of Jackson Creek running under the reserve

·     Option 3 - Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Option 1 - Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Enhanced planting and visual appearance of the reserve.

·     Increased recreational user opportunities for the reserve.

·     Incorporates and supports the delivery of other elements and features associated with the Selwyn Street Masterplan.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Public access and use of the reserve will be restricted during the construction phase.

·     No other significant disadvantages have been identified.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Selwyn Street Reserve is located at the intersection of Brougham Street, Selwyn Street, and Somerfield Crescent.

5.2       The Selwyn Street Shops are located across Selwyn Street to the East, and are zoned Commercial Local Zone. The residential area to the south of the reserve is zoned Residential Medium Density. Brougham Street adjoins the northern boundary of the reserve and is classified as a motorway.

5.3       The reserve is bisected midway by a sealed pedestrian footpath. The western portion is characterised by an open grassed space, and a large existing tree close to the western boundary.  The eastern portion is enclosed by a series of mature trees on the eastern boundary, and a central grassed area containing some street furniture. The existing trees lend a pleasant amenity to this end of the reserve, separating it from the busy Selwyn Street frontage. The northern boundary which is shared with Brougham Street is an open grassed frontage devoid of trees, or any other planting. The reserve is an elongated triangle shape and measures approximately 100m long by 13m wide at its narrowest, and 27m wide at its widest point.

5.4       An existing concrete block public toilet building sits on the south-eastern corner of the site. The toilet block is mostly surrounded by existing trees.

5.5       Essentially this is a simple upgrade of the reserve which includes some additional planting, pathways and landscape features.

5.6       The project initially considered daylighting the historic Jackson’s Creek which used to flow through the reserve, however was ultimately considered unfeasible for a number of reasons:

5.6.1   The creek is situated approx. 2 metres below ground level, a significant depth given the size and shape of Selwyn Reserve

5.6.2   The water course has a very low base flow – almost non-existent, and is unreliable.

5.6.3   Increasing the natural base flow would require additional works upstream. A costly undertaking with no available funding at this stage.

5.6.4   Daylighting is likely to require the removal of a significant section of reserve land to establish create a suitable batter for a safe embankment.

5.6.5   Given the depth of the creek, a narrower/steeper embankment would present a potential hazard to users of the reserve and a potential rubbish trap with increased maintenance and operational costs.

5.7       Implementation of the corner park from the Selwyn Street Master Plan. This project will ensure the corner park is to the standard the plan has anticipated.

5.8       Priorities for the reserve from early stage consultation:

5.8.1   Safety of users, in particular children, given the proximity to Brougham Street

5.8.2   Reduction in vehicle/traffic noise from Brougham Street

5.8.3   Accessibility and amenity, and a direct route through the reserve.


 

6.   Option 1 – Approve Selwyn Street Reserve Landscaping Plan (preferred option)

Option Description

6.1       This option delivers an enhanced landscape development for the reserve providing additional recreational opportunities for the local community and other park users.  The landscaping plan shown in attachment B (L373701 dated 5/02/2019) has been amended to reflect the community feedback received through public consultation, including:

6.1.1   A new path to follow the desire line across the park to the Brougham Street frontage.

6.1.2   Add in drinking fountain.

6.1.3   The design accentuates the dry river bed to highlight the original location of Jacksons creek/ brick barrel location.

6.1.4   Reposition seating to create a meeting / gathering / social interaction space for residents / users of the park.

6.1.5   Remove one of the proposed picnic tables after discussion about how many would be used.

6.1.6   Add in the idea of bluebell bulbs into the lawn areas to create Spring colour and interest. 

6.1.7   Add in a hedge along the Brougham street side of the park to create a buffer between the busy road and the park without obscuring views near pathways.

6.1.8   Upgrade of toilet block would be recommended but unfortunately it is out of scope and budget of this project, however the design allows for this in the future.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance included a letter box drop to the local community showing the proposed plan along with a reply paid feedback form for stakeholder feedback.  A link to the proposed plan was also posted on the Council’s “Have Your Say” page between 13 September – 4 October 2018.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       By the close of consultation Council had received 17 submissions. Fourteen people support the plan and three people do not support the plan.  Consultation feedback it attached.

6.6       We delivered our consultation PIL to 430 properties, 12 absentee owners and emailed 48 stakeholders.

6.7       Team responses to queries are below.

Summarised feedback and comments

Project team response

Support the proposed

-      Feedback noted

Safety concerns

-      Lighting

-      Board walk and scooters

-      Toilet block security and CCTV

 

-      Lighting will be considered within CPTED design principles and practices.

-      Path location has been balanced between providing convenient access through the reserve and maintaining open areas to other recreational uses and activities.

-      The boards on the board walk will be flush so they won’t have space between them, this should eliminate the risk of wheels getting caught it in them.

-      CCTV and toilet block upgrades outside the scope of this project.

Additional requests

-      Water feature of some kind

-      Bluebells

-      Evergreen trees rather than deciduous

 

-      Council staff agree that such a feature would be nice, but propose a wheelchair accessible water fountain be the ideal addition to fill this desire, there will be a bowl off to the side for dogs.

-      Council agree that bluebells would be an easy and attractive addition to the park, these have been included.

-      Deciduous trees have been chosen to maximise the possible light in the reserve through the winter months, evergreen trees would leave the reserve dark and cold.

Prioritising – why spend money on this park and not others?

-      The reserve is being upgraded as part of the Selwyn Street Master Plan, one of the plans in place to work on improving areas badly affected post-earthquake.

-      The project sits within the current approved 2018-2028 LTP.

 

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.8       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.9       Cost of Implementation – The cost of implementing the current landscape plan is approximately $110,000 (refer to breakdown in 6.9 below)

6.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The reserve is currently under a maintenance contract and schedule, which undertakes inspections of the reserve and associated grounds keeping such as mowing of the grassed areas, and pruning of the vegetation and trees. There is likely to be a small increase in operational costs to implement this project due to the increase in furniture and planting within the reserve.

6.11    Funding source

6.11.1 $116,912 – CPMS 19307 – N1 Selwyn Street Reserve

6.11.2 $15,000 – CPMS 66 – Urban Renewal Funding to contribute towards the false riverbed feature, interpretation sign, and timber boardwalk

 

Legal Implications

6.12    There is no legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

6.13    The Community Board has the delegated authority to approve the landscape plan attached to this report.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.14    There is a low level of risk associated with this project apart from the standard implementation risks associated with construction such as weather related delays etc.

 

Implementation

6.15    Implementation dependencies – This project requires Community Board approval of the attached landscape plan prior to implementation.

6.16    Implementation timeframe:

6.16.1 Board approval – 7 May 2019

6.16.2 Tender works – June/July 2019

6.16.3 Construction – August 2019 onwards, subject to receiving an acceptable tender

Option 1 Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   Enhanced planting and visual appearance of the reserve.

·   Increased recreational user opportunities for the reserve.

·   Incorporates and supports the delivery of other elements and features associated with the Selwyn Street Masterplan.

6.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Public access and use of the reserve will be restricted during the construction phase.

·   No other significant disadvantages have been identified.

7.   Option 2 – Daylighting

Option Description

7.1       The project originally considered the daylighting of Jackson’s creek and the planting/tree work that is required as per master plan recommendations.

7.2       Jackson’s Creek daylighting investigations were undertaken in 2017:

7.2.1   The creek is situated approximately two metres below ground level.  A significant depth given the size and shape of Selwyn Reserve, meaning that most of the reserve would be taken up to achieve a safe batter on the banks if day-lighting was to be carried out. 

7.2.2   The water course has a very low base flow – almost non-existent except during periods of rain, and is unreliable outside of that time.

7.2.3   Increasing the natural base flow would require additional works upstream – a costly undertaking with no available funding at this stage.

7.2.4   Daylighting is likely to require the removal of a significant section of reserve land to create a safe embankment.

7.2.5   Given the depth of the creek a narrower/steeper vertical embankment would present a potential hazard to users of the reserve and could be a potential rubbish trap with ongoing maintenance issues.

7.2.6   Daylighting was not seen as a viable option when all the above factors were taken into consideration.

Significance

7.3       The level of significance of this option is low for the same reasons outlined in option 1.

7.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance would be the same as option 1.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, however if the daylighting option was to be pursued then Council would liaise with Ngai Tahu via normal Council communication channels as a matter of courtesy.

Community Views and Preferences

7.6       Council did not seek community views on this option due to the unsuitability and adverse impacts on the wider use of the reserve with this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies, however it is not a viable option for this site.

Financial Implications

7.8       Cost of Implementation – The full cost of this option has not been calculated, however previous experience suggests the implementation cost for this option would significantly exceed the current budget for this project.

7.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Reactive

7.10    Funding source – N/A – unbudgeted.

Legal Implications

7.11    There no a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision

Risks and Mitigations  

7.12    There is a risk with this option that the overall use of the reserve would be significantly compromised due to the area of park that would be required to construct a safe batter on the side of the drain.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - Subject to Community Board approval.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – N/A

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   There would be no significant advantages from this option.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Significantly reduce the useable area of the park and compromise other recreational opportunities.

·   A large proportion of the park would be taken up providing a safe batter on the sides of the banks.

·   The depth of the drain would create a trap for rubbish and increase maintenance and operational costs.

·   There is insufficient funding for this option.

8.   Option 3 – Do Nothing

Option Description

8.1       No additional landscape enhancement of the reserve.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is low.

8.3       There would be no engagement requirements under this option.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       N/A

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       N/A

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.7       Financial Implications - Nil

8.8       Cost of Implementation - Nil

8.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - reactive

8.10    Funding source – Parks operational budget

Legal Implications

8.11    N/A – There are no legal implications with this option.

Risks and Mitigations  

8.12    N/A

Implementation

8.13    N/A

8.14    N/A

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Funding could be reallocated to other projects.

8.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Enhanced recreational opportunities for current and future generations is unrealised.

9.   Options Matrix

Issue Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – Landscape enhancement

Option 2 – Daylighting Jacksons Creek

Option 3 – Do Nothing

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

$110,000

$350,000 plus                  (High level estimate)

Nil

Maintenance/Ongoing

Reactive

Reactive

Reactive

Funding Source

LTP, CPMS 19307

N1 Selwyn Reserve Landscaping

N/A – Insufficient funding for this option.

N/A

Impact on Rates

Nil

Nil

Nil

Climate Change

Positive impact on the effects of climate change through increased plantings.

This option has a negative impact through reduced area for planting.

No change

Accessibility

Additional pathways and seating have a positive impact on accessibility.

Would significantly reduce the accessible area of the reserve.

Opportunity to improve accessibility is lost.

Health & Safety Impacts

Plantings on the Brougham Street frontage provide a visual and physical buffer for the reserve.

Potential health and safety issues from to the steepness of the bank due to the depth of the pipe.

No improved health and safety outcomes for the reserve.

 

Future Generation Impacts

Positive impact on future generations through improved park environment and increase recreation opportunities.

Reduced recreational opportunities. 

Opportunity for increased recreational outcomes for future generations is lost.

 

Statutory Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – Landscape enhancement

Option 2 – Daylighting Jacksons Creek

Option 3 – Do Nothing

Impact on Mana Whenua

Nil

Nil

Nil

Alignment to Council Plans & Policies

Proposed plan is in line with current Council Plans and Policies

Would be in line with current Council Plans and Policies.

No change

 

 

 

 

·  


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

10.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultation feedback

24

b

Selwyn Street Reserve Ladscape Concept

26

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Will Rolton - Junior Project Manager

Ann Campbell - Senior Engagement Advisor

Samantha Sharland - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Rod Whearty - Team Leader Project Management Parks

Darren Moses - Manager Capital Delivery Community

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

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Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

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Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

9.     40km/h variable speed zone extension – Hoon Hay Road

Reference:

19/357978

Presenter(s):

Privinn Mwene – Traffic Engineer

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider the extension of a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour) from Sparks Road to include Hoon Hay Road as shown on Attachment A, and make a recommendation to the Council for approval and its inclusion in the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       This report is staff generated, in response to community requests and this site being a top priority on the Council’s approved school zone implementation priority list.

2.2       The implementation of the preferred option means:

·    Reduction in operational speed, improving the safety in the area during the school hours.

·    Enhanced driver awareness of the presence of children.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits on Sparks Road and Hoon Hay Road be revoked and set as identified in Attachment A and detailed in 1a-1c below including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps;

a.         Revoke the existing 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) on Sparks Road commencing at a point 62 metres southwest of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a south-westerly direction for a distance of 402 metres to a point 22 metres southwest of its intersection with Maryhill Avenue.

b.         Approve that a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) be set on Sparks Road, commencing at a point 80 metres northeast of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a south-westerly direction for a distance of 556 metres to a point 26 metres southwest of its intersection with Maryhill Avenue, as it meets the requirements of the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, Page 1284) including the times of operation.

c.         Approve that a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) be set on Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 229 metres northwest of its intersection with Sparks Road and extending in a south-easterly direction for a distance of 305 metres to a point 76 metres southeast of its intersection with Sparks Road, as it meets the requirements of the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, Page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve the speed limit changes listed in clauses 1a – 1c above come into force following the date of Council approval, installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure (as indicated in Attachment A), and the required notice provided to NZTA and NZ Police in accordance with Section 2.7(6) of Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

 

4.   Context/Background

Issue or Opportunity

4.1       Hoon Hay Primary School and Our Lady of the Assumption School (OLA) have frontages to Hoon Hay School and Sparks Road.  There is an existing School Speed Zone on the Sparks Road frontage. 

4.2       The intersection of Sparks Road and Hoon Hay Road was recently upgraded to traffic signals from a roundabout as part of the Quarrymans Trail Major Cycleway Route project.  Removal of the roundabout has resulted in higher traffic speeds. 

4.3       Following the introduction of traffic signals, various traffic surveys were commissioned on Hoon Hay Road between Muirson Ave and Sparks Road around September 2018. Key findings reported below:

·    Average weekday traffic volume of approximately 11,000 vehicles per day (vpd)

·    Weekday 85% speed – 53.6km/h

·    Weekday median speed – 49.0km/h

·    Approximately 85-90 pedestrians recorded walking outside OLA on Hoon Hay Road before and after school hours.

4.4       These conditions meet the legal warrant to implement a variable 40km/h School Speed Zone. 

Strategic Alignment

4.5       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.5.1   Activity: Traffic Safety and Efficiency

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of casualties on the road network - =129 (reduce by 5 or more per year)

Decision Making Authority

4.6       Part 4, Clause 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides Council with the authority to set speed limits for roads.  Council has not delegated this authority. 

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

4.7       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

4.8       The level of significance was determined by the project being low cost and affecting a limited group of residents. The decision is easily reversible.

4.9       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

5.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

5.1       The following reasonably practicable options were considered and are assessed in this report:

·   Extend 40km/h variable speed limit to include Hoon Hay Road.

·   Do Nothing.

5.2       The following options were considered but ruled out:

·   No other options were considered.

Options Descriptions

5.3       Preferred Option: Extend the 40km/h variable speed limit to include Hoon Hay Road. 

5.4       Option Description: Install the 40km/h Variable Speed Limit (school speed zone) as shown on Attachment A.

5.4.1   Option Advantages

·     Likely reduction in operational speed, therefore improving the safety in the area during the school hours.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

5.4.2   Option Disadvantages

·     None identified. 

5.5       Option 2 - Do nothing

5.5.1   Option Description: Do nothing.

5.5.2   Option Advantages

·     None identified. 

5.5.3   Option Disadvantages

·     It does not address the safety concerns of the school and that of the community.

Analysis Criteria

5.6       Options have been assessed by their contribution to the following issues:

·    Reducing traffic speeds due the school drop off and pick up times thus increasing the safety for the school children.

·    Alerting drivers of the school zone.

6.   Community Views and Preferences

6.1       Engagement was carried out with the NZ Transport Agency, NZ Police, Hoon Hay School and Our Lady of the Assumption School.  The Police have provided written support for the proposal.  The Transport Agency has no objections and the operating times were set following engagement with the principals from Hoon Hay School and Our Lady of the Assumption.

6.2       On 26 March 2019, an information leaflet was delivered to all properties within the proposed zone between 60-131 Sparks Road and between 155-186 Hoon Hay Road which included a plan of where the new signage was proposed to be located and contact details should any residents have any concerns regarding this option.

6.3       An objection was received from a resident at one of the proposed locations for the signs. He argued that the sign would obstruct his view to his house and wanted the sign relocated. Modifications were made to the initial proposed location and the sign was moved to an area in front of vegetation along his property. This mitigates the obstruction of view for the resident. The resident still requested the sign be moved all together in front of his property. The resident was informed of all the options which were considered and why the area in front of his property was chosen. No further comments/ replies have been received from the resident.

6.4       To date no further objections or concerns have been received.

7.   Legal Implications

7.1       The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284).

7.2       The Interpretation Act 1999 provides for the New Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 128) and NZTA Traffic Note 37 to have continued effect, despite those documents being established under (and referring to) the now repealed Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2003.

7.3       The Council’s Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 allows the Council to set and change speed limits on roads in Christchurch in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting Speed Limits 2017 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

7.4       In accordance with the Christchurch City Council Delegations Register, Council has not delegated its powers under the above legislative framework.

8.   Risks

8.1       None identified.

9.   Next Steps

9.1       Implementation dependencies - dependent on endorsement by the Community Board and approval by Council to legalise school speed zone.

9.2       Implementation timeframe - Installed by June 2019. 


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

10. Options Matrix

Issue Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – Extend School Speed Zone

Option 2 – Do Nothing

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

Approximately $55,000 to supply, install and commission signs.

Nil

Maintenance/Ongoing

Covered under the traffic signals maintenance contract.

Not applicable

Funding Source

Minor Safety Improvements

Not applicable

Impact on Rates

Nil

Nil

School Safety

Supports school safety and is responsive to recent changes to travel patterns

Does not support school safety and is unresponsive to recent changes to travel patterns

 

·  


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hoon Hay Road - 40km/hr Variable Speed Limit

34

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Privinn Mwene - Traffic Engineer

Wayne Gallot - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

10.   Waihoro Spreydon-Cashmere 2018/19 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme

Reference:

19/411742

Presenter(s):

Emma Pavey, Community Recreation Advisor
Gail Payne, Community Development Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider applications received for funding from its 2018/19 Youth Development Fund.

1.2       This report is to assist the Board to consider applications of funding from Eva Elliott, Ynys Robbie Bach-Strong, and Billie Hazel Trioka Pine.

1.3       There is currently a balance of $1,895 remaining in this fund.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve a grant of $250 from its 2018/19 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Eva Elliott towards participation in the National Senior Adventure Racing Event in Turangi from 29 April to 3 May 2019. .

2.         Approve a grant of $500 from its 2018/19 Youth Development Fund to Ynys Robbie Bach-Strong towards participation in the Korfball Under 21 Asia and Oceania Competition in China from 19 to 29 May 2019. 

3.         Approve a grant of $500 from its 2018/19 Youth Development Fund to Billie Hazel Trioka Pine towards participation in the Future Problem Solving International Conference in Massachusetts, USA from 5 to 9 June 2019.

3.   Key Points

Issue or Opportunity

3.1       Provide the opportunity for young people to play their chosen sport at both national and international level; and/or to foster personal development and growth in terms of cultural, leadership or extra-curricular educational opportunities. 

Strategic Alignment

3.2       Investing in our youth to develop leadership, cultural competence and success in their chosen field builds the capacity of our city’s youth, our future adults. In doing so we increase the likelihood of these youths contributing to developing a vibrant, prosperous and sustainable 21st century city; one of the council’s six Strategic Priorities. The recommendations contained in this report are based on this principle.

Decision Making Authority

3.3       Determine the allocation of the discretionary Response Fund for each community (including any allocation towards a Youth Development Fund).

3.4       Allocations must be consistent with any policies, standards or criteria adopted by the Council

3.5       The Fund does not cover:

·   Legal challenges or Environment Court challenges against the Council, Council Controlled organisations or Community Board decisions

·   Projects or initiatives that change the scope of a Council project or that will lead to ongoing operational costs to the Council (though Community Boards can recommend to the Council that it consider a grant for this purpose).

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

3.6       The decisions in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.7       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.8       Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

4.   Applicant 1 – Eva Elliott

4.1       Age: 17

4.2       School: Cashmere High School

4.3       Suburb: Beckenham

4.4       Event seeking support for: National Senior Adventure Racing in Turangi from 29 April to 3 May 2019.

4.5       Eva Elliott lives in Beckenham with both parents and two sisters.  Eva is part of the Cashmere High School Senior Adventure Racing Team and came second in the regional event in May 2018 which has qualified the team to take part in this year's competition.  Eva has been involved in Adventure Training since starting at High School and has competed in South Island competitions as well as travelling to the Great Barrier Island in 2016 with her team.  Adventure Racing requires a team of eight where the team members are pushed both physically and mentally through various situations a quickly as possible.  This requires team members to overcome weaknesses and work to strengths together.

4.6       As well as Adventure Racing, Eva is a keen mountain biker, tramper and kayaker.  Eva reports to enjoy anything outdoors.  When Eva leaves school she is planning to work for a year before going to university to study engineering.

4.7       Eva has been fundraising by organising a pizza night, a raffle and a sausage sizzle at Bunnings.

4.8       This is the first time Eva has applied for Youth achievement and Development Scheme funding.

4.9       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Eva Elliott:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Airfare

$268.75

Fuel

$100

Ferry costs

$73.25

Entry Fees

$737.50

Misc

$65.63

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$1,245.13

 


 

5.   Applicant 2 – Ynys Robbie Bach-Strong

5.1       Age: 18

5.2       School: N/A

5.3       Suburb: Somerfield

5.4       Event seeking support for: New Zealand Korfball Under 21 Asia and Oceania Competition in China from 19 to 29 May 2019.

5.5       Ynys has left school and is working part time at a café.  Ynys has been selected to represent New Zealand and had previously represented New Zealand in the Under 17 Korfball team in 2018 competing in the Netherlands.  Korfball is a ball sport with similarities to netball and basketball and is played in teams of eight players (four male and four female) with the objective to throw a ball into a bottomless basket that is mounted on a high pole.  Korfball originated in the Netherlands.

5.6       Ynys has been playing korfball for a number of years and also enjoys playing football and studies aikido.  Ynys is also musical and plays the piano and the violin.  Ynys has left school achieving level 3 NCEA and is focussing on training for the competition.  Ynys also referees the high school korfball games as a volunteer to give back to the sport that he reports to enjoy. 

5.7       Ynys has been fundraising by marshalling the Weetbix Triathlon and City to Surf event.

5.8       This is the second time Ynys has applied to the Youth Achievement and Development Scheme Funding.

5.9       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Ynys Robbie Bach-Strong:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Travel

$2,075

Accommodation

$1,156

Tournament Expenses

$156

Team Costs

$563

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$3,950

 

6.   Applicant 3 – Billie Hazel Trioka Pine

6.1       Age: 14

6.2       School: Cashmere High School

6.3       Suburb: Thorrington

6.4       Event: Seeking support to represent New Zealand at the Future Problem Solving International Conference in Massachusetts, USA, from 5 to 9 June 2019.

6.5       Future Problem Solving (FPS) is a respected international programme that engages highly able students in a multi-disciplinary manner, requiring them to consider topics of crucial importance to humanity in the future (25+ years from now) from 18 perspectives, including: technological, mechanical, scientific, economic, environmental, social, ethical, governance etc. The FPS Mission is: to develop the ability of young people globally to design and achieve positive futures through problem solving using critical and creative thinking. The mission in itself, requires students to think beyond themselves and to create potential or actual solutions that will have immediate and longer term benefits for society, the world and/or its environments. Students from most US states and many countries enrol in FPS, and at the international championships, held each June in the USA, over 2,000 of the best FPSers in the world compete for international honours. The 2019 conference topic is “De-extinction”. 

6.6       Billie is a Year 10 student at Cashmere High School. In Year 9 she competed in the National Future Problem Solving competition, and won a role as a representative of New Zealand at the 2019 International Championship. Billie reports that she is honoured to represent her school, community, and country.

6.7       Billie is interested in teaching / tutoring peers, and partaking in extension programmes. She believes that participating in the international conference will help her in becoming qualified to teach younger local FPS students, and to mark their work. She also wishes to help spread the FPS programme to other schools.

6.8       Because FPS is a non-profit organisation, they are unable to assist with conference costs. Billie has raised some funding towards her trip via a sausage sizzle, busking, and a quiz night.   

6.9       Billie’s FPS teacher takes the programme to several schools, including Cashmere High School; and is a member of the FPS National Advisory Board. She explains that in order for Billie to get to this point, she had to compete against other highly able students within the New Zealand programme, be selected for FPS National Finals in Auckland, and then win the Middle Division competition. As a result she was selected into the New Zealand representative squad, and will represent her country and her school, in Scenario Performance at the FPS International Conference in June. 

6.10    The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Billie Pine:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Airfares

$2,130.90

Accommodation and Food

$1,000

                                                                                                 Total

$3,130.90

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Gail Payne - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

   


Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

07 May 2019

 

 

11.   Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.