Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

Extraordinary Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An Extraordinary meeting of the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Friday 31 May 2019

Time:                                   12.30pm

Venue:                                 Council Chamber, Level 2
Civic Offices, 53 Hereford Street

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Members

Ali Jones

Emma Norrish

Jo Byrne

John Stringer

Pauline Cotter

Mike Davidson

Sally Buck

Jake McLellan

Alexandra Davids

Darrell Latham

Tim Lindley

Brenda Lowe-Johnson

Deon Swiggs

Sara Templeton

Yani Johanson

 

 

28 May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Hovell

Community Board Advisor

941 8637

 

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C          1.        Apologies................................................................................................. 4

B         2.        Declarations of Interest.............................................................................. 4

C          3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................. 4

B         4.        Deputations by Appointment....................................................................... 4

Staff Reports

5.        North Avon Road - No Stopping Restrictions - Post-Construction Safety Audit........... 13

6.        Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Management Plan................... 21   

 

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 

1.   Apologies

There are no apologies to date.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Extraordinary Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board meeting held on Wednesday, 8 May 2019  be confirmed (refer page 8).

4.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

4.1

Cranford Street Downstream Effects Management Plan – St Albans School

Aaron Tunnicliff (Deputy Chair of the St Albans School Board of Trustees), Ginnie Warren (Principal of St Albans School) and Juliet Calder (Parent Representative, St Albans School Board of Trustees) will speak on behalf of the St Albans School Board of Trustees regarding the Downstream Effects Management Plan.

 

SUBMISSION CONTENT

As the Board of Trustees for a school of more than 600 learners whose zone will be split in two by this proposal, we discuss, read and respond with three concerns in mind:

 

1. Safety

We are concerned about the following aspects of the design as we believe they will raise the risk of our community being harmed beyond the current risk level.

 

Crossing Cranford Street

We would like to see specific details around safe crossing options for Cranford Street including but not limited to, the consideration of an elevated pedestrian crossing, pedestrian refuges in the centre of the road and longer pedestrian cross signals that are further separated from red light runners during peak school commute times.  These crossing options should be regularly spread along Cranford Street to reduce the temptation to cross at uncontrolled points and yet work in concert with traffic flows to help ensure compliance and limit frustration.  All pedestrian crossing points should also take into account the current prevalence of scooters as a primary means of transport for school age children and that many accompanying whanau push toddlers and babies in push chairs and buggies.

 

Local road calming measures 

We are concerned that the extensive proposed local road calming measures will lead to non-compliance and more reckless behaviour as frustrations rise. In particular we note that local road calming measures taken around the Papanui Parallel cycleway have been unsuccessful in their intended purpose.

Examples of this are the turning restrictions from Rutland St into Westminster St which are so often ignored that the physical barrier has been replaced multiple times and is no longer there at all, and when it is in place traffic often performs three point turns further up Rutland St in order to turn east bound into Westminster St.   In this instance it is easy to conceive of a St Albans school learner not expecting a vehicle to turn from a direction it’s not supposed to and being injured as a result.

Another example is the 30 kph zone along Trafalgar Street which is largely ignored despite all measures taken and we fear that a broadening of these artificial means of calming traffic makes it more difficult for our learners and whanau to safely cross these roads because it’s significantly harder to safely judge incoming traffic when that traffic can be travelling at vastly differing speeds.

Our hope is that traffic flow can be maintained along Cranford Street at all times so that Northern Arterial route users don’t look for alternative routes and increase the risks into the wider suburb where the narrower streets, sharp corners and more densely populated areas provide more risk of injury and harm.

 

Parking restrictions leading to unsafe drop off practices

We fear that parking restrictions and limited access to existing parking facilities will lead to less safe school drop off practices.  We currently have multiple measures in place to help encourage and promote safe school drop off practices which includes staff, students and volunteers guiding and enforcing our safe drop off practices. However we fear that as access to the English Park car park, Shepard Place and

Westminster St drop off areas becomes harder and less convenient whanau and caregivers will drop off learners in non-safe drop locations increasing the associated risk. We also fear that the local road calming measures will restrict our whanau and caregivers from being able to drop learners off as part of their own commute to work as access is reduced by road closures, road narrowing and reduced speed limits, the resulting tension and heightened risk from more stress filled drop off times cannot lead to positive outcomes.

We do note the “Safe access to school (Study)” zone along 300 metres of Cranford St and would like more information but are concerned that the proposal under estimates the school’s local impact having more than 600 learners commuting to and from school daily who access the school from multiple entry points and who are travelling to us from every direction.

 

 2. Accessibility

We have reservations that the proposal as outlined will reduce access or at least make access to our school harder and more time consuming.  In particular stage 2 as proposed will have a large impact on the majority of learners’ journeys to school in a detrimental way. Our learners use multiple methods of transport to travel to school, while we don’t track this daily and it varies depending on season, weather, etc., in descending order these tend to be:

·         Car (200+)

·         Walk (200+)

·         Scoot (100)

·         Cycle (10- 15)

·         Tricycle/Tandem (2) 

Some of these commutes are multi stage journeys with learners dropped off at the home of a neighbour or another local family before travelling with that family to school. These journeys influence the ability of our learners to participate fully in school and get the most from their education, as longer and more stressful commutes and riskier commutes will all make our learners less ready and able to get the most from their education and we would implore you to maintain access to the school as safe, quick and easy as possible so that we may maximise the educational outcomes of our learners.

In addition to St Albans School being a primary school that attracts local in zone enrolments, it is also much more:

It is a special interest school providing Maori emersion education for the surrounding area, a large number of whom travel from out of the immediate school zone. It is a school that opens its facilities to numerous community groups that range from after school schemes, martial arts, hockey, football, rugby, allowing swimming pool access to the wider community during summer time and numerous other out of school activities. We view this as a responsibility to our local community as an active and positive part of the St Albans area and relish the opportunities it affords our learners who are often a part of these out of school-based activities. It would be disappointing to see these opportunities for our learners and wider community reduced because:

“The local football coach can longer get to the school facilities from their work in a reasonable time to hold weekday afternoon practices”

“Martial arts enrolments drop and become unviable because parents cannot make class times as it’s too difficult to access the classes hosted at school”

“After school and holiday programmes are no longer offered because other local schools and facilities are more convenient”

Accessibility is a contributing factor to the success of this school which is currently at full capacity for student enrolments and has just been given such an exceptional rating by the Ministry of Education that the Minister of Education (The Rt. Hon. Chris Hipkins) reached out and congratulated the Principal, staff and board directly on the appraisal. 

We would urge you to reconsider stage 2 and ensure that those changes are carefully balanced to ensure that the local community is not restricted in its use of our school facilities regardless of their means of transport.

 

3. Community

St Albans School has a diverse zone and school population which contributes to what we think of as a very special and positive culture. Parts of our zone are leafy broad residential streets with traditional and sizeable houses on large manicured sections, parts are higher density flats and townhouses on busier streets, and more are somewhere in between.  Like all St Albans residents we fear that the increasing traffic on Cranford Street will create a division that effectively segregates our students into “East” and “West” of Cranford, limiting out of school socializing and other out of school opportunities.

But more than this that the local traffic calming measures will further restrict the opportunities for children inside our school zone to get the most from school by mixing with other learners from the south and north of our zone (if stage 2 effects are not balanced and limit the ability for parents and caregivers to pick up children from playdates etc).

In summary, while we appreciate the efforts in stage 1 to safely balance traffic flow with safety and access, we do have concerns over the effects of local traffic calming measures (both their effectiveness and unintended consequences as witnessed by the recent implementations of these measures against the Papanui Parallel cycleway) and have reservations about the potential effect of the stage 2 proposals that will make safe and easy access to our school more difficult. We would welcome the chance to present to the community board about this proposal and welcome any further opportunity to work with the council to refine the plans to further support the needs of our school community.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Aaron Tunnicliff

Deputy Chair,

St Albans School Board of Trustees

 

 

 

 

  


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 

 

Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Wednesday 8 May 2019

Time:                                   9.24am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Level 2, Civic Offices, 53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Members

Ali Jones

Emma Norrish

Jo Byrne

John Stringer

Pauline Cotter

Mike Davidson

Jake McLellan

Darrell Latham

Tim Lindley

Deon Swiggs

Sara Templeton

Yani Johanson

 

 

8 May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Hovell

Community Board Advisor

941 8637

 

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

Joint Committee Resolved JM-LA/2019/00001

That the apologies for absence from Sally Buck and Alexandra Davids be accepted.

 

Member Davidson/Member Byrne                                                                                                                     Carried

 

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

 

4.   Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan - comments received

 

Joint Committee Resolved JM-LA/2019/00002 (original staff recommendation adopted without change)

That the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the comments submitted on the Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan. 

Member Templeton/Member Norrish                                                                                                               Carried

 

The Joint Meeting Heard from the following:

 

·... Duncan Webb – MP for Christchurch Central

·... Jenny Smith and Rodney Routledge

·... A joint presentation from Axel Wilke and Emma Twaddell – SARA, representing Emma Twaddell, SARA, Axel Wilke, Ngahuia Freed, Mark Wilson, Jason Harvey and Simon Geary.

 

Member Lindley arrived 9.51am.

 

·... Shane Dixon and Nathan Burford– Paparoa Primary School Board of Trustees.

·... Peggy Kelly

Member Cotter left the meeting at 10.43am and returned to the meeting at 10.45am.

Member Byrne left the meeting at 10.44am and returned to the meeting at 10.46am.

 

·... Kirsty Humm

 

The meeting adjourned at 10.55am and reconvened at 11.07am.  All members were in attendance apart from Member Swiggs.

 

·    David Wells

·    Peter Jasper

 

Member Swiggs joined the meeting at 11.10am.

 

·... Connie Christensen – Go Cycle Christchurch

·... Margaret Stewart. Tabled a letter from Minister of Transport Hon Phil Twyford (Attachment 1)

 

Member Lindley left the meeting at 11.30am.

 

·... Francine Bills

·... Jessica Halliday

·... Andrew Willis

·... Connie Christensen

·... Robina Dobbie

·... Dike De Lu – Spokes Canterbury

·... Aynsley McNab

·... Martin Meehan – Kidds Cakes and Bakery

·... Clarrie Pearce

·... David Moorhouse

 

Member Lindley returned to the meeting at 12.25pm.

Member Templeton left the meeting at 12.30pm.

 

·... Martin Pinkham

 

Member Templeton returned to the meeting at 12.33pm. 

Member Swiggs left the meeting at 12.34 pm.

 

·... Connie Christensen presented on behalf of Vince Eichholtz

·... Peter Davey

·... Paul van Herpt

·... Annie Broughton and Rose Bayldon - Generation Zero Christchurch

·... John Ingles – Ourvets St Albans

 

  Meeting concluded at 1.09pm.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 22nd DAY OF MAY 2019.

Ali JOnes

Chairperson

 

 

Attachment 1 – Letter Tabled by Margaret StewarT

 

 

 

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 

5.     North Avon Road - No Stopping Restrictions - Post-Construction Safety Audit

Reference:

19/382225

Presenter(s):

Kirsty Mahoney, Project Manager Transport

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to request the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board to approve the installation of no-stopping restrictions on North Avon Road as a result of post-construction safety audit recommendations.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       The construction of the North Avon Road Street Renewal project was completed in early October 2018. 

2.2       A post-construction safety audit was undertaken in November 2018.  Recommendations of this safety audit included installation of no-stopping line restrictions to mitigate the potential conflict between parked vehicles, cyclists and moving vehicles.

2.3       This report requests the approval of no-stopping restrictions as outlined in the staff recommendations below.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote and the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Boards:

 

1.         Approve that under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the parts of North Avon Road, Nicholls Street and Stapletons Road as indicated in the attached drawing TP324002 Issue 1, dated 08/04/2019.

2.         Revoke any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls described in this report.

3.         Approve that these resolutions take effect when there is evidence that the restrictions described in the staff report are in place.

 

4.   Context/Background

Issue

4.1       The construction of the North Avon Road Street Renewal project commenced in January 2018, and was completed in early October 2018.  A post-construction safety audit was carried out in November 2018.  This safety audit identified a number of recommendations to ensure the safe use of the completed works along North Avon Road.

4.2       The recommendations included installation of additional no-stopping restrictions at the following locations to mitigate the potential conflict between parked cars, cyclists and moving vehicles:

4.2.1   Approximately 20 metres outside 41 and 43 North Avon Road, which is in the vicinity of Kids First Kindergarten.  The safety audit has recommended that the extent of the parking area outside Kids First Kindergarten is clearly defined and no stopping lines are provided to cover the extent of the tapered cycle lane ahead of the raised median island.  As there can be high parking turnover here during pick up and drop off times, cyclists riding past these parked vehicles are in the car door opening zone.

4.2.2   Approximately an additional 10 metres northbound on the western side of Nicholls Street from its intersection with North Avon Road.  The safety audit has recommended various approach delineation methods to minimise the opportunity for drivers to crash into the offset kerb build-out at this intersection.  These options include the installation of no-stopping lines on the western side of Nicholls Street to remove potential conflict between parked vehicles, cyclists and moving vehicles in both directions.

4.2.3   Approximately 30 metres outside 51 and 55 North Avon Road.  The safety audit has recommended that extent of the parking area at this location is clearly defined and no stopping lines are provided to cover the extent of the tapered cycle lane.  Cyclists riding past these parked vehicles are in the car door opening zone.

4.2.4   Approximately an additional 10 metres northbound on the western side of Stapletons Road from its intersection with North Avon Road.  The safety audit has recommended various approach delineation methods to minimise the opportunity for drivers to crash into the offset kerb build-out at this intersection.  These options include the installation of no-stopping lines on the western side of Stapletons Road to remove potential conflict between parked vehicles, cyclists and moving vehicles in both directions.

4.2.5   Approximately 20 metres outside 82 and 84 North Avon Road.  The safety audit has recommended consideration is given to removing parking from this section of North Avon Road as the 1.7m width available is too narrow and parked cars encroach the cycle lane and introduce the car door opening safety concern.  As a minimum, yellow no stopping should be extended beyond the boundary of 82/84 North Avon Road to remove the potential for cars to park in the location where drivers cut across the cycle lane.

Strategic Alignment

4.3       The recommendations in this report seek to mitigate potential conflicts between parked vehicles, cyclists and moving vehicles within the carriageway.

4.4       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.4.1   Activity: Traffic Safety and Efficiency

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of casualties on the road network - =129 (reduce by 5 or more per year)

Decision Making Authority

4.5       Pursuant to clause 32 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002, the Council delegates the responsibilities, duties and powers under the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 to Community Boards to exercise within their communities (as defined in the Local Government Act 2002).

4.6       This delegation includes Clause 7 of the Bylaw to “restrict the stopping, standing or parking of vehicles, or any class of vehicles, on any road; or …” (Part D – Sub Part 1 – Community Boards,  Christchurch City Council Delegations Register, 18 Dec 2018).

4.7       Any decision by a Community Board must be consistent with any policies or standards or resolutions adopted by the Council.

Previous Decisions

4.8       The preferred scheme design for the North Avon Road reconstruction project was approved to proceed by the Shirley/Papanui, Burwood/Pegasus and Hagley/Ferrymead Community Boards on 4 October 2016.  The Council approved the preferred scheme plan at its meeting held on 2 November 2016.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

4.9       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

4.10    The level of significance was determined by Council staff assessment of the criteria in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

5.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

5.1       The following reasonably practicable options were considered and are assessed in this report:

·   Install the no-stopping restrictions recommended by the post-construction safety audit

·   Do nothing.

Options Descriptions

5.2       Preferred Option: Option 1 - Installation of no-stopping restrictions

5.3       Option Description: The post-construction safety audit recommendations included installation of additional no-stopping restrictions at the following locations to mitigate the potential conflict between parked vehicles, cyclists and moving vehicles:

·    Approximately 20 metres outside 41 and 43 North Avon Road, which is in the vicinity of Kids First Kindergarten

·    Approximately  an additional 10 metres northbound on the western side of Nicholls Street from its intersection with North Avon Road

·    Approximately 30 metres outside 51 and 55 North Avon Road

·    Approximately an additional 10 metres northbound on the western side of Stapletons Road from its intersection with North Avon Road

·    Approximately 20 metres outside 82 and 84 North Avon Road

5.3.1   Option Advantages

·     The advantages of installing these no stopping restrictions is the mitigation of potential conflict between cyclists and parked and moving vehicles.

5.3.2   Option Disadvantages

·     Loss of potential on-street parking space that has been historically used by members of the community.

5.4       Option 2 – Do nothing

5.4.1   Option Description: The do nothing option will retain the status quo.

5.4.2   Option Advantages

·     Existing on-street parking opportunities will remain in place.

5.4.3   Option Disadvantages

·     There is increased risk of conflict or incidents between cyclists with parked and moving vehicles.

·     There is an increased risk of challenge as a significant identified safety risk as not been addressed.

Analysis Criteria

5.5       The key assessment criteria were based on the findings and recommendations of the post-construction safety audit.

6.   Community Views and Preferences

6.1       The contractor had been instructed to install the no-stopping lines as part of the defects list for completion.  It is noted that the no-stopping lines proposed outside the Kids First Kindergarten were installed for a distance greater than recommended by the safety audit, which has caused concern for the parents and staff of the Kids First Kindergarten.

6.2       The contractor has removed the lines not included in the recommendation.


7.   Legal Implications

7.1       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.2       This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

8.   Risks

8.1       The key risk sits with maintaining the status quo (i.e. do nothing) as this will not address the potential conflict between road users (i.e. parked vehicles, cyclists and moving vehicles).

9.   Next Steps

9.1       The approval of the staff recommendations will enable the no stopping restrictions to be legalised.

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

10. Options Matrix

Criteria

Option 1 – Install no stopping restrictions

Option 2 – Do nothing

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

$6,405

Nil

Maintenance/Ongoing

Re-marking as required

No material implication

Funding Source

Project budget (capital work)

Not required

Impact on Rates

Nil

Nil

(Criteria 1 e.g. Climate Change Impacts)

No material impact

No material impact

(Criteria 2 e.g. Accessibility Impacts)

Reduces potential existing parking opportunities

Maintains status quo with regard to on-street parking

(Criteria 3  e.g. Health & Safety Impacts)

Reduces potential safety conflicts

Maintains increased risk of collisions involving cyclists and vehicles (parked and moving)

(Criteria 4 e.g. Future Generation Impacts)

No material impact

No material impact

 

Criteria

Option 1 -

Option 2 -

Impact on Mana Whenua

Nil

Nil

Alignment to Council Plans & Policies

Aligns with Council Plans and Policies to improve traffic safety and efficiency.

Reduces alignment with Council’s aims for traffic safety and efficiency.


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

North Avon Road - Post-Construction Safety Audit - No Stopping Restrictions

20

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Kirsty Mahoney - Project Manager

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

  


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

PDF Creator


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 

6.     Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Management Plan

Reference:

19/401838

Presenter(s):

Andy Richards (Project Manager) Shane Turner (Independent Traffic Expert)

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to request the Waipuna/Papanui-Innes and Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Boards receive the final Downstream Effects Management Plan and recommend to Council the endorsement of the final Downstream Effects Management Plan.

1.2       Council staff have worked with the relevant Community Boards throughout the development of the methodology that has informed the Downstream Effects Management Plan.  Although the decision-making authority for the final Downstream Effect Management Plan belongs to Council, staff wish to continue to communicate and seek the endorsement and support for any recommendation to Council for matters relating to the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       Under the conditions of the relevant Consent Order, Christchurch City Council is required to:

2.1.1   Mitigate the downstream traffic effects arising from the operation of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

2.1.2   Engage an independent traffic expert to identify the potential impacts on those streets at the end of the Christchurch Northern Corridor which may be potentially affected as a result of the operation of the Christchurch Northern Corridor and recommend appropriate traffic mitigation measures to Council.

2.1.3   Engage with certain owners/occupiers and specified persons/groups regarding the Independents Expert’s recommendations.

2.1.4   Carry out ongoing monitoring and identify the anticipated future increase in traffic as a result of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

2.1.5   Carry out any recommended traffic mitigation measures if traffic volumes are anticipated to increase by over 30% on any street. Council must implement mitigation measures as soon as reasonably practicable and in accordance with the timeframes required by the Consent.

2.2       Council received the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan in February 2019 for consultation and Council staff have now completed the second phase of community engagement. Feedback received during this engagement has fed into the attached final version of the Downstream Effects Management Plan (Attachment A) that has been prepared by the Independent Traffic Expert.

2.3       The final Downstream Effects Management Plan anticipates that main roads and some local roads in the study area will likely see an increase of more than 30% in traffic volume upon the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor. The report proposes a prioritised work programme to address this.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the joint Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive and endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan.

2.         Recommend to Council to endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan.

3.         Note that Council Staff will proceed to design and consult on the proposed interventions in Stage 1A and will develop a programme and costings for the remaining stages.

 

 

 

4.   Context/Background

Designation Conditions

4.1       In mid-2015 a Hearings Panel of Independent Commissioners confirmed the Notice of Requirement for the Northern Arterial, the Northern Arterial Extension and the Cranford Street Upgrade, subject to conditions. 

4.2       That decision was appealed to the Environment Court.  One appeal related to the turning bays and u-turn bays north of Innes Road on Cranford Street and the other was property-related.  None of the appeals lodged concerned the condition which addressed downstream traffic effects or the proposal as a whole. Both appeals were settled by agreement without the need for a hearing.

4.3       In February 2016 the Environment Court considered the consent memorandum of the parties which resolved the appeals lodged and issued a Consent Order which included the addition of one further condition and associated plans for turning bays and u-turn bays on the northern end of Cranford Street.  All other conditions for the Northern Arterial Extension and the Cranford Street Upgrade remained unchanged. 

4.4       Along with the Northern Arterial, these projects would subsequently become collectively known as the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

4.5       Condition 26 of the Notice of Requirement Conditions for the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade Designation, RMA92024074 (Designation condition) relates to downstream traffic effects.  Condition 26 states: 

Prior to operating the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade (NAE/CSU) authorised by this designation Christchurch City Council shall implement the Downstream Effects and Property Amenity Traffic Management Plan contained in Appendix A to these conditions  to address any downstream effects relating to traffic arising from the operation of the NAE/CSU.” 

4.5       Appendix A of the Notice of Requirement Conditions is the Downstream Effects and Property Amenity Traffic Management Plan (management plan)This management plan outlines the following objectives:

·    To identify preferred vehicle access routes, particularly for trucks, between the end of the Christchurch Northern Corridor and Central City;

·    To identify strategies to keep vehicles on preferred vehicle access routes; and

·    To discourage vehicles away from public transport and walking or cycling routes such as Main North Road/Papanui Road and Rutland Street corridors respectively.

4.6       Appendix A then goes on to state that the purpose of the management plan is to:

·    Assess the existence, nature and extent of any increased traffic on streets adjacent to, or adjoining Cranford St attributed to the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade that might cause or contribute to a loss of a service to any of these streets for up to 10 years after the opening date of the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade;

·    Implement measures to avoid, remedy or mitigate such effects, where these are more than minor, in a timely and cost effective manner and where appropriate and practicable; and

·    Monitor efficacy of the measures for an appropriate period and implement further remedial action, if this is necessary and appropriate.

4.7       Appendix A also requires Council to appoint an independent expert, who is a suitably qualified traffic engineer. They will investigate and design an appropriate methodology to identify the potential impacts (if any) and address the requirements of the Designation conditions.

Independent Expert

4.8       Council appointed Dr Shane Turner as an independent traffic expert to develop a methodology to identify potential impacts and draft the Downstream Effects Management Plan.  As part of the development of a methodology, Dr Turner recommended preliminary engagement with the local community prior to drafting the Downstream Effects Management Plan.  This preliminary engagement was not required as part of the Designation conditions.

4.9       Dr Turner completed the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan and Council staff sought community feedback on this in March/April 2019 in accordance with the Designation conditions.

4.10    Following consideration of the community feedback received, Dr Turner has completed the final Downstream Effects Management Plan. This sought to balance the needs of local communities with safety and accessibility considerations, while ensuring an accessible city for all Christchurch residents, businesses and visitors. The staged approach proposed timely monitoring, an arterial corridor upgrade, local road traffic calming and improving access to schools, parks and commercial areas.

Strategic Alignment to National, Regional and Local Strategies

4.11    Various national, regional, and local strategies exist which have also helped guide the direction of the attached Downstream Effects Management Plan. Any options developed need to be conscious of the relevant objectives contained within those strategies.

National

4.12    The Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018 has four strategic directions:

·    Safety.

·    Access.

·    Environment.

·    Value for Money.

4.13    These strategic directions were considered during option conception and in the application of the multi-criteria analysis to assess the efficacy of any proposed options regarding the impact on the local community.

4.14    The Safer Journeys Strategy (2010-2020) guides how safety concerns will be addressed in New Zealand over the period 2010-2020. It outlines the Safe System approach which recognises the vulnerability of road users, and the four pillars of safe roads and roadsides, safe speeds, safe vehicles, and safe road use, under which safety is to be addressed. In urban areas the safety of pedestrians (especially vulnerable pedestrians; young, and elderly) and cyclists needs to be considered alongside vehicle safety. This is considered as an integral part of the staged recommendations of the Downstream Effects Management Plan. It suggests safer speeds for the local areas and has an emphasis on developing safer access to schools, parks and commercial areas. The plan also recommends investing in an alternative secondary cycle route on the eastern side of Cranford Street and if required, an additional pedestrian crossing facility along Cranford Street. 

Regional

4.15    The Regional Land Transport Plan (2015-2025) outlines five regional objectives:

·    A land transport network that addresses current and future transport demand

·    A land transport system that is increasingly free from death and serious injury

·    The Canterbury Earthquake recovery is supported

·    The land transport network is resilient and supports long-term sustainability

·    Investment in land transport infrastructure and services is efficient.

4.16    In addressing the downstream effects, the formation of the Downstream Effects Management Plan has been particularly conscious of regional objectives 1, 2, and 5, as well as long-term sustainability mentioned in objective 4. Resilience was considered less of a priority due to the various routes available in Christchurch should, for example, Cranford Street become temporarily unavailable.  Any implementation of works must also be conscious of earthquake recovery projects when they occur.

Sub-regional

4.17    The Greater Christchurch Transport Statement 2012 provides an overarching framework for managing the transport network and focuses on key links within Greater Christchurch.  It acknowledges northern growth issues as a priority for the sub-region and refers to the importance of connectedness, travel choice, safe journeys and liveable communities. 

4.18    Whilst the Downstream Effects Management Plan is prepared in support of the Christchurch Northern Corridor, it primarily focusses on discouraging through traffic onto local residential streets, as well as away from the key prioritised routes for public transport and cycling.

4.19    The Downstream Effects Management Plan also aims to improve accessibility and safety for schools, commercial areas and parks within the study area. It proposes a secondary cycle route on the eastern side of Cranford Street and endorses using the Healthy Street Framework to create safe, healthy and liveable local streets.

City

4.20    The Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan has four goals:

·    Improve access and choice

·    Create safe, healthy, and liveable communities

·    Support economic vitality

·    Create opportunities for environmental enhancements.

4.21    The Downstream Effects Management Plan seeks to align with the Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan by:

·    Supporting the Christchurch Northern Corridor that is currently being built to support growth and economic activity within the region.  The CNC will improve access into the City from the north and will remove heavy and other traffic off some sub-urban roads, making them safer, encouraging walking, cycling and the use of public transport – especially through Redwood and Belfast.

·    Discouraging general traffic from the Main North Road/Papanui Road Public Transport corridor and Papanui Parallel Major Cycle Route corridor. The Plan seeks to improve safe access to schools, parks and commercial activity areas. It proposes a secondary cycle route to the east of Cranford Street and develops Healthy Street Framework to encourage mode choice.

·    It integrates with a wider package of workstreams referenced in from section 4.23 below which seek to reduce single occupancy vehicle trips and encouraging Public Transport express services.

4.22    The Long Term Plan 2018-2028 sets out Christchurch City Council’s funding priorities for transport over the next 10 years. Funding has been allocated in the Long Term Plan for projects from the Downstream Effects Management Plan in the period 2018/19 to 2023/24. This Long Term Plan outlines Council’s commitment to the Christchurch Northern Corridor along with other key programmes such as Central City Transport, Major Cycle Routes, a local cycle network (connecting to major cycle routes), pedestrian improvements plan, and Public Transport Infrastructure. 

Other related workstreams

4.23    There are a number of inter-related workstreams across the northern area of Christchurch that Council are managing or actively participating in.  These specifically include the High Occupancy Vehicle lane and Northern Travel Demand Management measures, as well as a city-wide programme of work to address growth, safety and changing travel patterns across the city. 

4.24    These workstreams are all investigating ways for either managing the downstream effects for when the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens, or reducing the number of single occupancy vehicle trips during peak hours.  To integrate these workstreams, a Programme Steering Group has been established which includes staff from Christchurch City Council, the New Zealand Transport Agency, Environment Canterbury and Waimakariri District Council.

4.25    High Occupancy Vehicle lane – Christchurch Northern Corridor:

·    The New Zealand Transport Agency has competed a detailed business case for the High Occupancy Vehicle lane on the Christchurch Northern Corridor.  This was endorsed by their Board in late 2018.

·    The current proposal is to install a High Occupancy Vehicle lane from the Tram Road interchange to approximately 450 metres north of the Cranford Street roundabout.

·    Through an update report to the Greater Christchurch Partnership Committee (Attachment B), it has been confirmed that investigation, design and construction funding has been allocated to the project.

4.26    Christchurch Northern Area Supporting Travel Demand Management Measures

4.27    The New Zealand Transport Agency, along with partners including Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury and Waimakariri District Council, have developed a Business Case titled ‘Christchurch Northern Area Supporting Travel Demand Management Measures’ to support the southbound High Occupancy Vehicle lane and cycle path across the Waimakariri Bridge on State Highway 1 and along the Christchurch Northern Corridor.  This is yet to be endorsed by the partners.  A copy of the draft business case forms Attachment C

4.28    The business case recommends a range of interventions across an extended timeframe.  Outlined below are the measures it recommends occur prior to or upon opening the HOV lane and CNC:

·    Communication Plan - to promote new infrastructure and to provide regular updates on construction and disruptions.

·    Marketing and promotional campaign - This will aim to raise awareness and understanding in the community regarding the High Occupancy Vehicle lane and its operation as well as the improved public transport service offering.

·    Mobility as a Service – This considers first and last mile connections and includes the launch/development of an app based tool that combines public transport, carpooling/rideshare and micro mobility travel options.

·    Training and education – Provide training and education to make commuters more comfortable with using alternative modes of transport.

·    Downstream travel demand management measures – Continued investigation into downstream measures which incentivise greater use of the High Occupancy Vehicle lane such as parking incentives.

·    Park and Ride - Interim Park and Ride sites in Kaiapoi and Rangiora, each with a capacity of 120 spaces. The Park and Ride will facilitate existing bus services (Blue Line and Service 95) and could include secure cycle lockers and bus and vehicle access.

·    Travel planning - Residents will be invited to participate in a personalised journey planning programme to encourage behaviour change to alternative modes of transport. This initiative will also target schools and workplaces.

·    New express public transport service - an additional express bus service targeting peak hour commuters and travelling between Rangiora, Kaiapoi and the central city along the new High Occupancy Vehicle lane. This includes 10 minute frequencies (between 7-9 AM and 4-6 PM) and a total of 24 additional services a day (12 in each peak period).

4.29    Public Transport Business Case:

Staff from the Greater Christchurch Partnership have prepared a business case for the sub-region, titled Public Transport Futures.  This has been endorsed by the Public Transport Joint Committee and is currently with the New Zealand Transport Agency awaiting the approval of their Board.  If approved, this will likely result in three further business cases as follows:

·    Rapid Transit (on the North and South-West Corridors).  

·    Foundations (focusing on the current five core bus routes – Orbiter, Yellow Line (Rolleston/Hornby -New Brighton), Blue Line (Rangiora/Belfast - Cashmere), Orange Line (Halswell – Queenspark) and Purple Line (Airport/Sheffield Crescent – Sumner).

·    Rest of Network (the remaining bus routes, including the four additional core routes proposed in the Regional Public Transport Plan).

4.30    The intention is to complete these business cases so they can feed into the 2021-2031 Long Term Plan’s for the relevant authorities and the 2021 National Land Transport Programme.

4.31    All of the above workstreams, including the cycle clip-on lane across the Waimakariri Bridge, are important improvements to the northern corridor to encourage more people to move in fewer vehicles and to provide alternative choices to how they travel between the Waimakariri District and Christchurch City.

Decision Making Authority

4.32    Christchurch City Council.

Previous Decisions

4.33    On 14 February 2019 Council resolved CNCL/2019/00025, that the Council:

·        Receive the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to commence engagement with the community on the recommendations contained within the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan.

·        Request Staff to work with the local communities on local access needs and provide the relevant Community Boards a briefing on the Travel Demand Management options currently being investigated.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

4.34    The decisions in this report are of high significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

4.35    The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in Council's Significance and Engagement Policy.  The level of significance reflects the high numbers of people affected and the high level of community interest and involvement in the Christchurch Northern Corridor over many years.

4.36    The community engagement outlined in this report reflects the assessment and has been developed in accordance with the Designation conditions within the Consent Order approving the Northern Arterial, the Northern Arterial Extension and the Cranford Street Upgrade and previous feedback received during the initial engagement in 2018.

 

5.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

5.1       The following options are considered and assessed in this report:

-      Option 1 – Endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan

-      Option 2 – Do not endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan

5.2       Staff did not consider any other options.

Options Descriptions

5.3       Preferred Option: Option 1 – Endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan (Attachment A)

5.3.1   Option Description: The final Downstream Effects Management Plan is the result of the methodology to assess the likely downstream effects of the Christchurch Northern Corridor. 

5.3.2   The report notes the following:

·     The modelling analysis indicates that the traffic impacts on Cranford Street south of Innes Road is anticipated to be immediate upon the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

·     A number of local streets are also expected to be affected by increased traffic volumes of more than 30% following the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

·     Given the uncertainty around these effects, based on land use estimates and expected driver behaviour, a key aspect is monitoring traffic volumes once the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens.

·     Community feedback has followed a number of themes (further detail in Section 6):

-        Feedback on community impacts

-        Support for non-car transport

-        Specific plan related feedback

-        A proposed community plan

-        Working with strategic partners

5.3.3   The report recommends a prioritised work programme in three stages.

·     Stage 1 – Works that need to be undertaken prior to the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.  These fall into two sub-stages:

-        Stage 1A - Work that must be completed to meet the Designation conditions of the Consent Order.

-        Stage 1B - Work that would be of benefit to the community to complete, but is not a requirement of the Designation conditions.

·     Stage 2 – Monitoring the efficacy of Stage 1 implementation and undertaking additional works as required.  Commencement, completion and implementation of identified studies. This will occur for up to three years following the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

·     Stage 3 – Implementation of works as required by monitoring and studies, until the end of the commissioning period.

·     Some of the above projects in Stages 2 and 3 may be required by the Designation conditions.  This will be identified by staff at the time that projects are identified to the Community Board and Council.

5.3.4   The proposed work programme for Stage 1 is summarised below (the complete programme is available as Attachment F):

Stage 1A - Recommendations required in order to meet the Designation conditions prior to the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor:

·     Major Road Upgrades:

-        Cranford Street (Innes Street to Berwick Street) and Cranford Street/ Sherbourne Street (Berwick Street to Bealey Ave), or

-        Berwick Street/Warrington Street to Forfar Street/ Madras Street and Barbadoes Street.

·     Intersection Upgrades:

-        Westminster Street/ Cranford Street, Berwick Street/ Cranford Street, Forfar Street/ Warrington Street and Barbadoes Street/ Warrington Street.

·     Traffic Calming:

-        Mersey and Berwick Streets (Innes Road to Forfar Street), Knowles Street, Weston Road, McFaddens Road, Malvern Street (left in left out at Cranford St intersection) and Dee Street (left in left out at Cranford St intersection).

·     Traffic Monitoring:

-        Traffic counts be collected at over 50 locations on main roads and local streets with a high potential for rat-running.

Stage 1B – Further recommendations to be carried out prior to the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor

·     Environmental Monitoring:

-        Vehicle emission, noise, vibration impacts.

·     Introduce nine 30km/h (or 40km/h) reduced speed limit areas through the downstream local road network.

·     Interim improvements on Cranford Street to increase the safety of pedestrians crossing Cranford Street.

·     Initiate the following studies:

-        Safe Access to Schools across Cranford Street.

-        Safe Cycling Routes including: Cycle Wayfinding Signage, McFaddens Road Secondary Cycle Corridor, Westminster/ Courtenay Secondary Cycle Corridor.

5.3.5   Option Advantages

·     The final Downstream Effects Management Plan is in accordance with the conditions of the Notice of Requirement, in particular condition 26 and Appendix A of the Environment Court Consent Order.

·     The final Downstream Effects Management Plan seeks to balance the needs of local communities with safety and accessibility considerations, while ensuring an accessible city for Christchurch residents, businesses and visitors through:

-        Assisting with traffic congestion relief and encourages vehicles to remain on preferred routes (arterials) and away from residential roads and community facilities (including schools).

-        Improve/retain amenity in residential streets.

-        Provide public transport benefits through reliable journey times.

-        Encouraging modal shift away from single occupancy journeys.

-        Improving access to schools, parks and commercial areas.

-        Introduction of cycle routes through local roads.

·     The proposed projects form an integral part of a wider work package to manage the volume of traffic travelling into Christchurch from the north.  This includes the development and implementation of travel demand measures to reduce single occupancy vehicle trips, such as a high occupancy vehicle lane and park and ride/rapid bus services.

·     Provides a prioritised programme of monitoring and implementation projects to mitigate the effects of increased traffic from the operation of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.  Some of these will be implemented before opening in 2020.

5.3.6   Option Disadvantages

·     The recommendations have financial implications that have been allowed for in the Long Term Plan 2018-2028.

·     The development of work packages and monitoring requirements will result in a staged approach to the delivery of solutions for the community. This will need to be reviewed regularly to ensure that it addresses the needs of the community.

·     Monitoring of traffic volumes on local streets may result in a delay to implementing interventions to prevent rat-running traffic.  The use of regular monitoring and assessments against baseline counts will improve the ease of decision making and speed of implementation.

·     Community concern has been raised over the number of single occupancy vehicle trips that will travel through the local community following the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.  This is being addressed through the Northern Travel Demand Management package and other projects across Council and the New Zealand Transport Agency.

·     Detailed responses to the submissions are outlined in the table after section 6.11 of this report. 

5.4       Option 2 – Do not endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan

5.4.1   Option Description: This option is to not endorse the final Downstream Effects Management Plan (Attachment A) or proceed with the prioritised work programme identified in Section 5.3.3.

5.4.2   This option has significant impacts on the ability of New Zealand Transport Agency and Council to effectively operate and obtain the benefits from the Northern Arterial, Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade, as detailed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The Northern Arterial could open between Chaney’s Corner and Queen Elizabeth II Drive as it is not a party to the Consent Order as this section of the Christchurch Northern Corridor is owned by the New Zealand Transport Agency.

5.4.3   However, according to Section 7 of this report, if Council wishes to comply with the Designation condition, then withholding approval of the final Downstream Effects Management Plan would mean Council cannot open the Northern Arterial Extension to public traffic.

5.4.4   The resulting impact on the road network would be that all Northern Arterial traffic would have to exit at the Queen Elizabeth II interchange, which is not designed to accommodate these traffic volumes. This would likely lead to severe traffic congestion due to rerouting traffic along Queen Elizabeth II Drive, Main North Road-Papanui Road Corridor, Marshland Road Corridor and Innes Road Corridor and filtering through the local road network.

5.4.5   Public transport and cycling routes would also be affected due to the impacts associated with increased traffic flows on these routes.

5.4.6   Option Advantages

·     The funding allocated in the Long Term Plan 2018-2028 to construct the recommendations in the Downstream Effects Management Plan could be reallocated to other projects.

5.4.7   Option Disadvantages

·     The main disadvantage of this option is that Council will not fulfil its statutory obligations.  This is detailed in Section 7 under legal obligations.

·     Furthermore, there is potential for enforcement action due to a breach of Designation conditions.

·     The Northern Arterial Extension section of the Christchurch Northern Corridor could not open, leading to:

-        Increased congestion on the road network.

-        Negative impact on Public Transport journey times and reliability.

Analysis Criteria

5.5       The Designation conditions require Council to produce a Downstream Effects Management Plan and sets out how this should be delivered. It specifies that an Independent Expert be engaged to provide a methodology to assess the impact of the Christchurch Northern Corridor on the local network. It also requires Council to have completed this Plan prior to opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor. If Council fails to fulfil this requirement then it cannot operate the Northern Arterial Extension. Council have already begun construction of the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade, due to be completed mid-2020. The preferred option allows Council to legally operate the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade.

Options Considerations

5.6       Endorsing the attached Downstream Effects Management Plan fulfils Council’s statutory obligations under the Resource Management Act and allows Council to open the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade.

6.   Community Views and Preferences

6.1       In May 2018 engagement was undertaken with an information document seeking early community feedback to inform the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan.  This was sent to approximately 12,000 properties.

6.2       As a result of this engagement Council staff received 408 submissions including a “Change.org” petition signed by over 2,000 people (Attachment D).  The results from this engagement were reported to the Community Board in January 2019 and then Council in February 2019.  The feedback received was considered and helped inform the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan.

6.3       Comment was then sought on the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan between Monday 11 March 2019 and Monday 15 April 2019.

6.4       Council Staff delivered the consultation document to 6350 properties and posted to 1880 absentee landowners.  An email was sent to 101 key stakeholders and all submitters from the previous engagement in 2018 were also advised we were now seeking feedback on the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan.

6.5       Information was available on the Have Your Say web site, Council Staff ran a Newsline story and three Facebook posts were shared with the St Albans Community Group.  The Facebook posts generated very little engagement. However, we had 1823 views on our Have Your Say web page and 185 views on the Newsline article.

6.6       Council Staff held four drop in sessions for the community to discuss the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan and ask any questions of the project team prior to providing their feedback.  Representatives of the St Albans Residents Association also set up an information stand at these sessions and spoke to the residents about the Community Plan.  Overall these sessions were attended by approximately 60 people.

6.7       A joint meeting of the Papanui-Innes and Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Boards was held on Wednesday 8 May 2019 for submitters to speak to elected members regarding their submission prior to the final Downstream Effects Management Plan being prepared.

6.8       At the close of consultation we received 227 submissions.  A full analysis of these submissions forms Attachment E.

6.9       All submitters have been advised the outcome of the consultation, with links to the consultation analysis, and details of the Community Board and Council meetings.

Summary of matters raised as a result of community engagement:

6.10    Issues raised during consultation can generally be sorted into three groups:

6.10.1 Key transport issues that need to be considered and have solutions implemented prior to the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor, these include:

·     Interventions that are required to be completed to meet the requirements of the Designation conditions.

·     Interventions that would be of benefit to the community but are not a requirement of the Designation conditions.

6.10.2 Transport issues that require monitoring and will be implemented when required.  Many of the issues raised by the community (especially site-specific issues) fall into this category.

6.10.3 Local transport issues that would have occurred despite the Christchurch Northern Corridor opening (e.g. outside the study area or as a result of baseline traffic growth).

6.11    The Table below summarises the matters raised as a result of consultation and the Independent Traffic Expert’s responses to those issues.

#

Item

Response

A

Strong emphasis on reducing single occupancy vehicle trips and overall number of vehicle trips from the north traveling through St Albans.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan recommends that Council should investigate adding additional peak hour capacity to the main arterial roads south of Innes Road to reduce rat-running through local road network.

-       This additional capacity could include additional lanes at traffic signals, peak hour tidal clearways and clearways that are restricted to buses and other high occupancy vehicles.

-       However, High Occupancy Vehicle lanes will not increase the capacity of general traffic on main arterial roads and can lead to:

-     Rat-running on local streets.

-     Vehicles diverting to Main North/Papanui Road and Rutland Street, which are principal bus and cycling corridors.

B

More emphasis needs to go on getting people onto buses (public transport) rather than using private motor-vehicles.  Request for 24-7 bus lanes on Cranford Street.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan supports wider Travel Demand Management measures.

-       Traffic analysis completed as part of the report shows the Christchurch Northern Corridor along with proposed peak hour clearways will likely reduce traffic levels on Main North Road/Papanui Road Corridor and supports public transport improvements.

-       Through monitoring, the proposed clearway can be adjusted as a managed lane to encourage more car sharing per vehicle (High Occupancy Vehicles) along with express buses and eventually this managed lane could be re-designated as a bus lane.

-       There are concerns that the immediate installation of permanent bus lanes on Cranford Street will:

-     Push traffic back onto Main North Road and Rutland Street impacting on safe and efficient bus and cycle usage of these routes. 

-     Lead to increased rat-running on local streets in St Albans.

-     Result in the permanent removal of on-street parking.

-       The negative impacts associated with bus lanes would be considerably greater than with High Occupancy Vehicle lanes.

-       Compare to permanent bus lanes on Cranford Street, the managed lane allows a flexibility to timely implement other Travel Demand Management measures and encourage mode shift. 

C

Transport partners (e.g. Christchurch City Council and New Zealand Transport Agency) need to do work together to change travel behaviour (e.g. looking at parking controls in Central City and allocating road space to buses). The focus should be on moving people not vehicles. 

-       Since September 2018, a Programme Steering Group comprising members from Christchurch City Council, New Zealand Transport Agency, Environment Canterbury and Waimakariri District Council has been established to lead the following key studies along the Northern Corridor:

-     Christchurch Northern Corridor High Occupancy Vehicle Lane Business Case (New Zealand Transport Agency lead).

-     Travel Demand Management (Northern Package) Study (New Zealand Transport Agency lead).

-     Downstream Effects Management Plan (Christchurch City Council lead).

 

-       Measures that are being investigated include:

-     A peak-hour southbound High Occupancy Vehicle lane on the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

-     Interim Park ‘n Ride sites in Kaiapoi and Rangiora.

-     Investigations into measures which incentivise greater use of High Occupancy Vehicle lane such as parking incentives.

-     New express bus service between Rangiora, Kaiapoi and the central city along the new High Occupancy Vehicle lane.

-     A marketing and promotional campaign to raise the awareness and understanding of the High Occupancy Vehicle lane and the improved public transport offering.

-     Launch/development of an app based tool that combines public transport, carpooling/car -sharing and micro-mobility options.

-     Training and education – cycle training courses & bus information.

-     Personalised travel planning. 

-       However, the Greater Christchurch Partners need to consider the impacts these measures could have in the Central City, on retail businesses, and on parking outside residential properties before implementing.

-       The recommendations in the Downstream Effect Management Plan do not preclude the provision of High Occupancy Vehicles and bus-lanes in the future.

D

Not enough measures around walking, cycling and public transport to be introduced before the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens.  Most of the changes appear to come later after traffic volumes have increased and should be in place before Christchurch Northern Corridor opens (Stage 1 improvements).

-       The Stage 1 proposals improve safety and access for these modes.  For example:

-     The implementation of a High Occupancy Vehicle lane will assist less congestion on public transport and MCR (Major Cycle Route) Corridors which will ultimately improve safety, journey times and trip reliability for buses and cycling.

-     The traffic signals at Warrington/Forfar Streets and Warrington/Barbadoes Streets intersections will improve access and safety for pedestrians and cyclists crossing Warrington Street and using St Albans Park. 

-     Signage and marking of an alternative north-south cycling route through quiet local streets to the east of Cranford Street.  This could be done relatively quickly and be in place before the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens. 

D

Confusion around the type of cycling facilities to be installed as part of secondary cycle routes network.  Are they to be separated cycle lanes? 

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan recommends the installation of secondary cycleways.

-       It is not recommended these cycleways will not include separators like those provided on the Major Cycle Routes (e.g. Papanui Parallel).  These cycleways will consist of painted cycle lanes and bicycle greenways (i.e. use of quiet streets). 

-       Proposed cycleways will be consulted on with the community.

E

Lack of safe cycling facilities on Cranford/Sherborne Streets during Clearway operation.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan encourages Council to investigate how a consistent level of service throughout the Cranford Street Corridor can be provided to cyclists during clearway operation. 

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan includes a number of recommendations to encourage cyclists away from the Cranford/ Sherborne Street Corridor and onto the Papanui Parallel and other quieter routes.

F

Concerns around staging of traffic calming on various streets and concerns on the time it might take to implement measures to address rat-running that does occurs after the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan recommends that Council should carry out vehicle monitoring before the Christchurch Northern Corridor is opened.

-       Vehicle monitoring will be collected to establish baseline data which will be used:

-     To confirm the validity of the traffic modelling.

-     As part of the ongoing monitoring of each street in relation to the impact of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan allows Council to implement traffic calming on streets that have not been identified in the plan that have been found to have 30% plus increase in traffic compared with pre Christchurch Northern Corridor.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan recommends that Council should look to implement improvements as early as possible on streets with a 30% plus increase compared with pre Christchurch Northern Corridor.

-       Temporary measures (or rapid implementation measures) are an option to reduce rat-running on some streets, especially if the effects are well over 30%.  For example, use of temporary islands and hit posts to ban some turning movements.

G

Right turn movements during clearway operation (e.g. into new play-centres on Cranford Street) will impact on capacity of two-lane clearway operation.

-       Right turns on the proposed clearways can reduce the capacity of the road, however it has limited effect on the capacity of the road if opposing flow (non-peak direction) is low as the right turning vehicle can make this manoeuvre quickly.

-       The recommendations in the Downstream Effects Management Plan propose:

-     Right turning restrictions at side-roads.

-     The provision of right turn bays at most traffic signals allowing traffic to turn right safely.

H

Concerns around peak period prohibition of car parking for clearways on roads with high kerbside parking demand.

-       As with all large-scale roading projects, Council will carry out parking surveys and look at managing parking demand by different users (e.g. local resident, commuters and short duration parking near shops).

I

Why the Downstream Effects Management Plan does not consider the downstream effects of Christchurch Northern Corridor on Innes Road and McFaddens/ Mays/ Normans corridors, given Innes Road is already heavily congested in peak periods.

-       The traffic analysis completed as part of the Downstream Effects Management Plan indicates that traffic levels on Innes Road will not be affected due to the Christchurch Northern Corridor and is not considered as part of the study.

-       Congestion can be addressed as part of the operational or capital improvements through the Council’s Long Term Plan.

J

Will there be monitoring of air, noise and vibration from traffic before and after the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens.

-       Council will monitor air, noise and vibration before the Christchurch Northern Corridor opens to establish baselines.

-       It also recommends that Council monitors annually or biennially so that any impacts of the additional traffic can be assessed.

-       The recommended locations to carry out this monitoring are at:

-     Cranford Street north of McFaddens Road

-     Cranford Street north of Berwick Street

-     Berwick Street immediately east of Cranford Street

-     Madras Street north of Edgeware Road

-     Barbadoes Street north of Edgeware Road

K

Concerns around pedestrian safety of children in the proximity of schools.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan has identified pedestrian safety concerns on Cranford Street between the Westminster and Berwick Street intersections. It recommends Council to improve both intersections considering pedestrian safety. It also recommends to monitor and investigate additional signalised crossing facility on Cranford Street, if required in front of the English Park.

-       The Downstream Effects Management Plan also suggests to lower the speed limit on Cranford Street at school peak hours to further improve pedestrian safety.

-       It is currently proposed that these measures will be implemented as part of a package of works on Cranford Street.

L

Requests to install tolls on the Waimakariri Bridge (SH1) to reduce number of cars travelling into Christchurch (as a traffic demand management measure).

-       Tolls:

-     Current New Zealand legislation does not permit existing roads to be tolled. Tolls can only be applied to new roads where suitable alternative routes are available. This option was not investigated as part of the Christchurch Northern Corridor and is not part of the existing Designation conditions.

-     Changes would be required to the Designation conditions and associated conditions for the Northern Arterial, Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade.

-     If Council were to implement tolling on the Northern Arterial Extension, then the alternative available transport route would be through the Christchurch Northern Corridor /Queen Elisabeth II Drive interchange. This interchange has not been designed to cater for the likely additional traffic and will require significant changes which is not part of the existing Alliance design.

-     Additionally, the likely re-routing will significant impact the operation of Main North Road and Cranford Street north of the roundabout.

-       Congestion Charging:

-     Similar to the road tolling option, Congestion Charging has not been investigated as part of the Christchurch Northern Corridor and does not form part of the existing Designation conditions.

-     Best practice recommends the following factors to be investigated prior to making a decision on congestion charging –

Political position.

Well planned public relations campaigns.

Single empowered agency.

Public recognition of need.

Ring fencing of revenues.

Proven technology.

Lengthy development.

Clear business case.

-     This option is not currently considered as part of the northern package Travel Demand Management study that was recently completed by the New Zealand Transport Agency.

-     While implementation of such a measure will require ministerial and wider public approval, there is limited information to evaluate the likely impact of such a significant Travel Demand Management measure.

Table 1: Matter raised during engagement and the Independent Traffic Expert‘s response.

7.   Legal Implications

7.1       There is legal context, issues and implications relevant to this decision.

7.2       This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

7.3       Condition 26 of the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade Designation (RMA92024074) states:

“Prior to operating the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade (NAE/CSU) authorised by this designation Christchurch City Council shall implement the Downstream Effects and Property Amenity Traffic Management Plan [Management Plan] contained in Appendix A to these conditions to address any downstream effects relating to traffic arising from the operation of the NAE/CSU.”

7.4       Appendix A of the Designation conditions contains the Management Plan.  Under Section 2 of the Management Plan, Council must appoint an independent traffic expert to investigate and design an appropriate methodology to identify the potential impacts (if any) of traffic effects on those streets at the end of the Christchurch Northern Corridor which may potentially be affected as a result of the operation of the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade.  This includes identifying potentially affected streets; the use of modelling to identify future increases in traffic caused by or attributable to, the operation of the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade; and, consider the effects arising from growth in traffic flows on potentially affected streets.

7.5       After the traffic expert has carried out their investigation, Clause 2.2(e) of the Management Plan states that, where an increase in traffic-related effects within potentially adversely affected streets is caused by or contributed to by the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade,  the independent traffic expert must recommend appropriate mitigation measures to Council and, where required, the local Community Board (where that Board holds the requisite delegation for any works required) as soon as practicable, and institute monitoring procedures to verify the outcome of the mitigation measures.

7.6       The recommendations made to Council must include appropriate remedial steps to be taken to avoid, remedy or mitigate any increase in adverse traffic-related effects where such effects are more than minor.  These remedial steps may include a programmed series of measures to be delivered over time, with the intention that any recommended remedial steps must be undertaken as soon as reasonably practicable after that recommendation is made.  All remedial steps must be completed within 10 years of the road opening (the Commissioning Period).

7.7       The Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations prepared by the independent traffic expert appointed by Council, Dr Shane Turner (Dr Turner), has been done in accordance with the Management Plan as outlined above.  Modelling has been carried out, potentially affected streets have been identified and recommendations have been made to avoid, remedy or mitigate any increase in adverse traffic-related effects.

7.8       Section 4 of the Management Plan contained in the Designation conditions sets the traffic level at which Council must implement the recommendations made by Dr Turner in the Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations.  Clause 4.1 states:

“If the independent traffic expert determines that the increase in traffic to be experienced prior to the expiry of the Commissioning Period that is caused by or attributable to the operation of the NAE/CSU, is likely to raise or has raised the level of vehicle movements on any of the potentially affected streets by more than 30 per cent above the traffic level that would have occurred without the operation of the NAE/CSU then measures to improve the operation of Cranford Street and Sherbourne Street and/or calming work will be undertaken by the Council as recommended.” [Emphasis added]

7.9       The modelling and investigations conducted by Dr Turner as part of the Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations indicates the threshold of more than 30 per cent will likely be triggered as soon as the Christchurch Northern Corridor is opened.  In accordance with the Management Plan, Dr Turner has made recommendations to avoid, remedy or mitigate these effects in Stage 1A of his Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations.

7.10    The other recommendations made in the Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations are part of the programmed approach and Section 4 of the Management Plan does not require those works to be carried out at this time.

7.11    To comply with its obligations under the Designation conditions, Council must undertake the Stage 1A recommendations in the Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations as soon as reasonably practicable to ensure any effects of traffic increases remain at an acceptable level.   Council will be in breach of Condition 26 of the Designation conditions if it does not adopt (and carry out) the Stage 1A recommendations in Dr Turner’s Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations to mitigate the more than 30% increase in traffic on the affected streets. 

7.12    The timeframe within which the Council must undertake any of the recommended remedial steps is “as soon as reasonably practicable”.  In this context, this will be as soon as possible allowing for some delays to implement design, contractual and other matters required to allow the physical works to be undertaken.  Council staff have advised that, if Council adopts the Stage 1A recommendations now (which on an as soon as reasonably practicable basis would be consistent with the Designation conditions/Management Plan requirements), then the mitigation measures can be implemented immediately with completion prior to the road opening.

7.13    Failing to comply with Appendix A is a breach of Condition 26 of the Designation.  A breach of the Designation conditions exposes Council to the risk of enforcement action.  Enforcement action could include some form of abatement or enforcement order under the Resource Management Act 1991. Penalties could also be imposed, which could be financial and/or prosecution.

7.14    There are both legal and reputational risks if Council breaches its obligations under the Designation condition and enforcement action is taken against it.  Any enforcement action would likely result from complaints being made by members of the public in the Christchurch area to this Council as the local authority.  Any enforcement action required to be taken would be this Council in its capacity as the local authority (and therefore the enforcement body) against this Council in its capacity as the designation authority.  As well as this potential enforcement action, New Zealand Transport Agency may also choose to take some form of enforcement action against this Council, who is a party to this roading project and is contractually obligated to complete the project.

7.15    If Council did not adopt the Stage 1A recommendations under the Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations there are two options available to Council to achieve compliance with the conditions of the Designation.

7.16    The first option is to not operate the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade. Cranford Street is an existing road so this could operate as it currently operates.  However, using any of the additional lanes or services that form part of the upgrade is likely to be considered as operating the Cranford Street Upgrade. 

7.17    Not operating the Northern Arterial and Cranford Street Upgrade would expose Council to serious risk in terms of its contractual and legal obligations under the Christchurch Northern Corridor Alliance and any other contractual obligations it has entered into.

7.18    Council is party to a number of contracts with New Zealand Transport Agency in relation to the governance, funding and construction of the Northern Arterial Extension. As defined in the contracts, the Northern Arterial Extension includes the Cranford Street Upgrade. Under the Multi-Party Funding Agreement Council records that it has agreed to

“deliver the construction of the NAE… including obtaining the Required Approvals and the Required Land to enable construction and operation of the NAE as a local road”. 

7.19    A failure to open and operate the road could therefore expose Council to a claim for fundamental breach of contract not only by New Zealand Transport Agency, but by express extension under the contracts, the other Alliance participants. By way of remedy, the New Zealand Transport Agency (or another of the Alliance participants) could pursue the Council for an award of damages or an order for specific performance.  Council also risks significant reputational damage with key stakeholders for breaching these contracts and failing to do what it has represented it will do.

7.20    Another issue is that a decision by Council not to operate the Northern Arterial Extension and Cranford Street Upgrade does not affect New Zealand Transport Agency operating the Northern Arterial.  New Zealand Transport Agency will likely be in breach of its obligations under the Christchurch Northern Corridor Alliance and other contractual arrangements if it does not operate the Northern Arterial, so it is likely to begin operation of the Northern Arterial mid-2020, which will push traffic onto Queen Elizabeth II Drive.   

7.21    The second option if Council did not wish to adopt the recommendations set out in Stage 1A of the Downstream Effects Management Plan – Report and Recommendations would be to make an application under Section 181 of the Resource Management Act 1991 to delete or vary Condition 26 (and any other associated conditions) of the Designation. Lodging such an application would not legalise the use of the road, the road would still need to remain closed until all matters concerning the change of the condition application were resolved (including appeal periods and appeal processes).

7.22    Any application made to change the Designation condition(s) that proposed changes that reduced the requirement for mitigation measures to address the downstream effects, or left the effects unaddressed, may not be successful.   Clauses 1.2 and 1.3 of the Management Plan record that, during the hearing for the Designation, expert reports identified potential adverse effects on residences and businesses in the immediate area around the southern end of the CSU.  This was the reason for condition 26 being included in the Designation conditions.  The Management Plan was proffered by Council (as designation authority) at the hearing and then finalised with the input of the relevant party’s traffic experts.

7.23    Council cannot mitigate the adverse effects identified without dealing with downstream effects in some way.  As a result, there is a risk that any application to change the designation condition or Appendix A would be declined or, Council would be left with a new condition and/or Management Plan which has similar (or even more onerous) requirements and/or obligations to the existing Designation condition and Management Plan.

8.   Risks

8.1       Therefore, according to Section 7 of this report, the following key risks have been identified by Council Staff if Council does not endorse the Downstream Effects Management Plan:

8.1.1   Christchurch City Council will not be able to open the Northern Arterial Extension to public traffic as outlined in Section 7 of this report.

8.1.2   The resulting impact on the road network is that all Northern Arterial traffic would have to exit at the Queen Elizabeth II interchange which is not currently designed to accommodate these traffic volumes. This would likely lead to severe traffic congestion due to rerouting traffic along Queen Elizabeth II Drive, Main North Road-Papanui Road Corridor, Marshland Road Corridor and Innes Road Corridor and filtering through the local road network.

8.1.3   The Cranford Street Upgrade may have to be closed between Cranford Street/Main North Road and Cranford Street/Innes Road.

8.2       Other potential risks include:

8.2.1   Possible contractual penalties could be applied if Council did not comply with the contractual obligations for the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

8.2.2   Option 2 will likely impact the relationship with the Greater Christchurch Partnership and undermine the success of delivering the Northern Package Travel Demand Management measures including the High Occupancy Vehicle lane along Christchurch Northern Corridor.

9.   Next Steps

9.1       Council to consider the endorsement of the final Downstream Effects Management Plan.

9.2       Staff will undertake a programme of work to design, consult on and implement the work programme identified in Section 5.3.3.

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

10. Options Matrix

Issue Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – Endorse the Downstream Effects Management Plan (Preferred Option).

Option 2 – Do not endorse the Downstream Effects Management Plan

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

·    Preliminary estimate  = approximately $10- 15 million

·    The financial implication of the projects will be reported at the time of implementing the work programme.

Nil

Maintenance/Ongoing

The proposed managed lane option will increase operational cost however it is envisage that the additional cost will be recovered through the enforcement measures.

Nil

Funding Source

·    ID#17088 RONS Downstream Intersection Improvements : Cranford Street Downstream

·    ID#41976 Route Improvement: Barbadoes St & Madras St (Bealey to Warrington)

Nil

Impact on Rates

Nil

Nil

Criteria 1 - Climate Change Impacts

·    Overall, the Downstream Effects Management Plan, with the other supporting TDM measures, encourages mode shift by supporting alternatives to single occupancy vehicle trips.

·    Additionally the Downstream Effects Management Plan supports the Northern Corridor Travel Demand Management measures.

·    The Downstream Effects Management Plan also:

-      Supports journey time reliability for the Main North Road-Papanui Road Public Transport corridor and Papanui Parallel Major Cycle Route.

-      Investigate a secondary cycle route on the eastern side of Cranford Street.

-      Proposes to use the healthy street framework on local streets.

·    The traffic analysis confirmed that the Downstream Effects Management Plan will not induce any additional traffic on the network. 

·    Not endorsing the Downstream Effects Management Plan will not support the Northern Corridor Travel Demand Management measures.

·    As indicated by the traffic analysis the Christchurch Northern Corridor will likely increase traffic congestion on the arterial road network and traffic re-routing through residential areas. This situation will ultimately result in slow moving vehicles which will likely increase CO2 emissions within the study area.

Criteria 2 - Central City regeneration

·    The Downstream Effects Management Plan supports the Central City regeneration by providing reliable journey times for all modes especially during peak periods between the north of Christchurch and the City Centre.

Nil

Criteria 3 - Transport Congestion

·    The Downstream Effects Management Plan proposes interventions to reduce traffic re-routing through the local residential areas and other key Public Transport and Major Cycle Route corridors.

·    Overall it improves network capacity for all modes.

·    Traffic analysis confirmed significant traffic congestion along Cranford Street Corridor and its surrounding residential areas. 

Criteria 4 - Impact on partnership relationship

 

·    Supports the Christchurch Northern Corridor and Northern Corridor Travel Demand Management Measures.

·    Significant – as this option will likely undermine the success of delivering the Northern Package Travel Demand Management measures including High Occupancy Vehicle lane along Christchurch Northern Corridor.

Criteria 5 - Timing

·    Delay in approving the Plan will create significant pressure to deliver the recommendations as proposed within the Plan.

Nil

 

Statutory Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 - (Preferred Option).

Option 2 -

Impact on Mana Whenua

Nil

Nil

Alignment to Council Plans & Policies

·    The proposal is aligned with Council Plans and Policies

·    Negative impact on Council’s Plans and Policies, as it adversely affects the journey time reliability of Public Transport and Active Transport corridors which could discourage mode shift.

 

 

 


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Final Downstream Effects Management Plan Report and Recommendations

46

b

Greater Christchurch Partnership Committee - Transport Update - 10 May 2019

196

c

Draft Christchurch Northern Area Supporting Travel Demand Management Measures Summary

200

d

Change.org Petition

270

e

Engagement Analysis

271

f

Summary Programme of Proposed Works

288

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Andy Richards - Project Manager

Nilesh Redekar - Senior Transport Network Planner

Ann Campbell - Senior Engagement Advisor

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Polly Leeming - Corporate Counsel

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

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Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

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Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

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Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

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Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

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Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and Papanui-Innes Community Board

31 May 2019

 

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