Christchurch City Council

Supplementary Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Thursday 9 May 2019

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor James Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

6 May 2019

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

 

Jo Daly

Council Secretary

941 8581

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

09 May 2019

 

 


Council

09 May 2019

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

38.      Resolution to Include Supplementary Reports....................................................... 4

39.      Water Supply Improvement Programme - update................................................... 5

40.      Mayor's Monthly Report - April 2019.................................................................... 21

31.      Resolution to Exclude the Public........................................................................ 25


Council

09 May 2019

 

 

38. Resolution to Include Supplementary Reports

1.      Background

1.1          Approval is sought to submit the following reports to the Council meeting on 09 May 2019:

39.   Water Supply Improvement Programme - update

40.   Mayor's Monthly Report - April 2019

41.   Appeal Issues

1.2          The reason, in terms of section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, why the reports were not included on the main agenda is that they were not available at the time the agenda was prepared.

1.3          It is appropriate that the Council receive the reports at the current meeting.

2.      Recommendation

2.1          That the reports be received and considered at the Council meeting on 09 May 2019.

39.   Water Supply Improvement Programme - update

40.   Mayor's Monthly Report - April 2019

41.   Appeal Issues

 

 


Council

09 May 2019

 

 

39.   Water Supply Improvement Programme - update

Reference:

19/388712

Presenter(s):

Helen Beaumont, Water Supply Improvement

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       To provide an update on progress with well head improvements and the progressive removal of chlorine disinfection from the water supply network for Christchurch city and the Lyttelton basin.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       Temporary chlorination of the city’s water supply was rolled out across 50 pump stations between March and May 2018.

2.2       A programme to accelerate the upgrade of the well heads across the city commenced in February 2018. To date 47 out of 140 wells have been upgraded and made secure.  Work is underway or timetabled at a further 54 wells.

2.3       Chlorine treatment is discontinued at a pump station when the upgrade works are completed on the associated wells. To date 11 pump stations do not require chlorine treatment, and a further three pump stations are able to operate without chlorine at times of low demand.

2.4       The timetable for the upgrade of the well heads, and consequential dates for the removal of chlorine from each pump station, would see approximately 75 per cent of the water delivered without chlorine disinfection by the end of May 2019.

2.5       By the end of July 2019 100 per cent of the water will be delivered without chlorine treatment, except at times of high demand. By the end of September 100 per cent of the water would be able to be delivered without chlorine disinfection.

2.6       The commissioning of ultraviolet disinfection treatment at Main Pumps is now planned for July/August 2019.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Council:

1.         Note the progress with the well head remediation programme and the removal of temporary chlorine treatment where the water is supplied from secure wells:

a.         With 75 percent of the water to be delivered from secure wells, and chlorine free, by the end of May 2019.

b.         With 100 percent of the water from secure wells, most of the time, by the end of July 2019 (with back up chlorine treatment available at six pump stations at times of high demand).

c.         With 100 per cent of the water from secure wells by the end of September 2019.


 

2.         Approve the continuation of chlorine treatment at those pump stations that are supplied from wells where the well heads are not deemed secure and improvement works have not yet been completed. There are 53 pump stations across the city and chlorine treatment is required at a small number of these:

a.         Chlorine treatment to be continued at nine pump stations through May and June – namely Avonhead and Jeffreys (in the Northwest water supply zone), Carters (Rawhiti), Picton (Riccarton), Sockburn (West), Addington, Main Pumps, Spreydon and Sydenham (Central).

b.         Back up chlorine treatment to be available for use (when required to maintain pressure across the network) at seven pump stations through July and August – namely Avonhead, Carters, Picton, Addington, Main Pumps, Spreydon and Sydenham.

c.         Back up chlorine treatment to be available for use (when required) at three pump stations through September – namely Avonhead, Spreydon and Sydenham.

d.         Back up chlorine treatment to be available for use (if the hill reservoirs require topping up) at one pump station from May through to September – namely Palatine (Central).

3.         Delegate authority to the City Services General Manager to vary the temporary chlorine treatment at any pump station if required to meet the provisions of the Water Safety Plan for the Christchurch City and the Lyttelton Harbour Basin. Any exercise of this delegated authority is to be reported to the Mayor and/or Deputy Mayor, within one working day, and to be reported to Council via the next Chief Executive’s report.

 

4.   Context/Background

Issue or Opportunity

4.1       The Water Supply Improvement Programme is focused on ensuring the supply of safe drinking water to the residents of Christchurch. Temporary chlorination of the water supply is in place while improvements to our infrastructure, particularly the well heads, are carried out.

Strategic Alignment

4.2       This work aligns with the strategic priority to have a safe and sustainable water supply and improved waterways and the community outcome seeking high quality drinking water.

4.3       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.3.1   Activity: Water Supply

·     Level of Service: 12.0.2.9 Council water supplies are safe to drink - Proportion of urban residents supplied water compliant with the DWSNZ bacterial compliance criteria: = 99.8%.

Decision Making Authority

4.4       The Council made a decision to temporarily chlorinate the water supply, for up to 12 months, in January 2018. Chlorination was rolled out across 48 pump stations between March and May 2018. Since then staff have removed the chlorine treatment as the well heads have been improved and all of the wells supplying water to a pump station have been signed off as secure. This approach is detailed in the approved Water Safety Plan for Christchurch City and the Lyttelton Harbour Basin.

Previous Decisions

4.5       There have been a series of Council decisions on the temporary chlorination and the progressive return, pump station by pump station, to a water supply without chlorine disinfection.

4.6       On 25th January 2018 CNCL/2018/00001 that the Council:

Approve the installation of temporary chlorination for up to 12 months at all 56 pump station sites within the Christchurch City Water and Brooklands/Kainga water supplies at a capital cost of $600,000 and an operating cost of $20,000 per month, until the Drinking Water Assessor and Medical Officer of Health agree that temporary chlorination can cease.

4.7       On 26th April 2018 CNCL/2018/00073 that the Council:

Resolves that the preferred approach to improving well head security is to raise well heads above ground wherever practicable, affordable and timely and requests staff to examine the options of installing UV treatment, including leasing and/or purchasing, as an alternative to wellhead improvements on a pump station by pump station basis where finance, timing and/or long term advantages have been considered.

4.8       On 9th August 2018 CNCL/2018/00002 that the Council:

Note and approve the measures being taken by staff to progressively remove chlorination from pump stations, as and when the well heads have been remediated and signed off as secure by an independent suitably qualified engineer.

4.9       O 22 November 2018 CNCL/2018/00003 that the Council:

Undertake interim remedial works on up to 42 low risk, below ground, well heads to achieve secure status (against bore water criterion 2 of the New Zealand Drinking Water Standards) for a two year period; noting that:

a.         The wells in question are deep bores with flowing artesian pressure

b.         Site specific risk management plans will be required for each pump station

c.         All of these well heads will be raised above ground in the future.

4.10    On 28 February 2019 CNCL/2019/00045 that the Council:

Notes the progress with the well head remediation programme and the timetable for the removal of temporary chlorine treatment with approximately 90 per cent of the water supply delivered from secure wells, and consequentially chlorine free, by May 2019; and 100 per cent of the water supply chlorine free by Spring 2019.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

4.11    The decision in this report is of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

4.12    The level of significance was determined by considering the number of people affected by the chlorine treatment.

Background

4.13    Temporary chlorination of the Christchurch city water supply was implemented between March and May 2018 in response to advice from the Drinking Water Assessor that the supply was not considered secure from possible contamination as the well heads did not meet the requirements of the Drinking Water Standards.

4.14    The programme to accelerate the upgrade of the well heads commenced in February 2018. The preferred approach is to raise all well heads above ground and install best practise infrastructure. The physical work generally includes placing a full grout seal around the well casing; standard headworks with a two way air vent, double bellows and double check valves; electrical upgrades, sensors and a flow meter; and an impermeable plinth/apron.

4.15    This upgrade work significantly advances the protection of well heads from surface contamination sources, increases the resilience of the well head infrastructure and improves access for operations and maintenance activities.

4.16    As at the end of April 2019 there were 47 well heads where improvements works had been completed. Work is underway or scheduled at a further 54 wells. The progress of the well head improvement programme and the plan to September 2019 is set out in Attachment A.

4.17    Chlorine treatment is discontinued at a pump station when the upgrade works are completed on the associated wells. To date 11 pump stations are fed by only secure wells and do not require chlorine treatment, and a further three pump stations are able to operate without chlorine at times of low demand (when the unsecure wells can be isolated from the network).

4.18    The initial chlorine dose has been reduced from 1 part per million (ppm) to 0.5 ppm at most pump stations. The reduction in the chlorine dose was initially driven by complaints about taste and odour from the water supply. The city has also seen an increase in the rate of hot water cylinder failure and water leaks which are being linked to the chlorination of the supply. A reduction in the amount of chlorine in the network is expected to mitigate these issues.

4.19    The actual progress with chlorine reduction to the end of April and the planned progress through to the end of September 2019, by the number of pump stations, is set out in Attachment B.

4.20    The commissioning of ultraviolet treatment at Main Pumps, initially scheduled for late June, has been delayed until August/September due to the discovery of asbestos containing materials in the plant room. The asbestos needs to be removed before the ultraviolet equipment can be installed.

4.21    Meeting the 12 month deadline for the removal of the temporary chlorination is planned for most of the city. Modelling of the network to maximise the delivery of untreated water demonstrates that approximately 75 per cent of the city supply would be without chlorine treatment by the end of May 2019.  Four water supply zones are expected to supplied entirely by secure wells by the end of May – Brooklands/Kainga, Ferrymead/Lyttelton, Parklands and Wainui. Chlorine treatment will still be required at a number of pump stations in the Riccarton, Central, Rawhiti, Northwest and West water supply zones.

4.22    The February 2019 report noted that the planned programme would have 90 percent of the water delivered without chlorine treatment by the end of May. The reasons for the delays include:

4.22.1 Fewer wells suitable for temporary below ground improvements – just 11 of the estimated 42 wells

4.22.2 Valve, pipework and pump failures encountered during repair works

4.22.3 Design issues due to incomplete documentation of ‘as built’ pump station and well head infrastructure

4.22.4 Contractor optimism when proposing the work programme. 

4.23    Modelling of the network for peak demand[1] during the winter indicates that 100 percent of the water could be delivered without chlorine, most of the time, by the end of July 2019.  However there would be very little additional capacity to cope with any drop in network pressure due to any spike in demand or an incident such as a pipe break, pump failure or major fire. If any such pressure drop were to occur, an isolated pump station, with chlorine treatment, would need to be brought back on line until the cause of the pressure drop was resolved.

4.24    The biggest challenge is in the southern part of the Central water supply zone with three large pump stations – Main Pumps, Spreydon and Sydenham – requiring significant improvement works. These pump stations generally service the suburbs of Sydenham, Beckenham, Opawa, St Martins, Spreydon, Hoon Hay, Cashmere, Bowenvale and Huntsbury.

4.25    By September 2019 improvement works will have been completed on most wells enabling 100% of the water supply to be delivered without chlorine treatment. The progress at key points in time is illustrated in Attachment C.

 

5.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

5.1       The following reasonably practicable options were considered and are assessed in this report:

·   Reconfigure the network to maximise the use of pump stations supplied by secure wells and maintain back-up chlorination equipment at pump stations needed at times of higher demand.

The planned programme would deliver 75 percent of the water without chlorine treatment by the end of May and 100 percent by the end of July 2019.

Chlorine treatment would be removed completely, pump station by pump station, as the well heads are signed off as secure and/or alternative disinfection is implemented. 

·   Continue with the progressive removal of chlorine, pump station by pump station, as the well heads are signed off as secure and/or alternative disinfection is implemented.

The planned programme would deliver 75 percent of the water without chlorine treatment by the end of May, 85 to 90 percent by the end of July and 100 per cent by the end of September 2019.

·   Discontinue chlorine treatment at every pump station at the end of May 2019.

Options Descriptions

5.2       Preferred Option: Reconfigure the network to maximise the use of pump stations supplied by secure wells and maintain back-up chlorination equipment at pump stations needed for times of higher demand.

5.2.1   Option Description:  This option requires additional works across the network to augment pump capacity and provide interconnections between water supply zones. This would enable the network to be operated to maximise the utilisation of pump stations supplied by secure wells.

5.2.2   Additional generators would be leased and installed at Thomsons, Grampian, Trafalgar and Blighs pump stations.  A new pressure reducing valve would be installed at Blighs to provide a connection through to the area usually serviced by the Jeffreys pump station. These network improvements would be retained to provide greater resilience and flexibility in the operation of the network to ensure continuity of supply.

5.2.3   Seven pump stations would be designated as back up only and the chlorine treatment systems maintained for operation when required.

5.2.4   Chlorine treatment would be removed, pump station by pump station, as the well heads are signed off as secure and/or alternative disinfection is implemented.   

5.2.5   The progress with the well head remediation programme and the removal of temporary chlorine treatment would see:

·     75 percent of the water to be delivered from secure wells, and chlorine free, by the end of May 2019

·     100 percent of the water from secure wells, most of the time, by the end of July 2019 (with back up chlorine treatment available at six pump stations at times of high demand).

·     100 per cent of the water to be from secure wells by the end of September 2019.

5.2.6   Option Advantages

·     Makes the fastest progress towards ceasing the temporary chlorination across most of the water supply

·     Is consistent with the Water Safety Plan for Christchurch City and the Lyttelton Harbour Basin

·     Has the agreement of the Drinking Water Assessor and the Medical Officer of Health.

5.2.7   Option Disadvantages

·     Incurs additional costs for a valve connection and installing generators (estimated at up to $60,000)

·     Continues the taste and odour, and possibly corrosion issues associated with chlorine treatment beyond May 2019.

5.3       Option two: Continue with the progressive removal of chlorine as the well heads are signed off as secure.

5.3.1   Option Description: chlorine treatment is discontinued at a pump station when the upgrades have been completed and all of the water can be supplied from wells that are signed-off as secure.

5.3.1   The progress with the well head remediation programme and the removal of temporary chlorine treatment would see:

·     75 percent of the water delivered from secure wells, and chlorine free, by the end of May 2019

·     85 to 90 per cent of the water delivered from secure wells by the end of July 2019

·     100 per cent of the water delivered from secure wells by the end of September 2019.

5.3.2   Option Advantages

·     Is consistent with the Water Safety Plan for Christchurch City and the Lyttelton Harbour Basin

·     Has the agreement of the Drinking Water Assessor and the Medical Officer of Health

·     Has lower costs than the preferred option.


 

5.3.3   Option Disadvantages

·     Continues the taste and odour, and possibly corrosion issues associated with chlorine treatment.

5.4       Option three: Discontinue chlorine treatment at every pump station as at the end of May 2019.

5.4.1   Option Description: chlorine treatment is stopped at every pump station with no regard to the secure status of the wells.

5.4.2   Option Advantages

·     Is consistent with the decision of Council to use chlorine treatment for 12 months

·     Aligns with the views of the majority of residents who prefer an untreated supply.

5.4.3   Option Disadvantages

·     Is inconsistent with the Water Safety Plan for the Christchurch City and Lyttelton Harbour Basin

·     Goes against the advice of the Drinking Water Assessor and the Medical Officer of Health

·     Invites the Director-General of Health to make a direction as to chlorine treatment.

Analysis Criteria

5.5       Protecting public health is our number one priority as a supplier of drinking water.  This obligation and the need for a very high standard of care has been reinforced by the outbreak of waterborne disease in Havelock North in 2016. Accordingly chlorine treatment has been continued at all pump stations supplied with water from unsecure bores.

5.6       Temporary chlorine disinfection to mitigate the risk of contamination via the unsecure well heads is documented in the Water Safety Plan for Christchurch City and the Lyttelton Harbour Basin water. An approved Water Safety Plan is a statutory requirement and documents our public health risk-based assessment and management process to ensure a safe and secure drinking water supply.

5.7       The Drinking Water Assessor and the Medical Officer of Health have been clear about the need for disinfection treatment to continue at any pump station that is being supplied with water from a bore that does not have secure status. This message has been reinforced by officials from the Ministry of Health.

5.8       There is a demand for drinking water without chlorine treatment and a majority of residents wish to have a supply without residual chlorine as soon as possible. To meet some of this demand two water collection points has been set up – at the Keyes (New Brighton) and Burnside pump stations.

5.9       The chlorine treatment has been linked to number of concerns by consumers including – unacceptable taste and odour, exacerbation of skin conditions, and failure of plumbing fittings.

6.   Community Views and Preferences

6.1       The residents of Christchurch city, and particularly those residing southern part of the Central Zone, are specifically affected by this option due to their consumption of drinking water from the Christchurch supply.  Their views are reflected in a city wide survey carried out mid-2018.

6.1.1   The vast majority of residents (94%) were well aware of the temporary chlorination and most (73%) understood the reasons for it – to protect against potential contamination while improvements were made to the well heads.

6.1.2   Over two thirds (71%) of residents considered the return to unchlorinated water to be a high priority and wished to make the switch back to an untreated supply as soon as possible. This was particularly marked for older age groups (around 80% for those over 40) with younger people seeing it as less urgent (around 50% for those 39 and under).

7.   Risks

7.1       There is a risk that fewer wells heads are improved and signed off as secure if there are unanticipated delays and consequential failures to deliver in accordance with the timetable proposed. This could result in chlorine treatment being required at a larger number of pump stations.  Staff are working closely with contractors to work through any issues that arise during the construction works and keep to the proposed timetable.

7.2       There could be further delays to the installation of ultraviolet disinfection at Main Pumps due to the need to remove asbestos containing materials from the plant room. The removal work is expected to take three weeks and be carried out in May. Staff will work closely with the removal specialists to ensure that the work can be carried out effectively and as quickly as possible.

7.3       The introduction of chlorine to the water supply has contributed to an increase in the incidence of pitting corrosion and consequential failure of hot water cylinders. Christchurch has historically had issues with hot water cylinder failure with certain areas of the city, such as Cashmere and Bowenvale, being affected more than others. The initial dose of chlorine has been halved at most pump stations and the network has been operated to maximise the supply of water from those pump stations with no chlorine treatment. The significant reduction in the amount of chlorine in the network is expected to mitigate the corrosion issues.

7.4       The incidence of leaks has slowly increased across the water supply network since the introduction of chlorine. While the causes of the leaks are still being investigated it is possible that chlorine in the water has contributed to some of these failures.  As noted above, the reduction in the amount of chlorine in the network is expected to mitigate any corrosion issues.

8.   Next Steps

8.1       The well head improvement work will continue for the next two financial years until all of the below ground well heads have been raised above ground in accordance with good practice for water supply infrastructure.

8.2       Central government has signalled further changes to the regulatory environment for community water supplies to minimise the potential for contamination and to ensure the protection of public health. In response further work is underway to scope other improvements to the security of the community water supply for Christchurch through both infrastructure and operational management. A report will come to the 23 May 2019 meeting of Council addressing:

8.2.1   Reservoirs and suction tanks

8.2.2   Backflow prevention

8.2.3   Distribution pipe integrity

8.2.4   Pump station resilience and security

8.2.5   Water supply zones

8.2.6   Smart water network

8.3       The water supply improvement programme for the future will be incorporated into the Water Supply Strategic Plan, the Infrastructure Strategy and the Water Supply Asset Management Plan as part of the 2021-2024 Long term Plan of Council. 


Council

09 May 2019

 

9.   Options Matrix

Issue Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – progressive removal of chlorine plus network changes

Option 2 – progressive removal of chlorine

Option 3 – stop chlorine in May

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

$35 million (3 years)

$35 million (3 years)

$35 million (3 years)

Maintenance/Ongoing

 

 

 

Funding Source

LTP three waters budget

LTP three waters budget

LTP three waters budget

Impact on Rates

 

 

 

Protecting public health

Extremely low risk

Extremely low risk

Extremely low risk

Compliance with approved Water Safety Plan

Complies

Complies

Does not comply

Consistency with agreement with Drinking Water Assessor and Medical Officer of Health

Consistent

Consistent

Inconsistent

Consumer expectations and access to chlorine free water

Least chlorine in the water supply network – up to July

Chlorine in the network through to September

Meets consumer expectations

 

Statutory Criteria

Criteria

Option 1 – progressive removal of chlorine

Option 2 – progressive removal of chlorine

Option 3 – stop chlorine in May

Impact on Mana Whenua

No particular impact

No particular impact

No particular impact

Alignment to Council Plans & Policies

Aligns with plans and policies

Aligns with plans and policies

Does not align with Water Safety Plan

<enter Other Statutory Criteria>

 

 

 

·  


Council

09 May 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Status of Wells

16

b

Chlorination by pumpstation until September

17

c

Overview piecharts May, July and September

18

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Helen Beaumont - Programme Manager - Water Supply

Approved By

Karleen Edwards - Chief Executive

  


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09 May 2019

 

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09 May 2019

 

 

40.   Mayor's Monthly Report - April 2019

Reference:

19/453965

Presenter(s):

Lianne Dalziel, The Mayor

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Mayor to report on external activities she undertakes in her city and community leadership role; and to report on outcomes and key decisions of the external bodies she attends on behalf of the Council.

1.2       This report is compiled by the Mayor’s office.

2.   Mayors Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in this report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mayor's Monthly Report - April 2019

22

 

 


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09 May 2019

 

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09 May 2019

 

 

31.   Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

09 May 2019

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

41

Appeal Issues

s7(2)(g)

Maintain Legal Professional Privilege

To keep legal advice within the Council meeting confidential

When the appeal proceedings on this matter end.

 

 



[1] The modelling looks at the number of pump stations and wells required to deliver the peak hourly demand (usually between 7am to 9am weekday mornings) without a significant drop in pressure in each water supply zone.