Waipapa

Papanui-Innes Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Friday 22 March 2019

Time:                                   9am

Venue:                                 Board Room, Papanui Service Centre,
Corner Langdons Road and Restell Street, Papanui

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Ali Jones

Emma Norrish

Jo Byrne

Pauline Cotter

Mike Davidson

John Stringer

 

 

18 March 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Christine Lane

Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

941 5213

christine.lane@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 


 

 

 

Mihi

 

 

Tēnā koutou

Kua hui mai nei

Ki tēnei whare ō tātou

Ki te kōrero, ki te whakarongo

i nga kaupapa ō to hapori

Nau mai, haere mai.

Nā reira tēnā koutou katoa

 

Greetings

to all who have gathered

within our (communal) house

to speak and to listen to the

topics/conversations of your community

Welcome, welcome

Therefore, again I greet all present

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C          1.        Apologies................................................................................................. 5

B         2.        Declarations of Interest.............................................................................. 5

C          3.        Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................. 5

B         4.        Public Forum............................................................................................ 5

B         5.        Deputations by Appointment....................................................................... 5

B         6.        Presentation of Petitions............................................................................ 6

B         7.        Correspondence....................................................................................... 13

Staff Reports

C          8.        Access to public transport - Innes Road bus stops.......................................... 15

C          9.        Right to Drain Water Easement over Janet Stewart Reserve............................. 71

C          10.      MacFarlane Park - Part Changes in Reserve Classification................................ 81

C          11.      Havana Gardens - Proposed Easement......................................................... 89

C          12.      Waipapa/Papanui-Innes 2018-19 Youth Development Fund - Application - Angus Hammett................................................................................................ 97

B         13.      Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report - March 2019.............. 101

 

B         14.      Elected Members’ Information Exchange................................................... 108 

 

 


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board meeting held on Friday, 8 March 2019  be confirmed (refer page 7).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes will be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

 

4.1

Positive Youth Development Report Back – Kate Davies

Kate Davies will attend to report back to the Board on her participation at the competitions and training camps for the Athletics New Zealand Jumps Future Squad from November 2018 to February 2019.

 

4.2

Positive Youth Development Report Back – Taiko Torepe-Ormsby

Taiko Torepe-Ormsby will attend to report back to the Board on representing New Zealand at the State Teams Age Short Course Swimming Championships in Canberra, Australia from 3-5 October 2018.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

 

5.1

Innes Road Bus Stops – Paul and Christian Kellar

Paul and Christian Kellar will speak to the Board regarding the Innes Road Bus Stops proposals.

 

5.2

Innes Road Bus Stops – Chris and Gemma Greenshield

Chris and Gemma Greenshield will speak to the Board regarding the Innes Road Bus Stops proposal.

 

5.3

Innes Road Bus Stops – Peter and Victoria Maddock

Peter and Victoria Maddock will speak to the Board regarding the Innes Road Bus Stops proposal.

 

 

5.4

Innes Road Bus Stops – Edward Wright, Environment Canterbury

Edward Wright, Manager Public Transport Strategy, Planning and Marketing – Environment Canterbury will speak to the Board regarding the Innes Road Bus Stops proposal.

  

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 

Waipapa

Papanui-Innes Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                    Friday 8 March 2019

Time:                                   9.02am

Venue:                                 Board Room, Papanui Service Centre,
Corner Langdons Road and Restell Street, Papanui

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Ali Jones

Emma Norrish

Jo Byrne

Pauline Cotter

Mike Davidson

 

 

5 March 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Christine Lane

Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

941 5213

christine.lane@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Part A           Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B           Reports for Information

Part C           Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

Community Board Resolved PICB/2019/00019

Community Board Decision

That the apology for absence received from John Stringer, be accepted.

Emma Norrish/Jo Byrne                                                                                                                                        Carried

 

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved PICB/2019/00020

That the minutes of the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board meeting held on Friday, 22 February 2019, be confirmed.

Mike Davidson/Pauline Cotter                                                                                                                            Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

4.1

Positive Youth Development Report Back – Rosa Vesty

Rosa Vesty reported back to the Board on her attendance at the Australian Volleyball Schools Cup held in Melbourne from 9 to 14 December 2018.

After questions from members, the Chairperson thanked Rosa for her presentation.

 

 


 

4.2

Speeds on Factory Road, Belfast – Brett Shaw

Brett Shaw presented his concerns regarding the speed of traffic on Factory Road, Belfast to the Board.

Mr Shaw informed the Board that the speed limit on Factory Road was 60 kilometres per hour, which he felt was too fast for safety in what is primarily a residential area. He also advised that motorists were speeding, sometimes as much as 20 kilometres per hour above the current speed limit, and asked that the Board look at options to deter this behaviour.

Mr Shaw was very concerned about the safety aspects of motorists exceeding the speed limit as there are residences with children and pets on Factory road.

After questions from members, the Chairperson thanked Mr Shaw for his presentation.

The Board decided to request that staff:

 a)       review the speed limit currently in operation on Factory Road and the nearby side streets in Belfast to determine whether the 60 kilometres per hour was still appropriate given the growth of residential housing in this formerly rural area

b)        conduct speed and traffic counts on Factory Road to ascertain speeding issues and traffic volumes, and

c)         review signage

and that  the information be provided in a report to the Board detailing the findings and providing options for remediation.

The Board also requested that staff contact the New Zealand Police to provide a presence on Factory Road for enforcement purposes.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.

 

 

7.   Correspondence

 

Staff Recommendations

Part B

That the Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the correspondence report dated 08 March 2019.

 

 

7.1       Portion of unmade road adjacent to 110 Sawyers Arms Road

Community Board Resolved PICB/2019/00021

The Board received a memorandum from staff regarding the portion of unmade road adjacent to 110 Sawyers Arms Road and thanked staff for the comprehensive information provided, noting that a report is due to come to the Board in April 2019.

Jo Byrne/Pauline Cotter                                                                                                                                        Carried

 

 

7.2       Modular Pump Track - 10 Shirley Road site

Community Board Resolved PICB/2019/00022

The Board received the tabled correspondence from Joanna Gould regarding the Modular Pump Track proposed for the 10 Shirley Road site.

Following discussion the Board decided to request that staff provide information on the process regarding a permanent versus a temporary structure and whether there would be a need for consultation pending the result of the funding application.

Ali Jones/Jo Byrne                                                                                                                                                    Carried

 

 

8.   Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report - February 2019

 

Community Board Resolved PICB/2019/00023(Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report for February 2019.

Mike Davidson/Emma Norrish                                                                                                                            Carried

 

 

9.   Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

Board members exchanged information on matters of interest including the following:

   

9.1       Notification of Works

Board members noted that they are no longer receiving Works Notices for road and infrastructure repairs in the Papanui-Innes wards in a consistent manner  It was also noted that the  website is not as efficient for Board members when dealing with public queries.

The Board asked for information on  why the system regarding the issuing of Works Notices to Community Board members has changed.

 


 

9.2       River Road and Courtenay Street

The Board requested an update from staff on what is happening with River Road and Courtenay Street.

 

 

Meeting concluded at 10.04am.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 22ND DAY OF MARCH 2019

Ali Jones

Chairperson

   


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

7.     Correspondence

Reference:

19/271654

Presenter(s):

Elizabeth Hovell, Community Board Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

Correspondence has been received from:

Name

Subject

Andy Waugh

Momorangi Reserve Children’s Playground

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the correspondence report dated 22 March 2019.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Momorangi Reserve Children's Playground - Andy Waugh

14

 

 


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

PDF Creator


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

8.     Access to public transport - Innes Road bus stops

Reference:

19/195396

Presenter(s):

Brenda O’Donoghue, Passenger Transport Engineer

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board to consider options to provide access to public transport on Innes Road, between Philpotts Road and Cranford Street.

2.   Executive Summary

2.1       This report is staff generated in response to a change in the route of the Orbiter, which is an outcome of recent changes to the intersection of Philpotts Road and QEII Drive as part of the Christchurch Northern Corridor project.

2.2       Due to the new route of the Orbiter, there is a need for bus stops on Innes Road, between Philpotts Road and Cranford Street in order to provide access to public transport for the surrounding residential area. 

2.3       The overview of the preferred bus stop locations is shown on Figure 1.

Figure 1:  Overview of the proposed bus stops (preferred, Option 1)

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board resolve to approve Option 1:

1.         Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as A1 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001A Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment A of the report from the agenda).

2.         Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as A1, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001A Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment A of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

3.         Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as A2 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001A Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment A of the report from the agenda).

4.         Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as A2, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001A Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment A of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

5.         Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as B1 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001B Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment B of the report from the agenda).

6.         Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as B1, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001B Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment B of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

7.         Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as B2 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001B Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment B of the report from the agenda).

8.         Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as B2, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001B Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment B of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

That should the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board decline to approve Option 1 that the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board resolve to approve Option 2:

9.         Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as C1 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001C Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment C of the report from the agenda).

10.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as C1, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001C Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment C of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

11.       Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as C2 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001C Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment C of the report from the agenda).

12.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as C2, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001C Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment C of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

That should the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board decline to approve all or part of the proposed bus stops and no stopping restrictions associated with Option 1 or Option 2, and that the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board resolve to approve from the alternative bus stop locations associated with Option 3:

13.       Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as D1 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001D Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment D of the report from the agenda).

14.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as D1, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001D Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment D of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

15.       Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as D2 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001D Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment D of the report from the agenda).

16.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as D2, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001D Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment D of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

17.       Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as E1 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001E Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment E of the report from the agenda).

18.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as E1, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001E Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment E of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

19.       Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as E2 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001E Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment E of the report from the agenda).

20.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as E2, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001E Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment E of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

21.       Under clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles is prohibited on the part of Innes Road referred to as F1 and as shown by broken yellow lines, identified as ‘no stopping’ on the attached drawing TG134001F Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment F of the report from the agenda).

22.       Under clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Innes Road referred to as F1, identified as ‘bus stop’ on the attached drawing TG134001F Issue 1, dated 26/02/2019 (refer to Attachment F of the report from the agenda), is reserved as a parking place in the form of a bus stop for the exclusive use of buses at all times.

23.       That any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls made pursuant to any bylaw to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls described in this report are revoked.

24.       That these resolutions take effect when the traffic control devices that evidence the restrictions described in the staff report are in place.

4.   Key Points

4.1       The recommendations in this report are consistent with the anticipated outcomes of the Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure in the Councils Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Preferred bus stop locations.  Install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Thames Street and install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Nancy Avenue.  (Refer to Attachments A and B)

·     Option 2 – Install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Ethne Street.  (Refer to Attachment C)

·     Option 3 – Install bus stops on Innes Road between Philpotts Road and Cranford at alternative bus stop locations not included as part of Option 1 or Option 2.  (Refer to Attachments E, D and F)

·     Option 4 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Good catchment potential for residents living along Innes Road, as well as the streets that connect to Innes Road, enabling better mode choice through shorter walking distances to access public transport.

·     All bus stops are located close to a pedestrian crossing facility, which can encourage pedestrians to choose safer locations to cross the road, and make the journey to and from the bus stop accessible.

·     The bus stops beside 229 Innes Road, 280 Innes Road and 360 Innes Road have no objects located within close proximity of the kerb.  This means that buses can pull up close to the kerb, thereby reducing the step gap for customers, and removes the potential for a bus to hit a fixed obstacle, such as a utility post, when manoeuvring into and out of the bus stop. 

·     All of the bus stops have an appropriate kerb height which makes for a more accessible step height between the platform and the bus.

·     All locations are suitable for a bus passenger shelter, should the Council wish to pursue this in the future.  The proposed bus stops include a seat as minimum.

·     The properties located beside the proposed bus stops have privacy screening, such as fences, hedges and garages. 

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The bus stop beside 271 Innes Road is located alongside a utility post.  This increases the risk of possible damage to the bus, should the bus pull up close to the footpath.  In practice the bus driver is likely to increase the gap between the bus and the platform to mitigate the risk.  The location of the utility post is unlikely to impact the safe entry and exit of the bus, due to the location of the post relative to its forward location along the bus box.

·     One of the bus stops is located across a driveway.  This is a temporary obstruction, lasting for a matter of seconds when the bus is stopped to allow passengers to board or alight the bus, which is why such configurations are common practice locally and nationally.

·     Reallocates on-street parking presently available for residents and visitors to those who travel by public transport.  There is sufficient on-street parking capacity in the general area for other motorists to continue to park on-street.

 

5.   Context/Background

Issue

5.1       Recent changes to the intersection of Philpotts Road and QEII Drive as part of the Christchurch Northern Corridor project has resulted in the route of the Orbiter changing to Cranford Street, as indicated in Figure 2.

Figure 2:  Orbiter route via Cranford Street

5.2       The route change results in an approximately one kilometre section of road where permanent bus stops are needed to allow access to public transport.

5.3       To ensure access is available to the new route, which commenced Monday 7 January 2019, a set of interim bus stops were installed on Innes Road, near Ethne Street.  Interim bus stops are used when a quick fix is needed. 

5.4       The interim bus stops were installed in accordance with the provisions set out in Part 9 of the Councils Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, which allows for temporary discontinuance of a parking place for the stopping or standing provisions for specified vehicles at that parking place.  However, any sign or traffic control installed under this clause must be removed after a period of three months from installation unless the Council, by resolution, has approved continued use.

5.5       Compliance with Part 9 of the Councils Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 means that the interim bus stops can be used until Sunday 7 April 2019, after which time the stops will either have to be removed, or by resolution the permanent bus stops are approved by the Papanui-Innes Community Board.

Strategic Alignment

5.6       Council’s strategic framework is a key consideration in guiding the recommendations in this report.  The provision of bus stops allows our communities access to public transport which in turn allows the Council to achieve:

·   Strong communities,

·   Liveable city,

·   Healthy environment, and

·   Prosperous economy.

5.7       The recommendations in this report will help to achieve the desired community outcome of a well-connected and accessible city through improved opportunities to access and use public transport.

5.8       All recommendations in this report, except for “Option 4 – Do nothing” are consistent with the anticipated outcomes of the Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure in the Councils Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

5.9       All recommendations in this report, except for “Option 4 – Do nothing” align with the Christchurch Suburban Parking Policy (2019), which provides a framework to address parking related issues and the management of competing demands for public space within the cities suburban areas.  As indicated in Table 1, policy one of the Suburban Parking Policy prioritises the provision of bus stops ahead of residential, short stay and commuter parking. 

Priority

Commercial Areas

Residential Areas

Other Areas

1st

Safety

Safety

Safety

2nd

Movement and amenity

Movement and amenity

Movement and amenity

3rd

Mobility parking

Mobility parking

Mobility parking

4th

Bus stops/ cycle parks/ bike corrals/ shared parking (bike share or car share)/ micromobility (e.g. scooters)

Bus stops

Bus stops / cycle parks/ bike corrals/ shared parking (bike share or car share)/ micromobility (e.g. scooters)

5th

Taxi ranks (special passenger vehicle stands)

Residents parking

Short stay parking

6th

Loading zones

Cycle parks/ bike corrals/ shared parking (bike share or car share)/ micromobility (e.g. scooters)

Residents parking

7th

Short stay parking

Short stay parking

Commuter parking

8th

Residents parking

Commuter parking

 

9th

Commuter parking

 

 

Table 1:  Policy 1, Suburban Parking Policy, prioritisation of road space


 

Decision Making Authority

5.10    Part 1, Clauses 7 and 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

5.11    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

5.12    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

5.13    The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

5.14    The level of significance was determined by assessing the impact of the project against the criteria set out in the Significance and Engagement assessment, and assessment of the number of properties affected by the proposed options.

5.15    The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment

Context – public transport

5.16    The length of Innes Road that staff are assessing for bus stops is about 950 metres in the north to east direction travel (Orbiter clockwise), and 1,100 metres on the east to north direction of travel (Orbiter anti-clockwise).  The separation distance means that at minimum one set of bus stops is needed.  However, providing one set of bus stops to bridge the separation gap, will make the walk to the bus stop longer for some residents who live on streets that connect with Innes.  Provision of two sets of bus stops will mean more people are located within a shorter walk from a bus stop.

5.17    The new bus stops provide access to the Orbiter bus line.  The Orbiter is a core public transport route, providing access to a number of city’s suburban hubs, schools and the University of Canterbury.  The Orbiter is a high frequency route, predominantly running every 10 minutes, Monday to Saturday.  The service runs every 15 minutes during the off-peak hours of service, including Sundays.

5.18    Patronage numbers have been assessed from passenger boarding data associated with the interim bus stops located on Innes Road near Ethne Street.  The patronage analysis covers the period 11 February 2019 to 3 March 2019.  It is noted that the interim bus stops have been in operation for a limited time, and the passenger boarding data may not yet be a true reflection of passenger demand, where the bus stop has had a longer period to become established with the surrounding community.  The passenger boarding numbers for both bus stops are indicated in Table 2.

Interim bus stops on Innes Road near Ethne Street

Daily weekday average passenger boardings

Daily weekend average passenger boardings

North side (Orbiter, clockwise)

7

4

South side (Orbiter, anti-clockwise)

28

8

Table 2:  Passenger boarding numbers

5.19    The passenger boarding numbers for the bus stop located on the south side of the road is indicating a strong suburban passenger demand to use the Orbiter (anti-clockwise, towards Northlands Shopping Centre). 

5.20    Typical with bus stops, one bus stop tends to be busier, facilitating customers that are traveling towards a key travel destination, and the second bus stop facilitates the customers return trip.  Bus stops that facilitate the return trip tend to have lower boarding numbers, which is the case with the north side bus stop (Orbiter, clockwise). 

Context – traffic and parking

5.21    Innes Road is classified in the Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan as a minor arterial route.  Minor arterial routes provide for access to key activity centres and connections to district arterials and state highways. 

5.22    The average weekday, two-way traffic flow on Innes Road between Hills Road and Cranford Street, recorded between August and September 2018, is about 15,000 vehicles per day.  This traffic flow is similar to the traffic flow on other minor arterial roads that are part of the Orbiter route, and much lower than the typical daily traffic flow for the major arterial sections of the Orbiter route.

5.23    A weekday parking occupancy survey was undertaken on Thursday 14 February 2019, along Innes Road between Philpotts Road and Mersey Street.  The survey was timed to coincide with the peak parking demand period associated with parents dropping off or collecting students from St Francis of Assisi school.  A weekday evening survey was included to assess the residential parking demand.  A Sunday morning parking occupancy survey of Innes Road between Philpotts Road and Nancy Avenue was undertaken to assess the on-street parking demand associated St Francis of Assisi church services.  The parking occupancy survey results can be found in Attachment J.  The following is a summary of the survey results.

5.23.1 The parking occupancy survey indicates the on-street parking capacity on Innes Road between Mersey Street and Nancy Avenue is underutilised[1].  There is sufficient on-street parking capacity for the installation of the bus stop, and for residents and visitors to continue parking on-street.

5.23.2 The demand for parking on Innes Road between Nancy Avenue and Philpotts Road is greater due to the St Francis of Assisi school and church activities. In this section of Innes Road, the peak occupancy of 86 percent was observed to occur at 3:00 p.m. during the Thursday survey.  However, the average occupancy for all of the surveyed time periods, including Sunday morning, was less than 75 percent.

Bus stop location planning

5.24    Bus stops provide key access connection points to allow personal mobility, by means of public transport.  The importance of bus stops is reflected in the Christchurch Suburban Parking Policy (2019).

5.25    It can be a challenge in an urban-residential environment to achieve a balance in bus stop planning criteria, because of the need to work with the space available on-street, and to be considerate to those who live near the bus stop.  However, the effects of bus stops in urban settings are generally not site-specific, they will have similar effects along the street irrespective of which property it is placed by.

5.26    There are multiple considerations in the location planning of bus stops, however the key topics to consider include:

·   Catchment areas and proximity to surrounding services and amenities,

·   Works well for the wider road network, bus network and bus passengers,

·   Accessibility,

·   Capacity,

·   Impact on the surrounding environment, and

·   Information gathered from site visits and feedback from stakeholders.

5.27    Following the multiple considerations in the location planning of bus stops, staff have determined a preference for four new bus stops on Innes Road, between Philpotts Road and Cranford Street.

6.   Options Analysis

Options Considered

6.1       The following options were considered and are assessed in this report:

·   Option 1 – Preferred bus stop locations.  Install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Thames Street and install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Nancy Avenue.

·   Option 2 – Install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Ethne Street.

·   Option 3 – Install bus stops on Innes Road between Philpotts Road and Cranford at alternative bus stop locations not included as part of Option 1 or Option 2.

·   Option 4 – Do nothing

6.2       A summary of all bus stop location options considered, including those that were not advanced to consultation is included in Attachment G.

Options Description

6.1       Option One: Preferred Option:  Install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Thames Street and install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Nancy Avenue.

6.1.1   Option Description: Install four bus stops in accordance with Attachments A and B.  The location overview of the Option 1 bus stop locations is shown on Figure 3.

Figure 3:  Overview of Option 1 bus stop locations

6.1.2   The bus stops in Option 1 are located beside 229 Innes Road, 271 Innes Road, 280 Innes Road and 360 Innes Road.

6.1.3   Option Advantages

·     Good catchment potential for residents living along Innes Road, as well as the streets that connect to Innes Road, enabling better mode choice through shorter walking distances to access public transport.

·     All bus stops are located close to a pedestrian crossing facility, which can encourage pedestrians to choose safer locations to cross the road, and make the journey to and from the bus stop accessible.

·     The bus stops beside 229 Innes Road, 280 Innes Road and 360 Innes Road have no objects located within close proximity of the kerb.  This means that buses can pull up close to the kerb, thereby reducing the step gap for customers, and removes the potential for a bus to hit a fixed obstacle, such as a utility post, when manoeuvring into and out of the bus stop. 

·     All of the bus stops have an appropriate kerb height which makes for a more accessible step height between the platform and the bus.

·     All locations are suitable for a bus passenger shelter, should the Council wish to pursue this in the future.  The proposed bus stops include a seat as minimum.

·     The properties located beside the proposed bus stops have privacy screening, such as fences, hedges and garages. 

6.1.4   Option Disadvantages

·     The bus stop beside 271 Innes Road is located alongside a utility post.  This increases the risk of possible damage to the bus, should the bus pull up close to the footpath.  In practice the bus driver is likely to increase the gap between the bus and the platform to mitigate the risk, which can impact passenger accessibility.

·     The location of the utility post is unlikely to impact the safe entry and exit of the bus, due to the location of the post relative to its forward location along the bus box.

·     One of the bus stops is located across a driveway.  This is a temporary obstruction, lasting for a matter of seconds when the bus is stopped to allow passengers to board or alight the bus, which is why such configurations are common practice locally and nationally.

·     Reallocates on-street parking presently available for residents, visitors and short stay parking, to those who travel by public transport.  There is sufficient on-street parking capacity in the general area for other motorists to continue to park on-street.

6.2       Option Two: Install a set of bus stops on Innes Road near Ethne Street 

6.2.1   Option Description: Install bus stops in accordance with Attachment C.  The location overview of the Option 2 bus stop locations is shown on Figure 4.

Figure 4:  Overview of Option 2 bus stop locations

6.2.2   The bus stops in Option 2 are located beside 259 Innes Road and 308 Innes Road.

6.2.3   Option Advantages

·     While not to the extent of Option 1, there remains good catchment potential for residents living along Innes Road, as well as the streets that connect to Innes Road.  However, for some residents the reduced catchment, in comparison to Option 1, will result in longer walking distances to get to the bus stops, which may impact those with limited mobility.

·     All locations are suitable for a bus passenger shelter, should the Council wish to pursue this in the future.  The proposed bus stops include a seat as minimum.

·     All locations the adjacent properties have privacy screening, such as fences, hedges and garages.

·     None of the bus stops are located across a driveway.

6.2.4   Option Disadvantages

·     The bus stops are not located in close proximity to pedestrian crossing facilities, which may impede on the safety of pedestrians walking to and from the bus stops, and make it more difficult for those with limited mobility to access public transport.

·     All of the bus stops have utility posts located within close proximity of the kerb.  The locations of the utility posts, relative to the bus box means there is an increased the risk of damage to the bus, when entering and exiting the bus stop.  The location of the utility posts is likely to increase the gap between the bus and the platform, which can impact passenger accessibility.

·     It is unlikely that the bus stop will have an appropriate step height from the platform.  This is due to the camber of the road and the depth of the drainage channel.  Further investigation will determine if bridge blocks are needed to improve the comfort for customers boarding or alighting a bus.  Reduced step height can impact passenger accessibility.

·     Reallocates on-street parking presently available for residents and visitors to those who travel by public transport.  There is sufficient on-street parking capacity in the general area for other motorists to continue to park on-street.

6.3       Option Three: Install bus stops on Innes Road between Philpotts Road and Cranford at alternative bus stop locations not included as part of Option 1 or Option 2,

6.3.1   Option Description: The alternative bus stop locations are as follows

·     241 Innes Road, in accordance with Attachment D for the part of Innes Road referred to as D1.  For example, this location would be suited as an alternative for the bus stop beside 229 Innes Road in Option One, or in conjunction with the bus stop location beside 308 Innes Road in Option Two, or in conjunction with the bus stop location beside 302 referred to below.

·     302 Innes Road, in accordance with Attachment D for the part of Innes Road referred to as D2.  For example, this location would be suited as an alternative for the bus stop beside 280 Innes Road in Option One or in conjunction with the bus stop location beside 257 Innes Road in Option Two, or in conjunction with the bus stop location referred to above, beside 241 Innes Road.

·     279 Innes Road, in accordance with Attachment E for the part of Innes Road referred to as E1.  For example, this location would be suited as an alternative for the bus stop beside 271 Innes Road in Option One, or in conjunction with the bus stop location beside 382 Innes Road, referred to below.

·     382 Innes Road, in accordance with Attachment E for the part of Innes Road referred to as E2.  For example, this location would be suited as an alternative for the bus stop beside 360 Innes Road in Option One or in conjunction with the bus stop location referred to above, beside 279 Innes Road.

·     257 Innes Road, in accordance with Attachment F for the part of Innes Road referred to as F1.  For example, this location would be suited as an alternative for the bus stop beside 259 Innes Road in Option Two.

6.3.2   The bus stop beside 27 Ethne Street (bus stop on Innes Road), which is currently one of the interim bus stops, has not been included in this report for further consideration as staff do not consider it a suitable or appropriate location for a permanent bus stop.  This is due to the minimum legal distance it is offset from the intersection with Ethne Street.

6.3.3   Option Advantages

·     The advantages to the alternative options will be similar to the advantages previously outlined in Option One and Option Two.

6.3.4   Option Disadvantages

·     The disadvantages to the alternative options will be similar to the advantage previously outlined in Option One and Option Two.

·     The proposed bus stop beside 279 Innes Road would reallocate two time restricted (P5, 8:15 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday to Friday).  The P5 parking is associated with the drop-off and collection of students attending St Francis of Assisi School.  Should the proposed bus stop beside 279 Innes Road become the authorised bus stop, a second consultation would occur to establish where the two P5 parking spaces would be relocated to.

6.4       Option Four: Do nothing.

6.4.1   Option Description: Do nothing, interim bus stops are removed and no permanent bus stops are installed.

6.4.2   Option Advantages

·     Does not reallocate on-street parking.

6.4.3   Option Disadvantages

·     The interim bus stops are permitted to be operational for three months under the Councils Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.  Should the Community Board proceed with the ‘Do nothing’ option or decide to leave the approval of the permanent bus stops to a later date, the three-month allowance for the interim bus stops will have expired.  Should this happen, the interim bus stops will have to be removed, resulting in a very long gap between the nearest bus stops, disadvantaging to those who currently use the bus stops to travel by public transport.

·     Restricts the freedom of movement for those who have limited choices in how they access education, employment and social activities.

·     Restricts the increase in the number of trips made by public transport,

·     Restricts mode choice for people have who live along or near Innes Road.

·     The potential negative impact it could have on the Council to carry out its role and functions.

Analysis Criteria

6.5       All new bus stops are planned in accordance with the Christchurch Bus Stop Guidelines (2009). 

6.6       The bus stop planning criteria as outlined in Section 5.  The criteria is used to assess all bus stop location options considered.  A copy of the bus stop location assessment, including those that were not advanced to consultation, is provided in Attachment G.

6.7       A parking occupancy survey was undertaken to analyse the parking demand within the area of interest.

Options Considerations

6.8       Options 1 to 3 are consistent with the Council’s approved Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure (2018-2028)

6.9       The “Do Nothing” option is inconsistent with the Council’s approved Service Plan for Public Transport Infrastructure (2018-2028):

6.9.1   Inconsistency – The “Do Nothing” option has the potential to not contribute to increase number of trips made by public transport. 

6.9.2   Reason for inconsistency – No bus stops are provided, restricting access to public transport 

6.9.3   Amendment necessary – Install bus stops as per Options 1, 2 or 3 of this report.

7.   Community Views and Preferences

7.1       Affected property owners and residents were sent letters on 4 February 2019. The consultation catchment area for the project is indicated in Figure 5. Letters were dropped into letterboxes at properties located within the catchment area and letters were sent to property owners who do not live at the address. Additional copies were given to the St Francis of Assisi school and church. Staff also door knocked residents who live adjacent to the proposed bus stops. The consultation period ran for three weeks from 4 February to 25 February 2019.  Refer to Attachment I for the submissions received.

Figure 5: Innes Road bus stop consultation catchment

7.2       During the consultation we received 35 submissions. 23 were from people who live near the bus stops, 11 were submissions related to the school and church and 1 was from someone outside.

7.3       Feedback was received from two stakeholder organisations, Environment Canterbury and Go Bus Transport, which have been assessed and included separately in Section 7.12 to 7.16.

7.4       Of those who submitted 13 supported Option 1, 21 supported Option 2 and one person supported neither option.

7.5       Of those who supported the recommended option (Option 1), their bus stop location preferences are indicated in Table 3.

Option 1 (two sets of bus stops)

Bus stop locations near Severn Street

Bus stops locations near Nancy Avenue

North side of Road: 229 Innes Road

9

North side of Road: 271 Innes Road

8

North side of road: 239/241 Innes Road

2

North side of road: 279 Innes Road

4

South side of road: 280 Innes Road

9

South side of road: 360 Innes Road

8

South side of road: 302 Innes Road

2

South side of road: 382 Innes Road

4

 

 

 

 

Option 1 was preferred, but no location preference provided.

2

Option 1 was preferred, but no location preference provided.

1

Table 3: Consultation feedback, Option 1 preferred bus stop locations

7.6       Where Option 1 was the preferred option, the preferred bus stop locations near Severn Street are beside 229 Innes Road and 280 Innes Road and the preferred bus stop locations near Nancy Avenue are beside 271 Innes Road and 260 Innes Road.


 

7.7       Of those who supported Option 2, their bus stop location preferences are as follows

Option 2, one set of bus stop near Ethne Street

North side of Road: 257 Innes Road

3

North side of road: 259 Innes Road

16

South side of road: 308 Innes Road

6

South side of road: 27 Ethne Street (bus stop on Innes Road)

12

 

 

Option 2 was preferred, but no location preference provided (on the north side of the road)

2

Option 2 was preferred, but no location preference provided (on the south side of the road)

3

Table 4: Consultation feedback, Option 2 the preferred bus stop locations

7.8       Where Option 2 was the preferred option, the preferred bus stop locations near Ethne Street are beside 259 Innes Road and beside 27 Ethne Street (bus stop on Innes Road).

7.9       The most popular option, Option 2, is reflective of submitters, including those who live outside the consultation catchment area, who are concerned with having a bus stop in close proximity to St Francis of Assisi school or church.

7.10    For residents living within the consultation catchment area, the most popular option is Option 1 (two sets of bus stops). 

7.11    There were a number of key themes and issues raised by submitters that were similar for both the Option 1 and Option 2 proposed bus stops.  The key themes and issues, along with a staff response, are provided in Tables 5 and 6.

Concerns raised common to all options proposed

Staff response

Loss of parking

The allocation of kerbside road space for bus stops is reflected in the priorities of the Council’s Parking Policy (2019).  In all areas, bus stops are prioritised above residential, short stay and commuter parking.

While there is some on-street parking reallocation, there is sufficient on-street parking capacity in the general area for other motorist to continue to park on-street.

Bus stop located over a drive way

Buses are legally permitted to stop over driveways for the purpose of picking up and dropping off passengers at a bus stop. 

Many bus stops in Christchurch and other bus stop locations around New Zealand are located across driveways.  At these stops, buses will only be stopping long enough to pick-up and drop-off passengers.

Hazard to motorists pulling out of their driveway

When pulling in or out of driveway, drivers must give way to all traffic on the road, including buses. 

Certain sight lines for movements to and from the driveway will be restricted while the bus is stopped.  This is a temporary obstruction, lasting for a matter of seconds when the bus is stopped to allow passengers to board or alight the bus, which is why such configurations are common practice locally and nationally.

Proximity to intersection makes it unsafe and causes visibility issues

The proximity to nearby intersections and pedestrian crossings for all bus stops proposed has been assessed as suitable.

Intrusion of privacy (noise and loitering)

When planning bus stops staff are mindful of the impact they can have on residents.  However, the impact of bus stops in urban settings are generally not site-specific, as they will have a similar impact along the street irrespective of placement beside one residential property or that of another. 

Where possible bus stops are placed beside properties that have fences, mature shrubs or other screens that mitigate the impact that the bus stop may have on the adjacent residents.

A bus will only stop at the bus stop if the passenger demand exists.  The frequency of which buses stop at suburban bus stops mitigates the impact of privacy intrusion.  Irrespective, bus stops are located within a public space, and are there to improve the transport choices for the community.

Littering

Rubbish bins are not typically included in the planning of bus stops.  If littering at the bus stop was to become an issue in the future, and this is reported to the Council, staff can assess if the installation of a rubbish bin is warranted.

Will cause traffic problems

The proposal is no different to any bus stop in the city.  Public transport is a fundamental measure to support mode shift and reduce traffic related problems.

Table 5:  Key concerns raised by submitters, common to all options proposed

 


 

Option 1 specific issues

 

Bus stops will create an unsafe environment for children

Buses are standard part of the traffic composition, and there are bus stops located near to schools around Christchurch, and other cities around New Zealand.  Traffic is a potential hazard on all streets, irrespective of the location of bus stops.

Option 2 specific issues

 

Lack of a safe crossing point

There is no existing nearby pedestrian crossing facility to aid safe pedestrian movements across Innes Road, near Ethne Street.  There is no pedestrian crossing facility proposed.  It is the recommendation by staff that Option 1 should be considered as the preferred option, as it includes nearby pedestrian crossing facilities.

Table 6: Key concerns raised by submitters, specific to the options proposed

Consultation feedback – Stakeholder Organisations

7.12    Christchurch City Council provides bus stops to support the Greater Christchurch public transport services provided by Environment Canterbury.  Consequently, Environment Canterbury has also been consulted on for all bus stop options proposed. 

7.13    Go Bus is the operator of the Orbiter. Go Bus drivers have to stop at the bus stops on request, and ensure where practicable, passengers can safely and accessibly get on and off the bus.  For this reason, Go Bus have a strong interest in the bus stops that are provided, as the location and features of the bus stops address how easy or restrictive the bus stop is for their bus drivers to use.

7.14    Feedback received from Environment Canterbury and Go Bus both outlined their preference as being Option 1.  The bus stop location preferences are the same as those represented by the community feedback concerning Option 1.

7.15    The reasons provided by Environment Canterbury for the preference of Option 1 are as follows:

·   The bus stops are closer to pedestrian crossings

·   Widens the catchment, encouraging more customers to utilise public transport and lessening the walk for elderly or disabled patrons in the area.

7.16    The reasons provided by Go Bus for the preference of Option 1 are as follows:

·   Safe entry and exit of vehicles into the stops

·   Allowing passengers to board and alight safely

·   Allow for the continuation of a reliable bus service in the area

·   Reduce the possibility of vehicle damage

·   Enable access within a reasonable distance for passengers to help enable trip choice and options

·   Enable passengers and pedestrians to use an existing crossing, which will hopefully reduce passengers and pedestrians crossings in an unsafe manner.

8.   Legal Implications

8.1       There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision

8.2       This specific report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit however the report has been written using a general approach previously approved of by the Legal Services Unit, and the recommendations are consistent with the policy and legislative framework outlined in Sections 5.6 to 5.9.

9.   Next Steps

9.1       Approval is required by the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board.

9.2       If approved, the recommendations will be implemented approximately two weeks of the Community Board approval.  The short period is due to the time limit that exists on the legal operation of the interim bus stops.


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

10. Options Matrix

Issue Specific Criteria

Criteria

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 4 (Do Nothing)

Financial Implications

Cost to Implement

$10,000 for the installation of traffic controls and seating, plus $7,500 for planning, consultation and the preparation of this report

$5,000 for the installation of traffic controls and seating, plus $7,500 for consultation and the preparation of this report

Depending on the outcome of the Community Board’s resolution associated with Option 3, the installation cost would be in the range of $5,000 to $10,000. Plus $7,500 for consultation and the preparation of this report

$7,500 for planning, consultation and the preparation of this report

Maintenance/Ongoing

Transport and City Streets, Operations Expenditure budget, includes maintenance of bus stop infrastructure, as and when it is needed.

$0

Funding Source

Traffic Operations, Capital Expenditure budget for bus stop installations, plus existing staff budgets

Existing staff budgets

Impact on Rates

No impact

Environmental Impacts

Bus stops provide access to public transport.  Public transport is part of a wider transport package to support mode shift to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce traffic congestion and traffic crashes.  This in in turn helps the Council provide a healthy environment and a liveable city (Council’s strategic framework).

Not providing access to public transport, does not support mode shift and the associated benefits to the environment.

Social & Community Impacts

This option will help to achieve the desired community outcome of a well-connected and accessible city through improved opportunities to access and use public transport.

This option will help achieve the desired community outcome of a well-connected and accessible city through improved opportunities to access and use public transport, however the impact might be restricted due to the matters listed in the following section ‘accessibility impacts’.

Dependant on what bus stop(s) are approved, Option 3 would result in a social and community impact similar to that of Option 1 or Option 2.

Option 4 would have a negative impact on social and community impacts, as it restricts the freedom of movement for people who have limited choices in how they access education, employment and social activities. 

Accessibility Impacts

Shorter walking distances, proximity to pedestrian crossing facilities, limited obstacles located beside the proposed bus stops, results in the best accessibility outcome of all options included in this report.  This in turn helps the Council provide for strong communities and a liveable city (Council’s strategic framework).

Matters associated with this option that may have a negative impact on the accessibility of the bus stop:

 

1) For some this option will result in longer walking distances to get to the bus stop.

2) The bus stops are not located in close proximity to a pedestrian crossing facility, with may impede access to the bus stops, particularly for those with limited mobility.

3) Obstacles located in close proximity to the kerb in addition to concerns associated with the camber of the road and the depth of the drainage channel, will impact how accessible the step height and step gap is for people moving to or from the platform and the bus.

Dependant on what bus stop(s) are approved, Option 3 would result in an accessibility impact similar to that of Option 1 or Option 2.

Option 4 would have a negative impact on accessibility, as it restricts the freedom of movement for people who have limited choices in how they access education, employment and social activities. 

 


 

 

Statutory Criteria

Criteria

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 4 – Do Nothing

Impact on Manua Whenua

No impact

Alignment to Council Plans & Policies

This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Option 1 - Proposed bus stops on Innes Road near Severn Street - TG134001A

38

b

Option 1 - Proposed bus stops on Innes Road near Nancy Avenue - TG134001B

39

c

Option 2 - Proposed bus stops on Innes Road near Ethne Street - TG134001C

40

d

Option 3 - Alternative bus stop locations on Innes Road near Thames Street - TG134001D

41

e

Option 3 - Alternative bus stop locations on Innes Road near Kensington Avenue - TG134001E

42

f

Option 3 - Alternative bus stop location on Innes Road near Ethne Street - TG134001F

43

g

All bus stop location options considered - multi criteria analysis

44

h

Consultation plans

47

i

Consultation feedback

50

j

Parking occupancy - Innes Road between Philpotts Road and Mersey Street

68

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Brenda O'Donoghue - Passenger Transport Engineer

Dane Moir - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

  


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9         Right to Drain Water Easement over Janet Stewart Reserve

Reference:

18/493832

Contact:

Justin Sims

Justin.sims@ccc.govt.nz

941 6424

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board to approve an easement for the right to drain water in gross over part of Janet Stewart Reserve, a Council owned Recreation Reserve (refer to Attachment C).

1.2       Additionally, as part of the intersection improvement works detailed below, Board approval is required to remove a significant tree that is now located on the land Council has compulsorily acquired and which has already been legalised as road as part of the land taking, together with other trees affected by the works.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is being submitted to the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board as Council is to undertake major intersection improvements at the junction of Hawkins, Lower Styx and Marshland Roads which involves piping stormwater run-off from the road to a swale to be constructed in the adjacent reserve.

1.4       Board approval to grant easements through reserves administered under the Reserves Act is required as there is no staff delegation to cover this.

1.5       Board approval is also required to remove trees on roads under the Control of the Council.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined utilising the significance and engagement assessment worksheet, taking into consideration (amongst other things) the number of people affected and/or with an interest, the level of community interest already apparent for the issue, possible environmental, social and cultural impacts, possible costs/risks to the Council, ratepayers and wider community of carrying out the decision, and whether the impact of the decision can be reversed.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board, acting in the capacity of the administering body, resolve to:

1.         Recommend that the Chief Executive acting as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate, consents to the granting of the easement to Christchurch City Council for the right to drain water as outlined in this report.

2.         Subject to the consent of the Minister of Conservation, approve the grant of the easement pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 to:

a.         Christchurch City Council - for the right to drain water over part of Janet Stewart Reserve at 9 Lower Styx Road (Certificate of Title reference 833731) shown on the plan at Attachment C, or such other area if this is only a minor amendment.

3.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager, should the easement be granted with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to finalise documentation to implement the easement.

4.         Approve the removal of the significant tree (identified in the District Plan as T246) together with any other trees affected by the road intersection improvement works.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report support a project that is in the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Roads & Footpaths

·     Level of Service: 16.0.3.0 Maintain resident satisfaction with road condition - =38%

4.2       The design of the intersection and the stormwater arrangement is constrained by the location of the Styx River and the identification of lamprey spawning grounds in one of the existing stormwater drains adjacent to the road.

4.3       This has resulted in the location of the swale being positioned in Janet Stewart Reserve as there is no practical alternative.

4.4       There is also no way to avoid the trees that occupy the land required for the new carriageway.

Option – Grant an easement to Christchurch City Council and approve removal of trees.

4.5       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

4.5.1   The advantages of this option include:

·        The easement will protect the infrastructure in perpetuity.

·        The easement will identify the existence of the swale on the Title.

·        The easement is required to fulfil the Reserve Act.

·        The intersection cannot be completed without the removal of the trees which occupy the new road carriageway.

4.5.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·        The property will be encumbered with an easement.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       As the Board is aware, Council is signalising the intersection of Hawkins, Lower Styx and Marshland Roads and widening the bridge over the Styx River. A location plan and general layout plan can be found at Appendix A and B.

5.2       This is being completed to address current safety deficiencies in the existing intersection and also to fulfil requirements set out in Plan Change 30 of the City Plan.

5.3       Ongoing development in the north of Christchurch and Waimakariri District is also predicted to increase traffic volumes on Marshland Rd highlighting the need to improve the intersection lay out.

5.4       The design of the intersection is constrained by the Styx River to the north and the identification of a spawning area for lamprey fish which are a protected species in the drain to the west.

5.5       Council approved the process to acquire the various properties involved at its public excluded meeting of 24th August 2017.

       Easement

5.6       Section 48(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 (“the Act”) provides that the administering body (Council), with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, may grant easements for the drainage of any other land not forming part of the reserve.

5.7       Under section 48(2) of the Act, it is necessary for the Council to publicly notify its intention to grant an easement except where the reserve is unlikely to be materially altered or permanently damaged, and the rights of the public in respect of the reserve are unlikely to be permanently affected (section 48(3) of the Act). 

5.8       As the swale is to be constructed on a small proportion of the reserve when compared to the whole and a new footpath, board walk and plantings (including endangered species) will be undertaken as part of the works, the rights of the public will not be permanently affected and therefore no public notification is required.

5.9       The easement location is outlined in red on Attachment C.

5.10    For easements, the Council has delegated the role of administering body to Community Boards.

 

Consent of the Minister of Conservation

5.11    By way of the Instrument of Delegation to Territorial Authorities the Minister of Conservation has delegated the Minister’s consent powers to Council. 

5.12    The delegation from the Minister includes an expectation that the role of administering body will be kept separate from the role as Minister’s delegate.  Council has addressed this through making community boards the administering body and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) the Minister’s delegate.

5.13    The Minister’s delegate responsibilities have not been sub-delegated to staff and remain with the CEO.

5.14    In exercising the consent of the Minister of Conservation, the Council should be satisfied that due process has been followed and in this respect it is confirmed that the following matters have been considered:

·   The land is held by the Council as a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

·   The easement being applied for, falls within the purposes specified in Section 48(1) of the Act.

·   There are sufficient grounds to waive the public notification requirements of Section 48(2) of the Reserves Act as the works comply with Section 48(3).

·   Iwi have not been consulted as this site is not a site of significance to Tangata Whenua in the City Plan. However the removal of the significant tree has been consulted and approvals received.

       Tree removal

5.15    The proposed intersection layout has been developed to minimise the project effect on the Canal Reserve Drain and lamprey fish habitat therein. The resulting layout requires removal of a number of healthy trees the most notable of which is a cabbage tree identified as significant in the District Plan which sits in the proposed carriageway as indicated on the plan below.

5.16    The option to relocate the tree was investigated but the likelihood of the tree surviving, coupled with the cost of its relocation, have eliminated this as an option.

5.17    MKT have been consulted on the removal of the tree and they accept that it is an unavoidable necessity.

5.18    To minimise the effects of the loss of the significant tree, it is proposed to harvest seeds from the tree and replant these in the most appropriate location within Janet Stewart Reserve in consultation with runanga.

5.19    As part of the intersection project, those areas subject to vegetation removal to facilitate the proposed works and additional areas not previously landscaped are proposed to be reinstated or newly planted with a variety of trees and shrubs. This will include 12 kahikatea trees, 36 totara trees and 22 kowhai trees together with a large variety of flax’s including 600 harakeke flax.

6.   Option - Grant an easement over part of Janet Stewart Reserve and remove trees.

Option Description

6.1       That the Council grants an easement for the right to drain water in gross to itself under the Reserves Act 1977.

6.2       Approve the removal of any trees located on the proposed carriageway or that are considered a risk to motorists if they are located within the road corridor.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       The level of significance was determined by considering the number of properties involved, the effect on the public on the use of the reserve and the precedent effect and potential implications for the Council.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       The tree removal was consulted and subsequent approvals received by local IWI via MKT.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Not applicable.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is considered to be consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation – a survey plan needs to be prepared and there are legal costs associated with registering the easement on the Title covered as part of the Council project. There are also costs to remove the trees which are anticipated as part of the project.

6.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - maintenance of the swale is a cost to the Council.

6.10    Funding source – Council project.

Legal Implications

6.11    The grant of an easement under section 48(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 would indicate the infrastructure on the titles.

Risks and Mitigations

6.12    None.

Implementation

6.13    Implementation dependencies – none.

6.14    Implementation timeframe – imminent.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The easement will protect the infrastructure in perpetuity.

·   The easement will identify the existence of the swale on the Title.

·   The easement is required to fulfil the Reserve Act if the swale is constructed in the reserve.

·   The intersection cannot be completed without the removal of the trees which occupy the new road carriageway.

6.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The title will be encumbered with an easement in perpetuity.

7.   Option 2 - Do Not Grant an Easement over part of Janet Stewart Reserve and do not approve removal of trees

Option Description

7.1       The Council does not approve the grant of an easement to drain water and does not approve the removal of trees from the legal road.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report. Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not required.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       Via MKT this option was consulted on and prior approval received, therefore it is expected that the tree is to be removed..

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Not applicable.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – Not applicable.

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Not applicable.

7.8       Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.9       Not granting easements would be in contravention of the Reserves Act.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Not applicable.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·        The existing notable cabbage tree is retained.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·        It would be a breach of the Reserves Act if the swale was created through the Reserve without an easement.

·        If Council decided to sell the land in the future an easement would need to be put in place at that time to provide the rights required to protect any infrastructure.

·        The intersection improvements cannot be completed without the removal of the trees.

1.1.1         Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Loction Plan

78

b

Intersection Layout

79

c

Easement Scheme Plan

80

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)    sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii)   adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Justin Sims - Property Consultant

Adrian Thein - Project Manager

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 



Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 



Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 



Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

10.    MacFarlane Park - Part Changes in Reserve Classification

Reference:

19/112025

Contact:

Dan Egeton

Dan.egerton@ccc.govt.nz

941 8477

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to request that the Papanui-Innes Community Board (acting under delegation from the Council) approves the initiation of the Reserves Act processes to:

a.         Reclassify part of MacFarlane Park from Recreation Reserve to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve; and

b.         Accommodate the proposed new Shirley Community Trust Building (Lions Building), and legalise the occupation of the existing KidsFirst Kindergarten Building.

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided by staff due to the points outlined in paragraph 1.1(b) above due to the inconsistency these have with the current reserve classification, being Recreation Reserve.

1.3       This report provides for the initiation of the processes required by the Reserves Act 1977.  The decisions on the proposed changes are made following public notification and the hearing of any objections.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessing potential outcomes from options provided within the Council's Significance and Engagement assessment worksheet.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the above assessment in addition to meeting the statutory (Reserves Act) requirements.  The Council is required to publicly notify the intentions to change the classification of the reserve land.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Papanui-Innes Community Board, acting under the delegated authority of the Christchurch City Council, resolves as follows:

1.         Under section 24(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, that the process to change the classification from 'recreation reserve' to 'local purpose (community buildings) reserve' in respect of that part of MacFarlane Park being part of Lot 1 & 2 DP 17482 as is shown outlined in red on the plan attached as Attachment A to the staff report from which this resolution emanates (“Affected Part of the Reserve”), be commenced and that the proposed change be publicly notified in accordance with section 24(2) of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.         That if no objections are received, the Papanui-Innes Community Board approves the change in classification of the affected Part of the Reserve from recreation reserve to local purpose (community building) reserve and authorises staff to seek the approval of the Minister of Conservation (whose power has been delegated to the Chief Executive) to such change.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Community Development and Facilities

·     Level of Service: 2.0.1.2 Provide a range of well utilised community facilities, including voluntary libraries - Community Facility Plan adopted

4.2       The following feasible option has been considered:

·     Option One - Resolve to commence the process to change of classification of part of the reserve.

·     Option Two – Do not resolve to commence the process to change the classification of part of the reserve and remove, or find an alternative use, for the buildings in situ.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     It enables the Shirley Community Trust building, as gifted by the Lions Foundation (accepted by the Council 2018), to remain on site post April 2021.

·     Legalises the use of the KidsFirst Kindergarten.

 

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Part of the Recreation Reserve is removed (albeit changed to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve).

 

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Context

 

5.1       The Reserves Act 1977 (“Act”) controls the uses that reserve land may be put by requiring that reserve land is classified in accordance with the Act and granting certain limited leasing powers according to how the reserve is classified.

5.2       MacFarlane Park is currently classified as recreation reserve.

5.3       Following the earthquakes the Government introduced the Canterbury Earthquakes (Reserves Legislation) Order (No 2) 2011 (“Order”) to allow the use of reserves for certain earthquake recovery related purposes that ordinarily wouldn’t have been permitted under the Reserves Act.   Pursuant to the Order the Shirley Community Trust building (“Building”) was located on MacFarlane Park.

5.4       However, the Order expires on 30 April 2021, and if the Building is to remain on MacFarlane Park it will need to be authorised using Reserves Act powers.

5.5       As the presence of the Building is inconsistent with the status of MacFarlane Park as a recreation reserve, it is necessary, before 30 April 2021, to change the classification of the reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve allow the Building to remain.  The alternative would be to require that the building is removed from the reserve.

5.6       If that part of the reserve affected by the Building is reclassified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve, then it will then be possible for the Council to lease the building to an appropriate community group.

Process

5.7       Section 24(1) of the Act specifies the process that must be followed to change the classification of a reserve.   Section 24 (2) requires public notification of the proposed change of classification and the right of the public to object within one month after the date of the first publication of the notice. 

5.8       If objections are received, which are unable to be satisfied, then a hearing is required. Following this hearing, the Hearing Panel then makes a recommendation back the Community Board for a decision.

5.9       Section 24(2)(b) of the Act requires the Local Authority to consult with Commissioner (Department of Conservation) before any public notification occurs.  Staff confirm that the Department of Conservation has been consulted and that it has no concerns with the proposal.

5.10    The approval of the Minister of Conservation is required to any change in the Reserves Act classification.  The Minister has delegated this power to the Council, which, in turn, has sub-delegated this power to the Council’s Chief Executive.

5.11    The Staff recommendation includes a recommendation that the proposed change of classification is approved if no objections are received.  This has been recommended in the interests of procedural efficiency if no objections are received.  However, if objections are received, then the effect of that particular resolution, if adopted, will be void and the objections will then be heard and considered with a new decision on the proposal then being required.

Proposed Partial Change in Reserve Classification

5.12    The proposed change in reserve classification for the part of the Park shown in Attachment A is necessary to permit the current use of the Kindergarten to continue, and the Shirley Community Trust Building to remain past April 2021. The current reserve classification of Recreation Reserve does not provide for such a use.

5.13    The Council has delegated its powers to initiate the Reserves Act reclassification to Community Boards, with the exception of hearing any submissions/objections received (which are considered by a Hearings Panel).

5.14    Public notification is required, whereby the public are able to make written objections to the proposed partial change in reserve classification within one calendar month from the date of notification.  The function to consider objections has been delegated to the Council Hearings Panels.  The Hearings Panel will then make a recommendation to the Community Board for a final decision on whether or not to proceed with the proposed reclassification of the reserve.  If the decision is made to proceed, a formal application will then need to be made to the Council's Chief Executive (acting in her capacity as delegate of the Minister of Conservation) for the Minister's approval of the proposed reclassification.

 

6.   Option One - Resolve to commence the process of change of classification of part of the reserve

Option Description

6.1       The Papanui-Innes Community Boards resolves to initiate the Reserves Act process for change of classification over part of MacFarlane Park (as shown in Attachment A) from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are necessary via standard Reserves Act notification processes.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value; therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The views of local residents and the wider public, are to be considered via standard Reserves Act notification requirements.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – Staff time and consultation costs

6.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Not applicable

6.9       Funding source – Existing budgets

Legal Implications

6.10    The proposed change in classification of part of the reserve are legal processes under the Reserves Act.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.11    Potential objections from local residents and/or occupiers and users of the Park, who may oppose the part changes to the reserve classification.

6.11.1 Treatment: Applying the due legislative process under the Reserves Act for consultation and consideration of objections/views.

6.11.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.12    Implementation dependencies - Subject to public notification and statutory processes.

6.13    Implementation timeframe – Approximately three months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   It enables the Shirley Community Trust building, as gifted by the Lions Foundation (accepted by the Council 2018), to remain on site post April 2021.

·   Legalises the use of the KidsFirst Kindergarten. The disadvantages of this option include:

6.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Part of the Recreation Reserve is removed (albeit changed to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve).

·   Loss of some park open space.

 

7.   Option Two – Do not resolve to commence the process of change of classification of part of the reserve and remove, or find an alternative use, for the buildings in situ.

Option Description

7.1       The Papanui-Innes Community Boards does not resolve to initiate the Reserves Act process for change of classification over part of MacFarlane Park (as shown in Attachment A) from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

7.2       This will result in Council having to find an alternative use for the existing buildings, or remove them from the land.

Significance

7.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not necessary.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value; therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.6       The views of local residents and the wider public are not known, however the removal of the facilities from the site are unlikely to be supported.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.8       Cost of Implementation – Staff time and consultation costs

7.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Not applicable

7.10    Funding source – Existing budgets

Legal Implications

7.11    None.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.12    Potential objections from local residents and/or occupiers and users of the Park, who may oppose the removal of the facilities from the reserve.

7.12.1 Treatment: Find alternative uses for the building, and alternative locations for the operations.

7.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies – Decision ratified.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – The Shirley Community Trust building is permitted to stay on site until April 2021.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   None.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The operational use of the buildings will have to change, or the buildings will have to be removed.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A

87

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Dan Egerton - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 



Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

11.    Havana Gardens - Proposed Easement

Reference:

18/1318934

Contact:

Dan Egerton

Dan.egerton@ccc.govt.nz

941-8477

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board to approve an easement for the right to convey telecommunications over the parts of Havana Gardens Reserve identified in Attachment A.

1.2       The Board is also requested that should it approve the granting of the easement, to recommend to the Chief Executive that she exercise her authority as delegate of the Minister of Conservation to consent to the easement.  The Minister has delegated her authority to the Council, who have subsequently delegated the authority to the Chief Executive.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is being submitted to the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board following a request from Enable Limited to connect a 2-Degrees Mobile Tower to the fibre network.

1.4       An easement is required over Council land but staff do not have a delegation to make a decision in this matter because the land is held as a reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. The Board has the delegated authority of the Council to make a decision on the granting of this proposed easement whilst the Council has the delegation to grant consent on behalf of the Minister of Conservation.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

·        The level of significance was determined by a significance and engagement assessment worksheet. 

·        The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

·        This assessment is based on the fact that there is no impact to the public or users of the reserve and in fact the project in its entirety creates a public benefit.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board resolve to:

1.         Recommend that the Chief Executive Officer acting as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate consent to the granting of the easement to Enable Networks Limited for the right to convey telecommunications as outlined in this report.

2.         Subject to  the consent of the Minister of Conservation, approves the grant of the easement pursuant to section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 to:

a.         Enable Networks Limited – for the right to convey telecommunications over part of Havana Gardens Reserve at 9 Havana Gardens (Record of Title 128730) shown on the plan at Attachment A, or such other area if this is only a minor amendment.

3.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager, should the easement be granted with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to do all things necessary at his soul discretion to finalise the easement.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report does not support the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025).

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Grant the easement (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do not grant the easement

 

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

·        The advantages of this option include:

·     The mobile network within Christchurch will be future proofed.

·     Council will derive income from compensation payable for the easement – noting the easement will be valued if approved.

·     The easement will protect the infrastructure in perpetuity.

·     The easement will identify the existence of the pipeline on the title.

·     An easement is required to comply with the Reserves Act 1977.

·     Supports Health and Safety by identifying the location of the facility on the title.

·        The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Minor earthworks and temporary restrictions on the use of the reserve.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

 

5.1       Enable Networks Limited have received a request from 2-Degrees Limited to connect an existing mobile tower to the fibre network, in order to connect the tower, fibre is required to be installed through the aforementioned reserve.

5.2       An easement is required to protect the in-ground infrastructure.

Havana Gardens Reserve

5.3       The areas of reserve land affected by the proposed easement comprise a:

·   5,287m2 parcel held in title 128730, being Lot 54 Deposited Plan 331269

·   The reserve is held by the Council as Local Purpose (Landscape) reserve which is subject to the Reserves Act 1977. 

Infrastructure

5.4       The fibre infrastructure will be installed underground, and there will be no material impact on the public and their ability to enjoy the reserve, other than when construction is taking place.

Easement

5.5       Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act) provides that the Council with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, may grant easements for rights-of-way and other services over reserve land. In this case Section 48(1)(a) “any public purpose”.

5.6       Under Section 48(2) of the Act, it is necessary for the Council to publically notify its intention to grant an easement except where the reserve is unlikely to be materially altered or permanently damaged, and the rights of the public in respect of the reserve are unlikely to be permanently affected (section 48(3) of the Act). Public notification is not required because the public’s ability to enjoy the reserve is not going to be permanently affected.

5.7       The easement area required is shown highlighted on the plan in Attachment A. 

5.8       It is the normal policy of the Council that a one-off compensation fee, as determined by an independent valuation, is payable to the Council for the privilege of gaining an encumbrance on the Council’s title. (Council 27 September 2001.)

5.9       If the easement is approved Council staff will instruct an independent valuer to determine the level of compensation payable.

5.10    The works will be undertaken by a suitably qualified contractor who will comply with all Health and Safety regulations in accordance with best practice. This contractor will be appointed by Enable Networks Limited.

Consent of the Minister of Conservation

5.11    In exercising the consent of the Minister of Conservation, the Council should be satisfied that due procedure has been followed and in this respect the Council should have regard to the following matters:

·        The land affected by the application is a reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

·        The easement being applied for falls within the purposes specified in Section 48(1) of the Reserves Act.

·        The provisions of Section 48(2) (public notification) have been complied with or that a waiver can be given to this requirement under Section 48(3).

·        Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 (this Act shall be interpreted and administered as to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) meaning that in consenting to transactions under the Reserves Act 1977, consideration is to be given to the requirement or otherwise to consult with iwi.

5.12    It is confirmed that the subject land is reserve land, held in title 128730 for Local Purpose (Landscape) Reserve.  Section 48(1) of the Act allows the Council to grant rights-of-way and other easements over any part of the reserve for any public purpose (section 48(1) (a)).  Public notification of the proposed easement is not required pursuant to Section 48(3) of the Act.

5.13    Specific consultation with iwi is not considered necessary as the site affected does not feature in the City Plan as having any significance to tangata whenua and the proposal is believed to be consistent with the framework of the Mahaanui Iwi Management Plan (MIMP) as the proposed earthworks activities will be minimal.

6.   Option 1 – Grant the easement (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Grant the easement on the conditions stipulated.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The communities views are not known, and their views are not being sought, as there is no material impact on the communities ability to enjoy the reserve due to the infrastructure being inground.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – nil, or costs borne by the applicant.

6.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – nil, all costs borne by the applicant.

6.9       Funding source – not applicable

Legal Implications

6.10    Section 48(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 enables the Council, with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to grant easements over public reserves, in this case for the right to convey telecommunications.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.11    The proposal is a permitted activity under the City Plan rules, current and proposed.

·        Residual risk rating - the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.12    Implementation dependencies – installation of the infrastructure is dependent on granting of the easement

6.13    Implementation timeframe - three to four months. The works are scheduled to commence mid to late 2019, and to be completed within four months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.14    The advantages of this option include:

·        The mobile network within Christchurch will be future proofed.

·        Council will derive income from compensation payable for the easement – noting the easement will be valued if approved.

·        The easement will protect the infrastructure in perpetuity.

·        The easement will identify the existence of the pipeline on the title.

·        An easement is required to comply with the Reserves Act 1977.

·        Supports Health and Safety by identifying the location of the facility on the title.

6.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·        Minor earthworks and temporary restrictions on the use of the reserve.

7.   Option 2 – Do not grant the easement

Option Description

7.1       Do not approve the grant of the easement.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       The community’s views and preferences are not known.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – zero

7.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – zero

7.9       Funding source – not applicable

Legal Implications

7.10    Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations 

·        No risks apply.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   There will not be minor earthworks and temporary restrictions to the reserve.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The mobile network in Christchurch will suffer from limited lack of future proofing.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A

95

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Dan Egerton - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

 



Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

12.   Waipapa/Papanui-Innes 2018-19 Youth Development Fund - Application - Angus Hammett

Reference:

19/250332

Presenter(s):

Trevor Cattermole, Community Development Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board to consider an application(s) received for funding from its 2018/19 Youth Development Fund.

1.2       This report is to assist the Board to consider an application(s) of funding from Angus Hammett.

1.3       There is currently a balance of $4,590 remaining in this fund.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve a grant of $300 from its 2018-19 Youth Development Fund to Angus Hammett towards the costs of attending the AFL New Zealand National combined fitness program to be held in Auckland from April 5 to April 8 2019.

 

3.   Key Points

Issue or Opportunity

3.1       As one of the top 36 identified male/female players selected for this combined fitness programme, the AFL provides the applicant with the opportunity to increase his ability, experience and knowledge to further his desire to represent New Zealand in the future in the AFL code.

Strategic Alignment

3.2       Investing in our youth to develop leadership, cultural competence and success in their chosen field builds the capacity of our city’s youth, our future adults. In doing so we increase the likelihood of these youths contributing to developing a vibrant, prosperous and sustainable 21st century city; one of the council’s six Strategic Priorities. The recommendations contained in this report are based on this principle.

Decision Making Authority

3.3       Determine the allocation of the discretionary Response Fund for each community (including any allocation towards a Youth Development Fund).

3.4       Allocations must be consistent with any policies, standards or criteria adopted by the Council

3.5       The Fund does not cover:

·   Legal challenges or Environment Court challenges against the Council, Council Controlled organisations or Community Board decisions

·   Projects or initiatives that change the scope of a Council project or that will lead to ongoing operational costs to the Council (though Community Boards can recommend to the Council that it consider a grant for this purpose).

Assessment of Significance and Engagement

3.6       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

3.7       The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

3.8       Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

4.   Applicant 1 – Angus Hammett

4.1       Age: 15

4.2       School: Saint Bedes

4.3       Activity: AFL

4.4       Event seeking support for: Attendance at the AFL New Zealand National combined fitness program

4.5       Angus is very active in sports which he reports takes up all of his spare time. Angus plays AFL, Rugby and Touch football.

4.6       Angus is also coaches a Junior Rugby team and enjoys giving back to sport because so many people have helped him.

4.7       Angus has his sights on playing for New Zealand and believes this opportunity will hone his skills. Angus realises that this is an experience that not many people will are fortunate to do.

4.8       This is the first time that Angus has applied to this fund.

4.9       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Angus Hammett:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Total cost for attendance at the AFLNZ National Combined Fitness

 

Programme

 

Travel, accommodation, catering, Playing Kit, off field kit

 

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$740

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Trevor Cattermole - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

  


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

13.   Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report - March 2019

Reference:

19/249166

Presenter(s):

Elizabeth Hovell, Community Board Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

This report provides information on initiatives and issues current within the Community Board area, to provide the Board with a strategic overview and inform sound decision making.

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receive the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Area Report for March 2019.

 

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Memos/Information/Advice to the Board

3.1.1   Information sent to Board:

·   CNC Alliance: Night Work on SH1 and QEII Drive (circulated 5 Mar 2019)

·   Celebrate St Albans Park Reopening Invitation (circulated 6 Mar 2019)

·   CCC Start Work Notice: Sisson Park Footpath (circulated 7 Mar 2019)

·   CNC Alliance: QEII Night Work and Lane Shift Postponed (circulated 11 Mar 2019)

·   SWN – Update Buller’s Stream Stormwater Facility (circulated 11 Mar 2019)

·   CCC Heritage Strategy: Our Heritage, Our Taonga (circulated 11 Mar 2019)

·   SWN – St Bedes Fire Sprinkler Connection to New Water Main (circulated 15 Mar 2019)

·   CNC Alliance: Chaneys On Ramp Closure March 2019 (circulated 17 Mar 2019)

·   SWN – Papanui Parallel Cycleway Rutland St to Bealey Ave (circulated 18 Mar 2019)

3.1.2   Heritage Strategy: Our Heritage, Our Taonga

This strategy is a high-level document that sets out how we intend to work in ongoing partnership with Ngāi Tahu and in collaboration with our communities to identify, protect and celebrate heritage.

It presents a broadened view of heritage that includes the built and natural environment and tangible and intangible heritage, including stories, memories and traditions, and movable heritage.

Ngāi Tahu taonga is acknowledged and integrated, and the heritage of the city’s diverse cultures and distinctive communities is respected and provided for. Click on the link below:

Read Our Heritage, Our Taonga – Heritage Strategy 2019–2029 here. [PDF, 9.6 MB]

3.2       Board area Consultations/Engagement/Submission opportunities

3.2.1   Draft Annual Plan 2019–2020 (Opens 1 March – Closes 1 April 2019)

This draft Annual Plan covers financial year two of the Long Term Plan, from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020. It contains some changes from the information contained in the Long Term Plan for the 2019/20 year.  Click on the links below for more information.

Consultation Document  and   Draft Annual Plan 2019-2020

3.2.2   Christchurch Northern Corridor Traffic Mitigation (Opens 13 March – Closes 15 April 2019)

The Christchurch Northern Corridor (CNC) will help people to travel to and from the north of Christchurch. The CNC extends the Northern Motorway to connect QEII Drive and Cranford Street, through to Innes Road.

The Downstream Effects Management Plan that we are asking you to comment on covers the impacts on all streets in the St Albans, Edgeware and Mairehau area south of McFaddens Road. The recommendations of the Plan can be viewed by clicking on the link below:

Christchurch Northern Corridor Traffic Mitigation - Have Your Say

The Plan (click on the link below) looks at ways to manage additional traffic and to mitigate the impacts of the additional traffic that will enter the local network at Cranford Street.
Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Management Plan (DEMP)

Previous feedback (click here to access)

Feedback received from the community helped shape the Management Plan. We listened when you said you wanted safe access for schools, parks and shopping areas and safe areas for all people to walk and cycle.

The requirement for a Downstream Effects Management Plan came from an Environment Court ruling when the Christchurch Northern Corridor was approved. Council must complete the Plan before the opening of the Christchurch Northern Corridor and mitigate the effects additional traffic will have on the local network.

Drop-In Sessions will be held as follows:

10.30am–12.30pm    Wednesday 20 March       Scottish Society Hall, 136 Caledonian Road, St Albans

5pm–7pm                     Monday 25 March              St Albans School Hall, 17 Sheppard Place, St Albans

3.30pm–5.30pm         Tuesday 26 March             Scottish Society Hall, 136 Caledonian Road, St Albans

5pm–7pm                     Thursday 4 April                 St Albans School Hall, 17 Sheppard Place, St Albans

3.2.3   Paddington Playground Proposed Play Space Renewal (Opens 15 March – Closes 7 April 2019)

This play space project is part of the Council’s programme to make sure your local community has play equipment that is suitable, safe and meets the New Zealand Playground Standards.

The vision for the new play space is to provide a range of play equipment that will cater for a wider range of abilities and age groups. We also plan to install new gardens and four new trees, near the playground, to enhance the play area.  For the planting around the playground we will select plant species that are low to the ground to ensure good visibility is maintained.

A concept plan [PDF, 1.9 MB] is presented to show the new layout.

We would like to hear your views prior to the final design. We would appreciate you taking the time to share your feedback with us. 

3.3       Annual Plan and Long Term Plan matters

3.3.1   A seminar was held on Friday 8 March 2019 to discuss the Board’s approach to the Draft Annual Plan 2019–2020 consultation. A summary of the discussions will be circulated to members for comment.

3.4       Board Reporting

3.4.1   The Board are asked to consider topics for inclusion in Newsline, the newsletter and the report to Council.

4.   Community Board Plan – Update against Outcomes

A final report on progress to date will be included in the 13 September 2019 Papanui-Innes Community Board meeting.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Strengthening Community Fund Projects

5.1.1   Nil to report.

5.2       Other partnerships with the community and organisations

5.2.1   Papanui Bush – Bridgestone Reserve

Denis McMurtrie from Papanui Rotary, with permission from the Parks team, has organised a noticeboard to go on Bridgestone Reserve. The noticeboard has been repurposed with City Care refurbishing and installing it at no cost on Tuesday 12 March 2019.

 

 

The Papanui Heritage group is working on a map and narrative on the history of Papanui Bush to go into the noticeboard.

 

Denis and Papanui-Innes community development staff are working with the Head of Department Arts and Arts History and the Student Visual Arts Council at Papanui High School on a mural of native fauna to be attached to the fence running parallel to Langdon Road – this art work is currently in the design phase.

 

5.3       Community Facilities (updates and future plans)

5.3.1   St Albans Community Facility

The final floor plan has been agreed by a working party consisting of Board members and community representatives from St Albans, including the St Albans Residents Association (SARA) that was set up in 2017 to consider the options for the new facility.

The artist’s impressions of how the final frontages on Colombo Street and Caledonian Road will look are laid out below together with the floor plan for what we hope will become a comprehensive and welcoming community hub for the St Albans residents.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Ward School Principals Meeting

The Board held the first term meeting with the Ward School Principals for this year on 15 March 2019. The Principal of Belfast School provided an update to her colleagues and Board members on the preparation and planning of the proposed new educational facility in Belfast.

Other topics discussed were the Draft Annual Plan, the current measles outbreak and recommended measures by the Ministry of Education, school zonings and traffic issues.

6.2       Events Report Back

6.2.1   Papanui Neighbourhood Day

This gathering was cancelled following the unfortunate events that occurred in Christchurch on Friday 15 March 2019.

7.   Updates from Other Units

7.1       The next bi-monthly report will be presented in April 2019.

8.   Community Board Funding Update

8.1       Positive Youth Development and Discretionary Response Funds Update

The 2018/19 financial year’s Positive Youth Development and Discretionary Response Funds Balance Sheet update is attached (refer Attachment A to this report).

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

DRF and PYDF Balance Sheet as at 8 March 2019

107

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Lyssa Aves - Governance Support Officer

Trevor Cattermole - Community Development Advisor

Stacey Holbrough - Community Development Advisor

Elizabeth Hovell - Community Board Advisor

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

Sharon Munro - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 


Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board

22 March 2019

 

 

14.   Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.

 

 

 



[1] If the parking occupancy is less than 75 percent of the parking capacity, the capacity is considered to be underutilised.