Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                    Thursday 14 March 2019

Time:                                   9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Jamie Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

8 March 2019

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

Jo Daly

Council Secretary

941 8581

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.        Apologies......................................................................................................... 6

2.        Declarations of Interest...................................................................................... 6

3.        Public Participation........................................................................................... 6

3.1       Public Forum...................................................................................................................... 6

3.2       Deputations by Appointment............................................................................................... 6

4.        Presentation of Petitions.................................................................................... 6

Community Board Monthly Reports

5.        Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council.................................. 7

6.        Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council........ 13

7.        Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council............... 19

8.        Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council - February 2019..................................................................................................................... 25

9.        Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council................................. 29

10.      Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council......................... 33

11.      Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council......... 41

Community Board Part A Reports

12.      Travis Road & Bower Avenue 40km/hr Variable Speed Limit (School Speed Zone) and Frosts Road Permanent Speed Limit Change.................................................................. 67

13.      50R Wilmers Road - Transfer of Part Owaka 2 Reserve to the Crown.......................... 83

14.      Improvements to Woolston Village Centre - WL1................................................... 95

15.      Curries Road/Tanner Street - Intersection Improvements..................................... 171

16.      Redcliffs Transport Project - Redcliffs School Transport Safety Requirements......... 181

17.      Cambridge Green Pouwhenua Artwork Future Treatment Options......................... 205

18.      Gloucester/Worcester Street Park - Proposed Name and Landscape Plan................ 269

19.      Sumner Road Realignment.............................................................................. 291

20.      Lyttelton Seafarers Welfare.............................................................................. 301

Regulatory Performance Committee

21.      Proposed Plan Change 1 Woolston Risk Management Area.................................... 305

Staff Reports

22.      Hearings Panel report to the Council on the Hereford Street (Manchester - Oxford) Upgrade Project......................................................................................................... 607

23.      Draft Council Submission on the Productivity Commission Paper on Local Government Funding and Finance....................................................................................... 649

24.      2018/19 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund application from Living Springs. 655

25.      Chief Executive's Report - February 2019............................................................ 657   

 

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation

3.1  Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2  Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared

4.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

5.        Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/166532

Presenter(s):

Kim Money, Chairperson Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for February 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Coastal-Burwood Community Board held meetings on 4 and 18 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were, the Board:

·   Approved East Shirley Cricket Club’s development of a junior cricket pitch on the site of the former bowls club in Burwood Park.

·   Approved the installation of two new sports field lighting poles on Queenspark Reserve, and the upgrading of two existing sports field lighting poles by Parklands Rugby Football Club Incorporated on Queenspark Reserve.

·   Amended the 2019 Board meeting schedule to replace the approved 15 July 2019 Board meeting with 22 July 2019 in order to avoid meeting during the Council’s recess week.

·   Approved a grant from its 2018/19 Youth Development Fund to a young person towards the costs of flights for representing Canterbury in the Under 18 Mixed Touch Team at the 2019 New Zealand Touch National Tournament in Rotorua in February 2019.

·   Approved the granting of a lease to A-Town Boxing Gym for the Wainoni Park Youth Activity Centre building and land.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Travis Road & Bower Avenue 40km/hr Variable Speed Limit (School Speed Zone) and Frosts Road Permanent Speed Limit Change. 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area       

5.1       Christchurch Hot Pools - Sod Turning

A site blessing and sod-turning event was held ahead of work starting on the Christchurch Hot Pools.

Construction of the five-pool facility, which will have steam and sauna activities and dedicated family and relaxation areas, is set to start once building consents are finalised this month. Site establishment and preparation work will begin shortly.

The site was blessed on February 11 by Aroha Reriti Crofts and the first spade placed in the ground by Coastal Ward Councillor David East and Coastal-Burwood Community Board Chair Kim Money.

Kim Money and Cr David East turn the first sod.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Burwood, Avondale and Dallington, Community Events

The group of residents associations and community organisations that comprise the Burwood Avondale and Dallington Group have successfully held a free family movie night in each area - Burwood, Avondale and Dallington. The three suburbs individually planned an event that would suit their capacity and community. Across the three events there were sausages, candy floss, popcorn, refreshments, fundraising, music, a petting zoo, pony rides and a free family movie. Around 600 people turned out to see the movies held at Robin Park, Burwood Park and at Chisnallwood Intermediate.

These were the group’s first community events and all were received warmly by attendees. The group are now looking forward to holding a combined riverside festival for all of their communities, “Duck down to the river” (named for a duck race they will be holding on the day) on March 30 2019 at Kerr’s Reach.

 

 

6.2       3PO presents S.O.S Community Safety Expo

A community-led Community Safety Expo will be held on Saturday 9 March from 11 -3pm at The Old School Te Kura Tawhito, New Brighton. The purpose of the Expo is to provide members of the community with information needed to protect themselves and their property, to foster a community togetherness and individual wellbeing. There will be stalls and information from Civil Defence, Christchurch City Council, Fire and Emergency New Zealand among many others.

6.3       South New Brighton Estuary Edge Report

The Parks Unit has engaged a consultant to identify options for the South New Brighton estuary edge in relation to the erosion that is occurring along the edge of the South New Brighton Reserve.

On Wednesday 20 February, the Coastal-Burwood Community Board and key stakeholders attended a site walk and feedback session which provided an opportunity for feedback to the consultant preparing the report.

The site meeting was welcomed by the Community Board and seen as an excellent way of getting key stakeholder input into the report that is being developed.

 

 

6.4       Hawke Street Public Carpark

The condition of the carpark was causing safety concerns to in community. The Board was pleased to see that an area of the carpark has been resealed improving the safety and accessibility of the carpark area.


 

6.5       New Brighton Public Toilets

Following feedback received by the Board from residents about the condition of the Shaw Avenue toilets and other public toilets in New Brighton, the Parks Unit have advised there is no funding in the current Long Term Plan for the Shaw Ave toilets and are working to provide the Board with advice about how these toilets could be addressed in the next Long Term Plan process. 

6.6       I Love New Brighton 2019 held on Waitangi Day

This event saw 7,000 people attend Thomson Park for a variety of activities and entertainment for families to enjoy.  36 community groups were involved to make this day such a success - plus the many businesses and individuals that supported the event.


 

6.7       Parklands at Play

The annual Parklands @ Play event was held on Sunday 17 February at Parklands reserve.  Entertaining performances from local schools, clubs and bands, along with activities provided for the children by local organisations and the Christchurch City Council.

This was a great example of community recreation working in partnership with key local organisations to plan and deliver such a popular and well attended event.


7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board approved the Coastal-Burwood Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 16 October 2017.  The Plan can be found at the following link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Community-Boards/Coastal-Burwood-Community-Board-Plan-2017-19.pdf

7.2       The Board’s ongoing decisions are being included as measures against the Outcomes and Priorities contained in the 2017 – 2019 Community Board Plan.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       In response to Council Resolution CNCL/2019/00019 requesting that staff brief the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board on progress on the Southshore South New Brighton Regeneration Strategy prior to reporting to the Council, the Board received a briefing from staff in February. Regenerate Christchurch will be coming to the Board to provide an update on progress on 1 April 2019. 

8.2       The Board received a public forum from representatives of Spencerville Residents’ Association. The Association spoke to their concerns about a proposed subdivision on Spencerville Road, and maintenance work required around the Community centre.

8.3       The Board received correspondence and a deputation from the Christchurch Beautifying Association on the projects and work that the Christchurch Beautifying Association do such as the Street/Garden and Community Pride awards. The Association expressed their commitment to working with the Board in a positive partnership relationship and requested the Board consider holding Garden Pride Awards in the ward in 2019. The current Board, and its predecessor, the Burwood-Pegasus Community Board, made decisions to hold the Community Pride Garden Awards and Community Service awards every two years, alternating between the two.  Normally the Community Pride Garden Award would be held in 2020.

8.4       The Board received responses from Staff to questions raised regarding the Aranui Vacuum Sewer System and asked to be kept updated on the current status of the wastewater capacity constraints faced in the Aranui and Shirley vacuum sewer catchments.

8.5       The Board received an update on road and traffic matters that have recently been raised with and/or considered by the Board. The matters sought to be addressed by the Board were;

•          Heavy vehicles on Breezes Road

•          Dallington Bridge and the Avonside-Gayhurst-Gloucester intersection

•          Road renewal projects in the Coastal and Burwood wards

•          Pedestrian crossings in the Coastal and Burwood ward

Staff extended the scope of the briefing in order to update the Board on the Traffic Operations Team 2019/2020 Minor Works Programme as it relates to aspirational projects in the Coastal and Burwood wards.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Ann Furlong - Support Officer

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Peter Croucher - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

6.        Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/133898

Presenter(s):

Sam MacDonald, Chairperson, Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board report for February 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held meetings on 4 February and 18 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Normans Road Proposed - School Bus Parking and 30 Minute Parking Restriction:  The Board approved the installation of a school bus parking area (from 8am to 9am and 2pm to 4pm, School Days, on Normans Road, near its intersection with Papanui Road and associated parking of vehicle restrictions.

·   Kapuatohe Cottage and Dwelling – Future Use: The Board approved the future use of Kapuatohe Cottage and Kapuatohe Dwelling to be leased out as residential dwellings once restored through funding from the 2018-28 Long Term Plan budgets and delegated to the Manager Property Consultancy the authority to take all necessary steps to negotiate, agree and enter into all necessary documentation on behalf of the Council, as they shall consider necessary or desirable to give effect to the above resolutions.

The Board also requested that consideration be given to the Kapuatohe Cottage and Kapuatohe Dwelling, if tenanted, being open to the public for an agreed period of time, during Heritage Week.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Discretionary Response Fund Applications:  The Board approved grants totalling $16,792 to the Bishopdale Menz shed towards the purchase and installation of a dust extraction system, Fendalton Park Croquet Club towards sewer drainage replacement at Fendalton Park and Burnside Park Rugby Football Club towards relining of the clay sewer line that extends from the Rugby Football Club through to the boundary at Burnside Park.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Youth Development Fund Applications:  The Board approved funding totalling $1,950 to 8 young people to attend events in South Africa, Dallas, Adelaide and Sydney, Auckland and Wellington. 

The Board also approved that $10,000 be transferred from its 2018-19 Discretionary Response Fund to its 2018-19 Youth Development Fund.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no Part A reports being presented to the Council.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Fendalton Library and Service Centre Closure for Repairs

The Fendalton Library and Service Centre will be closed for repairs on Friday 2 March 2019 and is expected to reopen at the end of July 2019.

During the closure the Fendalton Service Centre will operate out of Shop 6, Fendalton Village, 376 Ilam Road. 

A library bus will visit the Fendalton Library Carpark three time as week during the closure period: 

·     Monday               1:30pm-3:30pm

·     Wednesday        9:15am-11:15am

·     Friday                    3.00pm- 5.00pm

 

Full library services are available at Orauwhata:  Bishopdale Library and Community Centre and Papanui Library.

5.2       Jeffreys Reserve Pump Station Suction Tank

During the first two weeks of February a topographical survey was carried out within and around the Jeffreys Pump Station compound. This work was part of the preliminary design phase for the replacement water tank and included potholes and soil and groundwater sampling.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Culture Galore 2019

Despite the forecast to the contrary, the weather stayed fine and dry for the 17th Culture Galore event on Saturday, 23 February 2019 at Ray Blank Park.

Over 6,000 people enjoyed the colourful and vibrant performances, partook of the tasty ethnic cuisine and had fun at the free children's activities.  In addition to the event’s regular performances, this year’s event included five new groups as well as delicious new food vendors.  The park was extremely busy for most of the day with the community enjoying the cultural diversity of our city.

Photo credited to Aaron Campbell

6.2       Community Pride Garden Awards 2019

Judging has been completed for this year’s Community Pride Garden Awards 2019. Over 300 award notification cards and 1,002 “Thank you” cards were given out in the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board area. The number of “Thank you” cards issued this year is over double the number of any other ward area in Christchurch.

To date 232 notification cards have been returned in the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board area.

Certificates and 5 trophies will be presented to recipients at the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Community Pride Garden Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, 27 March 2019 at the Russley Golf Club and Function Centre, 428 Memorial Avenue. 

4 of the trophies were gifted to the Fendalton/Waimairi Community Board by Pat Harrow (former Community Board member and Councillor)

•     South Island Promotion for Retirement Villages, Hotel & Motel Gardens (Commercial)

•     Sweethearts Restaurant Premier Garden (Residential)

•     Berryfields Second Place (Residential)

•     Christchurch Beautifying Association Third Place (Residential)

•     New trophy - Community Board Choice (Residential)

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board’s ongoing decisions are being included as measures against the Outcomes and Priorities contained in the Board’s 2017 -2019 Community Board Plan. 

             The next update will be presented to the Board in April 2019.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Margaret Henderson - Community Board Advisor

Lisa Gregory - Community Recreation Advisor

Bronwyn Frost - Support Officer

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

7.     Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/201822

Presenter(s):

Mike Mora, Chairperson
Matthew Pratt, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board report for February 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held meetings on 13 February 2019 and 26 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·        Approval of intersection controls throughout the Knights Stream Park and Longhurst subdivisions

·        Allocations of 2018-19 Discretionary Response Fund funding to three local organisations

·        Allocation of 2018-19 Youth Development Fund support to a local recipient

·        Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre – Kyle Park - Partial Changes to Reserve Classification and Management Plan – Process

·        Approval of the following road names:

·        Milns Park (RMA/2016/3384) at 53 and 85 Milns Road

·     Whitburn Avenue

·     Collier Drive

·     Kearns Drive

·     Te Repo Drive

·     Lochhead Avenue

·     Allied Road

·     Mabel Crescent

·     Dunning Way

·     Helen Place

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for the Council’s consideration:

4.1       50R Wilmers Road – Transfer of Part of Owaka 2 Reserve to the Crown

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Strengthening Community Fund Projects

The Oak Development Trust, a key organisation in the Riccarton area, are offering a range of new programmes alongside existing activities this term. Programmes include line dancing and fitness for refugees and migrants will feature alongside the Men 2 Cook, weekly Friday English classes, children's multicultural dancing, Older Adults gatherings, bi-monthly Common Ground Café, Mainly Music and Nail Care clinic.

5.2       Other partnerships with the community and organisations

5.2.1   Local Community Governance staff are partnering with the Hornby Community Care Trust to bring a Hornby Community Activator to Hornby.

The Community Activator will be undertaking ‘grassroots’ community development work in the Greater Hornby area, beginning with a stocktake of all the local organisations, sports clubs, groups and facilities. 

Interviews for the role have been completed and it is anticipated that an appointee will commence by mid-March 2019. 

5.3       Community Facilities (updates and future plans)

5.3.1   On 30 January 2019, Historic Places Canterbury Chairman, Mark Gerrard, made a deputation to the Council’s Social, Community Development and Housing Committee regarding the Yaldhurst Memorial Hall.

The Committee heard that the Hall, which at present is not deemed a heritage building, does potentially contain heritage values that could meet the threshold of being scheduled under the District Plan. 

The Committee requested to be provided with information from staff on the Yaldhurst Memorial Hall.

The staff memorandum is to provide a ballpark figure for a potential repair of the Hall and also cover whether any Central Government funding is available to assist with potential repairs.

Additionally, the Council’s Heritage Team is progressing a brief assessment on the heritage values of the Hall.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area     

6.1       Community Pride Garden Awards 2019

Judging for this year’s Community Pride Garden Awards took place from 19 January to 10 February 2019.

The Christchurch Beautifying Association and Board member Debbie Mora selected award-winning gardens taking into account, effort, overall tidiness and impact of the garden on the street.

Certificates will be presented on Monday 18 March 2019 at a Community Board hosted function which is expected to have a larger attendance than similar events held in recent years.

6.2       Community Service and Youth Service Awards 2019 - Nominations

Nominations for Community Service and Youth Service Awards 2019 open on Friday 15 March and close on Friday 12 April 2019.

6.3       Knights Stream School and Wigram School - Openings

Two new schools opened in term one 2019 in the Halswell Ward at Knights Stream School, 1 Killarney Avenue and at Wigram School (formerly Sockburn School) at 5 the Runway in Wigram. 

6.4       Templeton Community – Quarry Submission

Local staff have provided a further submission writing session for the Templeton community in preparation for submitting on the Fulton Hogan resource consent application for the proposed Roydon Quarry. 

The generic sessions have been based on providing advice on how to put together an individual submission. 

Following Fulton Hogan's lodgement of its application in November 2018, Environment Canterbury and Selwyn District Council made a request for further information. 

Fulton Hogan subsequently requested an extension to the 31 January 2019 deadline for information until 28 February 2019 and have since requested to extend the deadline again, with a revised draft clean fill management plan and a visual impact assessment expected by 12 March.

6.5       Riccarton Community - Fitness Opportunities

The Riccarton Community Boot Camp sessions that New Zealand Institute of Sport have been running for the Riccarton community, are being extended in 2019. 

Since 2014, the Institute has been running a free boot camp every Tuesday afternoon.  Starting in February 2019, a new class will be run every second Saturday morning. 

Additionally, Sport Canterbury is running an exercise class for refugee and migrant women at the Riccarton Baptist Church.

6.6       Local Community Events

6.6.1   Culture Galore

The seventeenth Culture Galore event was successfully held at Ray Blank Park on Saturday 23 February 2019 with over 6,000 people attending and participating.

The event had representation from thirty different countries with 23 stage performances and 65 food and information stalls, and lots of activities to entertain those attending. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


6.6.2   Hello Hornby

After the success of last year's event, Hello Hornby was again held at Wycola Park on Saturday 9 March 2019 from 12 to 3pm.

Organised by a local committee which brings together over ten different organisations from the greater Hornby area, the event was expected to attract over 2,000 people and showcase all that Hornby has to offer.

 

6.6.3   Hansons Reserve

A community event, run by the Life Church and La Vida Youth Trust, was successfully held again on Saturday 2 March 2019 at Hansons Reserve for the Upper Riccarton community.

Previously held each year in November/December, the new timing takes advantage of the warm and settled weather.

6.6.4   Connect 2019

Now in its fourth year, Connect 2019 was held on Sunday 10 March 2019 from 4pm to 6pm at Harrington Park.

The community gathering aims to connect new people to the area and welcome them to Riccarton.

With a free BBQ and fun activities, the event provided an opportunity for local people in the community to get to know one another. 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Updates are being presented quarterly (April and September 2018 to date ) to the Board on its Community Plan 2017-19  to measure progress against the Board’s approved outcomes and priorities.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Matthew Pratt - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Peter Dow - Community Board Advisor

Noela Letufuga - Support Officer

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

8.        Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council - February 2019

Reference:

19/173889

Presenter(s):

Sally Buck, Chairperson
Arohanui Grace, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for February2019.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held meetings on 4 and 20 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·    Parking Restrictions in:

·    Peterborough Street.

·    Waltham Road.

·    Ferry Road near Hart Street.

·    Major Hornbrook Road at Muritai Terrace, Mt Pleasant.

·    Mt Pleasant Road.

·    Ocean View Terrace near Awaroa Lane, Sumner.

·    Gloucester Street at Latimer Square

 

·    Cass Street near Durham Street –Loading Zone.

·    Beachville Road, Redcliffs – Accessible Parking

·    The Board approved parking restrictions, and the installation of a bus stop for the Improvements to Woolston Village Centre – WL1 Project.  The Board received a petition that was received during the consultation period requesting that on street carparks are not removed.

·    The Board requested further advice and investigations in regards to the Improvements Woolston Village Centre Project on:

Extending 30kmh speed restriction down St Johns Street from Ferry Road to Glenroy Street.

Increasing the green cycleway surfacing to make the cycleways more visible to motorists.

Larger or additional signage to highlight the off street parking in the Woolston Village, behind the shops and adjacent to the Woolston Library.

The phasing of the signalised pedestrian crossing in Woolston Village to lessen the wait time for pedestrians.

Confirm the provision for an EV charger within the Woolston Library rebuild project.

·    The Board approved parking restrictions, the disestablishment of a bus stop and pedestrian crossings for the Redcliffs Transport Project - Redcliffs School Transport Safety Requirements.

·    The Board approved a licence to occupy for a National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited (NIWA) Electronic Weather Station at Te Huingi Manu Wildife Refuge.

·    The Board approved the attendance of interest Board members to attend 2019 Community Boards Conference in New Plymouth.

·    The Board approved Discretionary Response Funding for rock band equipment, advocacy services, setting up a residents’ and business association and garden seating.

·    The Board approved Youth Development Funding for youth to participate in the Tenzing Hillary Cup, New Zealand Secondary Schools Volleyball Tournament, 2019 Vantage Age Group Track National Championships, New Zealand Deaf Rugby Football Union, and the Rotary Young Leaders Award North America.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Improvements to Woolston Village Centre – WL1.

4.2       Redcliffs Transport Project - Redcliffs School Transport Safety Requirements.

4.3       Gloucester/Worcester Street Park – Proposed Name and Landscape Plan.

4.4       Cambridge Green Pou Artwork Future Treatment Options Report.

4.5       Curries Road/Tanner Street – Intersection Improvements.

The Board’s recommendation for staff to provide as part of their advice to the Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee and the Council on the review of the Lime scooter trial, whether or not a fee could be charged to all hire mobility providers who use the public realm under permit, with the revenue being used for footpath repairs and maintenance was considered by the Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee at its meeting on 13 February 2019.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Brougham Street/Moorhouse Avenue

5.1       Staff from the NZ Transport Agency, Christchurch City Council and Beca are working together to develop a 30 year strategy, with the aim of making it easier and safer to get around one of Christchurch’s busiest areas.  Feedback from the first round of community engagement is currently being analysed.  A workshop is to be held on 27 February 2019.

The purpose of the workshop is:

·     To outline the list of possible treatments (individual measures and specific interventions) for the Brougham-Moorhouse Single Stage Business Case

·     To discuss the possible options, based on key themes e.g. a package of treatments that give priority to north south movements

·     The information required and assumptions to be made in defining each option e.g. evidence required to assess the treatments/ options.

5.2       The Community Board attended a combined briefing with the Papanui Innes Community Board around matter relating to the Downstream Effects Management Plan Briefing the


 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum

6.1       Ms Nicola Wilkie addressed the Board regarding a proposal to consider a rates reduction for property owners who have grey water disposal systems on their properties.  Nicola made separate presentation to the Board’s 20 February meeting on her views on waste minimisation and reduction for residents to receive a rates reduction.

6.2       Mr Evan Chadwick and Ms Lesley Willougby addressed the Board regarding Wyon Street being used as a shortcut by motorists and excessive speeding.  Mr Chadwick and Ms Willoughy understood that Wyon Street was due to be renewed pre Canterbury Earthquakes and the street has still not been renewed.

6.3       Tayla Reece, Linwood Youth Festival Experience (LYFE), with two Linwood College Students updated the Board on their upcoming event to be held on Saturday 9 March 2019, 12-4pm. 

6.4       It is the season for community events and a number have been held in the Community Board area in the past month including:

·    Garden Party at Edmonds Factory Garden, 17 February

·    Bromley Community Fair at the Bromley Community Centre 23 February

·    Estuary Fest 2019, at McCormacks Bay Reserve, 23 February

·    Roimata Community Fun Day at Radley Park, Saturday 2 MarchFree entry

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Te Oranga Waikura, the urban forest and water retention basin on Ferry Road, is the focus for a current place-making and nature play project.  Council staff are co-ordinating professional development workshops for local schools, early childhood centres, after school and holiday programme providers on 29th and 30th March to guide their use of the space. Plans are also underway to set up another ‘pop-up nature play space’ similar to the ones carried out in Parks Week in 2018.

7.2       LYFE (Linwood Youth Festival Experience) is celebrating 21 years of LYFE on 9 March at Linwood Park from 12 noon to 4pm.  It brings together a diverse mix of performance, have a go activities, clubs and organisations that youth are involved with and can benefit from.  It also strengthens links between organisations supporting positive youth development in greater Linwood. A crew of local youth aged 12 to 18 years have been working alongside an experienced event manager/ youth development worker to bring LYFE to life. Many hours have been spent developing event management skills, making friends and creating an event for youth and the wider community.  LYFE is managed by the LYFE Advisory Group which is made up of local youth and community focused organisations including Bromley Community Centre, Woolston Development Project, Strengthening Linwood Youth Trust, 4YP and Sport Canterbury with support from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Governance staff.  

7.3       The Inaugural Linwood Central Heathcote Community Board Edible Garden Awards 2019 ceremony is to be held on Thursday 7 March 2019.  The gardens were assessed on the week of 18 February 2019 by selected members of the Horticultural Society and a Board member.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

Bromley Odour

8.1       The Community Board will hold a seminar with Environment Canterbury and Council staff to receive the results of the Bromley Odour Survey.

 

Community meeting around city fringe planning and development issues

8.2       Over past months community and residents groups representing the areas immediately outside and bordering the four avenues have raised planning and development issues that they feel have both immediate and long term implications for the amenity, neighbourhood, residential and development values in their area. The groups feel these issues need to be addressed to preserve the values they associate with living close to the inner city in areas that are still essentially residential areas. 

Some of the groups involved have formed the Inner City Action Network (ICAN) to pursue these issues on a collective basis.  Council staff have met with ICAN representatives and agreed a first step in the form of a Community Board and community workshop on 20 March 2019, to ensure that all those involved have a common understand of the legal and planning issues involved and have a common understanding of the issues from the residents perspectives.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

Liz Beaven - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

9.     Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/205760

Presenter(s):

Ali Jones, Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for February 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board held meetings on 8 and 22 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board laid the Palms Suburban Interchange Upgrade – Stage 1 – Shirley Road Bus Stop and Shelter Upgrade on the table at its meeting on 8 February subject to staff reporting on the removal of the cabbage tree located behind the existing bus shelter, moving the proposed bus shelter back towards the Shirley Intermediate School boundary by 500mm, consulting with Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) regarding the right turn from Shirley Road into KFC and the pinch points/congestion issues on Shirley Road should the right turn be retained.

The Board laid the report on the table again at its meeting on 22 February and requested that staff:

a)     Advise the Board on the implications of removing the right hand turn into KFC as far as traffic flow and ‘pinch points’ are concerned and provide a comparison with the proposed mitigation measures.

b)     Investigate leasing land behind the proposed bus shelter, as far west as the Totara tree, from the Ministry of Education, to accommodate the suggestion of moving the bus shelter back by 500 millimetres

c)     Advise the Board around the process regarding changes to the proposal as per a) above and whether there is a need to re-consult.

·   Approval of the following grants:

·   $2,500 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund towards the “Celebrate St Albans Park” opening on Sunday 31 March 2019.

·   $600 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to the Richmond Residents’ and Business Association towards administration costs.

·   $200 from its 2018/19 Positive Youth Development Fund to Owen Dabkowski towards the costs of representing Canterbury at the U16 National Baseball Tournament in Auckland.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A recommendations from the Board for Council consideration.

5.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Community Facilities

5.1       Neighbourhood Links (formerly Redwood Plunket Rooms) 

Following the exterior painting the interior fit out is now occurring prior to the scheduled opening on Wednesday 27 February 2019.

Staff are currently working with local community organisations around the future community development aspirations for the area which will include the Plunket rooms.

5.2       10 Shirley Road      

The park is in a tidy condition, the grass that was re-sown after Downers vacated is now growing and a regular mowing schedule has been implemented. The Parks Team are aiming to place a picnic table on the site.

Events

5.3       Belfast Community Network (BCN) – A Slice of Summer

A final successful community event was held on Saturday 2 February from 1pm.  The event was hosted by the Belfast Community Network and supported by Christchurch City Council.

Approximately 450 people attended throughout the afternoon.  All activities were very popular and families enjoyed the opportunity to connect while children had fun.  Once again the Skate Jam was the highlight and over seventy children received skate instruction (refer following photo).

5.4       Pool Party     

Although a slightly colder night, local youth braved the cooler temperatures to enjoy the Jellie Park Disco Pool Party on Friday 15 February.  Great music, awesome dance moves and a fantastic bomb competition helped warm everyone up.

The event was supported by the local youth agencies Te Ora Hou, PYDT and Northcity. 

                   

Approximately 110 high school age young people attended.

5.5       Neighbourhood Links Centre Opening

The Neighbourhood Links Centre opening held on Wednesday 27 February 2019 saw the official transformation of the old Redwood Plunket Rooms into a new community-led hub.

The Papanui-Innes Community Board is delighted to support the new initiative and Councillor Mike Davidson (Master of Ceremonies) spoke about the role of the Community Board and Council in funding the repairs to the building.  The Deputy Chair, Emma Norrish, delivered a short speech about the history of the building and the number of individuals and non-government organisations (NGOs) that have been involved in the Northcote Project which led to the activation of the building.

  

Joss Buttriss, the original Northcote Project coordinator, spoke about the development of the delivery of community focused responses within the Northcote Redwood area and introduced the two local volunteers, Angie Durey and Charlotte Clark, who will now work from the new centre and continue to build on the work already well started.

Approximately 30 guests witnessed Te Ora Hou’s kaumatua, Mr H, formally bless the building, the reading of a blessing contributed by the Reverend Joanne Latham from St Silas Church and the cutting of the cake by Mike, Emma, Joss, Angie and Charlotte (above right).

  

The Papanui-Innes Community Board expressed their thanks to Geoff Edwards of Resene Paints NZ and Peter Dalman of Finesse Painting and Landscaping for their kind donations of products and time to help refurbish the building.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

10.   Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/200028

Presenter(s):

Karolin Potter, Community Board Chairperson
Melanie Coker, Community Board Deputy Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board report for February 2019.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held meetings on 5 and 15 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

5 February 2019

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Grove Road

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Hazeldean Road

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Major Aitken Drive

·    Revoking the existing parking restriction in parts of Hoon Hay Road

·    Approving that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes on school days from 8:15 to 9:15am and from 2:30 to 3:30 pm, in parts of Hoon Hay Road

·    Revoking the existing parking restrictions in parts of Spencer Street

·    Approving that a marked bus stop be installed in parts of Spencer Street

·    Approving that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes on school days from 8:15 to 9:15 and from 14:30 to 15:30, in parts of Spencer Street

·    Approving that the parking of vehicles be prohibited at any time on school days from 8:15 to 9:15 am and from 2:30 to 3:30 pm, in parts of Spencer Street

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Spencer Street

·    Revoking the existing parking restriction in the parts of Spencer Street and approving that a Residents Parking Area, restricted to the parking of authorised residents vehicles only displaying the appropriate permit be installed.

·    Revoking the existing parking restriction in parts of Poulson Street

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Poulson Street

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Cashmere Road

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time in parts of Hillsborough Terrace

·    Approving that all current parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Kenmure Drive from 45 metres southeast of its intersection with Major Aitken Drive south easterly for 26 metres be revoked.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the northeast side of Kenmure Drive from 45 metres southeast of its intersection with Major Aitken Drive south easterly direction for eight metres.

·    Approving that a marked bus stop be installed on the northeast side of Kenmure Drive 53 metres southeast of its intersection with Major Aitken Drive south easterly for 14 metres.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the northeast side of Kenmure Drive from 67 metres southeast of its intersection with Major Aitken Drive south easterly for four metres

·    Declining to make a grant from its 2018/19 Youth Achievement and Development Fund to Tessa May Cockerton-Holmes towards the Summer Course of the English National Ballet School in London.

·    Declining to make a grant from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to West Spreydon School towards the School Hangi 2019.

·    Approving a grant of $500 from its 2018/19 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Haydn Llewellyn Armstrong Boul towards participation in the New Zealand Under 18 Ice Hockey World Championship Tournament 2019 in Bulgaria, 14 to 31 March 2019.

15 February 2019

·    Adopting the revised criteria and approval process for the Spreydon-Cashmere “Off The Ground “ Fund

·    Adopting the revised criteria and approval process for Neighbourhood Week/Let’s Get Together this Summer Funding

·    Adopting the revised criteria for the Spreydon-Cashmere Youth Development and Achievement Fund

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A recommendations from the Board to the Council in February 2019.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area                          

5.1       Barrington Mall entrance/exit improvements

The Barrington Mall entrance/exit on to Barrington Street is an interface between motor vehicles turning both right and left into and out from the mall carpark, vehicles and cyclists travelling along Barrington Street and pedestrians accessing the mall, the adjacent Spreydon Library, bus stops and local shops. There have for some time been concerns about the safety of the entrance/exits and the local residents association, the Spreydon Neighbourhood Network advocated for changes to the configuration of the entrance. A proposal that will remove the right turn out of the carpark together with a number of other safety improvements was developed by staff working with the mall owners and management and residents and approved by the Board and the Council late last year.

The Barrington Mall entrance/exit improvements project has now gone through the detailed design stage and is currently being safety audited.  A preferred contractor has been identified and staff are working through cost share arrangements with Barrington Mall management. Construction is programmed to start early April 2019 and expected to take 4-5 weeks.

 

5.2       Cashmere, Worsleys and Hoon Hay Roads intersection

The Board is aware of the increase in traffic using the Cashmere/Hoon Hay/Worsleys Roads intersection and has advocated for improvements to be made to the intersection.  Construction of the Cashmere/Hoon Hay/Worsleys intersection improvement originally proposed for the 2018/19 financial year was delayed and scheduled to commence in 2019. The Board is pleased to note that the recently released draft Annual Plan maintains funding for the improvements to be made in the 2019/20 financial year.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

   6.1       LJ and Friends Bike workshop.

The Board recently received a presentation on a youth-run community bike workshop providing services in Spreydon, LJ and Friends.  The initiative got underway in August 2017 and now runs workshops on the corner of Cobham and Lyttelton Streets on Sundays 1 -4pm. At the workshops young trainee bike mechanics dismantle and repair donated bicycles, provide tools to community members so that they can repair their own bicycles, and assist with or undertake repairs on site.  The presenters explained that the initiative has a vision of training young people in skills, attitude and personal growth and operates in an environment that is fun, relational, developmental, proximal and safe.

 

 

  

 

6.2       West Spreydon School Community Pool.

West Spreydon Community and School Pool first opened in 1935.  This was the result of four years of fund raising by a Baths Committee made up of members from the local community with support from local businesses.  The pool was well used for over 82 years by not only the school but also the wider community.  Like many school pools across the country the West Spreydon Community and School Pool was closed in 2007.   

In 2009 the School Board of Trustees responded to voices within the community and carried out feasibility and strategic planning to re-establish a pool.  A pool committee was set up to work towards re-opening the pool which required upgrading and funding.  A hugely successful two year funding campaign was held and resulted in the pool being re- opened on the 17th February 2011.  Four days later the 22nd February 2011 earthquake struck and extensively damaged pool necessitating its closure. 

Over the next six years the pool committee undertook further fundraising to repair the pool again.  Repairs were carried out in stages with the Board making a grant towards the repair.

It was proposed that the pool would operate a key system allowing local families to purchase a key at a small charge so that they could access and use the pool outside school hours and during the weekend.  On 24 November 2017 the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board granted $1,980 towards sponsoring 22 families to receive pool keys to access the pool over the 2018/19 summer months.

Induction sessions were held on 4 November, 5 November and the 3 December with all families attending.  Recipient families were identified by Hoon Hay School, Rowley Avenue School, West Spreydon School, Our Lady of Assumption School and Addington School. 

The Pool re- opened January 2018.The pool keys were split evenly between the schools and a number of larger families have benefited with access to free swimming over the summer months.

 

6.3       Somerfield Park Sports Pavilion Community Mural Event

The Somerfield Residents Association was granted Neighbourhood Week funding last year for a novel event. On Sunday 2nd December 2018 Somerfield residents and friends and supporters came together to paint a mural on the wall of the Sports Pavilion at Somerfield Park and to share a Sausage Sizzle. The Association gathered a collection of designs from Somerfield School Students (aged 6/7 years) and held a People’s Choice competition / engagement at South Christchurch Library.

Despite the very wet weather there was a good turnout and it was a very successful and enjoyable day. The Pavilion wall was transformed into an amazing bright and colourful mural which helped represent the designs of the Somerfield School Students. Although not completed on the day the mural was progressed following this event through the efforts of a project team and was completed by the end of 2018.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Staff continue to work on the priority actions identified at the last Board workshop on the Community Board Plan and provide the Board with regular updates on progress.

7.2       Age-friendly Spreydon-Cashmere.

The Community Board Plan recognises that the development of an Age Friendly Spreydon-Cashmere Action Plan would contribute to a strong community one of the outcomes identified in the Plan.

An Age-friendly Spreydon-Cashmere Steering Group was formed on 21 August 2018 and has met regularly since. At its meeting on 21 February 2019 the agreed to provide a report to the Board and seek an opportunity to meet informally to discuss progress towards an Age Friendly Spreydon-Cashmere Action Plan and the relationship between the Steering Group and the Board going forward.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Give Gear Get Great

The Give Gear Get Great sports recycling initiative has been running in the Spreydon-Cashmere area for over two years.  The project consists of branded recycling bins being located in libraries, schools and sports stadiums where people can drop off any unwanted or outgrown sports items for recycling into the community.  The bins are regularly emptied and the equipment stored to be given out at local community events. At the Hoon Hay Fiesta in November 2018 all of the sports equipment collected over the previous year was given out into the community.  Items that are particularly popular with young people are sports shoes that have been outgrown rather than outworn.

The initiative also helps schools that identify students who may need equipment throughout the year.  At the end of the school year all recycling bins were collected with a view to targeting additional schools in the new school year.

 

8.2       Spreydon-Cashmere Board Funds Criteria Revision

The Board held a workshop with local staff in December 2018 to review and update the criteria and eligibility that apply to a number of its funds: “Off the Ground” Fund;” “Let's Get Together Next Summer/Neighbourhood Week”; and the “Youth Achievement and Development Scheme”.

The “Off the Ground Fund” was established after the 2011 earthquake to provide the community with access, on a quick turn- around consideration process, to small grants as one-off funding for community volunteer projects with an earthquake recovery focus. The Board accepted the value of extending this fund to community benefit projects beyond those related to disaster recovery. Retaining the “one-off” criteria was favoured. The emphasis of this fund being available for projects creating “a moment of joy” was reiterated.

It was noted that “Neighbourhood Week” /”Let’s Get Together this Summer” funding attracts a proportionately high number of applicants in Spreydon-Cashmere, The workshop identified, however, that a return to a shorter event period could be more likely capture the spirit of the project and less likely to result in applications for already existing or otherwise planned events such as carol singing or Halloween, Guy Fawkes celebrations or their alternatives. This may be reconsidered in the future.

It was agreed that Spreydon- Cashmere Youth Achievement and Development Scheme grants must be applied for by individuals, and that the criteria to demonstrate achievement includes not just reaching exemplary levels of recognition but also the degree of individual effort, talent, and growth reached from any starting point including challenging circumstances. It was clarified that applicants need to reside wholly or principally in the Spreydon- Cashmere Board area to be eligible for a grant.

The revised criteria was approved by the Board at its meeting on 15 February 2019.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

11.    Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/192522

Presenter(s):

Pam Richardson, Community Board Chairperson
Joan Blatchford, Community Governance Manager
Penelope Goldstone, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for February 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Banks Peninsula Community Board held a meeting on 4 February 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Petition – Lease for Dark Star Café

Martin Richardson presented a petition regarding the lease for the Dark Star Café in Diamond Harbour seeking the community’s support to demand that the Council allow the café building lease to remain in place until such time as new services are built on the Godley House site, so that new owners could continue to serve the community, visitors and tourists after the current lessees endeavour to sell the business in March 2019.

Richard Suggate, resident of Diamond Harbour, spoke to the Board in support of retaining the Dark Star Café. He said the community wants to see a permanent long-term café on the Godley House site and asked that the Board and Council expedite a review of the future use of the site.

The Board noted that the lessees had been offered an extension of their current lease through to June 2021 (under the provisions of the Canterbury Earthquake Order), but had not as yet taken up that offer. 

 

The Board also noted community support for a commercial operation on the Godley House site and questioned whether there was a legislative method that could allow a lease to continue on the site, until its future had been decided through a community engagement and consultation process.  The Board noted the need for some urgency around that process due to the commercial imperatives referred to in the petition.

The Board resolved to receive the petition and refer it to Property Consultancy staff for urgent consideration.

·   Submission to Ministry of Transport on Prevention of Pollution from Ships

The Board resolved to make a submission to the Ministry of Transport on New Zealand’s potential accession to the International Maritime Organisation Treaty – Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships 1973.

The Board recommended that New Zealand sign the Treaty as this would improve air quality around our ports and harbours, demonstrate New Zealand’s commitment to a green, healthy environment and align with international best practice.

·   Pedestrian Improvements – Godley Quay/Voelas Road, Lyttelton

The Board expressed a wish to find a balance for the parking and stopping restrictions in this area that would focus on improved pedestrian safety, whilst still leaving as many as possible on-street parking spaces available.

The Board resolved to leave the report to lie on the table and ask staff to:

·    Bring the report back to the Board with more detail on the no stopping provisions for Option 2;

·    Circulate the Safety Audits on the proposal to the Board;

·    Arrange a site visit to the area for Board members to gain a better understanding of the site aspects.

·   Additional Parking Space – Oxford Street, Lyttelton

The Board approved an additional parking space on Oxford Street in Lyttelton to make it easier for residents to find parking.

·   Parking Controls – London Street, Lyttelton

The Board approved parking restrictions on the north side of London Street in Lyttelton town centre in response to requests from businesses whose customers found it difficult to find a park. The Board also asked staff to look at parking on London Street between Coleridge Terrace and Dublin Street to maximise parking in the area.

·   Reserve Management Committees

The Board received the minutes from the Robinsons Bay Reserve Management Committee meeting on 15 January 2019.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Lyttelton Seafarers Welfare

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of Lyttelton Seafarers Welfare will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 14 March 2019.

4.2       Sumner Road Realignment

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of the Sumner Road Realignment will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 14 March 2019.

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Lyttelton Design Review Panel

The Lyttelton Design Review Panel, an advisory body of the Banks Peninsula Community Board, provides free, local and independent design advice for developers, property owners and the Council to promote and assist quality design outcomes that embody and contribute to Lyttelton’s built character.

In the last year the Panel has provided design advice on two commercial, two residential, two mixed use and one public development, the Lyttelton Museum. More information is available at https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/urbandesign/lyttelton-design-review-panel/

 

5.2       Banks Peninsula Gateway Signs

The Board provided feedback on proposals for updating and improving a selection of Banks Peninsula’s gateway signs. The Board supported staff making minor changes to the signs regarding freedom camping, and requested that staff seek feedback from stakeholders on the purpose of the signs to inform a broader review and report back to the Board.

5.3       Banks Peninsula Toilets and Buildings

The Board provided feedback on the long term programme for toilet and building renewals on Banks Peninsula. Staff will report back to the Board with additional information regarding toilets and planned capital work on the HMNZS Steadfast building in Cass Bay.

5.4       Britomart Memorial Reserve

The Board provided feedback on the draft landscape plan for Britomart Memorial Reserve in Akaroa prior to public consultation.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Little River Big Ideas

Staff provided the Board with a progress update on implementation of Little River Big Ideas, a community-led village plan, including:

·    Drainage – Planning for drainage work is underway, and staff will facilitate community input as the project proceeds;

·    Tennis Courts – Staff are facilitating communication and input between the Project Manager and the community;

·    Fitness Equipment – Funding has been allocated for fitness equipment following the Board and community’s advocacy.

6.2       Orion New Zealand Limited - Proposed Electricity Upgrade - Lyttelton Tunnel

The Board received a briefing from Orion New Zealand staff on the proposed upgrade of the electricity line through the Lyttelton Road Tunnel.        

6.3       Akaroa Cemeteries

Board members noted the work of the recently formed cemeteries group whose members were carrying out maintenance and restoration work in the local cemeteries.  Questions were raised as to why the group had been requested by Council staff to stop working in the cemeteries.

The Board requested that an explanation be provided by staff as to why the group had been requested to stop work.

6.4       Commercial Operation in Residential Zone – Rue Balguerie, Akaroa

It was reported that a commercial business operating in Rue Balguerie, Akaroa, was creating issues in the local vicinity including parking of buses and the general lack of available parking.  The lack of a formed footpath in the area was also noted as a concern.

The Board requested information from staff on whether a commercial business has to have consent to operate in a residential zone, and what conditions are put on such consents.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Community Board Plan – Progress Update to 31 December 2018 is attached.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Okains Bay

The Board was provided with a progress update on various activities in Okains Bay, including:

·    Okains Bay Enhancement Society – Since the Mayor and Councillors visited Okains Bay in August 2018 significant progress has taken place. For example staff facilitated the Society’s identification of priority projects and provided advice on funding opportunities;

·    Okains Bay Maori and Colonial Museum – Staff have been working closely with the Museum on funding opportunities.

8.2       Lyttelton Community Visioning

Over the last year, members of local Lyttelton groups and organisations have been meeting to discuss a community vision for the town.

In early-2019 a group met to discuss a “narrative statement,” which is the culmination of these discussions. Those present agreed that it captured the multi-faceted themes of Lyttelton and then moved to discuss actions. The next meeting will discuss actions in more detail.

Lyttelton: the Heart of the Harbour

Where you can explore from the Port to the peaks

Where you can be inspired by the sights and the sounds of artists and makers

Where you can uncover a unique heritage and learn from the past

Where you can feel the pulse of the Port, and the drift and grit of the sea and the shore

Where you can connect with the earth and connect with the people

Where you can plant a seed of hope and grow a future

Where you can find a welcome home

 

8.3       Corsair Bay Maintenance

Diana Harrison spoke to the Board regarding her view of parks maintenance issues in Corsair Bay. She noted that rubbish is a concern around the bay especially broken glass left behind by groups of people drinking in the area.  Ms Harrison tabled photographs she had taken which she believed showed the area in a poorly maintained state.  She asked that the Council be made aware of the problems and that a maintenance plan be implemented for the Lyttelton West area.

The Board noted that Ms Harrison had previously attended Board meetings to raise the same issues and that the lack of maintenance in parks appeared to be an ongoing problem in Corsair Bay.

The Board resolved to:

·    Refer the issues raised about the ongoing lack of maintenance in Corsair Bay, to staff for investigation and report back to the Board outlining what can be done to address these issues.

·    Ask Parks staff to provide a briefing on the current maintenance for Corsair Bay.

·    Seek clarification on the policy around consuming alcohol in the Corsair Bay area, and information on whether an alcohol ban can be introduced.

Parks staff have provided the following advice.

Efforts have been made to ensure Corsair Bay is up to an expected standard during the busiest time of the year. Areas are in process of changing from informal (meaning five cuts per annum) to amenity (meaning up to 26 cuts per annum). This includes the terraced area with two picnic tables (see below image).

A damaged drinking fountain, which had been an ongoing issue, has now been repaired (see below image).

A long term (approximately eight years) leak issue below the retaining wall on the beach has now been successfully resolved and remediation of the turfed area is now underway (see below images).

In general Corsair Bay is now in a much improved state with all facilities able to be used by the public (see below image).

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Board Plan - Progress Report as at 31 December 2018

48

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Approved By

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

Report from Coastal-Burwood Community Board  – 18 February 2019

 

12.    Travis Road & Bower Avenue 40km/hr Variable Speed Limit (School Speed Zone) and Frosts Road Permanent Speed Limit Change

Reference:

19/178555

Presenter(s):

Wayne Gallot, Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

 

1.  Coastal-Burwood Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits on Travis Road, Bower Avenue and Frosts Road be revoked and set as indicated in the drawing TG133450 as attached to the agenda for this meeting and listed below in Clauses 1a – 1d including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps;

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Frosts Road, commencing at its intersection with Travis Road and extending in a northerly direction to a point 100  metres south of Beach Road.

b.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Frosts Road, commencing at its intersection with Travis Road and extending in a northerly direction to a point 100  metres south of Beach Road, be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

c.         Approve that a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) be set on Travis Road, commencing at a point 110 metres east of Frosts Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 600 metres, as it meets the requirements of the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

d.         Approve that a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) be set on Bower Avenue, commencing at a point 100 metres north of Travis Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 385 metres, as it meets the requirements of the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve the speed limit changes listed in Clauses 1a – 1d above come into force following the date of Council approval, installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure (as indicated in drawing TG133450), and the required notice being provided to NZTA and NZ Police in accordance with Section 2.7(6) of Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

Linda Stewart/Tim Sintes                                                                                                                                           Carried

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Travis Road & Bower Avenue 40km/hr Variable Speed Limit (School Speed Zone) and Frosts Road Permanent Speed Limit Change

69

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Travis Rd - Bower Ave School Speed Zone and Frosts Rd Speed Limit Change Plan (tg133450)

76

b

Travis Rd - Bower Ave School Speed Zone and Frosts Rd Speed Limit Change Submissions Table (PUBLIC)

77

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Travis Road & Bower Avenue 40km/hr Variable Speed Limit (School Speed Zone) and Frosts Road Permanent Speed Limit Change

Reference:

19/88882

Presenter(s):

Wayne Gallot (Traffic Engineer) & Tessa Zant (Senior Engagement Advisor)

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Coastal-Burwood Community Board to endorse the installation of two new 40 km/h variable speed limit (school speed zone) on Travis Road and Bower Avenue, and the setting of a permanent 50 km/h speed limit on Frosts Road.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to formal requests received from Avonside Girls High School (AGHS) and Shirley Boys High School (SBHS) to have the school speed zones installed on Travis Road and Bower Avenue. The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road is also in response to requests from AGHS, SBHS and community Police.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits on Travis Road, Bower Avenue and Frosts Road be revoked and set as identified in Attachment A (HPRM 19/95764) and listed below in Clauses 1a – 1d including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps;

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on Frosts Road, commencing at its intersection with Travis Road and extending in a northerly direction to a point 100  metres south of Beach Road.

b.         Approve that the permanent speed limit on Frosts Road, commencing at its intersection with Travis Road and extending in a northerly direction to a point 100  metres south of Beach Road, be set at 50 kilometres per hour.

c.         Approve that a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) be set on Travis Road, commencing at a point 110 metres east of Frosts Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 600 metres, as it meets the requirements of the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

d.         Approve that a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit (school speed zone) be set on Bower Avenue, commencing at a point 100 metres north of Travis Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 385 metres, as it meets the requirements of the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve the speed limit changes listed in Clauses 1a – 1d above come into force following the date of Council approval, installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure (as indicated in Attachment A), and the required notice being provided to NZTA and NZ Police in accordance with Section 2.7(6) of Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report does not support any specific levels of service identified in the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028).

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Establish 40 km/h variable speed limits (school speed zones) on Travis Road and Bower Avenue, and reduce the permanent speed limit to 50 km/h on Frosts Road in accordance with Attachment A (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road will help to reduce operational speeds, and therefore improve safety.

·     The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road will support the safe operation of a new signalised pedestrian crossing proposed by NZTA.

·     The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road provides increased consistency with existing speed limits on Travis Road, Beach Road and Mairehau Road, and therefore helps to improve credibility of speed limits locally and nationally.

·     The proposed 40 km/h variable speed limit (school speed zones) on Travis Road and Bower Avenue will reduce operational speeds on these roads, and therefore improve safety, during peak school travel times.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increased amount of signage on Travis Road and Bower Avenue, as well as side roads, within the proposed school speed zones.

 

5.   Context/Background

Context

5.1       New school facilities are currently being built for Avonside Girls High School (AGHS) and Shirley Boys High School (SBHS) on land that was formally part of QE II Park. The new schools will become operational at the beginning of the second term of this year (29 April 2019).

5.2       The new schools have direct frontage to both Travis Road and Bower Avenue. Increased numbers of all road users (including vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians) associated with the new schools are anticipated on Travis Road, Bower Avenue and Frosts Road.

Background

5.3       During the consenting processes to establish the new schools on the QE II Park site, Council staff worked closely with external agencies including the Ministry of Education (MoE) and the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) to identify and consider transport infrastructure changes that would be necessary to support development of the schools whilst minimising impacts on transport level of service. Part of that process, and Council staff participation, included an NZTA-led “Safer Journeys to School” working group.

5.4       In addition to a number of road layout improvements for Travis Road and Bower Avenue that were identified through that process (and have now largely been completed), Council committed to consider the installation of a school speed zone on Travis Road that was to be fully funded by MoE. To that end, MoE has provided Council a financial contribution of $55,000 to cover the costs of a school speed zone on Travis Road.

5.5       In response to concerns raised about pedestrian safety crossing Frosts Road, Council staff have been working with NZTA to develop an NZTA proposal for a signalised pedestrian crossing north of the Anzac-Frosts-Travis roundabout. That project is being funded and progressed by NZTA, separate to this Council proposal for the school speed zones and the Frosts Road speed limit change.

5.6       Council also has an ongoing commitment to improve road safety. Reducing excessive vehicle speeds, where appropriate, outside schools during peak arrival and departure periods improves safety for children. Council has a programme of installing 40 km/h variable speed limits (school speed zones) outside schools according to a prioritisation process. This process, including the methodology behind it, was endorsed on 25 August 2011 by the Council as the most appropriate method of improving road safety outside certain schools, where no other traffic control devices are practical or feasible.

5.7       Council staff have continued a close working relationship with AGHS and SBHS following the consenting process, to identify and consider various transport safety and travel planning matters. Local community Police have also been involved in that process, which led to formal requests being received by Council for the installation of school speed zones on Travis Road and Bower Avenue as well as a request to consider a reduced speed limit on Frosts Road.

5.8       Prior to finalising the current proposal, technical advice and preliminary feedback was obtained from NZTA (in their regulatory capacity). The current proposal, including the school speed zone sign locations and also the reduced speed limit on Frosts Road, is supported by NZTA.


 

6.   Option 1 - Establish 40 km/h variable speed limits (school speed zones) on Travis Road and Bower Avenue, and reduce the permanent speed limit to 50 km/h on Frosts Road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install the 40 km/h variable speed limits (school speed zones) on Travis Road and Bower Avenue, and reduce the permanent speed limit on Frosts Road to 50 km/h, as shown in Attachment A.

6.2       Electronic signs are proposed to be installed at the start of each zone on the north side of Travis Road to the east of Frosts Road, on the south side of Travis Road to the west of Bower Avenue, on the west side of Bower Avenue to the north of Travis Road and on the east side of Bower Avenue to the north of Marriotts Road. Signs installed on the opposite side of the road, will advise road users that they are exiting the school speed zone. Signs identifying the start and end of the school speed zones will be installed on all side roads (Atlantis Street, Blue Gum Place, Wattle Drive, Saltaire Street, Marriotts Road and Ascot Avenue). Appropriate warning ‘children’ and ‘school’ signs will also be installed as required in accordance with legislative requirements and national guidelines. Localised footpath widening is proposed outside No.219/221 Bower Avenue to ensure that an adequate footpath width is maintained past the proposed electronic school speed zone sign in this location.

6.3       As required by the conditions listed in the New Zealand Gazette (see the Legal Implications Section below), the school speed zones will operate on school days for no more than 35 minutes in the morning, and 20 minutes in the afternoon.  The proposed operating times will be aligned to the schools’ start and end times, once these are confirmed.

6.4       Existing signage on Frosts Road associated with the current 70 km/h speed limit will be removed, or possibly relabelled and repositioned to act as repeater (reminder) 50 km/h speed limit signage. Additional infrastructure (eg signage and markings) to support the reduced speed limit may be considered in future once the schools become operational.

Significance

6.5       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with Section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.6       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.7       AGHS and SBHS communities and local residents are specifically affected by this option due to the improved safety provide by changes to the speed limits on neighbouring roads.

6.8       Consultation on the proposal ran from 20 December 2018 to 28 January 2019.

6.9       An email notification was sent to key and local stakeholders, residents of the affected roads were door knocked, and absentee owners were sent a letter. A message also went out in the QEII newsletter which has a reach of approx. 700.

Consultation Feedback

6.10    In total 47 submissions were received and most were in support. See Attachment B (19/101657) for a list of all submissions.

6.11    Of the 38 comments about the school speed zone, 35 were in support, one wanted a smaller zone, one was not in support and one was about an out of scope matter.

6.11.1          Of those in support of the School Speed Zone 15 wanted additional restrictions, such as a lower speed, permanent speed change, and extension of the School Speed Zone.

6.12    Of the 42 comments about the speed reduction on Frosts Road, 27 were in support, 13 were not in support and two commented about an out of scope matter.

6.12.1 Those opposed to the proposal mentioned the lack of driveways, wide cycleway / footpath, existing crossing points and pupils using other routes, as reasons to maintain the current 70kmph speed limit.

6.13    Feedback was received on a range of out of scope issues, including the intersection of Frosts and Travis Road and parking generated by the schools. A new crossing on Frosts road should address some of these concerns and parking around the schools will be monitored once they are operational.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.14    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.15    Cost of Implementation – approximately $80,000.

6.16    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.17    Funding source – allocated funding in the 2018/2019 Traffic Operations capital expenditure budget (including the $55,000 financial contribution received from MoE).

Legal Implications

6.18    Implementation of variable speed limit school speed zones, including installation of any associated signs and/or markings, must comply with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) and NZTA Traffic Note 37 revision 2 (May 2011).

6.19    The interpretation Act 1999 provides for the New Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 128) and NZTA Traffic Note 37 to have continued effect, despite those documents being established under (and referring to) the now repealed Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2003.

6.20    The Council’s Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 allows the Council to set and change speed limits on roads in Christchurch in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting Speed Limits 2017 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

6.21    In accordance with the Christchurch City Council Delegations Register, Council has not delegated its powers under the above legislative framework.

6.22    The installation of any signs and/or markings must also comply with Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.23    None identified.

Implementation

6.24    Implementation dependencies - dependant on Community Board endorsement and Council approval for eth proposed speed limit changes.

6.25    Implementation timeframe – Installed by 30 April 2019 (start of second school term)

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.26    The advantages of this option include:

·   The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road will help to reduce operational speeds, and therefore improve safety.

·   The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road will support the safe operation of a new signalised pedestrian crossing proposed by NZTA.

·   The proposed 50 km/h permanent speed limit on Frosts Road provides increased consistency with existing speed limits on Travis Road, Beach Road and Mairehau Road, and therefore helps to improve credibility of speed limits locally and nationally.

·   The proposed 40 km/h variable speed limit (school speed zones) on Travis Road and Bower Avenue will reduce operational speeds on these roads, and therefore improve safety, during peak school travel times.

·   The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

6.27    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Increased amount of signage on Travis Road and Bower Avenue, as well as side roads, within the proposed school speed zones.

7.   Option 2 – Do nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing 70 km/h speed limit on Frosts Road and do not install the proposed 40 km/h variable speed limit school speed zones on Travis Road or Bower Avenue.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with Section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       As a road safety project, this option was not consulted on. Refer to Section 6.7 for community views and preferences relating to the preferred option, which includes feedback that does not support the preferred option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – cost of staff time investigating the proposal and preparing report.

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable

7.8       Funding source – not applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    None identified.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe – not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No additional cost to Council.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not address the safety concerns and preferences of the schools, community and other stakeholders.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Travis Rd - Bower Ave School Speed Zone and Frosts Rd Speed Limit Change Plan (tg133450)

 

b 

Travis Rd - Bower Ave School Speed Zone and Frosts Rd Speed Limit Change Submissions Table (PUBLIC)

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Gallot - Traffic Engineer

Tessa Zant - Senior Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 13 February 2019

 

13.    50R Wilmers Road - Transfer of Part Owaka 2 Reserve to the Crown

Reference:

19/157499

Presenter(s):

Sarah Stuart, Property Consultant

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change

Part A

That the Council resolve to:

1.         Dispose of the part of reserve land highlighted green on the plan in the agenda report as Attachment A (subject to survey) for roading purposes to the Minister for Land Information, as a transfer of an existing public work under Section 50 of the Public Works Act 1981:

a.         Being Part Lot 2 DP 447519, held in title 564911 as Local Purpose (Access) Reserve.

2.         Delegate authority to the Property Consultancy Manager to do all things necessary at his sole discretion to give effect to this resolution and transactions.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

50R Wilmers Road - Transfer of Part Owaka 2 Reserve to the Crown

84

 

No.

Title

Page

a

50R Wilmers Road Owaka Reserve - Required Land

91

b

NZTA - CSM2 - Design Plans

92

c

CCC - Process of Disposal and Legalisation

94

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

50R Wilmers Road - Transfer of Part Owaka 2 Reserve to the Crown

Reference:

18/1269590

Contact:

Sarah Stuart

sarah.stuart@ccc.govt.nz

941 8191

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the recommendation of the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to the Council to resolve to:

·    Dispose of part of the Owaka 2 Local Purpose (Access) Reserve to the Minister of Land Information as the transfer of an existing public work under Section 50 of the Public Works Act 1981 (PWA).

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is initiated by staff in response to a request from The Property Group on behalf of the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) to enter into a Memorandum of Agreement pursuant to the PWA.   The affected land is required by the Crown for roading purposes under Section 50 PWA for the extension of the Christchurch Southern Motorway Stage 2 (CSM2) (refer Attachment A).

1.3       Staff do not have a delegation to make a decision regarding the disposal because the land is held as a reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. 

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy (SEP).

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by applying the Council’s SEP, taking into consideration (amongst other things) the number of people affected and/or with an interest, the level of community interest already apparent for the issue, possible environmental, social and cultural impacts, possible costs/risks to the Council, ratepayers and wider community of carrying out the decision, and whether the impact of the decision can be reversed.

2.1.2   The significance is low because the effect of the decision is localised and has little impact on the community and the environment.  Whilst the reserve area is reduced, its function for access is not compromised and the transfer of the land to the Crown will enable construction of CSM2 with continued cycleway provision.  There is no risk to the Council, nor any impact on its ability to function.  The decision is not practically reversible.

2.1.3   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment and the legal requirements.

 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council resolve to:

 

1.         Dispose of the part of reserve land highlighted green on the plan in the agenda report as Attachment A (subject to survey) for roading purposes to the Minister for Land Information, as a transfer of an existing public work under Section 50 of the Public Works Act 1981:

a.         Being Part Lot 2 DP 447519, held in title 564911 as Local Purpose (Access) Reserve.

2.         Delegate authority to the Property Consultancy Manager to do all things necessary at his sole discretion to give effect to this resolution and transactions.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.1 Provide journey reliability on specific strategic routes

4.2       The following options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Agree to dispose of the required land (preferred).

·     Option 2 – Do not agree to dispose of the required land.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Option 1)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The Crown can acquire the land by agreement rather than by compulsion under the PWA.

·     Represents a collaborative approach consistent with the Council’s goals for reliability on strategic routes and continuity of cycleways.

·     Enables the construction of the CSM2 which will:

-      reduce traffic and congestion in the built up areas of Hornby and Templeton creating a more pleasant environment for residents.

-      improve safety and reduce fatal and serious crashes by 40 per cent.

-      reduce commuter travel time.

-      improve provisions for walking, cycling, and public transport.

-      improve access, connectivity, and freight efficiency. 

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     A net reduction of 107m2 in the overall area of reserve land.  This will have no impact on the utility and operation of the reserve land.  The compensation payable to the Council by the Crown, reflects this reduction.

·     The cost of staff time, noting that legal costs will be reimbursed by the Crown.

4.4       Option analysis

4.4.1   Option 1 is the recommended option because it allows a more straight-forward and co-operative process aligned to the Council’s goals for reliability on strategic routes and continuity of cycleways.  Option 2 is not considered to be a viable alternative because whilst the end result is essentially the same - the required land is acquired by the Crown (through compulsory powers) – the process is more fraught and has the potential to impact on construction timeframes.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

 

Land required by the Crown

5.1       The Crown requires part of the parcel of Council owned land at 50R Wilmers Road for the construction of the Halswell Junction Road on-ramp and realignment of the cycleway as part of the greater CSM2 project. 

5.2       The required land is subject to the Reserves Act 1977 and comprises:

·   107m2 approximately, being part Lot 2 DP 447519, held in title 564911 as Local Purpose (Access) Reserve. 

·   This is an irregular shaped strip and a long narrow parcel running along the Halswell Junction Road frontage to be used for road widening in conjunction with a new interchange (roundabout). 

·   The required land is shown as highlighted in green below (as also shown in Attachment A). 

·   The existing fence (lined in red) will be replaced along the new boundary (lined in purple).

5.3       The required land will be used to construct the Halswell Junction Road on-ramp with the cycleway realigned to ensure continuity.  Cycleway realignment is necessary because the on-ramp will be built over part of the existing cycleway.

5.4       The Owaka 2 reserve has the potential to be developed as part of a network of access linkages between Council greenspaces and drainage reserves and residential areas/transport routes.  Such development would easily link into the existing cycleway and the underpass providing a pedestrian/cycle link between Warren Park and other parks to the north, and Knights Stream Park to the south.

5.5       There is no impact on the current or likely future uses of the reserve from this proposal.

5.6       Design plans are provided in Attachment B.

5.7       The Board is asked to recommend that the Council resolve to dispose of this parcel of reserve land for roading purposes to the Minister of Lands as a transfer of an existing public work under section 50 of the PWA.

Compensation

5.8       The parties have agreed to base the compensation payable on the rate assessed for the recent PWA transfer of the Owaka Basin Reserve land at 412R Halswell Junction Road.  The compensation to be paid to the Council by the Crown is $6,500, based on a rate of $60/m2.

5.9       The Crown will reimburse the Council’s reasonable legal costs.

Process

5.10    The formal process for the disposal of the land and its change of status to legal road, is provided in Attachment C

5.11    The Crown will obtain all ministerial consents required and attend to the legalisation process.

 

6.   Option 1 – Agree to dispose of the required land

Option Description

6.1       Agree to transfer the required land to NZTA under section 50 of the PWA.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report. 

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       These have not been specifically sought but are presumed to be similar to those taken into account by NZTA as part of the designation process for the adjacent land also required for CSM2. 

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

6.6.1   Inconsistency – Not applicable

6.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – Not applicable

6.6.3   Amendment necessary – Not applicable

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – Cost of staff time.  The Council will receive $6,500 plus GST (if any) as compensation, and reasonable legal costs will be reimbursed.

6.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – The disposal of a small part of the reserve will have little impact on costs which will continue to be part of ongoing operational expenses from existing Parks budgets.

6.9       Funding source – Not applicable

Legal Implications

6.10    The required process associated with this transaction is outlined in Attachment C.

6.11    Section 50 of the PWA enables the Council to dispose of land to the Minister for Land Information for a public work, whether of the same kind or not, if reasonable provisions for satisfying the requirements of the public interest in that work will continue to exist (s50(1) PWA).

6.12    The agreement relating to the sale and purchase of a public work pursuant to section 50 of the PWA may contain such provisions as the Minister and the local authority think fit (s50(2) PWA).

6.13    The provisions of the PWA as to the disposal of land held for a public work do not apply (section 50(3) PWA).

6.14    Consent from the Minister of Conservation is required to revoke the reserve status (s24 Reserves Act 1977) and to enable the Minister for Land Information to set the reserve land apart for a public work (s52 PWA).   

6.15    There is no need to revoke the reserve status under the usual reserve revocation process as sections 50 and 52 of the PWA have the effect of removing it.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.16    The risk that the Minister of Conservation declines to revoke the reserve status and to allow the land to be set apart for a public work. 

6.17    Risk to the CSM2 project caused by the Minister of Conservation’s declination.  This risk is borne by NZTA.  There will be no change to the status quo for the Council and therefore no associated risk.

6.18    Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low

Implementation

6.19    Implementation dependencies  - dependant on the consent of the:

·    Minister of Conservation to revoke the reserve status

·    Minister for Land information to set the land apart for a public work and then declare it to be road.

6.20    Implementation timeframe – 18 to 24 months.  The land will be surveyed when construction is complete and then declared road.  Weather permitting, the motorway is expected to be completed and open to traffic late summer/autumn 2020. 

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.21    The advantages of this option include:

·   The Crown can acquire the land by agreement rather than by compulsion under the PWA.

·   Represents a collaborative approach consistent with Council’s goals for reliability on strategic routes and continuity of cycleways.

·   Enables the construction of the CSM2 which will:

-      reduce traffic and congestion in the built up areas of Hornby and Templeton creating a more pleasant environment for residents

-      improve safety and reduce fatal and serious crashes by 40 per cent

-      reduce commuter travel time

-      improve provisions for walking, cycling, and public transport

-      improve access, connectivity, and freight efficiency 

6.22    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   A net reduction of 107m2 in the overall area of reserve land.  This will have no impact on the utility and operation of the reserve land.  The compensation payable to the Council by the Crown, reflects this reduction.

·   The cost of staff time, noting that legal costs will be reimbursed by the Crown.

 

7.   Option 2– Do not agree to dispose of the required land

7.1       Option Description

7.2       Do not agree to transfer the required land to NZTA under section 50 of the PWA.

7.3       Significance

7.4       See paragraphs 6.2 and 6.3 above. 

7.5       Impact on Mana Whenua

7.6       See paragraph 6.4 above.

7.7       Community Views and Preferences

7.8       See paragraph 6.5 above. 

7.9       Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.10    See paragraphs 6.7 to 6.9 above.

7.11    Financial Implications

7.12    Cost of Implementation – Cost of staff time.  The Council will receive compensation determined by independent registered valuation.  Reasonable legal costs will be reimbursed.

7.13    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – see paragraph 6.8 above.

7.14    Funding source – Not applicable

7.15    Legal Implications

7.16    See paragraphs 6.10 to 6.15 above.

7.17    Risks and Mitigations  

7.18    See paragraphs 6.16 to 6.18 above.

7.19    Implementation

7.20    Implementation dependencies - dependant on:

·    NZTA following the process for compulsory acquisition as outlined in the PWA

·    Consent of Minister of Conservation to revoke the reserve status

·    Consent Minister for Land information to set the land apart for a public work and then declare it to be road.

7.21    Implementation timeframe – One to two years to work through the above processes.

7.22    Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.23    The advantages of this option include:

·   No advantages are identified.  NZTA’s power to compulsorily acquire the land means the end result will be the same i.e. the required land will be transferred to the Crown.

7.24    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Represents an uncooperative approach inconsistent with the Council’s goals for reliability on strategic routes and continuity of cycleways.

·   Potential delays to the completion of CSM2 due to the need for the Crown to work through the process of compulsory acquisition.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

50R Wilmers Road Owaka Reserve - Required Land

 

b 

NZTA - CSM2 - Design Plans

 

c 

CCC - Process of Disposal and Legalisation

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Sarah Stuart - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

PDF Creator


Council

14 March 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

14 March 2019

 

PDF Creator


Council

14 March 2019

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 4 February 2019

 

14.    Improvements to Woolston Village Centre - WL1

Reference:

19/136267

Presenter(s):

Kelly Griffiths, Project Manager
Bill Homewood, Traffic Engineer
Philippa Upton, Engagement Advisor

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Consideration

 

1.       The Board received and took into consideration deputations from Mesdames Neave and Brewer and the tabled petition from Mr Bane. 

2.       The Board requested additional items to the Woolston Village Improvements including extending the speed restriction down St Johns Street, better marking of the cycleway for better visibility to motorists, and better signage for off street parking and staff to investigate the current phasing of the Woolston Village signalised pedestrian crossing and if EV chargers were considered when the Woolston Library was rebuilt.

 

2.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Council:

1.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Portman Street be revoked.

2.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Oak Street be revoked.

3.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Catherine Street be revoked.

4.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with St Johns Street be revoked.

5.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Maronan Street be revoked.

6.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 16 metres be revoked.

7.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with St Johns Street be revoked.

8.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 145 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

9.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 82 metres be revoked.

10.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Catherine Street be revoked.

11.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Maronan Street be revoked.

12.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry   Road, commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 71 metres be revoked.

13.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Portman Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 68 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

14.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Portman Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 70 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

15.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of St Johns Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 29.5 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

16.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of St Johns Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 81 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

17.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Oak Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street be revoked.

18.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Oak Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street be revoked.

19.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Catherine Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 45 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

20.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Catherine Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 150 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

21.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Maronan Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 30 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

22.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Maronan Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 13 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

23.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes, pedestrian refuge islands, landscaping, tree planting and road surface changes, on Ferry Road, Portman Street, Oak Street, St Johns Street, Catherine Street and Maronan Street, as detailed in Attachment A.

24.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 116 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

25.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 75.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

26.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 15 minutes on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 75.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 16.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

27.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 92 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 10 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

28.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 102 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

29.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 116 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 52.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.  Note 2 applies.

30.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of ten minutes on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 168.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 23 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

31.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 191.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with St Johns Street, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

32.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 77 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

33.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 77 metres southeast of its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

34.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 91 metres southeast of its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 55.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

35.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 15 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

36.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 15 metres northwest of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 16.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies

37.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 31.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 50 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

38.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

39.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point seven metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

40.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 21 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.  

41.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 35 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 46 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

42.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 81 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 16 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

43.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 97 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 53.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

44.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 150.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 13.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

45.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 164 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 26 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

46.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 190 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Catherine Street, as detailed on Attachment A.

47.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of four metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

48.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point four metres southeast of its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

49.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 17.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Maronan Street, as detailed on Attachment A.

50.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 13 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

51.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 13 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 18.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

52.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 31.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 24 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

53.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at a distance of 55.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 16.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This restriction is to apply between the times of 8.15am and 9.15am and 2.30pm and 3.30pm on school days only.

54.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Portman Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 15.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

55.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the northwest side of Portman Street commencing at a point 15.5 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 53 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

56.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Portman Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 16 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

57.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the southeast side of Portman Street commencing at a point 16 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 53 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

58.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of St Johns Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 16 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

59.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of five minutes on the northwest side of St Johns Street commencing at a point 16 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

60.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of St Johns Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 25 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

61.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes on the southeast side of St Johns Street commencing at a point 25 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 56 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

62.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Oak Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

63.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Oak Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

64.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Catherine Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 20 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

65.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the northwest side of Catherine Street commencing at a point 20 metres southwest of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 25 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

66.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Catherine Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 150 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.  Note 2 applies.

67.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Maronan Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 12 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

68.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the northwest side of Maronan Street commencing at a point 12 metres southwest of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 18 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

69.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Maronan Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 13 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

70.       Approves that a Stop control be placed against the Portman Street approach to its intersection with Ferry Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

71.       Approves that a Stop control be placed against the Oak Street approach to its intersection with Ferry Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

72.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the St John Street approach to its intersection with Ferry Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

73.       Approves the installation of a bus shelter at the following locations:

a.         729 Ferry Road (Attachment A),

b.         650 Ferry Road (Attachment A), and

c.         608 Ferry Road (Attachment A).

74.       Approves that the pathway on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 51 metres, be resolved as a bi-directional shared pedestrian/cycle path. This shared path is authorised under clause 21 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, as detailed on Attachment A.

75.       Approves that the pathway on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 28 metres, be resolved as a bi-directional shared pedestrian/cycle path. This shared path is authorised under clause 21 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, as detailed on Attachment A.

76.       Approves that the section of road reserve situated between the north-western boundary of 689 Ferry Road and south-eastern boundary of 687 Ferry Road, be resolved as a bi-directional shared pedestrian/cycle path. This shared path is authorised under clause 21 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017. As detailed on Attachment A.

77.       Approves the removal of nine trees as identified on Attachment A.

78.       Approve that these resolutions take effect when parking signage and/or road markings that evidence the restrictions is/are in place (or removed in the case of revocations).

79.       Request staff to increase the green cycleway surfacing on the Woolston Village cycleways when implementing the Woolston Village Improvements Project – WL1 to make the cycle ways more visible to motorists.

80.       Request staff to investigate extending the 30kmh speed restriction down St Johns Street from Ferry Road to Glenroy Street.

81.       Request staff to investigate larger or additional signage to highlight the off street parking in the Woolston Village, behind the shops and adjacent to the Woolston Library.

82.       Request staff to investigate the phasing of the signalised pedestrian crossing in Woolston Village to lessen the wait time for pedestrians.

83.       Request staff to advise if there was provision for an EV charger within the Woolston Library rebuild project.

 

3.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original Staff Recommendation Accepted without Change

Part A

For the purposes of the following resolutions:

(a)         An intersection is defined by the position of kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and

(b)        The resolution is to take effect from the commencement of physical road works associated with the project as detailed in this report; and

(c)         If the resolution states "Note 1 applies", any distance specified in the resolution relates the kerb line location referenced as exists on the road immediately prior to the Community Board meeting of the 3rd December 2018; and

(d)        If the resolution states "Note 2 Applies", any distance specified in the resolution relates the approved kerb line location on the road resulting from the resolution as approved on 4 February 2019 for resolutions 1 – 13, and at the Council 14 March 2019 meeting for resolutions 14 – 91.

That the Council:

1.         Approves the improvements to Woolston Village Centre (WL1) preferred option for detailed design and construction as shown in Attachment A.

2.         Relying on its powers under the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Part 21 of the Local Government Act 1974.

a.         Approves that all traffic controls except the speed limit on Ferry Road, commencing at a point 16 metres west of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to a point 71 metres east of its intersection with St Johns Street be revoked.

b.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 20 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

c.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with St Johns Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

d.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 146 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

e.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 82 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

f.          Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Catherine Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

g.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Maronan Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

h.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 71 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

i.          Approves that a signalised pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with sections 6 and 8.5 (3) of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Devices 2004, on Ferry Road, located at a point 28 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street, as detailed in Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

j.          Approves that a signalised pedestrian and cycle crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with sections 6 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Devices 2004, on Ferry Road, located at a point 22 metres southeast of its intersection with Catherine Street, as detailed in Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

3.         In pursuance of the powers vested in it by Section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule- Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council hereby authorises the head teacher of St Anne’s Catholic School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Ferry Road school crossing point as shown on Attachment A, located at a point more or less 36 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Improvements to Woolston Village Centre - WL1

104

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan for Approval

126

b

Woolston Village 2018 Consultation Leaflet

127

c

Woolston Village Parking Comparison Plan

139

d

Woolston Village 2018 Project Team Responses

140

e

Woolston Village 2016 Consultation Leaflet

145

f

Woolston Village 2016 Consultation Submissions

148

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Improvements to Woolston Village Centre - WL1

Reference:

18/786011

Presenter(s):

Kelly Griffiths, Project Manager
Bill Homewood, Traffic Engineer
Philippa Upton, Engagement Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to recommend to the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board that they approve the improvements to Woolston Village Centre WL1, which are part of the Ferry Road Master Plan, to proceed to detailed design and construction.      

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following completion of public consultation for the improvements to Woolston Village Centre WL1 project.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of businesses, property owners and the local community affected by the changes proposed in the project area, as well as the wider effects on the transport network on Ferry Road for drivers, pedestrians, cyclists and bus users.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment of medium significance.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

For the purposes of the following resolutions:

(a)        An intersection is defined by the position of kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and

(b)        The resolution is to take effect from the commencement of physical road works associated with the project as detailed in this report; and

(c)         If the resolution states "Note 1 applies", any distance specified in the resolution relates the kerb line location referenced as exists on the road immediately prior to the Community Board meeting of the 3rd December 2018; and

(d)        If the resolution states "Note 2 Applies", any distance specified in the resolution relates the approved kerb line location on the road resulting from the resolution as approved on 4 February 2019 for resolutions 1 – 13, and at the following Council meeting for resolutions 14 – 91.

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to Council that it:

1.         Approves the improvements to Woolston Village Centre (WL1) preferred option for detailed design and construction as shown in Attachment A.

2.         Relying on its powers under the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Part 21 of the Local Government Act 1974.

a.         Approves that all traffic controls except the speed limit on Ferry Road, commencing at a point 16 metres west of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to a point 71 metres east of its intersection with St Johns Street be revoked.

b.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 20 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

c.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with St Johns Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

d.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 146 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

e.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 82 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

f.          Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Catherine Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

g.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Maronan Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

h.         Approves that a Special Vehicle Lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 71 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This Special Vehicle Lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

i.          Approves that a signalised pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with sections 6 and 8.5 (3) of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Devices 2004, on Ferry Road, located at a point 28 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street, as detailed in Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

j.          Approves that a signalised pedestrian and cycle crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with sections 6 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Devices 2004, on Ferry Road, located at a point 22 metres southeast of its intersection with Catherine Street, as detailed in Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

3.         In pursuance of the powers vested in it by Section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule- Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council hereby authorises the head teacher of St Anne’s Catholic School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Ferry Road school crossing point as shown on Attachment A, located at a point more or less 36 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street.

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

4.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Portman Street be revoked.

5.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Oak Street be revoked.

6.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Catherine Street be revoked.

7.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with St Johns Street be revoked.

8.         Approves all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Ferry Road with Maronan Street be revoked.

9.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 16 metres be revoked.

10.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with St Johns Street be revoked.

11.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 145 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

12.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 82 metres be revoked.

13.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Catherine Street be revoked.

14.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Maronan Street be revoked.

15.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 71 metres be revoked.

16.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Portman Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 68 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

17.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Portman Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 70 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

18.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of St Johns Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 29.5 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

19.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of St Johns Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 81 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

20.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Oak Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street be revoked.

21.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Oak Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street be revoked.

22.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Catherine Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 45 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

23.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Catherine Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 150 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

24.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northwest side of Maronan Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 30 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

25.       Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southeast side of Maronan Street, commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 13 metres be revoked. Note 1 applies.

26.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes, pedestrian refuge islands, landscaping, tree planting and road surface changes, on Ferry Road, Portman Street, Oak Street, St Johns Street, Catherine Street and Maronan Street, as detailed in Attachment A.

27.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 116 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

28.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 75.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

29.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 15 minutes on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 75.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 16.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

30.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 92 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 10 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

31.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 102 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

32.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 116 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 52.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.  Note 2 applies.

33.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of ten minutes on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 168.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 23 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

34.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 191.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Portman Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with St Johns Street, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

35.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 77 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

36.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at point 77 metres southeast of its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

37.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 91 metres southeast of its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 55.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

38.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 15 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

39.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 15 metres northwest of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 16.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies

40.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 31.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 50 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

41.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

42.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point seven metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

43.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 21 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.  

44.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 35 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 46 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

45.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 81 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 16 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

46.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 97 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 53.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

47.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 150.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 13.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

48.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 164 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 26 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

49.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 190 metres southeast of its intersection with Oak Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Catherine Street, as detailed on Attachment A.

50.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of four metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

51.       Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point four metres southeast of its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

52.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 17.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Catherine Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Maronan Street, as detailed on Attachment A.

53.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 13 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

54.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 60 minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at point 13 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 18.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

55.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Ferry Road commencing at a point 31.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 24 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

56.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at a distance of 55.5 metres southeast of its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 16.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This restriction is to apply between the times of 8.15am and 9.15am and 2.30pm and 3.30pm on school days only.

57.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Portman Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 15.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

58.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the northwest side of Portman Street commencing at a point 15.5 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 53 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

59.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Portman Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 16 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

60.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the southeast side of Portman Street commencing at a point 16 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 53 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

61.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of St Johns Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 16 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

62.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of five minutes on the northwest side of St Johns Street commencing at a point 16 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

63.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of St Johns Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 25 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

64.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes on the southeast side of St Johns Street commencing at a point 25 metres northeast of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a northeasterly direction for a distance of 56 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

65.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Oak Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

66.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Oak Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction to its intersection with Heathcote Street, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

67.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Catherine Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 20 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

68.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the northwest side of Catherine Street commencing at a point 20 metres southwest of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 25 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

69.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Catherine Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 150 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

70.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northwest side of Maronan Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 12 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

71.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the northwest side of Maronan Street commencing at a point 12 metres southwest of its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 18 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 applies.

72.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southeast side of Maronan Street commencing at its intersection with Ferry Road and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 13 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.   Note 2 applies.

73.       Approves that a Stop control be placed against the Portman Street approach to its intersection with Ferry Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

74.       Approves that a Stop control be placed against the Oak Street approach to its intersection with Ferry Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

75.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the St John Street approach to its intersection with Ferry Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

76.       Approves the installation of a bus shelter at the following locations:

a.         729 Ferry Road (Attachment A),

b.         650 Ferry Road (Attachment A), and

c.         608 Ferry Road (Attachment A).

77.       Approves that the pathway on the northeast side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with St Johns Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 51 metres, be resolved as a bi-directional shared pedestrian/cycle path. This shared path is authorised under clause 21 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, as detailed on Attachment A.

78.       Approves that the pathway on the southwest side of Ferry Road, commencing at its intersection with Maronan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 28 metres, be resolved as a bi-directional shared pedestrian/cycle path. This shared path is authorised under clause 21 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, as detailed on Attachment A.

79.       Approves that the section of road reserve situated between the north-western boundary of 689 Ferry Road and south-eastern boundary of 687 Ferry Road, be resolved as a bi-directional shared pedestrian/cycle path. This shared path is authorised under clause 21 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017. As detailed on Attachment A.

80.       Approves the removal of nine trees as identified on Attachment A.

81.       Approve that these resolutions take effect when parking signage and/or road markings that evidence the restrictions is/are in place (or removed in the case of revocations).

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Active Travel

·     Level of Service: 10.5.2.0 Improve the perception that Christchurch is a cycling friendly city - =53%

·     Level of Service: 16.0.10.0 Improve the perception that Christchurch is a walking friendly city = 84%

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·    Option 1 – The Preferred Option

·    Option 2 – Original Consulted Option 2016

·    Option 3 – Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages of the Preferred Option

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·    A pedestrian focused environment

·    A trial speed limit of 30km/h for one year with the possibility of a permanent 30km/h speed reduction.

·    New gateways to identify the start and end of the village.

·    Upgraded crossing facilities.

·    Improved passenger transport facilities.

·    Improved safety at St Anne’s school.

·    Wider cycle lanes.

·    Wider footpaths.

·    Increased landscaping.

·    Links Woolston Village with the Major Cycleway Route network.

·    Smallest impact on parking of all schemes considered.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·    Loss of 11 parking spaces.

·    Potential for some minor delays to traffic due to the slower speed environment.

 

5.   Context/Background

Ferry Road Master Plan

5.1       Council adopted the Ferry Road Master Plan in 2014. This was developed to support the recovery of suburban centres along Ferry Road from Fitzgerald Avenue to the Ferrymead Bridge, and to improve the safety and amenity of this road corridor. The Master Plan forms part of the Council’s Suburban Centres Programme and was prepared in response to the damage caused in suburban centres from the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes.   The Master Plan was prepared in consultation with the Ferry Road community and is divided into individual projects focusing on specific areas along Ferry Road.

5.2       The improvements to Woolston Village Centre project (WL1) aims to improve the streetscape along Ferry Road through Woolston Village. The aim is to enhance Woolston’s appeal as a destination, highlight the distinctive industrial character of the village centre and balance the needs of all users.

5.3       Public consultation on a draft proposal for improvements to Woolston Village Centre took place in May and June 2016.

5.4       In response to the 2016 proposal there was strong support for enhancing and beautifying the village. However, significant concern was raised about the negative effects the proposed removal of 56 on-street parking spaces would have on the viability of businesses and the local community.

5.5       More details of the 2016 proposal and the community views and preferences can be found in Section 7 of this report.

5.6       A workshop was held with the Community Board to discuss next steps.  At this it was agreed to proceed with investigating a revised proposal, taking into account the feedback received. Revised project objectives were agreed by the Community Board and Project Sponsor.

5.7       At the same time, it was discovered that the old tram tracks and kerb-to-kerb concrete foundations are still in place in this section of Ferry Road.  The kerb-to-kerb concrete limits the use of certain treatments in the scheme e.g. landscaped medians.

5.8       During investigations for the new scheme a number of different options were considered, taking into account consultation feedback received, physical limitations such as the tram tracks and concrete, and budget constraints.

5.9       Public consultation on the revised proposal was open for four weeks from Tuesday 5 June until Tuesday 3 July 2018.

6.   Option 1 – Preferred Option

Option Description

6.1       The preferred option aims to create a pedestrian focused environment, while improving access to the village centre for all modes of transport and creating a village feel.  The details of the plan can be seen in Attachment A.

6.2       The pedestrian environment will be improved through the use of wider footpaths at key locations, such as the busy shopping area between Portman Street and Oak Street.  The wider footpaths will allow pedestrian movements, as well as encouraging pedestrians to stop and meet.

6.3       The number of pedestrian crossing points will increase from four to five, and will include two signalised crossings and three pedestrian refuges.

6.4       The existing signalised crossing currently outside New World supermarket’s loading area will be relocated to link with the car park at the rear of the Woolston Community Library and increase the accessibility to these spaces.  The existing pedestrian refuges will also be upgraded to meet current design standards.

6.5       Public transport is a vital component of the transport options in Woolston, and the public transport provision will be upgraded as part of this proposal.  The bus stops will be brought into the village centre to reprioritise their use, and will be paired with signalised crossings to improve their accessibility.

6.6       Cycle infrastructure will be upgraded with wider cycle lanes provided through the village centre. The scheme also incorporates a signalised cycle crossing on Ferry Road to the east of Maronan Street, which will link the village centre and allow cyclists to move between the major cycle routes to the north and south of Woolston, as well as helping to provide safe cycle access to the shops, churches and school.

6.7       Gateways will be created at either end of the scheme to clearly identify the extent of the village. The gateways use a combination of vertical elements and changes in material pallet, through landscaping and road narrowings to signal the arrival into the village and to prompt drivers to reduce vehicle speeds.

6.8       A 30km/h design speed is one of the project objectives. It is proposed to trial a 30 km/h speed limit along Ferry Road between Portman Street and St Anne’s School. Reducing vehicle speeds is seen as being essential to allow safe pedestrian crossing movements, particularly for those who cross using the flush median, and contribute to the village feel.

6.9       The landscape design includes replacing and increasing the amount of street furniture.  There will be eight new seats and nine new rubbish bins. In addition, there will be five cycle stands which can accommodate six cycles each, creating a total of 30 cycle parking spaces throughout the scheme.  The preferred option includes new paving along the footpaths and at pedestrian crossing points and approximately 36 new trees.

Significance

6.10    The level of significance of this option is medium and consistent with Section 2 of this report.

6.11    Engagement activities for this level of significance includes:

6.11.1 ‘Have Your Say’ community consultation with both online and hard copy documentation and feedback forms.

6.11.2 Social media and communications coverage.

6.11.3 Public information sessions and meetings with affected stakeholders and community representatives.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.12    This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.13    Those affected by this proposal include businesses in Woolston Village and residents in the local community, as well as members of the wider community traveling through or visiting Woolston for work or leisure. This includes drivers, pedestrians, bus users and cyclists.

6.14    Staff introduced the proposal to directly affected businesses and key stakeholders before public consultation started at an information evening at St Johns Church on 30 May 2018, which was attended by fifteen people including three Community Board members. Separate pre-consultation meetings were also held with Foodstuffs Ltd, St Anne’s School and Church, and the MP for the Port Hills who is based in Woolston.

6.15    Public consultation on the revised proposal was open for four weeks from Tuesday 5 June until Tuesday 3 July 2018.

6.16    Council ‘Have Your Say’ leaflets and feedback forms were available online and approximately 800 copies were hand-delivered or posted to businesses, residents, schools and preschools, community groups, absentee landowners and stakeholders. Attachment B shows the 2018 consultation leaflet and feedback form.

6.17    A drop-in consultation information session attended by ten people was held in St Johns Church on 13 June 2018, and ongoing communication and meetings with businesses and property owners took place during and beyond the consultation period. The project team also presented the revised proposal at a well-attended Greater Linwood Community Forum at Te Waka Unua School.

6.18    There were 114 responses to the revised proposal.  Forty-four submitters (38%) indicated support including Woolston Plunket, Environment Canterbury, Holy Smoke Building owners, Three Boys Brewery and St Anne’s School. Forty-two submitters (37%) indicated support with suggestions including NZ Heavy Haulage Association, Canterbury District Health Board and St Anne’s Catholic Church. Twenty-five submitters (22%) did not support the proposal including SPOKES Canterbury, Woolston businesses such as Woolston Pharmacy, Rangiora Holdings as owner representing 12 shops in the village centre, and Woolston Dairy at 701 Ferry Road. The remaining three submitters provided concerns or suggestions only, including Foodstuffs representatives.

 

6.19    Key positive comments included commendations for a revised plan that better balances the need for revitalisation and a sense of place, with parking provision. There was support for improving the village for locals and visitors, including walking space and seating for pedestrians, and facilities for cyclists and bus users. Several noted that improving the village will make it more attractive for prospective residents and existing business committed to being in the area. There was support for a general tidy up and enhancement – a number of those keen to see landscaping and trees improved also providing alternative suggestions.

6.20    Key issues raised during consultation were

·   Parking removal (in particular the proposal for one parking space outside the pharmacy)

·   Requests for alternative tree and landscaping species

6.21    Approximately 40% of submitters requested all or some of the existing parking spaces be retained, and a petition document received as a submission included 1038 signatures requested:  ‘We, the undersigned, do not agree with the proposal to remove 14 car parks from the Woolston village and ask that these car parks be retained’. The petition is presented to the Community Board along with this report.

 

6.22    Sixty-seven submitters gave Woolston as their address, and seven were from nearby suburbs of Linwood, Redcliffs, Sumner and Clifton Hill. The remaining 40 were from other Christchurch suburbs. Of those from Woolston, 26 indicated support, 27 indicated support with suggestions and 14 did not support the proposal.

Parking issues

6.23    Key parking-related comments included the need for access for elderly and mobility impaired drivers, in particular close to the pharmacy and adjacent businesses. There was also some concern about the proposed loss of parking outside St Anne’s School, although this concern was not raised by the school.

Project team response to parking issues

South side of Ferry Road parking

6.24    As part of the proposal and in response to submissions to the 2016 concept plan, there is an increased number of car parks on the south side between Oak and Catherine Streets, as detailed in Attachment C - Parking Comparison Plan. This is because although most businesses on the south side have private off-street car parking at the rear, drivers may not be aware of this and some people find these car parks difficult to access. 

North side of Ferry Road parking

6.25    In response to requests for more on-street car parking outside the pharmacy and adjacent shops, parking outside 683 – 687 Ferry Road has been increased from one space to three spaces.

6.26    There is a considerable amount of easily accessible private off-street parking on the north side of Ferry Road for those visiting private businesses. Some businesses on this side of the road do not have parking on-site. A number of on-street car parks in this location have been retained. The Council car park behind the Woolston Community Library also provides 32 spaces.

St Anne’s School & Church parking

6.27    Feedback also identified some concerns with the loss of parking around St Anne’s School. Since consultation, two additional parking spaces have been included on the south side of Ferry Road outside number 670, which is opposite the church and school. Recent discussions with St Anne’s Church have removed three parking spaces outside 733 Ferry Road to allow for a bus stop location that meets the needs of both the project and the church. This means that between Maronan Street and the eastern boundary of St Anne’s School, the number of car parks has decreased by two - from the existing 17 to the now proposed 15.

6.28    Feedback from St Anne’s School requested removing the P3 parking restrictions to the west of the kea crossing outside 733 and 664 – 666 Ferry Road. These parks are now proposed to have P60 restrictions.

6.29    There was little comment and no formal opposition for the relocation of the bus stops at Portman Street to central Woolston.

6.30    The overall parking provision proposed in the village is now 56 spaces, which is a decrease of 11 spaces when compared to the existing number of on-street parks in this section of Ferry Road. Recent parking survey information shows that demand can be met in the remaining on-street and off-street car parks.

Other improvements for parking and access in the village centre

6.31    Signs have now been installed to direct drivers to the car park behind the Woolston Community Library from Ferry Road via Portman Street.

6.32    The Council car park behind the Community Library has 32 spaces. This is four more spaces than previously provided, including two designated mobility parks which are only a short distance from the pharmacy and shopping area, and a well-lit, level shared path from the car park provides easy access to Ferry Road for pedestrians.

6.33    The signal-controlled pedestrian crossing has been moved closer to the Woolston Community Library car park so that people can park here and safely cross to the businesses on the south side of Ferry Road. 

6.34    Summary of proposed parking changes following consultation feedback

·   Two further short-term car parks will be retained outside the pharmacy and adjacent shops, now three car parks in total.

·   Three car parks removed from outside 733 Ferry Road due to changes to the bus stop location.

·   Two further car parks included outside 670 Ferry Road.

·   P60 parking restrictions outside 733 and 664 – 666 Ferry Road

6.35    Following discussion with adjacent business owners seven parking spaces proposed on the north side of Ferry Road will have time restrictions:

·   Four parking spaces outside the dairy at 701 Ferry Road will be restricted to ten minutes.

·   Three parking spaces outside the pharmacy and adjacent shops will be restricted to fifteen minutes.

Trees and landscaping

6.36    Approximately 20% of submitters commented on the proposed trees, 5% in support of the proposal and 7% requesting more natives/evergreens instead of the deciduous trees proposed as part of the Master Plan. Key opposition comments stated a preference to prioritise wider footpaths and trees over parking retention.


 

Project team response to suggestions for trees and landscaping

6.37    The Woolston Village improvements project is part of the Ferry Road Master Plan which was developed with the community through workshops and consultation in 2014. This resulted in a plan for trees with a red and white colour theme, a maximum height of 8 metres, and seasonal variety and interest (deciduous).

6.38    The tree selection has been reviewed in response to requests from a number of submitters that native and evergreen trees be considered for Woolston.  New Zealand Kauri trees will now replace the Upright Hornbeams at the village entrances and the English Oaks at St Johns Church.  Native plants will also be incorporated into the under-planting.  Magnolia Kobus will be retained as the main street tree.

6.39    The set of four Pin Oak trees at the west end of the village will now all be removed and will be replaced with Magnolia Kobus. This is in response to concerns raised by the NZ Heavy Haulage Association regarding the ability for oversized vehicles to move through this section of road.  Magnolia kobus are smaller than Pin Oaks and replacing the trees on the south side of the road will enable the new trees to be moved back slightly from the kerb thereby further increasing the road space.

6.40    New Zealand Kauri (Agathis australis) is a slow growing, evergreen conifer which makes an attractive specimen tree.  It has a narrow, pyramid form which lasts for more than fifty years.

6.41    Changes to the layout outside 669 Ferry Road - the old ANZ bank building - and proposed layout changes at 683 Ferry Road have meant the privately owned space for two racks of six cycle stands and two seats proposed for these locations is no longer available. Staff are continuing to work with the property owners to find available space for the cycle stands on their property.

6.42    More detailed response to and including other issues raised such as requests for rubbish and recycling bins, the 30km/h speed limit and cycle provisions are available in Attachment D – Issues/Suggestions and Project Team Response.

6.43    Full submissions with names only can be viewed online at https://cccgovtnz.cwp.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/151

6.44    Changes to the 2018 consulted plan that have resulted in this final plan for Community Board and Council approval are:

·   Two further short-term car parks will be retained outside the pharmacy and adjacent shops, now three car parks in total. These parks will be restricted to 15-minute parking.

·   Three car parks removed from outside 733 Ferry Road due to changes to the bus stop location. The bus stop and shelter outside 729 Ferry Road has been relocated to outside 733 Ferry Road.

·   Two further car parks included outside 670 Ferry Road.

·   P60 parking restrictions outside 664 – 666 Ferry Road

·   Four parking spaces outside the dairy at 701 Ferry Road will be restricted to ten-minute parking.

·   Moving the 30/50 speed limit threshold to the eastern boundary of the St Anne’s school.

·   The shared path on the south side of Ferry Road has been extended onto Maronan Street, so cyclists do not have to cycle on Ferry Road to use the signalised crossing if travelling from the major cycleway on the other side of the Heathcote River.

·   Extension of the cycle lane on St Johns Street so it extends past the existing indented parking to help guide cyclists around the short term parking.

·   The island outside New World has been shortened in length to allow right turns into the Salvation Army access (636 Ferry Road), however this will still restrict right turns into New World super market, as outlined in their resource consent.

·   The island outside New World has been narrowed slightly to improve the alignment for vehicles and cyclists.

·   The island in the road outside 622 Ferry Road has been shortened in length to allow right turning into the access for the bakery.

·   The island outside St Anne’s Church and St Anne’s School has been relocated slightly to the east to make it easier to turn right into the adjacent driveways.

·   In response to requests for more native and evergreen trees, we are now proposing to plant six NZ Kauri instead of the two English Oaks outside St Johns Church.  This change in conjunction with the proposed street upgrades and existing activity at the St Johns/Catherine Street intersection makes this area the more natural gateway for the eastern entrance of the Woolston Village. 

·   The two tress proposed outside St Anne’s School have been removed, as this location is no longer the eastern gateway.

·   The set of four Pin Oak trees at the west end of the village will now all be removed and will be replaced with Magnolia Kobus.

·   The rack of six cycle stands and two seats proposed outside 669 Ferry Road, and the rack of six cycle stands proposed outside 683 Ferry Road have been removed.

·   To make room for the additional two parking spaces outside the pharmacy and adjacent shops, two small existing trees will be removed along with the two proposed trees along the kerb. To balance this and create a more vegetated and defined feel to the public space we are now proposing to replace the two small existing trees with three Autumn Blaze maple trees.

·   An extra rubbish bin has been added outside 630 Ferry Road due to the volume of food shops and take-away outlets along this stretch of Ferry Road.

·   One extra street light will be added on both Catherine and Maronan streets.

Parallel consultation - shared path proposal

6.45    Sixty-eight submitters were in support of the proposed shared path from Ferry Road to the Woolston Community Library car park, which was presented in the same consultation document. Twenty-nine didn’t support and 18 didn't answer the question.

6.46    The shared path has been installed as part of the construction of the Community Library. The resolution to formalise this change to a shared path status is included in this report.

Next steps

6.47    Thirty-three submitters would like to be kept informed about how we will be including reminders of Woolston’s cultural history and meaning in the detailed design and following our work with Matapopore.

6.48    The Community Board has been sent the full submissions including contact details, ahead of the meeting. Submitters have been sent a letter with a summary of consultation, and a link to the plan including full submissions with names only, the final proposal and details of the meeting and how to request speaking rights.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.49    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies – Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan, which designates Woolston Village as a ‘Walkable Centre’ and also forms part of the ‘Local Cycle Network’.

Financial Implications

6.50    Cost of Implementation – The estimated total project cost to implement WL1 is $3,174,939.

6.51    There is a shortfall in funding of $507,472 which is proposed to be met from funds currently sitting at program level in the Suburban Master Plan – Ferry Road programme. A budget change will be processed according to financial delegations and process. The tender will not be let until the budget is available.

6.52    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – There will be an increase in maintenance costs due to the regular maintenance required on the new green cycle lane surfacing, new landscaping and trees, and new street furniture, e.g. rubbish bins. Following the first years defects liability period, this has been calculated as an increase of approximately $9,870 per annum, which will be included in the annual maintenance schedule.

6.53    Funding source – Funding of $2,667,467 has been allocated in the Council’s Long Term Plan to implement the Improvements to Woolston Village Centre – WL1 (named Ferry Road Master Plan - Project WL1 in the Long Term Plan) with the balance from Suburban Master Plan – Ferry Road programme as above.  Ongoing costs will be funded from the budgeted annual maintenance schedule.

Legal Implications

6.54    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

6.55    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations

6.56    There are no significant risks with this option.

Implementation

6.57    Implementation dependencies – The following consents may be required:

·    National Environmental Standards (NES) consent from CCC for management of contamination of the road e.g. coal tar & contaminated soil.

·    Stormwater Authorisation under the Interim Global Stormwater Consent, Environment Canterbury may also require a construction stormwater consent.

·    Removal and works around trees may be able to be covered under the CCC Global Tree consent.

6.58    Requires Council approval of traffic controls by resolution including cycle lanes and traffic signals.

6.59    Implementation timeframe – Council approval is scheduled for March 2019. After detailed design and tender, construction is currently anticipated to commence in January 2020 and take approximately five months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.60    The advantages of this option include:

·    A pedestrian focused environment

·    A trial speed limit of 30km/h for one year with the possibility of a permanent 30km/h speed reduction

·    New gateways to identify the start and end of the village

·    Upgraded crossing facilities.

·    Improved passenger transport facilities.

·    Improved safety at St Anne’s school.

·    Wider cycle lanes.

·    Wider footpaths.

·    Increased landscaping.

·    Links Woolston Village with the Major Cycleway Route network.

·    Smallest impact on parking of all schemes considered.

6.61    The disadvantages of this option include:

·    Loss of 11 parking spaces.

·    Potential for some minor delays to traffic due to the slower speed environment.

7.   Option 2 – Original Consulted Option 2016

Option Description

7.1       The original option went to public consultation in 2016, however it was not taken to the Community Board for approval due to the significant community concerns about the proposed loss of parking.

7.2       This option included:

·    A pedestrian focused environment, with wider footpath and four new pedestrian refuge islands.

·    New gateways to identify the start and end of the village.

·    A trial speed limit of 30km/h for one year with the possibility of a permanent 30km/h speed reduction.

·    A paved flush median along the centre of the road, with some raised landscaped sections.

·    Wider cycle lanes.

·    Updated street furniture and landscaping, including new seating and tree planting.

·    A reduction in parking from 77 to 21 spaces.

Significance

7.3       The level of significance of this option is medium and consistent with Section 2 of this report.

7.4       Engagement activities for this level of significance includes:

7.4.1   ‘Have Your Say’ community consultation with both online and hard copy documentation and feedback forms.

7.4.2   Social media and communications coverage.

7.4.3   Public information sessions and meetings with affected stakeholders and community representatives.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.6       Those affected by this proposal include businesses in Woolston Village and residents in the local community, as well as the wider community traveling through or visiting the centre for business or leisure. This includes drivers, pedestrians, bus users and cyclists.

7.7       Also see Context/Background Section 5 of this report and Attachment E - 2016 Consultation Leaflet.

7.8       168 written submissions were received. A significant number of the submissions received indicated their opposition because of concerns that the negative effects of parking removal, and to a lesser extent speed reduction, would outweigh the benefits of the proposal. There was a strong sense from these submitters that Woolston’s business centre currently relies on passing traffic and easy access. The full submissions can be viewed in Attachment F.

7.9       Those indicating support focused on the wider travel choice and pedestrian benefits of the proposal, and supported the improvements to the village streetscape as a way of attracting people to visit and spend time in Woolston.

7.10    Ninety-four submitters (56%) - approximately half of whom were local residents, businesses or property owners indicated they generally opposed the scheme, focusing on concerns about business and community viability due to the proposed parking loss.

7.11    A petition with 770 signatures, largely from residents, business or property owners in Woolston and surrounding areas, was presented the Community Board on 19 September 2016, with these key points: highlighting the need to support the beautification of Woolston Village, opposing the removing of car parking between St Johns Street and Portman Street, and noting that most shops in Woolston Village are not ‘browsing shops’ but ‘purchase and leave’.

7.12    72 submitters (43%) indicated they generally supported the scheme, wanting to see the benefits of improvements to Woolston despite some having reservations about aspects of the proposal that were mainly parking related.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.13    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies – Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan, which designates Woolston Village as a ‘Walkable Centre’ and also forms part of the ‘Local Cycle Network’.

Financial Implications  7.14          Cost of Implementation – The total estimated project cost for the original consulted option for WL1 in 2016 was originally estimated to be $2,200,000.  This does not take into account the additional costs to construction as a result of the tram track and concrete foundation.  These additional costs are anticipated to be in the order of $1,500,000.

7.15    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – There will be an increase in maintenance costs due to the regular maintenance required on the new green cycle lane surfacing, new landscaping and trees, and new street furniture, e.g. rubbish bins.

7.16    Funding source – Funding of $2,667,467 has been allocated in the Council’s Long Term Plan to implement the Improvements to Woolston Village Centre – WL1 (named Ferry Road Master Plan - Project WL1 in the Long Term Plan).

Legal Implications

7.17    There was not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.18    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations 7.19 There are no significant risks with this option.

Implementation

7.20    Implementation dependencies – The following consents may be required:

·    National Environmental Standards (NES) consent from CCC for management of contamination of the road e.g. coal tar & contaminated soil.

·    Stormwater Authorisation under the Interim Global Stormwater Consent, Environment Canterbury may also require a construction stormwater consent.

·    Removal and works around trees may be able to be covered under the CCC Global Tree consent.

7.21    Would require Council approval of traffic controls by resolution including cycle lanes and traffic signals.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.22    The advantages of this option include:

·   A pedestrian focused environment, with wider footpath and four new pedestrian refuge islands

·   New gateways to identify the start and end of the village

·   A trial speed limit of 30km/h for one year with the possibility of a permanent 30km/h speed reduction

·   Improved safety outside the school

·   A paved flush median along the centre of the road, with some raised landscaped sections

·   Wider cycle lanes

·   Updated street furniture and landscaping, including new seating and tree planting

7.23    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   A reduction in parking from 77 to 21 spaces

·   Potential for some minor delays to vehicle due to the slower speed environment

8.   Option 3 – Do Nothing

Option Description

8.1       Do nothing

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with Section 2 of this report.

8.3       There are no engagement requirements for this option.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       This option does not implement the aims or objectives of the Ferry Road Master Plan, which was adopted by Council following extensive consultation with the local community.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.6.1   Inconsistency – Doing nothing does not fulfil the Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan, which designated Woolston Village as a ‘Walkable Centre’ and as forming part of the ‘Local Cycle Network’.

8.6.2   Inconsistency – Doing nothing does not fulfil the aims and objectives of the Ferry Road Master Plan, which has been approved by Council for implementation.

8.6.3   Reason for inconsistency – Doing nothing offers no improvements to Woolston Village.

Financial Implications

8.7       Cost of Implementation – There are no financial implications.

8.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – There is no increase in maintenance costs.  The required footpath resurfacing would need to be funded from the existing footpath maintenance budget.

8.9       Funding source – Funding is not required.

Legal Implications

8.10    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.11    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations

8.12    Non applicable

Implementation

8.13    Implementation dependencies – Non applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   Maintains existing level of car parking

8.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not implement the aims or objectives of the Ferry Road Master Plan, which was adopted by Council following extensive consultation with the local community

·   Does not provide a pedestrian focused environment

·   Does not upgrade the crossing facilities

·   Does not improve safety at St Anne’s School

·   Does not improve the amenity values of the village.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Plan for Approval

 

b 

Woolston Village 2018 Consultation Leaflet

 

c 

Woolston Village Parking Comparison Plan

 

d 

Woolston Village 2018 Project Team Responses

 

e 

Woolston Village 2016 Consultation Leaflet

 

f 

Woolston Village 2016 Consultation Submissions

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Kelly Griffiths - Project Manager

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Philippa Upton - Engagement Advisor

William Homewood - Traffic Engineer - Investigation & Design

Approved By

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


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14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 20 February 2019

 

15.    Curries Road/Tanner Street - Intersection Improvements

Reference:

19/187352

Presenter(s):

Sandra Novais, Project Manager Transport
Barry Hayes, Traffic Engineer Traffic Operations

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Consideration

 

The Board noted that there are projects within the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Board Area that have been delayed owing to a shortfall of funding and ask Council to consider reallocating the funding from the Curries Road/Tanner Street project to another project within the Board area. 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board approve and recommend to the Council:

1.         The ‘do nothing option’ for the Intersection Improvements: Curries Road/Tanner Street project.

2.         Cancel the project and remove from the Long Term Plan.

 

3.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That Council:

1.            Cancel the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan project Intersection Improvement - Curries Road/Tanner Street (Project 17402) and reallocate the funding, in consultation with the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board, to another project within the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Board area that has been delayed owing to a shortfall of funding.   

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Curries Road/Tanner Street - Intersection Improvements

172

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Meeting - Curries_Tanner intersection_Scheme Investigation data

178

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Curries Road/Tanner Street - Intersection Improvements

Reference:

18/383943

Presenter(s):

Sandra Novais – Project Manager
Barry Hayes - Traffic Engineer - CCC Operations

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to advise the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board of a change in circumstances at the Curries Road level rail crossing and request that the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board approve the ‘do nothing option’ for this project and recommend to Council that the project be cancelled. This is as a result of changes in Kiwirail Operations.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following detailed project investigations.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by using the engagement significance matrix. The engagement assessment performed by staff shows that the matter is of low significance due to the fact that no changes are proposed to the current layout of the intersection.

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board approve and recommend to the Council:

1.         The ‘do nothing option’ for the Intersection Improvements: Curries Road/Tanner Street project.

2.         Cancel the project and remove from the Long Term Plan.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Roads & Footpaths

·     Level of Service: 16.0.3.0 Maintain resident satisfaction with road condition - =38%

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Do nothing (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Continue with a project despite need not being there.

 

4.3       Option Summary – ‘Do nothing’ Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     It reflects the current situation at the intersection and rail crossing.

·     No road works disturbance to residents.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Enhancement opportunity at the intersection is lost.

 

5.   Context/Background

Location

·   The roads and their classifications within this project are:

·     Tanner St– Collector

·     Curries Rd – Collector

·     Maunsell St – Collector (East of the intersection - towards Cumnor)

·     Maunsell St – Local (West of the intersection - towards Garland)

 

·   These roads do not form part of the freight network, walking network, core public transport network or local cycleway network, as outlined in the CTSP.

·   The Heathcote Major Cycleway Route is currently being constructed along Cumnor Terrace to the east of this intersection.

·   The location of the project is shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1 – Location of the Tanner/Curries/Maunsell intersection.

5.2       The project brief identified a traffic efficiency problem at the intersection during the shunting operation at the railway crossing on Curries Road.  Shunting operations were causing the line to be closed to road traffic, hence resulted in delays to traffic with cars waiting for long time to be able to cross the railway line.

5.3       In the analysis of the 10 year CAS data 2007 – 2017 there were three crashes at this intersection. Two of these were non injury crashes and one resulted in a minor injury.

5.4       Attachment 1 of this report contains information about crashes, traffic volumes, rail activity and operations works in the intersection.

Project Objectives

5.5       The original project objectives are outlined below.

5.5.1   Improve capacity and minimise traffic delays at the intersection especially during shunting operation.

5.5.2   Allow efficient movements for heavy traffic through the intersection;

5.5.3   Free up Tanner St Corridor and encourage Tanner Street traffic to use the Cumnor Terrace and Chapman Road route especially during shunting operation;

5.5.4   Align the intersection design with the Heathcote Expressway Major Cycleway proposal

5.5.5   Maintain safety for all road-users; and

5.5.6   Develop a cost-effective solution.

Evaluation of objectives

5.6       The primary objective of the scheme was to reduce the delay experienced at this intersection due to shunting at the railway line. 

5.7       Based on the investigation undertaken and outlined in the scheme report, it is considered that the rail crossing no longer has a significant detrimental impact on the capacity of the road network in this location. The average delay is less than 2 minutes when the crossing is in operation and the average queue length is 4 vehicles. Shunting on average occurs 5 times/day.

5.8       Since the project was initiated, railway operations have changed. Lyttelton Port Company’s (LPC) ‘Inland’ facility at Rolleston is now the major freight hub (where previously it was in the CityDepot/Woolston area) and the majority of shunting operations are now carried out at Rolleston. Major freight roading networks have been developed to support this change (e.g. extension of Halswell Junction road and extension of rail tracks by Hornby).

5.9       The LPC Inland Port at Rolleston, named ‘MidlandPort’ is considered critical by the Port Company for increasing container movement by rail and with the aim of removing trucks from Christchurch roads and allowing customers to avoid road congestion and delays.

5.10    Mindful of the above, and given that the primary objective for the project is no longer required as there is little delay to the traffic and no benefit from the proposed works, the project should be cancelled. 

Conclusions

5.11    Based on the above the project team recommends the ‘do nothing option’ for this project as it is considered any improvements are not necessary at this intersection due to the change in the railway operations since the project was initiated.

6.   Option 1 – Do nothing – remove project from LTP (preferred option)

Option Description

6.1       For this ‘Do nothing’ option no changes to the intersection layout are required.  Normal maintenance activity would continue.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with Section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       This project has not reached the consultation phase and no options were presented to the community.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies, especially the Long Term Plan 2015-25, which includes improvements for this intersection. Council approval is required for this project to be cancelled.

Financial Implications

6.6       Cost of Implementation - nil

6.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – there will be no additional maintenance costs if the intersection stays the way it is.

6.8       Funding source – n/a

Legal Implications

6.9       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

Risks and Mitigations

6.10    There is no significant risk associated to the implementation of this option for the intersection.

6.11    No barriers arms are present at the intersection currently.

Implementation

6.12    Implementation dependencies - n/a

6.13    Implementation timeframe – n/a

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.14    The advantages of this option include:

·     It reflects current situation at the intersection and rail crossing.

·     No road works disturbance to residents.

6.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Enhancement opportunity at the intersection is lost.

7.   Option 2 - Continue with the intersection upgrade project

Option Description

7.1       This option involves progressing with the scheme design, consultation, design works and construction works for the project and allow for potential changes to the physical layout of the intersection.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with Section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This project has not reached the consultation phase.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies, especially the Long Term Plan 2015-25, which includes improvements for this intersection, but, it does not address the issues that trigged the project and as the issues are now considered minor the option is not recommended.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $75,000 - $300,000

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - there may be additional maintenance costs that are yet to be determined.

7.8       Funding source – previous LTP (2015-2025)

Legal Implications

7.9       Nil

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    There is a risk of public perception that Council is utilising funds for projects that have no benefit.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - n/a

7.12    Implementation timeframe – n/a

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Potential enhancement of street environment due to new landscaping.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Funding is expended for no benefit.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Meeting - Curries_Tanner intersection_Scheme Investigation data

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Sandra Novais - Project Manager

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 4 February 2019

 

16.    Redcliffs Transport Project - Redcliffs School Transport Safety Requirements

Reference:

19/136280

Presenter(s):

Mark Gregory – Transport Network Planner
Isabelle Gensburger – Project Manager
Tara King – Senior Engagement Advisor

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Consideration

 

1.    The Board received and considered deputations from the Redcliffs School Board of Trustees, Redcliffs School Principal and Mr Macadam a local resident. 

 

2.    The Board considered that the speed on Main Road, Sumner needs to be reduced in the vicinity of the new Redcliffs School and acknowledged that vehicle speeds around schools is an issue throughout the city.  The Board requested staff to engage with the community on the potential for 30kph speed restrictions on Beachville Road and Celia Street and asks the Council to advocate on behalf of the community for 30kph school speed zones in line with other slow speed zones in the city.

 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Approve the preferred Option, consisting of the following (in accordance with Attachment A)

a.         Establish a turning restriction, banning the right turn movement from Main Road (from the east) to Beachville Road (to the north/east).

b.         Extend the traffic island at the intersection of Main Road/Beachville Road intersection, as per Attachment A.

c.         Disestablish the bus stop on the south side of Main Road, including the indented bay, (located approximately 70 metres east of McCormacks Bay Road).

d.         Resolve no stopping markings in place of the bus stop (entirely) on the south side of Main Road (approximately 70 metres east of McCormacks Bay Road).

e.         Establish a zebra crossing, to operate as a School patrol crossing, outside of 25-27 Main Road, including kerb build outs.

f.          Remove the pedestrian crossing opposite the proposed Redcliffs Park (the ‘old School site’).

g.         Construct a refuge island and kerb build outs in place of the pedestrian crossing, opposite the proposed Redcliffs Park.

h.         Establish a kerb extension and pedestrian crossing refuge island, at the intersection of Beachville Road / Celia Street.

i.          Establish a footpath on Celia Street, between 53 Celia Street and Beachville Road (a distance of approximately 93 metres).

2.         That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to the Council to approve:

a.         A new variable speed limit of 40km/h (School Zone), as per Attachment A:

i.          On Main Road, commencing approximately 42 metres west of the McCormacks Bay Road centre line, for a distance of approximately 480 metres.

ii.         On Beachville Road, from Main Road (at Main Road / Beachville Road/McCormacks Bay Road intersection), to outside 107 Beachville Road; a distance of approximately 320 metres.

iii.        On Celia Street, outside 47 Celia Street to the intersection of Beachville Road/Celia Street; a distance of approximately 140 metres.

iv.        On McCormacks Bay Road for a section of approximately 20m south of Main Road.

b.         Cycle lanes on approaches to proposed zebra crossing and refuge island, in accordance with Attachment A.

 

3.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Approve the preferred Option, consisting of the following (in accordance with Attachment A)

a.         Establish a turning restriction, banning the right turn movement from Main Road (from the east) to Beachville Road (to the north/east).

b.         Extend the traffic island at the intersection of Main Road / Beachville Road intersection, as per Attachment A.

c.         Disestablish the bus stop on the south side of Main Road, including the indented bay, (located approximately 70 metres east of McCormacks Bay Road).

d.         Resolve no stopping markings in place of the bus stop (entirely) on the south side of Main Road (approximately 70 metres east of McCormacks Bay Road).

e.         Establish a zebra crossing, to operate as a School patrol crossing, outside of 25-27 Main Road, including kerb build outs.

f.          Remove the pedestrian crossing opposite the proposed Redcliffs Park (the ‘old School site’).

g.         Construct a refuge island and kerb build outs in place of the pedestrian crossing, opposite the proposed Redcliffs Park.

h.         Establish a kerb extension and pedestrian crossing refuge island, at the intersection of Beachville Road / Celia Street.

i.          Establish a footpath on Celia Street, between 53 Celia Street and Beachville Road (a distance of approximately 93 metres).

j.          Request staff to engage with the community on the potential for 30kph speed restrictions on Beachville Road and Celia Street.

 

4.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approves  new variable speed limit of 40km/h (School Zone), as per Attachment A:

a.         On Main Road, commencing approximately 42 metres west of the McCormacks Bay Road centre line, for a distance of approximately 480 metres.

b.         On Beachville Road, from Main Road (at Main Road/Beachville Road/McCormacks Bay Road intersection), to outside 107 Beachville Road; a distance of approximately 320 metres.

c.         On Celia Street, outside 47 Celia Street to the intersection of Beachville Road/Celia Street; a distance of approximately 140 metres.

d.         On McCormacks Bay Road for a section of approximately 20 metres south of Main Road.

e.         Cycle lanes on approaches to proposed zebra crossing and refuge island, in accordance with Attachment A.

2.      Advocates to the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) for 30kph school speed zones in line with other slow speed zones in the city.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Redcliffs Transport Project - Redcliffs School Transport Safety Requirements

184

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Redcliffs Transport Plan for approval

198

b

Redcliffs Transport Project Public Information Leaflet

199

c

Redcliffs Transport Project Submission Form

201

d

Redcliffs map of submissions

203

e

Map of all submissions

204

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Redcliffs Transport Project - Redcliffs School Transport Safety Requirements

Reference:

19/14647

Presenter(s):

Mark Gregory – Transport Network Planner,
Isabelle Gensburger – Project Manager
Tara King – Senior Engagement Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to approve the proposed changes to the road network, associated with ensuring a safe environment for the proposed Redcliffs School development (Refer Attachment A).

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated as part of the 2018/19 funding round process.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by using the engagement and significance matrix.  Staff have considered the significance of the decision to be made by the Community Board and Council.  Their assessment is that the matter is of medium significance for the following reasons:

2.1.2   There is a strong interest within the local community in relation to any work that is associated with the new Redcliffs School.

2.1.3   The new Redcliffs School cannot operate without a full safety audit that includes specific consideration of access to the school and speed in the area.  This transport plan works to address this requirement.

2.1.4   There are strong safety benefits in the implementation of the transport plan, as it will ensure that children and parents accessing the school can do this safely and traffic is managed appropriately.

2.1.5   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect this assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Approve the preferred Option, consisting of the following (in accordance with Attachment A)

a.         Establish a turning restriction, banning the right turn movement from Main Road (from the east) to Beachville Road (to the north/east).

b.         Extend the traffic island at the intersection of Main Road / Beachville Road intersection, as per Attachment A.

c.         Disestablish the bus stop on the south side of Main Road, including the indented bay, (located approximately 70 metres east of McCormacks Bay Road).

d.         Resolve no stopping markings in place of the bus stop (entirely) on the south side of Main Road (approximately 70 metres east of McCormacks Bay Road).

e.         Establish a zebra crossing, to operate as a School patrol crossing, outside of 25-27 Main Road, including kerb build outs.

f.          Remove the zebra crossing opposite the proposed Redcliffs Park (the ‘old School site’).

g.         Construct a refuge island and kerb build outs in place of the zebra crossing, opposite the proposed Redcliffs Park.

h.         Establish a kerb extension and pedestrian crossing refuge island, at the intersection of Beachville Road / Celia Street.

i.          Establish a footpath on Celia Street, between 53 Celia Street and Beachville Road (a distance of approximately 93 metres).

2.         That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to the Council to approve:

a.         A new variable speed limit of 40km/h (School Zone), as per Attachment A:

i.          On Main Road, commencing approximately 42 metres west of the McCormacks Bay Road centre line, for a distance of approximately 480 metres.

ii.         On Beachville Road, from Main Road (at Main Road / Beachville Road/McCormacks Bay Road intersection), to outside 107 Beachville Road; a distance of approximately 320 metres.

iii.       On Celia Street, outside 47 Celia Street to the intersection of Beachville Road/Celia Street; a distance of approximately 140 metres.

iv.        On McCormacks Bay Road for a section of approximately 20m south of Main Road.

b.         Cycle lanes on approaches to proposed zebra crossing and refuge island, in accordance with Attachment A.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Traffic Safety and Efficiency

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of casualties on the road network - =129 (reduce by 5 or more per year)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Approve the Redcliffs Transport Plan as per attachment A (preferred).

·     Option 2 – Do not approve the Redcliffs Transport Plan and request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Meets objectives relating to safety and the design is safety audited.  The outcome of Audit finds no outstanding safety matters.

·     Ensures that effects on the function of the Arterial Road network, including the strategic freight corridor, are limited.

·     Minimum impact on surrounding communities (e.g. no reduction in availability of on street car parking).

·     Achieves financial and legal requirements (outlined below, section 6.32).

·     Designed to be appropriately scaled to meet anticipated needs and demands.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     It has not been possible to include a crossing point on Main Road in immediate vicinity of site pedestrian access.

4.4       Option Summary – Advantages and Disadvantages (Option 2)

4.4.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     There are no identified advantages at this stage.

4.4.2   The disadvantages of this Option

·     Uncertain that safety objectives would be achieved, and need for revised planning, design and safety auditing.

·     Uncertain that outcome would achieve financial and legal objectives.

·     Uncertain that outcome would be appropriately scaled to meet anticipated needs and demands.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       The Ministry of Education (MoE) are planning to operate a school, initially for approximately 300 pupils (potentially increasing to 400 over time).  The MoE have acquired the former Redcliffs Park site for this purpose, and have been granted resource consent for the project. Following the preferences of Council (7 September 2017), conditions have been included in both the Land Sale Agreement and Resource Consent, that suitable safety remediation works be undertaken in order to ensure safe pedestrian access to the proposed school, with particular focus on Main Road.  Substantial funding has been sought from the MoE, and the design has been undertaken in partnership with the MoE.

5.2       The objectives of the scheme are to enable safe pedestrian access to the proposed school, without compromising the function of the network, including preserving the ‘alternative freight route’ function of Main Road. The design has been safety audited (with a ‘post implementation audit’ to follow) and no outstanding safety concerns are identified. Whilst achieving the objectives, the preferred option is also suitably scaled (in terms of cost and likely effects) to the size of the proposed school, and requires no additional funding from Council over and above pre-existing proposals.

5.3       Several alternative design options have been considered, including a crossing closer to the proposed building access. However, it has not been possible to achieve a crossing which would comply with necessary safe design standards without compromising the Arterial and freight function of Main Road.

5.4       The preferred option achieves the provision of safe walking routes, (integrated with the location of pick up – drop off points) including carefully aligned crossings. Pedestrians will not be required to walk ‘out of their way’ to access a safe crossing, meaning that all pedestrian crossing activity of Main Road are expected to be managed, and within a reduced speed environment. 

5.5       Safety works will continue after implementation of the scheme, to ensure that access to the school operates as intended. A School Travel Plan is to be prepared in partnership between the MoE/Board of Trustees and the Council’s Travel Demand Management Officer, and ensure ongoing dialogue in this space. A post implementation Safety Audit will also be undertaken, and monitoring by Council’s transport team.

Community Consultation

5.6       Community Consultation on the Redcliffs Transport Project was undertaken from 19 November 2018 to 17 December 2018.  The submission form asked submitters to indicate whether: Yes, they supported the traffic changes; or no they did not support the traffic changes.  There was also the opportunity to provide any further comments on the transport plan. (Refer to Attachment B and C for the public information leaflet and submission form).

5.7       A public drop in session was held on Tuesday 27 November from 4 pm to 6 pm at the Redcliffs Mt Pleasant Bowling Club in Redcliffs.  There were 15 residents who attended the drop in session over the two hour period, to find out more information on the project and to drop off their feedback forms.  Generally those who attended supported the transport plan but had some concerns about the increase in traffic on Celia Street and the removal of the bus stop.

5.8       Approximately 150 consultation leaflets were hand delivered to properties surrounding the new Redcliffs School location, including 68 absentee land owners.  A link to the consultation page on ‘Have Your Say’ was also emailed out to 798 key stakeholders (those who participated in the consultation on the new Redcliffs School land swap) and printed copies of the consultation leaflet were made available at the Linwood Service Centre, Civic Offices, Matuku Takotako:  Sumner Centre, Redcliffs Village Library, Redcliffs School and Beckenham Service Centre.

5.9       A Newsline article was also published on the 19 November 2018 and included a link to where online submissions could be made https://ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/newsline/show/3178

5.10    At the close of consultation 48 submissions were received with 27 (56%) in support of the transport plan, 17 (36%) not in support and 4 (8%) who did not indicate.

Yes - support

No – do not support

Did not indicate

Total

27 (56%)

17 (36%)

4 (8%)

48

 

5.11    All submissions have been provided to the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board and are publicly available on the Council ‘Have Your Say’ page electronically https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/207

 


 

6.   Option 1 – Redcliffs Transport plan as per attachment A (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       A package of measures intended to facilitate safe pedestrian and cyclist access to the proposed Redcliffs School site.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are consistent with the level of significance for this project.  These activities are included in section 5.2 to 5.5 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi  Tahu, their culture and traditions.

6.5       Mahaanui Kurataiao Limited (MKT) have been provided with all the information on this project.  The project team had not received specific feedback from MKT at the time of writing this report.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Local residents surrounding the new Redcliffs School location and those who use the school are specifically affected by this option due to their proximity to the new school and their use of the school.  Their views have been collected as part of the consultation process.

6.7       At the close of consultation 48 submissions were received with 27 (56%) in support of the transport plan.

6.8       The Redcliffs School Board of Trustees support the transport plan, but would prefer the speed limit to reduce to 30 km/h instead of 40 km/h.

6.9       The Ministry of Education also support the transport plan.

6.10    Environment Canterbury support the transport plan, however they do have concerns about the space left between bus stops, in particular with the removal of the bus stop on the corner of Main Road and McCormacks Bay Road.

6.11    The location of other submissions and whether they support the transport plan is available on a on the attached map (refer to Attachments D and E).

Themes relating to those who support the Redcliffs Transport Plan

6.12    For those submitters who supported the transport plan, the common reasons were:

Reasons for supporting the plan

Submitter ID #

No. of comments

Good safety improvements

20615, 20598, 20583, 20513, 20205

5

Speed reductions good

20603, 20583, 20573, 20513, 20361

5

Happy with the pedestrian crossings

20603, 20598, 20205, 20195, 20167

5

 


 

6.13    For those who did support the transport plan there were also further requests:

Requests

Submitter ID #

No. of comments

Move zebra crossing closer to the school

20598, 20583, 20513, 20540

4

Reduce the 40 km/h school speed limit to 30 km/h (extend to Celia Street and Beachville Road).

20598, 20583, 20513

3

Do not ban the right turn onto Beachville Road from Main Road (Causeway end)

20287, 20222

2

Install traffic lights at the Beachville Road and Main Road intersection (Causeway end).

20183

1

 

6.14    Project team comments in relation to these are as follows (where relevant):

Moving of the zebra crossing

6.15    There were four comments from those who support the transport plan, requesting that the zebra crossing is moved closer to the school.

“We would like to ask that the new zebra crossing is places as close as possible to the school.  Closer than planned would be very much appreciated”.  Submitter ID #20598.

Due to other technical challenges, there isn’t room to locate the crossing directly outside the school gate.  We have instead located is as close as possible, and have also ensured that the location of the crossing suits all users.

School speed zone reduced from 40 km/h to 30 km/h

6.16    There were three comments from those who support the transport plan, requesting that the 40 km/h speed limit is reduced further to 30 km/h and includes all of Celia Street.  There were also two separate comments requesting that the entire length of Celia Street was included in the speed reduction area.

“We would prefer a 30kph rather than 40kph speed limit around the school, including all of Beachville and Celia as these streets will have children crossing to the school all along their lengths.  The evidence is definitive on how much safer for pedestrians 30kph is than 40kph”.  Submittter ID #20583.

The proposed 40km/h limit is cognisant with standard school speed zone treatments around the City; however, the project team will monitor the performance of the school speed zone post implementation, and recommend proposed changes if necessary (noting that these will require special approval from the New Zealand Transport Authority). 

Celia Street already has traffic calming measures in place with the narrowing of the road and installation of the islands.  It is considered as an existing low speed environment.

Do not ban the right turn into Beachville Road

6.17    There were three comments from those who support the transport plan, requesting that the right turn into Beachville Road from Main Road (at the Causeway end) is not banned.

“The proposal to prohibit a right turn into Beachville Road for cars coming from Sumner should be rejected.  It will just increase traffic along Beachville Road and past the school, and is entirely unnecessary”.  Submitter ID #20287.

The main purpose of this plan is to ensure it is safe and the design has been safety audited.  The current space available for right turning traffic will not be enough, and the result will be increased delays on Main Road, as the right turn queue ‘over spills’. Furthermore, the presence of a right turn queue will obstruct pedestrian sight distance at the crossing. Therefore, if the right turn is in place it will create congestion issues on the Arterial Road network and visibility issues for pedestrians using the pedestrian refuge island.

Installation of traffic lights at the Beachville Road and Main Road intersection

6.18    There was one comment from a submitter who supports the transport plan, suggesting a set of signalised traffic lights is installed at the Beachville Road and Main Road intersection (Causeway end).

“I do wonder whether with the extra traffic, whether lights should be installed at this intersection, with pedestrian crossing for school children”.  Submitter ID #20183

Signalised traffic lights were considered for this intersection, but the proposal did not meet the test in relation to demand, cost and network impacts.  The size of the school is not large enough to generate enough traffic to justify the significant cost for signalised lights.  In order for the lights to work appropriately the McCormacks Bay Road and Main Road intersection (opposite Beachville Road) would also require traffic lights, which would also increase the cost and put it well outside the available budget.

Themes relating to those who do not support the Redcliffs Transport Plan

6.19    For those submitters who did not support the transport plan, the common reasons were:

Reasons for not supporting the plan

Submitter ID #

No. of comments

Concern over increased congestion and traffic issues

20422, 20356, 20297, 20158

4

No mention of cyclists in the transport plan

20641, 20605, 20599,

3

Do not support right turn ban from Main Road onto Beachville Road (Causeway end).

20400, 20398

2

Request to see the 40 km/h speed limit reduced to 30 km/h

20605, 20599

2

Request for roundabout installation at Beachville Road and Main Road intersection (Causeway end)

20207

1

Request for traffic lights to be installed at Beachville Road and Main Road intersection

20338

1

 

6.20    Project team comments in relation to these are as follows (where relevant).

Concern over increased congestion and traffic issues

6.21    There were four comments from submitters who did not support the transport plan, in relation to the school traffic creating further issues in the area.

“Very concerned about the impact of significant increased traffic on homes and community in narrow Celia and Beachville Roads, congestion, parking and traffic speed.  Neither road was ever intended as a main traffic thoroughfare to and from a school.  Submitter ID #20422.

The transport plan provides three opportunities for accessing the school with either Main Road, Beachville Road or Celia Street, which should split up traffic numbers.  The school is also working on a school travel plan as part of the conditions of the resource consent, this plan will work to actively encourage students to walk or cycle to school instead. 

The Redcliffs Transport Plan will be an improvement to what is currently in place.  The site will also be monitored to ensure that it is working appropriately.

No mention of cyclists in the transport plan

6.22    There were three comments from submitters who did not support the transport plan, as the plan made no mention of cyclists.

“I am concerned about the lack of cycling facilities in this plan.  Main Road and Beachville Road are important cycling connections between Sumner to the east and the rest of Christchurch to the west, and these works would be an excellent opportunity to make safer and more attractive”.  Submitter ID #20605.

Cycle lanes will continue to operate along Main Road as they have done previously.  The Coastal Pathway is also available for some pupils to use.  There is not enough road space to separate the cycleway with separator posts and this route is not a major cycleway route.  We also need to accommodate heavy vehicle trucks, as they will use Main Road again once Sumner Road is re-opened.

Do not support right turn ban from Main Road onto Beachville Road

6.23    There were two comments from submitters who did not support the transport plan, as they do not support the right turn ban from Main Road onto Beachville Road (Causeway end).

“I support everything except the no right turn onto Beachville Road from Main Road – while I think it is a good idea to reduce potential congestion around the new pedestrian crossing, I am worried that it would funnel a significant amount of school traffic down Celia Street.  Celia Street is narrow and not suited to heavy traffic volumes”.  Submitter ID #20400

Please refer to project team comments in section 6.17 of this report.

Speed zone reduced from 40 km/h to 30 km/h

6.24    There were two comments from submitters who did not support the transport plan, as they would like to request the speed zone is changed to 30 km/h.

“I would also support lowering a speed limit to 30 km/h in a school zone rather than 40 km/h.  A lower speed limit will not significantly increase travel time, as it does not affect average speed as much as it affects top speeds, but the security gain for cyclists, particularly children cycling to school, will be worth it”.  Submitter ID #20605

             Please refer to project team comments in section 6.16 of this report.

Request for roundabout installation at the Beachville Road and Main Road intersection

6.25    There was one submitter who did not support the transport plan, who suggested that a roundabout would work better at the Beachville Road and Main Road intersection (Causeway end).

“A safer option would be to realign McCormacks Bay Road slightly so that it lines up more closely with Beachville Road and install a mini roundabout”.  Submitter ID #20207.

There would be a significant cost to install a roundabout at this intersection, as additional land would be required. Given the relatively low turning traffic volumes, compared to non-turning, the level of service for the side roads would not be improved by a roundabout, meaning that the sought after improvements would not be achieved by a roundabout.


 

Request for traffic lights to be installed at Beachville Road and Main Road intersection

6.26    There was one submitter who did not support the transport plan, who suggested that a set of signalised traffic lights would work better at the Beachville Road and Main Road intersection (Causeway end).

“For the McCormacks Bay/Beachville/Main Road intersections, install lights after the intersection (on the Causeway) to enable pedestrians/cyclist to join the coastal pathway”.  Submitter ID #20338.

Please refer to project team comments in section 6.18 of this report.

Comments from those who did not indicate

6.27    There were four submitters who did not indicate on their submission form whether yes they support the plan or no they do not support the transport plan.  The main comments related to retaining the right turn, increased traffic and congestions concerns and request to reduce the speed limit proposed from 40 km/h to 30 km/h.

The project team comments in relation to these concerns are responded to in section 6.17, 6.21 and 6.16 of this report. 

6.28    In summary, the main themes from all submissions relate to:

Description

No. of comments

Project team comment

Reduce the 40 km/h school speed limit to 30 km/h (extend to Celia Street and Beachville Road).

5

To be monitored, but a reduction would require NZTA approval.

Move zebra crossing closer to the school

4

Crossing is as close as we can technically get it.

Do not ban the right turn onto Beachville Road from Main Road (Causeway end)

4

For safety reasons the right turn is being banned.

Concern over increased congestion and traffic issues

4

We are not expecting this to be an issue with what is in place, but we will monitor.

No mention of cyclists in the transport plan

3

The final plan to be approved now specifically marks out the cycle lanes.

 

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.29    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies, including the Land Sale Sub Committee’s recommendations adopted by Council on 7 September 2017.

Financial Implications

6.30    Cost of Implementation: $396,841

6.31    The following funding streams:

6.31.1 $183,000 received from the Ministry of Education

6.31.2 $213,841 programmed through the Master Plan ‘Main Road M3 Beachville Road Streetscape enhancements’


 

Legal Implications

6.32    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

6.33    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

6.34    The legal consideration is that the proposal:

6.34.1 Enables conditions of Resource Consent to be enacted, agreed within the framework of resource Management Act s176, namely that:

“The school shall not commence operation at the new site until a full safety audit is undertaken in accordance with “Road Safety Audit Procedures for Projects: Guidelines”, NZTA May 2013, with particular consideration given to:

Pedestrian crossing location and design for school pupils crossing Main Road to the school; and

The design of the Main Road/Beachville intersection; and

Vehicle Speeds in the vicinity of the school”.

6.34.2 The design safety audit has been completed, and a post-implementation safety audit will also be completed.                 

6.34.3 Meets the Conditions of Land Sale, with regards to the delivery of road safety measures and financial contributions towards the Project paid by the Ministry of Education:

"The Crown agrees to pay to the Council a minimum of $183,000 towards new traffic management and pedestrian safety systems, such sum to be paid on the Settlement Date."

Risks and Mitigations

6.35    There is a risk to the Ministry of Education’s project in the event that the proposed Part C matters are not resolved. 

Implementation and dependencies

6.36    Approval of Part A matters by Council, including Cycle lanes, and inclusion of the temporary (School zone) speed limit.

6.37    Implementation of the temporary (school zone) speed limit must proceed in accordance with section 2.5 and 2.6 of the ‘Land Transport Rule Setting of Speed Limits (2017)’. Consultation with the Community Board and Community meets the requirements of the rule. Subject to Community Board approval, formal approval will be sought from the additional parties identified in the rule, including NZTA and Police. The proposed scheme meets the technical requirements for a school speed zone.

6.38    Option 1 would be constructed from mid-2019, in time for the proposed School opening currently scheduled for January 2020.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.39    The advantages of this option include:

·   Meets objectives relating to safety; and design is safety audited. Outcome of Audit finds no outstanding safety matters.

·   Ensures that effects on the function of the Arterial Road network, including the strategic freight corridor, are limited.

·   Minimum impact on surrounding communities (e.g. no reduction in availability of on street car parking).

·   Achieves financial and legal requirements (outlined below, section 6.32).

·   Designed to be appropriately scaled to meet anticipated needs and demands.

·   Developed in partnership with the NZTA and Traffic Engineering Consultants, and considered the ‘best’ option, optimising costs and impacts, in light of an array of other design options.

6.40    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It has not been possible to include a crossing on Main Road in the immediate vicinity of the school entrance.

7.   Option 2 – Do not approve the Redcliffs Transport Plan and request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

Option Description

7.1       Do not adopt the preferred option; adopt alternative designs.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option could be high due to the Legal Implications (see paragraph 7.12).

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are to Consult (as defined within the Significance and Engagement Policy).

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Local residents surrounding the new Redcliffs School location and those who use the school are specifically affected by this option due to their proximity to the new school and their use of the school.  Their views would need to be collected and considered again if a completely new traffic design was created.

7.6       At the close of consultation 48 submissions were received with 17 (36%) not in support.  However, there were no submitters who indicated that a transport plan was not required at all and that staff should do nothing.  Those who did not support the plan did acknowledge that changes need to be made to accommodate the new Redcliffs School location.

7.7       Alignment with Council Plans and Policies.

7.8       This option is likely to be inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

7.8.1   Inconsistency – Does not respond to the Hearing Panel’s recommendations made to Council (7th September 2017) for a school speed zone ‘pedestrian safety systems that may be required’.

7.8.2   Amendment necessary – an alternative scheme could possibly meet requirements approved by Council.

Financial Implications

7.9       Cost of Implementation - Unknown

7.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Unknown

7.11    Funding source – Unknown

Legal Implications

7.12    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.13    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

7.14    The legal consideration is that under Option 2:

7.14.1 The Ministry of Education cannot enact Conditions of Resource Consent, and henceforth would be unable to operate a school without being in breach of conditions.

Risks and Mitigations

7.15    Given uncertainty of Option 2, there is a risk that technical, financial and legal requirements would not be met. The ability of the Ministry of Education to deliver the proposed school, within the purview of its Conditions of Consent, would be uncertain.

Implementation

7.16    Implementation dependencies – unknown.

7.17    Implementation timeframe – unknown.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   No known advantages at this stage.

7.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Legal risks: The MoE would be unable to proceed with the proposed school, until such time that an alternative design was found to meet requirements of Conditions of Consent.

·   Financial: There are no known sources of funding for alternative designs at this stage, especially those pertaining to more expensive options.

It is unlikely that options of greater expense (for example, traffic signals at Main Road/Beachville Road/McCormacks Bay Road) would be appropriately scaled to demand, forecast growth and unlikely to achieve value for money against any of the funding criteria.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Redcliffs Transport Plan for approval

 

b 

Redcliffs Transport Project Public Information Leaflet

 

c 

Redcliffs Transport Project Submission Form

 

d 

Redcliffs map of submissions

 

e 

Map of all submissions

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Mark Gregory - Transport Network Planner

Tara King - Senior Engagement Advisor

Isabelle Gensburger - Project Manager (Consultant)

Approved By

Richard Holland - Team Leader Asset Planning

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

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14 March 2019

 

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14 March 2019

 

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14 March 2019

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 20 February 2019

 

17.    Cambridge Green Pouwhenua Artwork Future Treatment Options

Reference:

19/187249

Presenter(s):

Jo Grigg, Project Manager

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Consideration

 

1.    The Board considered that the pouwhenua are a significant feature of the local community and noted that the community, or the original working party that installed the pouwhenua, had not been consulted on the removal or the future of the pouwhenua. 

 

2.    The Board understands that Ōtākaro Limited have an artworks fund for the Avon River Corridor and that funding to reinstate the pouwhenua or replacements may be obtained from Ōtākaro Limited.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Council:

1.         Decommission the Cambridge Green Pouwhenua artwork and carefully remove the remaining carved wooden pou from site and return all three pieces to the carver’s family

2.         Commission a new artwork for the plinths on this site in the future.

 

3.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Note that the Community Board has requested staff consult with the original commissioning group before a decision is made by the Council.

2.         Decommission the existing Pouwhenua artwork in Cambridge Village Green Reserve and carefully remove the remaining carved wooden pouwhenua from site and return all three pieces to the carver’s family

3.         Commission a new artwork for the plinths on this site in the future. 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Cambridge Green Pou Artwork Future Treatment Options Report

207

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Cambridge Green Pouwhenua Earthquake Structural Inspection Report

217

b

Cambridge Green Pouwhenua - Condition Assessment June 2011

230

c

Cambridge Green Powhenua Core Assessment  - Treetech Revised Report 5 July 2016

253

d

Cambridge Green Pouwhenua Structural Review 24 January 2019

266

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Cambridge Green Pou Artwork Future Treatment Options Report

Reference:

18/951434

Presenter(s):

Jo Grigg, Project Manager, Parks Project Management Team

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to recommend to Council an option for the future treatment of the Cambridge Green Pouwhenua artwork.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated to Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board as a result of the earthquake damage to the artwork.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the cost, city wide significance and number of people affected by the decision.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

It is recommended that the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Decommission the Cambridge Green Pouwhenua artwork and carefully remove the remaining carved wooden pou from site and return all three pieces to the carver’s family

2.         Commission a new artwork for the plinths on this site in the future.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.9.1.4 To manage and maintain Public Monuments, Sculptures, Artworks and Parks Heritage Buildings of significance - Public Monuments, Sculptures, Artworks & Parks Heritage Buildings Asset of above average condition: 80%

4.2       This report supports the Artworks in Public Places Policy 2002.

4.2.1   That the Council approves the Procedures for Moving, and Altering Artworks as described in Appendix 10

4.3       An Artworks Commissioning Agreement was not executed for this artwork.

4.4       The following options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Decommission the artwork and return the wooden pou to the carver’s family, and commission a new artwork at a later date (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Repair existing and carve new central pou

·     Option 3 – Do nothing

4.5       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Option 1 - Preferred Option)

4.5.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The original artwork is no longer damaged and deteriorating.

·     The risk of the remaining two pou falling in a seismic event is eliminated.

·     The concrete plinths remain, therefore no requirement for consents, archaeological authority. Impact on ecological system is significantly reduced.

·     There are funds available to undertake the removal.

·     Supported by the carver’s family representative.

·     Supported by Matapopore representatives.

·     Supports Maori tikanga practices.

·     Commissioning a new artwork allows Ngāi Tahu / Ngāi Tūāhuriri history to continue to be interpreted on the site.

·     The site continues to be enhanced with artwork.

4.5.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The context of the original artwork as a whole including the plinth is lost permanently.

·     The carved pou are no longer on display and the plinths largely hidden by the surrounding foliage until such time as a new artwork is commissioned.

·     There is a risk that the community perceive the artwork could have been repaired or replaced like for like.   However this can be mitigated through effective communication and education on the cultural sensitivities surrounding this artwork.

 

5.   Context/Background

Artwork Commissioning and Interpretation

5.1       An Artwork Commissioning Agreement was not executed for this artwork.

5.2       The Pouwhenua in Cambridge Village Green Reserve were erected in 2004 to signify the importance of the site to Māori. This area was a part of Tautahi’s Pā site.

The macrocarpa pouwhenua were carved by Tohunga Whakairo George Edwards, and bought by the Hagley/Ferrymead Community Board for the site via a third party.

A small working party oversaw the artwork plan. The working party comprised representatives from Tuahiwi, Ōtautahi Runaka, Council staff, the Council Community Board and local residents associations. The artworks were given a judges citation from Creative New Zealand for the works and the consultation process that was undertaken.

The concrete plinths were designed by Council’s former Maori Community Arts Advisor under the guidance of Reverend Maurice Gray. The designs on the plinth are moko kauae (traditional Maori chin tattoo worn by Maori women).

Pou A: Hine-titama (Goddess of life)

Pou B: Hine-nui-te-pō (Goddess of death & wisdom)

Pou C: Hine-ahu-one (Goddess of mortal beings)

The poles figuratively represents ‘te ara’ – ‘the pathway’ to the star constellation of Tautoru (Orion’s Belt). The three stars of Orion’s Belt are at the top of each pole. The feminine spiritual pathways which connect to the masculine cosmic stars are captured in the structures. The first pole is Tautahi, the middle pole is Taurua and the third Tautoru which completes the trinity of stars.  The rope cords are symbolic as they bind the masculine and feminine energies together as one united force.

The Pou were erected and unveiled at a dawn ceremony carried out by Reverend Maurice Gray. One half of a pounamu mauri stone is installed in the plinth of the central pouwhenua. The other half is located beneath the Tribute to Firefighters artwork upstream.

In the handover report following installation, it notes that the wooden pouwhenua were installed in a degraded state. The lifespan of the wooden pou was estimated at 5-10 years and the rope five years.  The concrete plinths have a lifespan of 50 years.

 

Condition Assessment

5.3       In the 22 February 2011 Canterbury earthquake, the central pou (B) failed and fell into St Mary’s stream. The two other pou (A and C) moved out of alignment by approximately 5-6°. Lateral spreading is visible in the surrounding area. Refer Attached– CCC Structural Inspection Report dated 3 October 2011.

The fallen pou was recovered in April 2011 and transported to CCC storage.  A condition assessment was undertaken by Emily Fryer Conservation in April and June 2011. Refer attached Condition Assessment Report dated June 2011. The pou was reported to have substantial decay and was in a very poor condition.

Treetech were engaged in June 2016 to undertake a condition assessment of the two remaining pou, as there were concerns over the level of decay. Refer attached Treetech Revised Report5 July 2017. Their investigations involved using a sounding hammer to detect audible changes in tone to the wood which would indicate areas of potentially poor wood structure. Visual observations of deterioration in the wood surface was also recorded.  The consultant arborist took two 350mm (L) core samples from each pou in the lower and upper third respectively.

The following was recorded:

·   Pou A (note reported as Pou 1 in Treetech Report)

-      The smaller of the two remaining pouwhenua

-      external degradation and splintering

-      Core Sample A – Lower third showed localised degradation of outer weathered surface but good wood from approximately 15mm and deeper to the centre.

-      Core sample B – Upper third showed overall sound wood. Good exterior surface with soft wood only 0.10mm depth.

·   Pou C (note reported as Pou 2 in Treetech Report)

-      The larger of the two remaining. Close proximity fall distance to pathways.

-      H&S concern falling. Reduced quality of wood. Greater target area for falling.

-      Core Sample C – Lower third showed substantial soft, deteriorating wood. Sound wood estimated at 250mm depth. The width of the pou is 520mm. Weaker wood structure with a softer interior and potentially reduced tensile strength.

-      Core Sample D – Upper third substantial soft, deteriorating wood. Sound wood estimated at 210mm plus depth. The diameter of the pou is 450mm. Weaker wood structure with a softer interior and potentially reduced tensile strength.

Recommendations: Pou A contains enough sound wood to remain on site however will require treatment and monitoring.  Analysis of the core samples indicate that the strength of Pou C has been compromised and should be removed.

Consultation

5.4       Council staff held a series of meetings during 2016 and 2017 with George Edwards’ family, Paula Rigby and Matapopore representatives to discuss the future treatment of the artwork.  Due to George Edwards’ ill health at the time, his daughter Mrs Kirsten Aumua represented the Edwards family. The following was discussed:

5.4.1   The Edwards family gave consent to decommission the artwork and expressed a strong desire to see the three pieces returned home to family.

5.4.2   Matapopore and Paula Rigby supported in principle the decommissioning of the artwork due to its earthquake damage.

5.4.3   An artwork or carving and its pieces would not normally be separated. The pieces should remain together, therefore the fallen pou should be displayed or returned to the site. The pieces should be given the treatment and honour they deserve and be preserved together.

5.4.4   It would be acceptable to reduce the height of the pou by cutting out the decayed wood, however in later discussions and upon inspection of the fallen pou it was agreed that the decay extended to nearly 90% of the length of the pou. It was agreed that the pou could not be re-erected safely at its full height and too much of the original material would be lost if the decayed wood was cut out.

5.4.5   A pouwhenua would not normally be laid down. They cannot be retained on site without a transitional layer between them and the ground.

5.4.6   The original carver is not able to undertake repairs or carve a new pou. It is not customary to have another carver carry out the work.

5.4.7   Agreed if the carved pou were to be removed, then it would be acceptable to leave the concrete plinths and tidy the top rope sections of the artwork. This would minimise the impact on St Mary’s stream and the ecosystem of the site. There would be no requirement for consents, an archaeological authority etc.


 

6.   Option 1 - Decommission Artwork and Gift Carved Pou to the Artist’s Family and Commit to Commissioning a New Artwork (preferred option)

Option Description

6.1       This option would see the artwork decommissioned and the remaining two pou carefully removed from the plinths. The concrete plinths would remain. The foundations extend approximately 6m into the ground below. The rope would be tidied to the top of the plinths or removed.

6.2       The fallen pou that is currently in storage would be transported to Cambridge Green and all three pou returned to the carver’s family. The careful removal would ensure that as much of the original carving is kept together.

6.3       Maori tikanga practices undertaken.

6.4       The Council would follow the Artworks in Public Places Policy, for the commissioning of new artwork.

6.5       The timeframe to commission a new artwork would be in excess of 12 months.

6.6       Mana Whenua and the Artist of the plinth would be involved in the project from its commencement, to participate in the early stages of the consultation and provide comment on the new artwork and to ensure the correct interpretation.

Significance

6.7       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report  Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium. Engagement with the carver’s family and Matapopore has been undertaken for the removal of the existing pou.

6.8       Engagement with mana whenua and the wider community will be required for any new artwork on this site.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.9       This option does involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

6.10    Matapopore representatives were consulted with in 2016 & 2017 and were supportive in principle of the decommissioning of the original artwork.

6.11    Consultation with Matapopore will be required for any new artwork.

Community Views and Preferences

6.12    The artists are specifically affected by this option due to the loss of the original artwork. The artists and/or their representatives are in support of the decommissioning of the artwork.

6.13    The community are affected by this option when commissioning a new artwork, due to “having a true account of the area’s history from the original occupants of the region, e.g. Ngāi Tahu”. This will allow for open and transparent conversations with communities and citizens within the region.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.14    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.15    Cost of Implementation - $4500 approximately for the removal. Funding source – Delivery Package Artworks Project (CPMS25506)

6.16    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs until the new artwork is installed - $500 per annum (wash down of the plinths, structural assessment)

6.17    Cost of Implementation for the new artwork is unknown and can only be determined once the new artwork has been designed and commissioned.

6.18    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs for the new artwork - Unknown

Legal Implications

6.19    There is a legal implication relevant to this decision. A commissioning agreement would need to be executed with the new artist for their artwork.

6.20    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations

6.21    There is a risk that in the event of another seismic event the remaining pou will fall.  This may result in injury to members of the public, destruction of the remaining pou.

This risk is eliminated by removing the carved pou.

Implementation

6.22    Implementation dependencies are as follows:

6.22.1 The removal of the remaining carved pou is approved by the Community Board.

6.22.2 Commissioning of a new artwork is approved by the Community Board

6.22.3 Funds are sourced to allow the project to proceed.

6.22.4 The artist who designed the plinth is engaged early on in the consultation process and approves of the new artwork

6.22.5 Mana whenua approve the new artwork.

6.23    Implementation timeframe – it is estimated that to commission a new artwork the process could take in excess of 12 months from consultation to installation.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.23.1 The advantages of this option include:

·     The original artwork is no longer damaged.

·     The risk of the remaining two pou falling in a seismic event is eliminated.

·     The concrete plinths remain, therefore no requirement for consents, archaeological authority. Impact on ecological system is significantly reduced.

·     There are funds available to undertake the removal.

·     Supported by the carver’s family representative.

·     Supported by Matapopore representatives.

·     Supports Maori tikanga practices.

·     Commissioning a new artwork allows Ngai Tahu / Ngai Tuahuriri history to continue to be interpreted on the site.

·     The site continues to be enhanced with artwork.

6.23.2 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The context of the original artwork as a whole including the plinth is lost permanently.

·     The carved pou are no longer on display and the plinths largely hidden by the surrounding foliage until such time as a new artwork is commissioned.

·     There is a risk that the community perceive the artwork could have been repaired or replaced like for like.   However this can be mitigated through effective communication and education on the cultural sensitivities surrounding this artwork.

7.   Option 2 - Repair the Carved Wooden Pou

Option Description

7.1       This option would see the decayed wood removed and new wood spliced in. The fallen pou cannot be reinstated, therefore a new central pou would be carved.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low. Consultation will be required with mana whenua, and the artist of the plinth.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does involve a decision in relation elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

7.5       Consultation with the carver’s family and Matapopore highlighted that it is culturally insensitive to engage another artist/carver to repair and replicate an original           carver’s work.

7.6       Further engagement with mana whenua and the artists family will be required if this option was selected.

Community Views and Preferences

7.7       The community and members of the public are not affected by this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.8       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.8.1   Inconsistency – The Artworks in Public Places Policy 2002, Appendix 10 Moving and Altering Artworks.

7.8.2   Reason for inconsistency – The carver’s family provided consent to decommission the artwork and advised another carver would not normally work on the repair or replication of an original carvers work. With the passing of George Edwards, the pou are unable to be repaired. This would not meet the policy conditions as approval has not been granted for repair.

Financial Implications

7.9       Cost of Implementation – estimated > $15,000

7.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – estimated at $2000 pa

7.11    Funding source – There are currently no funds identified sufficient to cover the cost of this option.

Legal Implications

7.12    There is no legal implication relevant to this decision

Risks and Mitigations

7.13    There is a risk of that if the pou are to be repaired, the carver may not fully understand Ngai Tahu / Ngai Tuahuriri history and therefore may not be mandated to integrate adequate interpretations to the current depictions. This may result in offence to both iwi and the artist’s whanau.

7.13.1 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) is implemented will be low.

7.13.2 Engagement would be required with both mana whenua and the carver’s family to gain approval to a) undertake the work and ensure the correct interpretation and b) approval of the carver.

Implementation

7.14    Implementation dependencies - Agreement required from the original artists and/or their representatives and mana whenua.

7.15    Implementation timeframe – in excess of 6 months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   The artwork is repaired like for like.

7.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Not supported by the artists family

·   In principle does not comply with Artworks in Public Places Policy, Appendix 10.

8.   Option 3 - Do Nothing

Option Description

8.1       This option would see the two remaining pou left on site with no further treatment.

8.2       The remaining pou are exhibiting areas of decay and will continue to decay to the point where they fail and fall.

8.3       This option is not in keeping with the intent of the original artwork.

8.4       This option is not supported by the carver’s family.

Significance

8.5       The level of significance of this option is Low consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.6       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.7       This option does involve a decision in relation elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

8.8       Following consultation with the carver’s family and Matapopore, it was advised that an artwork or carving and its parts would not normally be separated. The carvings should remain together, therefore the fallen pou should be displayed or returned to the site. The carvings should be given the treatment and honour they deserve and be preserved together. By doing nothing, this option does not support mana whenua culture and tradition.

Community Views and Preferences

8.9       There is currently no community interest.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.10    This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.10.1 Allowing the artwork to degrade and be incomplete is not aligned with LTP Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.9.1.4 To manage and maintain Public Monuments, Sculptures, Artworks and Parks Heritage Buildings of significance - Public Monuments, Sculptures, Artworks & Parks Heritage Buildings Asset of above average condition: 80%

Financial Implications

8.11    Cost of Implementation - $0

8.12    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Unknown. However it is anticipated that there will be future costs for removal once the two pou have degraded to a point they fail and fall.

8.13    Funding source – No funding source has been identified in the LTP for future works.

Legal Implications

8.14    There is a potential for legal implication relevant to this decision, if one of the pou fails in an earthquake or due to degradation and injures a member of the public.

Risks and Mitigations

8.15    There is a risk that in a seismic event the remaining pou could fall and injure members of the public walking by.

Implementation

8.16    This option has no implementation dependencies or timeframe.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.17    The advantages of this option are NIL.

8.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Ongoing maintenance costs

·   Risk of injury to members of the public, legal action and associated costs.

·   The remaining pieces of the artwork will continue to degrade

·   The artwork remains incomplete.

·   Not supported by the carver’s family.

·   This option does not meet the Councils’ Level of Service.

·   Does not meet the Councils Art in Public Places policy.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Cambridge Green Pou EQ structural inspection report.doc

 

b 

Cambridge Green Pouwhenua - Condition Assessment June 2011

 

c 

Cambridge Green Powhenua Core Assessment  - Treetech Revised Report 05-07-16

 

d 

Cambridge Green Pouwhenua Structural Review 24.01.2019

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Jo Grigg - Project Manager

Approved By

Rod Whearty - Team Leader Project Management Parks

Darren Moses - Manager Capital Delivery Community

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

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14 March 2019

 

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14 March 2019

 

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14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 20 February 2019

 

18.    Gloucester/Worcester Street Park - Proposed Name and Landscape Plan

Reference:

19/188426

Presenter(s):

Sarah Blows, Parks Planner
Nicki Williams, Landscape Architect
Jennie Hamilton, Engagement Advisor

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Consideration

 

1.    The Board were concerned on the lack of walkway lighting, a rubbish bin and a drinking fountain for people and dogs.  The Board requested further staff advice on the inclusion of these items in the landscape plan.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Approve and recommend to the Council for adoption the proposed name as listed below:

Proposed Name

Address

Legal Description

Area

Reserve Classification

Te Ara a Rongo – Gloucester/Worcester Park

300 Gloucester Street

Part Town Reserve 88

0.0506

Recreation Reserve

302 Gloucester Street

Lot 1 Deposited Plan 7674

0.0508

Recreation Reserve

304 Gloucester Street

Lot 2 Deposited Plan 7674

0.0521

Recreation Reserve

261 Worcester Street

Part Section 88 Town Reserve Christchurch

0.0516

Recreation Reserve

 

2.         Approve the landscape plan (reference number LP373602) for the development of the new community park located at 300, 302, 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street (Attachment A).

 

3.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Approve the landscape plan (reference number LP373602) for the development of the new community park located at 300, 302, 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street (Attachment A).

2.         Request staff advice on the possible placement of a recycle/rubbish bin, a drinking fountain and the cost of putting lighting along the walkway for Te Ara a Rongo – Gloucester/Worcester Park.

 

4.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original Staff Recommendation Accepted with Change

Part A

That the Council:

1.    Adopt the proposed park name as listed below:

Proposed Name

Address

Legal Description

Area

Reserve Classification

Te Ara a Rongo – Gloucester/Worcester Park

300 Gloucester Street

Part Town Reserve 88

0.0506

Recreation Reserve

302 Gloucester Street

Lot 1 Deposited Plan 7674

0.0508

Recreation Reserve

304 Gloucester Street

Lot 2 Deposited Plan 7674

0.0521

Recreation Reserve

261 Worcester Street

Part Section 88 Town Reserve Christchurch

0.0516

Recreation Reserve

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Gloucester/Worcester St Park - Proposed Name and Landscape Plan

271

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Gloucester/Worcester St Park - Proposed Landscape Plan

282

b

Gloucester/Worcester St Park Sumbissions

283

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Gloucester/Worcester St Park - Proposed Name and Landscape Plan

Reference:

19/10383

Presenter(s):

Sarah Blows – Parks Planner, Nicki Williams – Landscape Architect, Jennie Hamilton – Engagement Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to:

1.1.1   To approve and recommend to the Council for adoption the proposed park name.

1.1.2   Approve the landscape plan for the development of a new community park located at 300, 302, 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street (Attachment A).

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following a seminar with the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board on 17 September 2018.

1.3       The report presents a proposed name and landscape concept plan for a new community park located at 300, 302, 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street. The proposed name and landscape plan was prepared in consultation with the community and affected stakeholders.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by using the engagement and significance matrix. While there are strong social and environment benefits in developing the park in this densely populated residential area, the project area is small and there is minimal risk to the Council in implementing the proposals.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report exceed the requirements for this level of significance because a decision was made at the outset of this project for staff to work closely with the surrounding community to develop a landscape plan and name for the neighbourhood park.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Approve and recommend to the Council for adoption the proposed name as listed below:

Proposed Name

Address

Legal Description

Area

Reserve Classification

Te Ara a Rongo – Gloucester/Worcester Park

300 Gloucester Street

Part Town Reserve 88

0.0506

Recreation Reserve

302 Gloucester Street

Lot 1 Deposited Plan 7674

0.0508

Recreation Reserve

304 Gloucester Street

Lot 2 Deposited Plan 7674

0.0521

Recreation Reserve

261 Worcester Street

Part Section 88 Town Reserve Christchurch

0.0516

Recreation Reserve

 

2.         Approve the landscape plan (reference number LP373602) for the development of the new community park located at 300, 302, 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street (Attachment A).

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.8.5.0 Satisfaction with the range and quality of recreation opportunities within parks - Resident satisfaction with range and quality of recreation facilities within Parks: = 85%.

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Approve and recommend to the Council the proposed name and approve the landscape plan (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do not recommend the proposed name to Council and; do not approve the landscape plan

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Improvement to the habitat, biodiversity and amenity values of the new park.

·     Encourages community ownership of the new park.

·     Implementing the outcome of the public consultation.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Closure of the park during the construction period of the implementation of the landscape plan is approved.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The Public Open Space Strategy 2010-40 identified the residential neighbourhoods in the east of the central city as an area requiring additional open green space with an inner city pedestrian connection.

5.2       Following the 2010 and 2011 earthquake an opportunity arose to purchase 300, 302 and 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street. On 19 September 2012 the Council resolved:

5.2.1   “(a) Approve the purchase of the property situated at 300, 302 and 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street in the inner City as a Recreation Reserve pursuant to Section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977, as part of the Neighbourhood Parks Programme.”

5.2.2   “(c) Pursuant of Section 16 (2)(A)(a) of the Reserves Act 1977 the reserve be classified as a Recreational Reserve.

5.3       The unoccupied, earthquake damaged houses located at 300, 302 and 304 Gloucester Street were demolished and the land returned to grass.

5.4       The property located at 261 Worcester Street was subject to a residential lease until 18 January 2013. Once the residential lease expired the house was demolished and the land returned to grass.

5.5       The development of the park was put on hold until funding became available.

5.6       Once funding was identified in the Long Term Plan 2018-2028, staff carried out a site investigation.

5.7       Staff attended a seminar with the Community Board on Monday 27 November 2017 to discuss the name and landscape plan.

Engagement with the community

5.8       Staff met a representative of Te Whare Roimata on 30 November 2017 to gain an understanding of the area and identify those who might wish to be involved with the development of the park.

5.9       The former owner of the properties attended a meeting on 15 January 2018 to discuss the family’s knowledge of the land and to gain an understanding of the existing trees and plants on site.

5.10    Staff met with local residents on 17 January 2018 to talk about the project. From this meeting an informal community advisory group was formed.

5.11    Approximately 60 residents and several Community Board members attended a sausage sizzle on Wednesday 7 March 2018. This was an opportunity for local residents to meet onsite, share their ideas for the park and to meet other local residents.

5.12    Staff drafted a landscape plan based on the ideas that were raised during the drop-in evening. The draft plan was discussed and revised at two further drop-in sessions with the advisory group.

5.13    Efforts were made to involve Christchurch East School at every stage. Staff met the student council on several occasions throughout the project to hear their ideas for the development of the site. The draft landscape plan was revised to include their suggestions, such as a chess board, prior to consultation.

5.14    A theme throughout the project was the inclusion of artwork in the park. An idea raised at the drop-in evening was for the school to create a community artwork on the side of the garage which borders the park. The owner of the garage has given permission to use the neighbouring wall which borders the park for a community artwork. A local artist has been working alongside a group of Christchurch East School students to design and install a mural. This is a separate project which is running alongside the development of the park and is following the process outlined in the Artwork in Public Places Policy 2002.

5.15    Space has been set apart to allow room for a communal garden if the community wish to pursue this in the future. This will require a lease due to the recreation reserve status of the land and will need to follow the Christchurch City Gardens Guidelines.

5.16    Staff are working with the neighbours through the Fencing Act 1978 to replace some boundary fencing, which is currently outside the scope of this project.

5.17    A Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) assessment was undertaken in September 2018. This assessment recommended against providing lighting in the park. Lighting of parks is only proposed where there is facilities and associated car parks that allow for night time use (community halls for example), or where there is no alternative safe route. In this instance, the roading network is the alternative safe route.

5.18    A landscape concept plan was presented to the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board at a seminar on Monday 17 September 2018.

Name of the park

5.19    Prior to consultation a resident asked the Council to find a Maori translation for a pathway link.  As a result Ngāi Tahu gifted the name Te Ara a Rongo. The definition of Te Ara a Rongo is:

5.19.1 Ara is defined as a path between two locations (in this case the two streets).

5.19.2 Rongo is the Māori Atua/deity who has a number of names depending on the following:

·     Rongomātāne - deity of cultivated foods. In this case (and this reserve) would include the fruit trees.

·     Rongomaraeroa - deity of peace. In this case (and on this reserve) would include a safe   space to reflect, and for our children to play and to flourish.

5.20    Some local residents had suggested the name Gloucester/Worcester Park because it was simple and described the location. This was offered as a descriptive name that sits with Te Ara a Rongo.

5.21    Naming options were discussed at the seminar with the Community Board on Monday 17 September 2018.

5.21.1

6.   Option 1 – Approve and recommend to the Council the proposed name and approve the landscape plan (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       This option recommends to the Council to approve the dual name Te Ara a Rongo – Gloucester/Worcester Park and to approve the landscape plan.

6.2       Mana Whenua were consulted and Ngāi Tahu have gifted the name: Te Ara a Rongo.  (See 5.19 for how the name was derived.)

6.3       Some local residents suggested an English translation of Gloucester/Worcester Park to support Te Ara a Rongo.

6.4       The landscape plan, refer Attachment A, has been prepared in consultation with the community and affected stakeholders. The landscape plan features bug hotels, native trees, seating which are planned alongside a formal pathway linking Gloucester and Worcester Street.

Significance

6.5       The level of significance of this option is low, consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.6       Engagement requirements for this level of significance have been exceeded because of a decision made at the outset of this project for staff to work closely with the surrounding community to develop a landscape plan and name for the neighbourhood park.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.7       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water. However, the park is in the vicinity of the pā site of the Ngāi Tahu chief Tautahi, by the Ōtākaro/Avon River on what is now Kilmore Street.

6.8       Mana Whenua approached Ngāi Tahu who have gifted the name Te Ara a Rongo for the new park located at 302, 304 Gloucester Street and 261 Worcester Street. The link with Ngāi Tahi is also acknowledged in the proposed planting of native trees.

Community Views and Preferences

6.9       Formal consultation on the Gloucester/Worcester Park landscape plan, name for the park and potential artwork was undertaken from 15 November to 10 December 2018.

6.10    More than 600 consultation leaflets were delivered to properties in the surrounding area. Sixty five consultation leaflets were posted to absentee owners and information about the project was emailed to Housing New Zealand and other key stakeholders.

6.11    The response form asked three questions:

6.11.1 Do you support the proposed landscape plan for the new park?

6.11.2 Ngāi Tahu have gifted the name Te Ara a Ronga for the park. Local residents have suggested Gloucester/Worcester Park as the descriptive name. Do you support Gloucester/Worcester Park as the descriptive name?

6.11.3 What artwork would you like to see in the park?

6.12    At a consultation drop-in meeting at the park on 29 November new suggestions included whether a local resident could donate a Dacrydium cupressinum (Rimu) tree, additional planting, an extra seat, and repairs to a neighbouring fence.

6.13    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Board meeting and how they can request speaking rights. Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback summary with project team responses.

Proposed landscape plan

6.14    Of the 20 submissions received during the consultation, 17 (85%) supported the proposed landscape plan, two (10%) did not support the plan and one respondent (5%) did not indicate a view.

6.15    Positive comments included: “We think that this park is a great idea. The kids will love it! Also a nice place for people to sit in.”

6.16    A submitter suggested Hoheria augustifolia (Narrow-leaved Lacebark) rather than Hoheria lyalli (Mountain Lacebark) for the avenue of trees leading from Worcester Street. The project team had opted for the Hoheria Lyalli (Mountain Lacebark) because it was a smaller variety. However, after reviewing both species again staff accepted this suggestion.

6.17    As a result of feedback, one of the two proposed Acer plamatum ‘Bloodgood’ trees has also been changed to a Fagus sylvatica (Copper Beech) to bring a larger specimen tree into the park. A Rimu tree, which a nearby resident wishes to donate, has also been included in the plan for approval.

6.18    About 20 of the park’s existing trees will remain. Eighteen of these are exotics, including five fruit trees.

6.19    Three submissions wanted lighting to be included in the plan, while one respondent did not.  The project team advised that a safety review had confirmed that lighting should not be included. At night, there were safer alternative routes available and lighting could give people a false sense of security.

6.20    Four submitters queried the provision of chess pieces that would be stored in seats, saying these pieces were likely to disappear. The project team supports a submitter’s suggestion to label round draught pieces as specific chess pieces so they can be used for both games.

6.21    A submitter was unsure about the relevance of bug hotels in this urban setting. The project team advised that a key aspect of the play elements in the park is to give young visitors a taste of nature.

6.22    Two requests for a rubbish bin in the park were not accepted as these are not included in neighbourhood parks as people normally live close by and can take their rubbish home with them.

6.23    A communal garden requested by another submitter is outside the scope of the project. However, space has been retained next to the barbeque area where they can be added in future. This will require a lease due to the recreation reserve status of the land and will need to follow the Christchurch City Gardens Guidelines.

6.24    Two submissions mentioned that there have been alcohol-related issues in the park and have requested appropriate signage.

6.24.1 The recently reviewed Christchurch City Council Alcohol Restrictions in Public Places Bylaw 2018 notes that the park falls within a permanent alcohol ban area (central city) and that the ban applies at all times, 24 hours, seven days a week.

6.24.2 The Bylaw also notes that where it is practicable or reasonable to do so, the Council will erect signage within Alcohol Ban Areas to provide information to the public about the restrictions. The size, location and content of the signage will be at the Council’s discretion. Project funding has been set aside to erect signage.

6.25    Exercise/fitness facilities, additional Sophora microphylla (Kowhai) trees, another seat and a drinking fountain were not included in the plan. Reasons are outlined in the table of submissions and responses in Attachment B.

 

Changes to the draft landscape plan as a result of consultation are:

6.26    The avenue trees on 261 Worcester Street changed from Hoheria lyalli to Hoheria angustifolia. As this is a taller species than the H.lyalli (6m rather than 4m) they have been moved closer to the path to create greater distance from the property boundaries.

6.27    Two Acer plamatum ‘Bloodgood’ trees were originally proposed for the site. The Acer plamatum ‘Bloodgood’ tree closest to 310 Gloucester St has been retained and the other has been changed to a Copper Beech to bring a larger specimen tree into the park and to provide shade.

6.28    A Rimu tree has been added to the garden bed next to the nature play area. This location has been selected because a Rimu does best among other planting to keep the roots cool. This part of the site is slightly wetter and is well away from the property boundaries. It also has good visibility in this location.

6.29    Chess pieces changed to draughts pieces which are labelled with the names of the chess pieces. This allows people to play both draughts and chess. It makes the pieces less attractive to steal and they require less space for storage. The pieces will be kept in a storage seat that will have a combination lock on it. The combination will be shared with the local community.

6.30    Three storage seats were originally proposed.  By changing the chess pieces to draught pieces less storage is required in the park. Two of the storage seats have been removed and replaced with standard park benches. This has reduced the overall cost and allowed for an extra seat to be added next to the chess board; this extra bench seat will contain the draughts pieces and creates a U shaped seating area. Users of the bench seat can face either direction making this a more flexible space.

6.31    Appropriate signage indicating that alcohol is banned in the park.

Name of the park

6.32    During the consultation submitters were asked if they agreed with Gloucester/Worcester Park as the descriptive name or did they have any other suggestions.

6.33    Twelve submissions agreed with Gloucester/Worcester Park as the descriptive name. Of the seven who did not agree, six said the park should have only one name: Te Ara a Rongo.

6.34    One submitter suggested Two Links Park or Counties Park.

Future artwork

6.35    In the consultation plan a site near the Gloucester Street entrance was identified for a potential artwork for the park. A sculpture was the most popular choice for this space but options will be considered in a separate project.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.36    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

6.37    The Council Policy: Naming of Reserves and Facilities, outlines the procedure for the naming of reserves, which is for the proposed reserve name to be referred to the Community Board in the first instance and then to the Council for adoption.

Financial Implications

6.38    Cost of Implementation – The cost of implementing the current landscape plan is approximately $117,500.

6.39    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The approximate cost to maintain this new park is $1300 per annum.

6.40    Funding source – Financial year 2019 - $80,000 – CPMS 43676 Delivery Package Play and Recreation Development.  - $22,000 – CPMS 43660 – Community Parks Development. $15,500 Urban Renewal Budget.

Legal Implications

6.41    There are no negative legal implications to the naming of the Council land. The land has already been entered into the maintenance contract under a proposed name and the naming of the park complies with the Council Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities.

6.42    The land is classified for Recreation Reserve pursuant of Section 16 (2)(A)(a) of the Reserves Act 1977.

6.43    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

Risks and Mitigations  

6.44    There is a risk of increase in costs of play equipment caused through time delay from estimates at the concept plan stage until gaining approval and placing orders.

6.44.1 Planned treatment include: Confirming the estimate and obtaining a final quote. If the cost is higher than expected, other suppliers will be researched for better pricing.

6.44.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of risk is low.

Implementation

6.45    Implementation dependencies – Gaining Council approval of the proposed name. Gaining Community Board approval to proceed with construction of the landscape plan.

6.46    Name implementation timeframe:

·   Approximately one month after the names have been approved by Council.

6.47    Landscape implementation timeframe:

·   Community Board approval of landscape plan – February 2019.

·   Detailed design and tendering – March – May 2019.

·   Construction – June – July 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.48    The advantages of this option include:

·   Improvement to the habitat, biodiversity and amenity values of the new park.

·   Encourages community ownership of the new park.

·   Implementing the outcome of the public consultation.

6.49    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Closure of the park during the construction period of the implementation of the landscape plan is approved.

7.   Option 2 - Do not recommend the proposed name to Council and; do not approve the landscape plan

Option Description

7.1       This option does not recommend to the Council to approve the proposed name or approve the landscape plan. Further, the Community Board requests staff to consider alternative name and landscape options and to re-consult with the community.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low, consistent with section 2 in this report.

7.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance have been exceeded because of a decision made at the outset of this project for staff to work closely with the surrounding community to develop a landscape plan for the neighbourhood park.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water. However, the park is in the vicinity of the pā site of the Ngāi Tahu chief Tautahi, by the Ōtākaro/Avon River on what is now Kilmore Street.

7.6       The park is in the vicinity of the pā site of the Ngāi Tahu chief Tautahi, by the Ōtākaro/Avon River on what is now Kilmore Street.

7.7       Mana Whenua were consulted and Ngāi Tahu have gifted the name Te Ara a Rongo for the new park. The link with Ngāi Tahi is also acknowledged in the proposed planting of native trees.

Community Views and Preferences

7.8       Two of the 20 submitters (10%) did not support the proposed landscape plan.

7.9       Two submitters did not support either of the names Te Ara a Rongo or Gloucester/Worcester Park.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.10    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.11    Cost of Implementation – Further funding would be required to cover the cost of a Landscape Architect to draft a new landscape plan and for an Engagement leader for further community consultation.

7.12    Funding source – Financial year 2019 - $80,000 – CPMS 43676 Delivery Package Play and Recreation Development.  - $22,000 – CPMS 43660 – Community Parks Development. $15,500 Urban Renewal Budget. This option would have an impact on the total budget available for the development of the park.

Legal Implications

7.13    There are no negative legal implications to the naming of the Council land. The land has already been entered into the maintenance contract under a proposed name and the naming of the park complies with the Council Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities.

7.14    The land is classified for Recreation Reserve pursuant of Section 16 (2)(A)(a) of the Reserves Act 1977.

7.15    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

Risks and Mitigations  

7.16    There is a risk of increase in costs of play equipment caused through time delay from estimates at the concept plan stage until gaining approval and placing orders.

7.16.1 Planned treatment include: Confirming the estimate and obtaining a final quote. If the cost is higher than expected, other suppliers will be researched for better pricing.

7.17    Residual risk rating: the rating of risk is low.

Implementation

7.18    Implementation dependencies – gaining Community Board support to consult on the name of the park, draft a new landscape plan and approval of the revised landscape plan.

7.19    Implementation timeframe:

·   Redesign of landscape plan and investigate alternative names – March/April 2019.

·   Community Board Seminar – May 2019.

·   Community Engagement – June 2019.

·   Community Board Support for name and Approval of Landscape Plan – August 2019.

·   Detailed design, tendering, placing orders for equipment – September 2019

·   Construction – November 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.20    The advantages of this option include:

·   The community has the option to consider alternative landscape designs.

7.21    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Additional funding for design, consultation and implementation which may result in less budget being available for play equipment/furniture/landscaping (or alternatively more budget may be required to complete the project).

·   Delay in completing the project.

·   Consultation feedback did not support this option.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Gloucester/Worcester St Park - Proposed Landscape Plan

 

b 

Gloucester/Worcester St Park Sumbissions

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Blows - Parks Planner

Jennie Hamilton - Senior Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

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Council

14 March 2019

 

Report from Banks Peninsula Community Board  – 4 March 2019

 

19.     Sumner Road Realignment

Reference:

19/236959

Presenter(s):

Justin Sims

 

 

 

1. Banks Peninsula Community Board Consideration

 

The Board was concerned that not all of the piece of recreation reserve being taken for legal road was needed for the physical roadway.  Members wanted as much of that land as possible to be managed as reserve so that the environmental impact would be minimal.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council recommend to the Council that it resolve to:

1.         Delegate to the Chief Executive the power to apply to the Minister of Lands pursuant to s114(2)(e) of the Public Works Act 1981 for part of Urumau Reserve (record of title reference CB31B/11) as indicated Sec 1 on the plan attached, to be declared as road under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981, and to give the written consent of the Council under section 114(2)(h) of that Act.

2.         Delegate authority to the Property Consultancy Manager to do all things necessary at his sole discretion to implement and conclude the declaration as road.

 

3. Banks Peninsula Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council resolve to:

1.         Delegate to the Chief Executive the power to apply to the Minister of Lands pursuant to s114(2)(e) of the Public Works Act 1981 for part of Urumau Reserve (record of title reference CB31B/11) as indicated Sec 1 on the plan attached, to be declared as road under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981, and to give the written consent of the Council under section 114(2)(h) of that Act.

2.         Delegate authority to the Property Consultancy Manager to do all things necessary at his sole discretion to implement and conclude the declaration as road.

3.         Request that the Property Consultancy Manager work with the Lyttelton Reserve Management Committee to establish future roles and responsibilities for management of the land, with the aim of having the maximum amount of land to be legalised as road managed as part of the Urumau Reserve, to reduce the environmental impact as much as possible. The roles and responsibilities to be formally established in the Reserve Management Committee Terms of Reference or similar documentation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Sumner Road Realignment

293

 

 

 


Council

14 March 2019

 

 

Sumner Road Realignment

Reference:

19/233831

Presenter(s):

Justin Sims

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board to recommend to the Council that it approve the declaration as road of part of Urumau Reserve indicated as Sec 1 on the plan at 5.10 below (record of title reference CB31B/11) due to the realignment of Sumner Road.

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being submitted to the Council as it has undertaken rock fall mitigation works above Sumner Rd followed by road repairs to the carriageway itself.  As a result, part of the road at Windy Point was moved away from the cliff edge for safety and financial reasons.

1.3       The new alignment and subsequent need to declare part Urumau Reserve for road can be completed under the Public Works Act 1981 (PWA) but is not covered by any staff delegations so it requires Council approval.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined utilising the significance and engagement assessment worksheet.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

2.1.3   The assessment reflects the fact that there is no impact to the public’s use of the reserve due to the negligible impact as a result of the topography. Furthermore, this is a necessary action to establish the correct land status related to the Sumner Road works.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board recommend to the Council that it resolve to:

1.         Delegate to the Chief Executive the power to apply to the Minister of Lands pursuant to s114(2)(e) of the Public Works Act 1981 for part of Urumau Reserve (record of title reference CB31B/11) as indicated Sec 1 on the plan attached, to be declared as road under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981, and to give the written consent of the Council under section 114(2)(h) of that Act.

2.         Delegate authority to the Property Consultancy Manager to do all things necessary at his sole discretion to implement and conclude the declaration as road.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity:

·     Level of Service:  

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Declare part of Urumau Reserve as road (preferred option).

·     Option 2 – Do not declare the land as road.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Relocating the road was considerably cheaper than rebuilding it in its previous location which would have required significant cliff stabilisation and construction of an expensive retaining wall above sensitive Lyttelton Port Company infrastructure.

·     Relocating the road results in a safer road alignment.

·     There are no alternatives given the road abuts the reserve on one side and a cliff edge on the other.

·     The part of Urumau reserve which is affected by the proposal in this report cannot be put to meaningful use given its topography, so there is a negligible loss in amenity.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

             Part of the reserve will become road.

 

5.   Context/Background

The Works

5.1       Sumner Road has, as result of the Canterbury earthquakes, sustained a significant level of damage to the carriageway surface and road edge due to rock fall from the bluffs above the road and earthquake induced slipping of the seaward half of the road. The bluffs above the road became fragmented and loose and posed an ongoing safety risk to road users to the extent that the road was closed temporarily by the Council.

5.2       The project was undertaken in two phases, the first to be the rock fall source risk mitigation works above Sumner Road, which reduces rock fall risk and allows access to the road itself, while the second phase was the road repair and reconstruction works.

5.3       Works undertaken include source rock deconstruction by scaling Windy Point and the upper reaches of the Crater Rims Bluffs, with a 400-metre-long, 15-metre-wide catch bench constructed at the base of the bluffs to protect the road below from rock fall.

5.4       A rock bund has also been constructed in Double Gully to the west of the Crater Rim Bluffs to intercept rock fall from the bluffs. This bund is several metres high and 50 metres long, faced with basalt cobbles to reflect the basalt stone walls in the area.

The issue

5.5       As Sumner Rd in the location of the proposed realignment is bound by a cliff edge on one side and Urumau Reserve on the other, there is no alternative to the proposed realignment.

5.6       Making safe the cliff below the road was not cost effective nor does it provide the most resilient long term solution. The majority of the land is also not in Council ownership.

5.7       The road was therefore realigned into a small part of Urumau Reserve which is a classified recreation reserve as shown on the aerial photo below (the red lines indicating the current road boundaries).

5.8       The majority of the land in which the road is to be located is a cliff edge already significantly modified by previous earthquake related emergency works and therefore its amenity value as a recreation reserve is not being lost as it is not capable of use by the public in any event.

5.9       Access to existing walking and mountain bike tracks will still be possible albeit this will be from informal access points as was the case prior to the earthquakes.

The Decision

5.10    As Urumau Reserve is a recreation reserve, Sec 1 on the plan below should be declared road under the provisions of the PWA to make lawful the new road alignment.

5.11    Occupation of the reserve originally occurred under an emergency legislation warrant.  The decision in this report relates to legalising this occupation under “business as usual” legislation.

 

 


 

6.   Option 1 – Declare part of Urumau Reserve as road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Realign Sumner Road away from the damaged cliff edge on to part of Urumau Reserve that is adjacent to the road. As the reserve is a classified Recreation Reserve this must be declared road.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       Sumner Road users are specifically affected by this option. As the part of Urumau Reserve that is to be declared road is not useable by the public due to its topography, the users of the reserve are not directly affected.

6.5       The declaration of part of the reserve as road does not require public notification.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – as part of Sumner-Lyttelton Corridor project the required works are within approved project budgets.

6.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – as part of road network maintenance

6.9       Funding source – Sumner-Lyttelton Corridor capital project(s);
9982 Sumner Road Zone 3A Roading - HI CSA funded

Legal Implications

6.10    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision. The procedure to declare land as road has been used on many occasions and is set out in the PWA.

6.11    The process under section 114 of the PWA requires the Council to apply to the Minister of Lands, and the Minister of Lands, by notice in the Gazette, declares the land to be road. 

6.12    Under section 114(2) of the PWA, part of the process involves the Council and also for the Minister of Conservation to provide written consent to the Minister of Lands to the land becoming road. 

Risks and Mitigations    

6.13    There is a risk approval to declare the land as road is not received from the Council and the Minister of Conservation.

6.14    Risk that the required consent of the Council and Minister of Conservation is not received which means the road would be occupying recreation reserve.

6.14.1 Treatment: provide a compelling case as to why the reserve should be declared road.

6.14.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.15    Implementation dependencies - opening of Sumner Road is dependent on realignment of the existing carriageway.

6.16    Implementation timeframe – by 29th March 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   Relocating the road was considerably cheaper than rebuilding it in its previous location which would have required significant cliff stabilisation and construction of an expensive retaining wall above sensitive Lyttelton Port Company infrastructure.

·   Relocating the road results in a safer road alignment.

·   There are no alternatives given the road abuts the reserve on one side and a cliff edge on the other.

·   The part of Urumau reserve which is affected by the proposal in this report cannot be put to meaningful use given its topography, so there is a negligible loss in amenity.

6.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Part of the reserve will become legal road and part a Local Purpose (Road) Reserve.

7.   Option 2 – Do not declare the land as road.

Option Description

7.1       Do not declare the land as road and leave the road occupying part of Urumau Reserve in breach of the Reserves Act 1977.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not applicable.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Impact on users of the reserve would in practical terms not be affected given the topography of the land limits current use and the ability to access the balance of the reserve whether the land is legal road or not is unaffected.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is not consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies as it would not comply with the Reserves Act.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation - as part of Sumner Corridor project

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - as part of road network maintenance

7.9       Funding source – Sumner Corridor capital project

Legal Implications

7.10    A breach of the Reserves Act would be actionable by the Minister of Conservation.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.11    The Minister of Conservation may require the breach in the Reserves Act to be remedied.

7.12    Risk that the occupation of the reserve for road is still required to be formalised or else removed from the reserve.

7.12.1 Treatment: subsequently approve the land to be declared as road or realign the road.

7.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - opening of Sumner Road is dependent on realignment of the existing carriageway.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – by 29th March 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Urumau Reserve would not be affected.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·