Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Thursday 14 February 2019

Time:                                    9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Jamie Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

8 February 2019

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

Jo Daly

Council Secretary

941 8581

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 5

2.       Declarations of Interest............................................................................................................ 5

3.       Public Participation.................................................................................................................. 5

3.1       Public Forum....................................................................................................................... 5

3.2       Deputations by Appointment............................................................................................... 5

4.       Presentation of Petitions......................................................................................................... 5

Community Board Monthly Reports

5.       Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council............... 7

6.       Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council........................................ 11

7.       Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council - February 2019.......................................................................................................................................... 19

8.       Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council.................... 23

9.       Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council................... 27

10.     Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council......................................... 31

11.     Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council............................... 37

Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board

12.     Avonhead Park Cemetery...................................................................................................... 41

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13.     Halswell Junction Road - Legalisation of Land Acquired for Road..................................... 65

14.     Notice of Motion - Halswell Swimming Pool Operating Hours........................................... 77

Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

15.     Mt. Pleasant Sea Scouts Building - Gift & New Lease.......................................................... 81

16.     Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)............... 109

Papanui-Innes Community Board

17.     Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)............... 235

Staff Reports

18.     District Licensing Committee member resignation and recruitment process................. 361

19.     2018/19 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund........................................................ 363

20.     Chief Executive's Report - December 2018 and January 2019........................................... 367

21.     Resolution to Exclude the Public......................................................................................... 381  

 

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation

3.1  Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2  Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared

4.   Presentation of Petitions

4.1

Councillor Galloway will present a petition of 431 submissions regarding an extension of the opening hours for the Halswell pool for 2019-2020 season.

 

Petition summary and background:  There is a demand for the Halswell pool to be open earlier in the day.

 

Action petitioned for:  Extension of the opening hours for the Halswell pool for 2019-2020 season.

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

5.        Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1351478

Presenter(s):

Pam Richardson, Community Board Chairperson
Joan Blatchford, Community Governance Manager
Penelope Goldstone, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board report for December 2018.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board held a meeting on 17 December 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Traffic Calming Around Onuku Marae

Onuku Rūnanga requested traffic calming around Onuku Marae as some vehicles in the area drive at high speeds. This is of particular concern when events are held at the Marae, and when children are playing in a nearby stream. The Board approved two speed humps on Onuku Road near Onuku Marae to support safe and appropriate speeds.

·   More Room on Roads in Rāpaki

Rāpaki is a popular destination, in particular during the summer and when Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke holds events. As the settlement’s roads are generally too narrow for vehicles to park and still leave room for passing vehicles, Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke requested No Stopping restrictions. The Board decided to prohibit vehicles from stopping in parts of Rāpaki and to approve a give way control.

·   Community Funding Matters

The Board approved a grant of $2,648 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to Governors Bay Community Association towards the Governors Bay Fete and Music Festival.

·   Cass Bay Reserves Management Committee

The Board approved two new Committee members.

·   Meeting Schedule

The Board adopted its meeting schedule for February to September 2019.

·   Recess Committee

The Board appointed a Recess Committee for the holiday period.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Akaroa Community Health Centre Funding Request

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of the Akaroa Community Health Centre Funding Request Report was considered by the Finance and Performance Committee of the Whole, on 7 February 2019.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Port Hills Management Plan 

5.1       Staff have started initial planning for the Port Hills Management Plan. Staff will next brief Councillors and affected Community Boards to introduce this important project to them. Discussion with key stakeholders is expected to start by mid-2019.

Duvauchelle Wastewater Project   

5.1       Deep well injection is not an option for this project. The proposed ponds will be an issue for the location of the A&P Show, and the golf course may require reorganisation.

Little River Drainage Work    

5.1       A capital project is underway to address stormwater, drainage and flooding concerns around the village. The Little River Wairewa Community Trust made a detailed submission to the Christchurch City Council and Environment Canterbury Long Term Plans for this issue. The Council has allocated $825,000.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum, Deputations and Correspondence     

6.1       Proposal for Multi Sports Body in Akaroa

6.1.1   Jan Whitehead spoke to the Board regarding the Akaroa Tennis and Netball courts and a proposal to re-establish a multi sports body to redevelop the croquet, tennis and netball area in Akaroa to better fit the needs of the Clubs and the greater Banks Peninsula community. The Board agreed to pass the information circulated by Ms Whitehead to staff for comment.

6.2       Impact of Cruise Ships in Akaroa

6.2.1   Victoria Andrews spoke to the Board regarding the Council’s Marine, River and Lake Facilities Bylaw. She tabled a number of questions relating to how cruise ship visits to Akaroa fit with the bylaw, including how the Council decided that only one cruise ship per day will access Lyttelton’s new terminal yet Akaroa must accept two to four ships per day with its inadequate infrastructure. The Board requested that staff provide a response.

6.2.2   Mike Norris spoke to the Board about the untidy state of Akaroa, its lack of appropriate public toilets and the state of the traffic management signage associated with the cruise ship visits. He asked the Board several questions around these issues including why the Council has not placed the toilets in a more suitable location. The Board agreed to pass these questions to staff for reply.

6.3       Friends of Akaroa Museum

6.3.1   David Miller, President of the Friends of Akaroa Museum (FOAM), spoke to the Board regarding the activities of FOAM over the past year. He also spoke about the upcoming review of the Akaroa Museum Advisory Committee, saying that FOAM members were unanimous in their support of retaining the Committee.

6.4       Funding Request for Akaroa Community Health Centre

6.4.1   Paul de Latour and Gordon Bloxall, on behalf of the Akaroa Community Health Trust, spoke to the Board regarding the Akaroa Community Health Centre Funding Request report (refer to the report in this agenda). They asked that the Council consult with the community on a suggested rates levy to help fund the Akaroa Community Health Centre, and indicated that the Trust preferred the levy to be a fixed charge levied over a four year period.

6.4.2   Craig Hastie spoke to the Board regarding the Akaroa Community Health Centre Funding Request report.  He voiced his opposition to a proposed rates levy to help fund the Centre and asked that the Board decline the proposal.

6.4.3   Allison Craw spoke on behalf of the Guardians of Akaroa Hospital regarding the Akaroa Community Health Centre Funding Request report. She said the Guardians fully supported the request from the Akaroa Community Health Trust for a rates levy to help fund the Centre.

Committee and Working Party Matters 

6.5       Reserve Management Committees

6.5.1   The Board received minutes from three Reserve Management Committee meetings:

·     Robinsons Bay Reserve Management Committee – 5 November 2018

·     Lyttelton Reserves Management Committee – 18 November 2018

·     Cass Bay Reserves Management Committee – 6 December 2018

6.5.2   The Board requested that staff investigate options for the Cass Bay community to have limited access to the Steadfast land while the Port Hills Management Plan is under development and discuss options for a track linking the Summit Road to the Cass Bay / Governors Bay area.

6.5.3   The Board requested that staff provide advice on options for preventing people from developing pirate tracks on Council reserves.

6.5.4   $130,000 has been allocated in FY2018/19 for capital works for Banks Peninsula in the Long Term Plan in response to the submissions made by Reserve Management Committees. Staff have collaborated to allocate this funding equitably with regard to the submissions made by these Committees.

6.6       Akaroa Museum Advisory Committee

6.6.1   The Board received minutes from the Akaroa Museum Advisory Committee meeting held on 28 November 2018.

6.7       Head to Head Walkway Working Party

6.7.1   The Board received notes from the Head to Head Walkway Working Party meeting held on 19 November 2018. Progress continues with the Walkway, which will be a continuous track around Lyttelton Harbour from Awaroa/Godley Head to Te Piaka/Adderley Head.

6.7.2   The Diamond Harbour community is partnering with the Council to construct and maintain a section of the walkway. A team of enthusiastic volunteers are working closely with Council Rangers on this project.

6.8       Akaroa Issues Working Party

6.8.1   The Board approved the appointment of a new member to the Working Party.

6.8.2   The Board asked staff to review a previous decision regarding a shower at the Akaroa Beach, in light of the increase to water quantity in Akaroa and an offer from the Lions Club to fund the project.

6.8.3   The Board requested that staff arrange for the long grass in all unmown public areas of Akaroa to urgently be cut, including the picnic area in Childrens Bay, the grounds of Yew Cottage and the track on L’Aube Hill up to the French Cemetery.

6.8.4   The Board sought reassurance from staff that both the temporary toilets, and the sanitary bins in all toilets in Akaroa, would be fully operational over the upcoming holiday period.

Briefings      

6.9       My Council and Snap, Send, Solve

6.9.1   The Board received a briefing from staff on My Council and Snap, Send, Solve, which are systems used by the public to report issues to the Council. The Board asked if it could receive a report on the number of requests for service received from Banks Peninsula.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Community Board Plan for 2017/19 is available at the following link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Community-Boards/PDF-Banks-Peninsula-Community-Board-Plan-2017-2019-Adopted-31-July-20172.pdf

7.2       The next six monthly progress report will be reported to the Board at its 4 March 2019 meeting.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Review of Parks and Road Maintenance Contracts

8.1.1   The Board has recently been given an undertaking that Community Boards would be involved in the review of the Parks Maintenance Contract and the Road Maintenance Contract. The Board requested that staff liaise with the Board at an early stage in those processes.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Approved By

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

6.        Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1346912

Presenter(s):

Kim Money, Chairperson Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board report for December 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board held a meeting on 3 December. Decisions made under delegation were, the Board:

·   Approved 18 new road names in the Prestons Park Subdivision.

·   Approved the installation of a soccer goal in Aston Reserve by the Northshore Residents’ Association subject to the Association confirming some specific construction details and meeting Council installation requirements.  

·   Approved a grant of $1,000 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to The Burwood Daycare for the Elderly towards its Community Fair/Anniversary Celebration.

·   Adopted a board meeting schedule from 4 February to 2 December 2019 with meetings generally being held on the first and third Mondays, with Public Forums at the first Monday.

·   Approved a grant of up to $500 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund towards the cost of decorating the New Brighton Clock Tower for the 2018/19 holiday season.

·   Appointed a Recess Committee comprising the Board Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson and any two Board members available, to be authorised to exercise the delegated powers of the Coastal-Burwood Community Board for the period following its ordinary meeting on 3 December 2018 up until the Board resumes normal business on 4 February 2019.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A recommendations.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Christchurch Hot Pools

The land for the hot pools is currently being prepared in the area between the Beachside Playground and the North Ramp carpark and has an estimated 12 month build time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Aston Reserve soccer Goals

The Community Board approved the installation of a soccer goal in Aston Reserve. This project is led by Northshore Residents’ Association, following request from parents and children in the area for an additional soccer goal. It will be placed opposite the existing goal post in the reserve to create a small pitch for recreational games. 

6.2       Bexley Park Reserve – Toilet Block

In response to concerns raised to Board members about the toilets at Bexley Park Reserve, the Coastal-Burwood Community Board and Council staff, along with representatives of Velocity Karts and NAC BMX, attended a site visit to Bexley Park. Staff advised the solar panels and piping which provide power supply to the toilets, were removed following an act of vandalism.

Staff provided an update on the toilet block repairs that were in progress as well as the other projects at the Reserve that will be initiated in the coming months.

6.3       The Duck Down to the River - Riverside Festival

The Duck Down to the River - Riverside Festival is scheduled for Sunday 24 March at Kerrs Reach, Avonside Drive.  This event is being developed and organised in partnership with community groups in Burwood, Avondale and Dallington suburbs.  The event will offer a range of activities for local residents to enjoy on the river bank and on the river itself including kayaking, a duck race, giant games, inflatables, food, music and local community information stalls. The event is part of a project that received funding from the Community Resilience Partnership Fund.


 

6.4       Kite day New Brighton 2019

Deep South Kite day was held on the 26 January on New Brighton beach. Kite-makers from around New Zealand took part in the popular family-style event. Members of the public were encouraged to create and decorate their own kite for the day.

 

6.5       Burwood, Avondale and Dallington Initiatives

The Dallington Family Movie Night was held on Friday 25 January. The event started with a petting zoo, pony rides and entertainment. Residents brought along their own picnics and dinner. In spite of a cold wind there were a good number of residents in attendance and the event was well organised and hosted by the Dallington Community Trust.

 

6.6       New Brighton Clock Tower Festive Decorations

On 3 December 2018, the Board approved funding towards the cost of decorating the New Brighton Clock Tower for the for the 2018/19 holiday season. Festive wrapping was installed by Grace Vineyard Church Beach campus helpers. Grace Vineyard Church also contributed the majority of the cost. The wrapping has been warmly received by residents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.7       Common Ground     

Common Ground is a collaboration of South Brighton community organisations and mobile food operators to activate the empty section at the South Brighton roundabout as a community gathering space for the South Brighton and Southshore communities. It provides a place for eating, meeting, learning, performing, sharing, growing food, for markets and exhibitions, and for sharing food and produce. The project is designed to enable and enhance resilience and well-being for these communities who still have no permanent place to gather together, and who remain without the local facilities and businesses that were lost after the 2011 earthquake. 

The Board recently approved Discretionary Response Funding, to Sustain South Brighton towards the Project. In addition, contractors, have provided free labour, materials and equipment use to transform and fence the empty space.

 

 

 

6.8       New Brighton South of the Pier Re: Activate Works

The mural was completed last year and the first stage of the basketball court works have been completed (new asphalt and installation of a new basketball tower). The artwork on that surface is scheduled to be applied early February after the Coast to Coast event.

 

6.9       I love New Brighton  2019 – Waitangi Day

I love New Brighton is a local event run by local people, to celebrate all they love about New Brighton while giving local groups the opportunity to showcase their groups. The event was held at Thomson Park on Waitangi Day 6 February 2019. There were bouncy castles, Zorb balls, live bands, a sports zone, food stalls, a market, large games, information stalls, face painting, free barbeque, free parking and more.

                                                                    

 

6.10    Infrastructure projects underway

6.10.1 Robin Playground, Burwood - Play Space Renewal

This project has been initiated with the funding starting in financial year 2020 and construction programmed in financial year 2021.

 

6.10.2 Travis Wetland Boardwalk Extension

This project is to address the current issue with the existing boardwalk and paths that are prone to flooding. The project is currently in the early design / investigation stages with the construction planned for Financial Year 2020.

 

6.10.3 Travis Wetland Driveway Resurface

This project is to repair the damage to the existing asphalt driveway and car park. This project is currently in the design and cost estimating stage, however construction is currently planned for completion mid May 2019.

 

6.10.4 Donnell Sports Park Project

This project is to remediate the earthquake damage to the tennis & basketball courts and provide a new toilet, and is currently at the stage of processing the Resource Consent. The construction is currently planned for completion the last week of May 2019.

 

6.10.5 Thomson park renewal project

This project is to upgrade Thomson Park by way of a new car park, landscaping and Exeloo toilet. The project is currently at the stage of processing the Resource Consent. The construction is currently planned for completion mid June 2019. The exeloo is now in place.

 

6.10.6 South New Brighton Reserves Development

A project to develop South New Brighton Reserves has been initiated. Staff have met with the Community Board and received confirmation to progress with designing  the new pump track in South New Brighton Park, Bridge St (south) new picnic area and landscaping and Blighs Garden picnic area and natural play. The project has 3 years of funding available for this initial phase of development.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board approved the Coastal-Burwood Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 16 October 2017.This Plan, can be found at the following link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Community-Boards/Coastal-Burwood-Community-Board-Plan-2017-19.pdf

7.2       The Board’s ongoing decisions are being included as measures against the Outcomes and Priorities contained in the 2017 – 2019 Community Board Plan.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       The Board received a public forum from a representative of the Wainoni-Avonside Community Services Trust, supported by the Chair of the Dallington Residents’ Association, regarding psycho-social well-being issues that some of the Trust’s clients are presenting. The Board was also updated regarding the building used by the Trust which is in poor condition and now has limited use. Consequently, the Trust is looking at possibilities to move elsewhere. 

8.2       The Board provided feedback to Council on Regenerate Christchurch’s Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor Draft Regeneration Plan.

8.3       At the Board’s meeting on 3 December 2018, the Board noted the intent to request that the Council prioritise funding for a shared three suburb (Burwood-Avondale-Dallington) Community Centre from the Capital Acceleration Fund ‘Residential Red Zone Seed Funding’. The Board considers this a legacy project that is of critical importance to these three communities- Burwood, Avondale and Dallington. Staff have advised that following a Regeneration Plan being approved and the governance body/arrangements established for this area, priorities for implementation (i.e. which projects go first) could be discussed. The Board is aware of the work underway by both the Burwood-Avondale-Dallington Group who are carrying out a feasibility for a shared suburb community centre, as well as the work being undertaken by Council staff to develop a Community Facilities Network Plan.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Ann Furlong - Support Officer

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Peter Croucher - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

7.        Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council - February 2019

Reference:

18/1334390

Presenter(s):

Sam MacDonald, Chairperson Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for December 2018 and January 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held a meeting on 10 December 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Normans Road/Hartley Avenue - Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - the Board resolved to approve no stopping restrictions on the north side of the intersection of Normans Road and Hartley Avenue.

·   Rugby Street - Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - the Board approved no stopping restrictions on Rugby Street south west of its intersection with Papanui Road.

·   Springbank Street - Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - the Board approved no stopping restrictions in Springbank Street near its intersections with Sevenoaks Drive.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2018-19 Youth Development Fund - the Board approved grants totalling $2,400 to eight recipients to participate in sporting and cultural events in Wellington, Rotorua, Gold Coast, and New York City and Orland.

·   Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Meeting Schedule 2019 - the Board approved its meeting schedule for 2019 with meetings generally being held on the first and third Mondays.

·   Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board - Recess Committee - the Board appointed a Recess Committee, comprising the Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson and a minimum of two other Board members available to exercise the delegated powers of the Board for the period following its 10 December 2018 meeting until normal business resumes on 4 February 2019.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Avonhead Park Cemetery

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Bishopdale Skate Park Renewal

At the recent Bishopdale Skate Jam event, Council engagement staff were on site to ask Skate Park users what they would like to see when the Bishopdale Skate Park renewal project is undertaken.  This information, together with other feedback gathered early in the New Year, will be used by the project team to create a design that will be formally consulted on.

5.2       Breens Road/Harewood Road/Gardiners Road Intersection

Council staff are currently working on the draft consultation document for the Breens Road/Harewood Road/Gardiners Road Intersection.

Two options for addressing and improving the safety of the intersection will be put to the community for its feedback.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1.1   Walk ‘n Talk

The Fendalton Walk ‘n Talk group held their Christmas Break-Up on Thursday, 13 December 2018.

The group is strongly supported weekly with up to 50 walkers, including the group’s original member Pat, who's in her 90's and still regularly attends.


 

6.2       Culture Galore

The annual Culture Galore event will be held on Saturday, 23 February 2019 from 12 noon until 4pm at Ray Blank Park, Maidstone Road.

This very popular event, which is jointly funded by the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood and Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Boards, celebrates the diversity of cultures in our city through performances and food. 

 

6.3       Community Pride Garden Awards

Judging has begun for this year’s Community Pride Garden Awards 2019 (19 January to 10 February 2019), with Judges from the Christchurch Beautifying Association selecting award-winning gardens that are visible from the street.

 

Judges take into account effort, overall tidiness and impact of the garden on the street. There is no competition and all gardens meeting the standard are awarded a certificate.  A notification card will be left in award recipients letterboxes and they have until 14 February 2019 to return their completed card to us.

 

Certificates and trophies will be presented in March at the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board awards ceremony.

6.4       Waterways

A number of issues regarding waterways in the Board’s area have been raised with Board members.  These include flooding issues in the Waimairi Stream due to the build-up of silt and weed and an issue with the Ilam Stream stream bed at the Colina Street culvert.

Staff have investigated the issues on an individual basis and where appropriate work has been undertaken to resolve.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board received an update against the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Plan at its meeting on 4 February 2019.

The next update will be provided to the Board in May 2019.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Maryanne Lomax - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Lisa Gregory - Community Recreation Advisor

Margaret Henderson - Community Board Advisor

Bronwyn Frost - Support Officer

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

8.        Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/53995

Presenter(s):

Mike Mora, Chairperson
Matthew Pratt, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendation

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board report for the December 2018/January 2019 period.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held an extraordinary meeting on 5 December 2018 and ordinary meetings on 11 December 2018 and 29 January 2019. 

Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Approval of road names for the Copper Ridge subdivision in Halswell.

·   Allocations of 2018-19 Discretionary Response Funding to several local organisations.

·   Allocations of 2018-19 Youth Development Funding to local recipients.

·   Adoption of the dates, time and venues of the Board’s Ordinary Meetings for the period January to September 2019 inclusive.

A recommendation from the Extraordinary Board Meeting held on 5 December 2018 regarding the site location for the Hornby Library, Customer Services and South West Leisure Facility was presented to and resolved on by the Council on 13 December 2018.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included separately in this agenda for the Council’s consideration:

4.1       Halswell Junction Road – Legalisation of Land Acquired for Road

4.2       Halswell Swimming Pool – Operating Hours

 

5.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Kennedys Bush Neighbourhood Association

The Kennedys Bush Neighbourhood Association continues to meet for up to three times a year with a focus on local community building. The group held a Christmas Party in the small park on Kennedys Bush Road on 16 December 2018. 

5.2       Local Events

The Halswell Skate Jam was held on Wednesday 16 January 2019 at Opouira/Knights Stream Park from 12 noon to 3pm.

The event jointly marked the openings of the new skate park at the Halswell Domain in December 2018, and the Opouira/Knight Stream Skate Park in use since July 2018. 

 


 

 


6.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

6.1       The Board’s ongoing decisions are being included as measures against the Outcomes and Priorities contained in the Board’s 2017 -2019 Community Board Plan. 

6.2       This information update for the December 2018 quarter was reported on and received by the Board at its meeting on 11 December 2018.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Peter Dow - Community Governance Manager

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Noela Letufuga - Support Officer

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Matthew Pratt - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

9.        Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/17258

Presenter(s):

Sally Buck, Chairperson
Arohanui Grace, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for December 2018.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held a meeting on 3 December 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·    Parking Restrictions in:

·    Francella Street, Bromley

·    Barbadoes Street near Nova Place

·    Forth Street, Richmond

·    Cannon Hill Crescent, Mt Pleasant

·   Francella Street, Bromley – Give Way and Stop Control.

·   St Johns Street and Linwood Avenue Intersection, Bromley – Safety Improvements.

·   Riccarton Avenue – Christchurch Hospital Emergency Vehicle Access.   

The Board made an additional request for staff to investigate options for replacement bus stops in the vicinity of Hagley Oval.

·   The Board approved 26 Nayland Street to be the location for a skate park in the Bays Area subject to 20/24 Nayland Street being transferred from Crown ownership to Council ownership.  The Board noted that there will be further discussion with the community through the next phase of community engagement on the future use of the balance of land at 20/24 Nayland Street.

·   The Board approved a lease of an area of Old School Reserve to the Scout Association of New Zealand and recommend to the Council to sell Mount Pleasant Sea Scout building located at Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ for the nominal sum of $1, noting the group will refurbish the building.

·   The Board approved the Coastal Pathway Shared Pathway resolutions.  The Board requested additional information on how the shared pathway is working and whether there is a need for speed limits or other measures to be implemented to manage potential conflicts.

·   The Board have laid on the table Discretionary Response Funding applications until the February Board meeting pending a discussion of funding matters at a Board workshop in January 2019.

·   The Board approved the Board’s meeting schedule from February to September 2019.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Mt. Pleasant Sea Scouts Building - Gift & New Lease.

4.2       Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Linwood Pool – Preview of the pool layout with the community      

5.1.1   On Saturday 8 December from 1 pm to 4 pm at Linwood Park, the community were invited to view the layout of the new Linwood Pool and to comment on some future changes to improve Linwood Park.

5.1.2   The plans were also available online for comment for those who were unable to attend the community day https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/203

5.1.3   A Newsline Story was also available on 10 December 2018 and provided further information on the draft layout https://ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/newsline/show/3247

5.1.4   There were around 300 people who came along to the community day, this included a lot of local families and some of the local sporting groups.

5.1.5   A specific area was set up at the event for people to come along and view large plans along the fenced area of the tennis courts and this also included draft plans of improvements to the rest of Linwood Park.  The design team were also present at the community day, so it provided a good opportunity for them to get some direct community feedback and to explain each design element.

5.1.6   Feedback from those who attended the community day was very positive and people were really happy with the sketches.  The less positive comments related to requests for items such as a gym, wave pool and hydro slide which were well outside the project budget for this facility and could be provided for more appropriately at other Council facilities.  Council also received 17 online submissions. 

5.1.7   The development plans for Linwood Park have a limited amount of funding, so these will need to be worked on in more detail before they are ready to go out for more formal consultation.  The timings for the pool and park will not quite run together now, but it was helpful to get some initial feedback on the park at the community day.  This information will be incorporated in the landscape plan when it is ready to go out.

5.1.8   The project team are continuing to engage directly with some of the key stakeholders on this project.

5.1.9   The gifting of Te Reo name for the facility has been requested via Council’s Ngai Tahu partnership team, the name will feed into the cultural design input that Matapopore have been engaged to provide.

5.1.10 Geotechnical investigations and analysis has been completed and while results were variable they have confirmed ground improvement will be required.  Given the potential significance of this aspect, further investigations will be undertaken to gather additional data to inform the design.

5.1.11 The next steps for this project will involve commencing and completing the concept design.  Community feedback on the draft layout will be incorporated into the concept design as it progresses, where appropriate.  This plan will then be presented to the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board for approval sometime in May 2019.  Construction is then due to commence in 2020. 

5.2       A process for ongoing communication with the community is being developed.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum

6.1       Kath Preston, member of Safer Sumner Group, updated the Board on the group’s Crime Camera Project. She advised that the group has a shortfall in funding.

6.2       Local resident Geoffrey King spoke to the Board regarding his concerns about the odour being emitted from the Living Earth Organics Processing Plant (OPP).  Mr King expressed his frustration about the time it is taking to have the matter dealt with.  He also mentioned that there is odour from the nearby Metro Refuse Station and queried whether it is being operated in compliance with resource consent conditions.

Community Update, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.3       Linwood Locals Exhibition - The recent Linwood Locals exhibition has received excellent community feedback.  The photographic and narrative exhibition show-cased twelve ‘everyday’ people who do significant work to help make Greater Linwood a connected and supportive community in which to live and thrive.

There is potential to consider running the exhibition again in 2019.  It is useful to note that one of the key findings in the Greater Linwood Older Adults research project is to ‘Celebrate Older People’ by recording and sharing heritage stories of long-term residents, giving awards to older volunteers, and acknowledging the many local services that are provided by older adults for older adults.

6.4       Community Board Edible Garden Awards 2019 - The inaugural Linwood-Central-Heathcote Edible Garden Awards applications are closing on 8 February 2019.  The award ceremony is to be held on Thursday 7 March 2019.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Community Board will consider progress against the Community Board Plan at a workshop in January 2019.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Liz Beaven - Community Board Advisor

Amanda Black - Support Officer

Bruce Coleman - Community Development Advisor

Sol Smith - Community Development Advisor

Diana Saxton - Community Recreation Advisor

Tracey Waho-Blayney - Support Officer

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

10.    Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/58459

Presenter(s):

Ali Jones, Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board report for December 2018/January 2019.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board held meetings on 7 December 2018 and 25 January 2019.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Approved the granting of a lease to the Belfast School Board of Trustees for the Belfast Pool.

·   Supported the installation of a modular pump track at 10 Shirley Road (the Shirley Community Reserve and former site of the Shirley Community Centre) with a request that the Parks Team explore alternative funding with a view to actioning the project within this financial year.

·   Approved the installation of No Stopping Restrictions on Fenchurch Street at its intersection with Northcote Road.

·   Proceed with purchasing and planning the contents of a new time capsule to be placed under a foundation stone for the replacement St Albans Community Centre to be opened 100 years from the completion of the rebuild (planned for 2020).  The Board also made the decision to rebury the previous deposit under the original foundation stone (dated 1920) to be incorporated into the new building.

·   Adopted the schedule of Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board meetings up to September 2019.

·   Recommended that the Council receive the Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft) (refer Section 4.1 of this report)

·   Approved the following grants:

·   $3,000 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to the Delta Community Support Trust towards Community Advocacy.

·   $1,399 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to The Santa Claus Workshop Charitable Trust towards the purchase of a scroll saw.

·   $210 from its 2018/19 Positive Youth Development Fund to Team Lhotshampa towards the costs of Anil Gurung, Bibak Magar and Nabin Bhattarai participating in the Tenzing Hillary Cup Inter-Nepalese Football Tournament in Auckland.


 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

The Board’s recommendation for the Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft) report will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 14 February 2018.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Infrastructure Projects Underway  

5.1       Paddington Playground Renewal and Basketball Hoop

Project Phase:            Initiate/Investigation and Scheme Design

Currently in investigative and planning stage.

5.2       Sabina Playground - Play Space Renewal

Project Phase: Initiate

Project funding starting in FY20 with construction programmed in FY21.

5.3       Redwood Plunket Building Repair

Project Phase:            Execute/Construction

All construction works have been completed.

5.4       Westminster Park field upgrades

Project Phase: On Hold/Programme Planning (concept)

Surface and drainage upgrade to improve the quality and usage of the front field in the park. Currently on hold pending the Parks Unit confirming the sports turf renewal priority and programme.

5.5       St Albans Park - Pavilion/Toilets

Project Phase: Execute/Defects Liability

The project is the replacement changing rooms/toilet facility for the previous earthquake damaged pavilion. The construction is completed with the public toilets now open. The balance of the facility will be in use once the fields are completed.

5.6       St Albans Community Centre

Project Phase:            Execute/Investigation and Scheme Design

The Project is currently in the Design and Consenting phase.

5.7       Belfast Cemetery Extension

Project Phase:            Execute/Construction

The project is for the development of the extension to Belfast Cemetery. Including a comprehensive consent for all works associated with the development.

The works included within the consent are all the new roads, paths, lawns, drainage, landscape, monumental beams and alterations to the toilet water and sewer system.

Approximately 500 new plots have been established in the extension works to date.


 

5.8       St Albans Park Sport Turf Renewal

Project Phase:            Execute/Construction

The renewal and upgrading of the turf surface to mitigate the frequent flooding of the park. Increase the available time the park can be used for the allocated sports, particularly in winter.

All the base construction,drainage, irrigation and sand slitting works are completed with the sand carpet surface to begin.

5.9       Papanui Domain Playground Renewal

Project Phase:            Execute/Defects Liability

Construction completed in early 2018.  Currently nearing the end of the defects liability period.

Other Partnerships with the Community and Organisations     

5.10    Belfast Community Network (BCN) – Garden

BCN have had some issues this year with their vegetable garden so staff have worked with our partners and have been able to supply BCN with four veggie boxes which are to be planted out with veggies next week. These veggies supply local whanau and the BCN “Simply Lunch” group.

There is a lot of work to do but BCN volunteers are up for the challenge and are very grateful.

     

5.11    Papanui Bush – Bridgestone Reserve

Staff met with Papanui High School, the local Rotary chapter and the Papanui Heritage group about the mural and the proposed notice board. Staff are also working internally on Papanui heritage items that need enhancement if they are to be presented in a notice board.

Due to the prior commitments of all the groups involved, the enhancement element of this project is taking longer than expected. Papanui High envision that they will be able to have students working on a mural in Terms one and two 2019.

5.12    Edgeware Village Beautification Project

The Edgeware Village Beautification Project was carried out by the local community on Saturday 1 December. Staff attended along with volunteers from the Community Focus Trust, SARA and New Horizons Rotary.

There were approximately 30 volunteers in total primarily from the Community Focus Trust. SARA organised the plants for the project as well as their placement for the best effect, and Community Focus Trust provided the volunteers to carry out the project showing how effective community collaboration can be for implementing projects.

This event was a major success and the results can be seen in the photos below.

      

                

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Events Report Back       

6.1       Papanui/Shirley Joint Interagency Networks End of Year Celebration

The end of year interagency meeting was a great success with our local organisations coming along to the Chapel Street Centre on 13 November to listen to each other’s organisational achievements for the year.

There were 30 organisations represented at the meeting.  The Board’s Deputy Chair, Emma Norrish, thanked the community for their efforts and Councillor Davidson spoke regarding the Annual Plan2019/20.

6.2       Belfast Community Network (BCN) – Simply Christmas Lunch

Staff volunteered at the Simply Christmas Lunch in the Park (6 December) which also kicked off the BCN “Slice of Summer” events.

Between 50 and 60 mainly elderly people enjoyed a lovely Christmas dinner which was held in a marquee on Sheldon Park. Countdown staff, who also supported the Simply Lunch programme during the year with vouchers and Kai, again were out in force volunteering, serving as well as providing Christmas cakes and goodies. Hellers also supported this event with one of their best hams at a reduced cost, and sausages, and the Rotary Club of Belfast/Kaiapoi provided beautiful new potatoes.

The Belfast School Kapa Haka group also performed and Christmas carols wafted across the lawn.

                    

6.3       MacFarlane Park Community Garden Opening

Staff attended the MacFarlane Park Community Garden Opening (5 December). Setting it up was a joint venture between Ian Dunbar(SCT), Just Dirt Trust, local Community Volunteers, C.C.C. Parks Unit, MacFarlane Park KidsFirst Kindergarten and local businesses who donated the following; Bunnings (plants), Living Earth (soil) (through Just Dirt Trust), Mitre 10 (shed), Edgeware Mowers and Chainsaws (mower, cash), Waghorn Builders (cash), TradeStaff (cash), Goodson Electrical (cash), Brian Perry Civil (fruit trees - $1000 worth), and Council Parks Unit (compost and delivery).

The event attracted between 30-40 people including a group of children from MacFarlane Park KidsFirst Kindergarten.

Speeches were made by Ian Dunbar (SCT) who thanked all the sponsors, Lorraine Stewart from Head Office KidsFirst, Helen O’Connell from MacFarlane Park KidsFirst, City Councillor and Community Board member Pauline Cotter and Graeme Mitchell Chair of the Shirley Community Trust.

Following the speeches a Doyenne Du Comice pear tree was planted by Councillor Cotter and children from the Kidsfirst Kindergarten and the ribbon was cut by the inaugural Community Gardener of the week, Eli Huffam from Kidsfirst. People lingered after the ceremony to chat over morning tea for quite a while, and were keen to be more involved and very supportive of seeing this community garden grow into the future.

6.4       Te Puna Oraka

Staff attended three events held at Te Puna Oraka on 11 December. Firstly, the community fare-welled Marge Reedy who has been the community worker at the Hub for the last eight years where she has exerted a major influence on the area by working 1-1 with whānau in the local community. Marge leaves to study full time next year for a Social Work degree.

Secondly, Te Puna Oraka celebrated the launch of the Community Pantry which was kindly built by a local dad on site. The pantry provides the wider community the opportunity to donate food which can be accessed by anyone in need.

Thirdly, there was also the presentation of a mural for the Te Puna Oraka building created by art students at Mairehau High School. This collaboration between the preschool and Mairehau High School was born out of an initial conversation held at Children’s Day which explored ways for the High School students to collaborate and connect with the local community

6.5       Northcote Breakfast Club

On Wednesday 12 December 2018 local staff volunteered at the final Breakfast Club held at Northcote School. Other volunteers included Housing New Zealand staff, Rotary members, North City members and local residents.

It felt as though the whole school roll was fed an exceptional breakfast of hot Milo’s Pancakes, fruit salad and cream, hash browns, bacon, toast, scrambled eggs, spaghetti, beans and sausages.

The Breakfast Club was initiated by Joss Buttriss (Belfast Community Network), now supported by Damien Ardell (Papanui Baptist Freedom Trust) and is driven by two main local volunteers (Angie and Charlotte) whose involvement has developed the Breakfast into a community-led project which provides opportunity for local people to become involved, give of their time, gain experience and connect with others.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Hovell - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

11.    Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

19/770

Presenter(s):

Karolin Potter, Community Board Chairperson
Melanie Coker, Community Board Deputy Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board report for December 2018 and January 2019.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held a meeting on 7 December 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board adopted its 2019 Meeting Schedule and continued the current pattern of generally meeting on the first Tuesday of each month at 5pm and the third Friday of each month at 8am.

·   The Board appointed a Recess Committee comprising a minimum of any two Board members available, to be authorised to exercise the delegated powers of the Board for the period following the Board’s final scheduled meeting for the year on 7 December 2018 until its next ordinary meeting on 5 February 2019.

·   The Board approved no stopping of vehicles restrictions in part of Maryhill Avenue.

·   The Board approved no stopping of vehicles restrictions in parts of Holliss Avenue.

·   The Board approved no stopping of vehicles restrictions in parts of Centaurus Road and Lascelles Street.

·   The Board approved P3 parking restrictions in part of Rowley Avenue on school days from 8:15am to 9:15am and from 14:30pm to 15:30pm.

·   The Board approved no stopping of vehicles restrictions in part of Dyers Pass Road and Overdale Drive.

·   The Board approved the installation of a Stop Control against Overdale Drive at its intersection with Dyers Pass Road.

·   The Board approved that double no passing lines be installed along the centreline of Dyers Pass Road, commencing at its intersection with Cracroft Terrace and extending westerly then southerly for 232 metres, with advance warning lines installed along the centreline of Dyers Pass Road, commencing at its intersection with Cracroft Terrace and extending easterly for 60 metres and commencing at a point 232 metres west from its intersection with Cracroft Terrace and extending southerly for 60 metres.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A recommendations from the Board to the Council in December 2018 or January 2019.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area                           

5.1       Manuka Cottage building

The Addington community development project, Addington Community House, known as “Manuka Cottage” has operated in Addington with the support of the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board since the 1990s.  It was noted at the group's recent AGM that the cottage activities mobilise over 91 voluntary roles and nearly 5,800 voluntary hours in the local community.  As a result of the earthquakes the Cottage was required to re-locate from its premises and has been in temporary accommodation since.

Due to the importance of this community development project for the support of a highly vulnerable population group Manuka Cottage was the first community development project to benefit from the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board bids to the Capital Endowment Fund for property purchase in 2012.  A site on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve was identified as the site for development of a new Council owned cottage style community centre. Consultation was undertaken with positive feedback to the proposal being received.

Project Management staff are managing the development in consultation with a steering group comprising staff, members of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and representatives of Addington Community House. Although it was hoped that the development would be complete and the building ready for occupation in 2018 contracting delays occurred. A contract for the construction of Manuka Cottage is, however, now in place.

Detailed design development and satisfaction of building consent requirements will be commenced in January 2019 with the consent expected to be granted by the end of February/ early March 2019. Removal of trees and playground from the site will occur around late February.

5.2       Quarryman’s Trail Cycleway 

Work is under way on the final stage of Quarryman’s Trail cycle route between Halswell and the central city.The first 4.6 kilometre section – from Moorhouse Avenue to Victors Road was opened in September. The final section stretches from Victors Road to Te Hapua: Halswell Centre.

The work will involve 3.8km of off-road cycleway and two new sets of traffic lights at the Henderson Road/Sparks Road intersection, as well as a mid-block crossing in Sparks Road at Milns Reserve.

Street lighting will also be upgraded and a 60 kilometre per hour speed limit in parts of Sparks Road is also proposed.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Hoon Hay Flooding Issues

Residents in the vicinity of Copenhagen Place/Marion Street and Weir Place, Hoon Hay have expressed concerned about an increase in localised flooding in their streets since the 2011 earthquakes.

At a residents meeting on 9 December 2017 to discuss the issues with land drainage staff it was agreed that staff would investigate the matters raised and provide feedback.

A memorandum explaining the investigations undertaken and commenting on measures already underway or which may be taken to alleviate the flooding was subsequently prepared by the Land Drainage Unit and distributed to residents.

The Board invited residents to a follow up meeting on 6 December with Land drainage staff in attendance to discuss the information provided. The meeting was well attended and the information and explanations provided were positively received by residents.

6.2       Beckenham Primary School

Beckenham Primary School has been working with Council staff to develop greenspaces in the school grounds near the Heathcote River. Pupils have been involved in projects to enhance outdoor spaces in and around the school.

The Board recently supported an initiative that saw approximately 30 pupils involved in painting a mural on the wall of the toilet block by Beckenham Ponds. The Board made a grant from its “off the Ground” fund towards the cost of paint and other supplies. There was a celebration of the mural on 13 December 2018 attended by Board members.

In addition the Board had a presentation from year 2 and 3 pupils of the school at its meeting on 7 December 2018. The children spoke about their concerns about rubbish being dropped in and around the Beckenham area and getting in the waterway.  The children would like to see signs put up throughout the area advising people not to drop rubbish and encouraging them to pick up rubbish that they see lying around. They have made drawings showing the problems that rubbish causes for the waterway and its inhabitants. The group also showed a short video highlighting the problem.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Work continues on the priorities identified at the Board’s latest review of progress on the Community Board Plan. This review informed the Board‘s initial input to development of the next Annual Plan.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Community Board End of Year Network Function

The Board held its annual end of year network function on December 2018. The event was attended by invited individuals and representatives of groups that the Board has worked with over the preceding year. The occasion was an opportunity for Board members, staff and community members to come together in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere to celebrate the community work being done in Spreydon-Cashmere.

The event went well and will be followed up in early 2019 by a Board hosted event for local community groups to “meet and greet” and learn about what each are doing and share experiences and ideas going forward.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance Team

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

Report from Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board  – 10 December 2018

 

12.    Avonhead Park Cemetery

Reference:

18/1333999

Presenter(s):

Eric Banks, Senior Network Planner, Parks

 

 

 

1.  Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Consideration

 

The Board considered the information provided in the deputation from Anthony Wright and in the correspondence received from Monica Renwick and the Avonhead Community Group and Friends of Avonhead Cemetery.

Board members acknowledged Monica Renwick for raising the headstone issue at the Avonhead Park Cemetery but noted that in accordance with the current Cemeteries Handbook, the internment requirements for the lawn section of the Avonhead Park Cemetery will remain unchanged.

The Board expressed concerns over a decline in the maintenance of the Avonhead Park Cemetery and for this to be raised with the Council through the Annual Plan process.

The Board also decided to recommend to the Council that it consult on a possible name change for Avonhead Park Cemetery to become Avonhead Memorial Cemetery.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board:

1.         Receive the information contained in this report.

2.         Agree not to recommend to the Council that it consult on a change of name for Avonhead Park Cemetery.

 

3.  Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part B

The Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board decided to:

1.         Receive the information contained in the staff report on the Avonhead Park Cemetery.

2.            Note that in accordance with the current Cemeteries Handbook, the internment requirements for the lawn section of the Avonhead Park Cemetery will remain unchanged.

 


 

 

4.  Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

3.         Consult on a change of name from Avonhead Park Cemetery to Avonhead Memorial Cemetery. 

 

Aaron Campbell requested that his vote against resolution 3. above, be recorded.

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Avonhead Park Cemetery

43

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 Avonhead Cemetery lawn area

56

b

Attachment 2 Avonhead Cemetery frontage

61

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

Avonhead Park Cemetery

Reference:

18/990037

Presenter(s):

Eric Banks,

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report to provide information on the issues requested by the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board and to recommend no further action is undertaken on a proposed name change for Avonhead Park Cemetery.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to fulfil Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board meeting of 3 September 2018, agenda item 15.1 Part B:

1.2.1   The Board requested that staff provide information regarding the possible installation of headstones in the lawn section of Avonhead Park Cemetery and that this information be included in the previously requested report on the options and costs related to changing the Cemetery façade and for consultation on a name change, that is to be presented to the Board at its December 2018 meeting.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the significance matrix.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board:

1.         Receive the information contained in this report.

2.         Agree not to recommend to the Council that it consult on a change of name for Avonhead Park Cemetery.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.0.3.0 Overall customer satisfaction with the presentation of the City’s Parks - Community Parks presentation: resident satisfaction =70 %

4.2       Issues associated with a proposed change to the lawn area of the cemetery. 

4.2.1   Families have purchased with the expectation the lawn cemetery style and operation will be retained.

4.2.2   Plots are laid end to end which determines the operation of the area.

4.2.3   Above ground plaques or headstones would prevent access by the digger.

4.2.4   Any alteration of the layout to accommodate above ground plots would reduce the capacity significantly.

4.2.5   Requests have been received by both those seeking above ground plaques and those wanting the status quo.

4.3       Information on the cemetery entrance.

4.3.1   The decision to make changes to the entrance are a staff delegation.

4.3.2   Potential options for Community Board comment have been provided.

4.4       Retain the name of Avonhead Park Cemetery – Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred option)

4.4.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     No funding required to update physical signage.

·     Community are already aware of and use the current name of Avonhead Park Cemetery.

·     Retaining the current name lessens confusion that there is no memorial at this cemetery.

·     No need to alter Cemeteries Bylaw, Handbook and Masterplan which have recently been reviewed and adopted by the Council.

4.4.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Does not fulfil the request made by the Friends of Avonhead Cemetery to change the name of the Cemetery to Avonhead Memorial Cemetery to reflect the February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake Internment Site.

 

5.   Context/Background

Community requests

5.1       Lawn area

·   The Waimaero / Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board has received or is aware of requests from members of the community who wish to be able to install above ground plaques or headstones in the lawn area of the cemetery.

·   Issues have been raised in relation to plaques being difficult to locate, being covered in grass and sinking.

5.2       Cemetery entrance

·   The Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust have suggested the entrance to the cemetery requires upgrading.

5.3       Cemetery name

·   The Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust have suggested the name of the cemetery should be changed.

 

6.   Lawn Area of Avonhead Park Cemetery

Background

6.1       When the Cemetery was developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s it was proposed that there would be a complete absence of memorials in the Cemetery, this decision by the Waimairi County Council took seven years. The cemetery was designed without visible grave markers to give the cemetery a park like appearance.  Instead of headstones, metal tags were installed to identify each individual plot. No memorial was allowed, instead a small plaque could be added to the memorial wall by the records room.

6.2       This scheme received mixed reviews from the community.

6.3       The Council resolved at its meeting on 21 September 1992:

6.3.1   That the original concept of Avonhead Park Cemetery be changed to allow memorials in the Cemetery;

6.3.2   That Section 18IV of the Waimairi District Bylaw 1983, No. 1, be altered to allow the erection of memorials in Avonhead Park Cemetery and that special order procedures be commenced at the December Council meeting; and

6.3.3   That the section of Cemetery already developed in the landscaped style be retained and that no memorials be permitted in this area.

6.4       In 1993 additional areas in the Cemetery were created allowing for upright memorials.

6.5       At its November 1996 meeting the Parks and Recreation Committee considered a request from the families of those persons interred in the ‘no memorial’ area of Avonhead Park Cemetery for some form of individual headstone memorial.

6.6       The Committee resolved that following consultation, design and plans for a small form of memorial within the ‘no memorial’ area be brought back to the Committee.

6.7       Of those that replied to the consultation 41.8 percent wanted no memorials. A preference for headstones was 58.2% and of those 21.5 percent wanted a larger headstone and 36.7% wanted a smaller headstone.

6.8       There was strong opposition to headstones, even in-ground memorials. It appeared that many family members of those interred in the lawn area still supported the original concept and wanted it retained.

6.9       The issue was then reported to the August 1997 Parks and Recreation Committee meeting.

6.10    The Committee deferred consideration of the staff report and appointed a sub-committee comprising the Chairman and four Councillors to consider the options.

6.11    The sub-committee were sympathetic to the concerns of those families seeking a change to the policy. They were also appreciative of the aesthetically pleasing and tranquil setting created by the lawns and no memorial environment.

6.12    After considering all points of view and noting that the majority of respondents were supportive of a change to existing policy of no memorials, the sub-committee unanimously agreed that as a compromise, a small flat ground level headstone measuring 200x290mm should be permitted in the landscaped section of Avonhead Park Cemetery.

6.13    On 11 February 1998 a report to the Parks and Recreation Committee considered the type and size of the proposed memorials.

6.14    Following this, the Avonhead Park Cemetery sub-committee recommended to the Parks and Recreation Committee on 13 May 1998, the following:

6.14.1 “That members, having reviewed their earlier  recommendation in light of the Monumental Masons association’s comments, are still of the unanimous belief that the compromise proposed is the best solution and meets the wishes of the majority of respondents to the survey of next of kin. Permitting small in-ground memorials in the landscaped section of the Cemetery will ensure the present open and tranquil setting is preserved and at the same time allow next of kin to place a small memorial on their family member’s grave.”  

6.14.2 Recommendation:

·     1. That in-ground memorials be permitted in the section of Avonhead Park Cemetery, subject to:

         a) Memorials not exceeding 200x290mm in size.

         b) No flowers placed on graves

         c) Next of kin accepting responsibility for the edge maintenance of memorials.

·     2. That the Waimairi District Bylaw be amended to permit the installation of small, in-ground memorials in the section of Avonhead Park Cemetery in which memorials are not currently permitted.

·     3. That the Council commence the Special Order proceedings at its May 1998 meeting, necessary to give effect to the above change.

6.15    Since then, the Council has continued to receive correspondence from both those requesting and those objecting to installing headstones in the lawn area of Avonhead Park Cemetery. 

Discussion

6.16    The following is intended to provide the requested information by illustrating the nature of the lawn area, how it operates and the implications of suggested changes.  Attachment One illustrates these points.

6.17    The fundamental observable difference between the lawn area at Avonhead Park Cemetery, the remainder of the cemetery and other Council cemeteries relates to the lawn character.  The lawn character is that of a park like setting with the absence of headstones.  A brief assessment of the character of the lawn area has been provided by the Council landscape architect on the title page of Attachment One.  This park like character of the lawn area with no headstones was the intention for the cemetery when it was designed prior to opening in 1983.

6.18    When Avonhead Park Cemetery was developed extensive tree planting was undertaken with trees planted in close proximity to encourage rapid growth and a mature park like setting. Trees are very important in the lawn area in particular, many people have chosen plots in this area due to the large numbers of mature trees.  In many cases families identify their plot locations using the trees.

6.19    Sheets 2 and 3 of Attachment One illustrate the manner in which the lawn area is laid out. Because the intention of the lawn area was for no headstones or plaques there was no need to leave a gap between the plots for access.  This layout maximises the number of usable plots in the area.

6.20    Once Council approval for in-ground plaques was given there needed to be a way to manage interments and undertake maintenance.  Once a burial has taken place the soil will slump for a long time afterwards, especially immediately after a burial.  This is particularly prevalent at Avonhead Cemetery because of the nature of the soil (see Sheet 3).

6.21    Because original layout of the lawn area incorporated no memorials there are no gaps between plots (See sheet 2) to allow for plaques to be installed.  Due to the location of the metal tags, plaques are laid on the adjacent plot (see Sheet 2).  This ensures the plaque will not become buried with the slumping of the newly dug plot.

6.22    Depending on the order of burials, the plaque may still be subject to slumping if the adjacent plot where the plaque is located has an interment at a later date.

6.23    As each plot is dug for an interment, or second interment, if there is a plaque on the plot, where possible, the plaque will be left in place however if the plot needs to be dug longer than the standard 2.4 metres or if there is excessive slumping of the soil under the plaque, it will be removed and reinstated when the interment is complete (see details on sheet 2).

6.24    One reason plaques are required to be installed just below the surface is to allow for mowing of the lawn area. The mower can safely pass over the plaque without damaging the plaque (or the mower). The second reason is to permit access for a digger to dig the plot.  At present the digger can traverse over other plots in the area to the plot required to be dug.  This is essential as there are so many trees within the lawn area.

6.25    If plaques were permitted to be installed above ground, the cost of maintenance would increase significantly for mowing and plots may need to be dug by hand as there would be insufficient room for a digger.  Hand digging of plots is more difficult and more costly and normally only undertaken where there are access issues such as some older cemetery sites where the site slope, access and proximity to other plots is an issue.

6.26    Headstones or raised plaques would require a base to support them. The extra bulk and weight of the base would contribute to, and be more susceptible to, slumping.  In cases where the headstone (and base) was required to be removed for an adjacent burial, other issues of responsibility for the removal, cost and greater disturbance of the soil would result.

6.27    It is likely that a raised plaque / headstone would require a base which was larger than the space available between the end of the digging area of the plot and the top end plot to the foot end, otherwise instability would result in an unstable headstone.  This would then also cover the area set aside for the identifying tag.

6.28    In order to avoid the above issues, a section of the unused area of the lawn could potentially be redesigned to that of a standard cemetery by separating the plots, in a similar fashion to that depicted in Sheet 4.  This would however result in a major loss of capacity (from 316 currently available plots in this section of the lawn area down to approximately 61 plots), a cost to implement, and further investigation to confirm particularly as there is a comprehensive irrigation system in the area. 

6.29    Given the status quo, responsibility for maintaining the edge of plaques lies with the owner of the plot.  This was a condition of the Council decision to allow plaques as a compromise in 1998.  Possibilities for improving the visibility of plaques could potentially include Council spraying the edges and adding a base course underneath each plaque and keeping it topped up to support the plaques.  This would be an additional maintenance cost to Council however and would require further investigation.

6.30    It is also worth noting that the specification for plots in each cemetery is incorporated into the Cemeteries Handbook.  At the time of writing the existing Handbook specifies below surface plaques only for the lawn area.  The recent review of the Cemeteries Bylaw and Handbook has been completed and is subject to approval by Council on 22 November 2018.  During the consultation period no submissions were received requesting a change of this specification.  The specification in the draft Handbook therefore remains unchanged at requiring plaques to be installed at 20mm below the surface.

6.31    In order for any potential change in the rules and operation of the lawn area to take place a number of requisites would need to take place: plot owners / families of plot owners in the lawn area should be located and canvassed for their opinion about the proposal, a proposal to Council to consult on an amendment to the Cemeteries Handbook, Council approval, budget be made available for the work.

7.   Name of Avonhead Park Cemetery

Background

7.1       The Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust provided a deputation to the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board on 10 April 2017.  One of the issues the Trust raised was their desire to change the name of Avonhead Park Cemetery to Avonhead Memorial Cemetery to reflect its wider significance as the internment site of the unidentified victims of the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake.

7.2       Staff responded to the request by email on 4 July 2017 and provided a memo to the Community Board on the 2 November 2017. The email and memo outlined the procedure for changing the name of the Cemetery and issues to take into consideration.  The processes and issues are outlined below:

7.2.1   Naming of Reserves and Facilities Policy 1993/Section 7 Burial and Cremation Act 1964.

·     The procedure for changing the name of the Cemetery would involve consultation, a report to the Community Board, and a recommendation to Council.  (Council has not delegated the power under section 7 of the Burial and Cremation Act re naming of cemeteries.   There is power to change the name of a cemetery but Council must also get the approval of the Minister of Health.)

·     No submissions requesting the name of Avonhead Park Cemetery to be changed were received during the extensive consultation for the draft Cemeteries Master Plan 2013 or during the 2018 review of the Cemeteries Bylaw and Cemeteries Handbook.

7.2.2   Origin of the current name

·     Avonhead Park Cemetery was named to reflect the park like setting of the landscaped trees, lawns and gardens.  It also reflects its position adjacent to Avonhead Park and the shared connections with it.  At the time of planning the new cemetery in 1979 the Council’s intention was for the lawn to also function as a park, hence the name, Avonhead Park Cemetery.  This was proposed as far back as 1976.  It was described as a parkland cemetery at the time of opening.

7.2.3   Earthquake Interment Site.

·     The interment site at Avonhead Park Cemetery for the unidentified victims of the 22 February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake is not a memorial site.  The site is required to inter the human remains of the unidentified victims as required under the Burial and Cremation Act 1964.

·     The Interment Site for the Unidentified Victims of the 22 February 2011 Earthquake was considered and approved by Council at 9 June 2011 meeting.  This report specifically noted that the Earthquake Interment Site is not a memorial.

7.2.4   Other cemeteries  

·     Memorial Park Cemetery is another example of a relatively modern Cemetery with a name designed to reflect its park like style.  The word “memorial” in the name refers to memorialising the deceased by using an upright headstone on each plot, not to a specific memorial.

·     Nearby Ruru Lawn Cemetery likewise reflects the type of Cemetery layout in its name.  The Ballantyne’s Fire Memorial (1947) is part of the Ruru Lawn Cemetery. It is both the interment site and the memorial, however, it is the only memorial for Ballantynes fire victims in the city, whereas the Interment Site at Avonhead Park Cemetery, is as the name says, an interment site for the four unfound victims and not a memorial for all earthquake victims.  The outer area was added at a request by families not as a statutory requirement.  At Ruru Lawn Cemetery, the Ballantynes Fire Memorial is not reflected in the name of the Cemetery.  It is just one of the features of the site.

·     There is also Diamond Harbour Memorial Gardens Cemetery.  The word “memorial” in the name refers to memorialising the deceased by using an upright headstone on each plot, not to a specific memorial.

·     It is possible the greater the number of cemeteries with “memorial” as part of the name, the more confusion could be created.  ‘Memorial’ is generally referred to a style of cemetery with upright headstones.

7.3       This information was then presented to the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board at a seminar on 6 August 2018.  At the seminar it was also discussed that if the name of the Cemetery were to change this would also need funding identified for the physical signage alterations.  No funding has been allocated for this.

Option 1 – Retain the current name of Avonhead Park Cemetery (preferred)

7.4       Option description

7.4.1   Retain the current name of Avonhead Park Cemetery.

7.5       Significance

7.5.1   The level of significance of this option is consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.5.2   Engagement requirements for this level of significance are limited to those specifically affected. Engagement requirements for this option would be limited to informing the Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust.

7.6       Impact on Mana Whenua

7.6.1   This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

7.7       Community Views and Preferences

7.7.1   Friends of Avonhead Cemetery, are specifically affected by this option. 

7.7.2   There were no submissions received on a name change for the cemetery during the recent consultation on the Cemeteries Bylaw and Handbook review.

7.8       Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.8.1   This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

7.8.2   The Naming of Reserves and Facilities Policy 1993 outlines:

7.8.3   “3. For existing reserves, whether previously formally or informally named, and through common usage are accepted by the community, generally these names shall be retained. Where changes are to be sought, the procedures as outlined for the new reserves shall be as followed.

4. Reserves having local or major status, naming proposals, including options shall in the first instance be referred to the appropriate Community Board.  To the extent deemed necessary, proposals will then be referred to the community for comment prior to formal adoption and recommendation, to the Council.”

7.9       Financial Implications

7.9.1   Cost of implementation – No cost to implement decision.

7.9.2   Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – none.

7.9.3   Funding Source – Not applicable.

7.10    Legal Implications

7.10.1 This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit. There are no legal considerations in relation to retaining the current name.

7.11    Risks and Mitigations

7.11.1 There are minimal, if any risks as the name of the Cemetery complies with the Council Policy Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities 1993.

7.12    Implementation

7.12.1 Implementation dependencies – No known implementation dependencies.

7.12.2 Implementation timeframe – Not applicable as the current name is being retained.

7.13    Option Summary – Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13.1 Advantages:

·        No funding required to update physical signage.

·        Community are already aware of and use the current name of Avonhead Park Cemetery.

·        Retaining the current name lessens confusion that there is no memorial at this cemetery.

·        No need to alter Cemeteries Bylaw, Handbook and Masterplan which have recently been reviewed and adopted by the Council.

7.13.2 Disadvantages:

·        Does not fulfil the request made by the Friends of Avonhead Cemetery to change the name of the Cemetery to Avonhead Memorial Cemetery to reflect the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake internment site.

Option 2 – Recommend to Council that it consult with the community on an alternative name for the Cemetery

7.14    Option description

7.14.1 There should be consultation with the community but as the Council has not delegated the power to change the name of a cemetery, the Board would need to recommend the name change to Council first, so the Council can decide if it wants to pursue a name change and carry out consultation.

7.15    Significance

7.15.1 The level of significance of this option is consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.15.2 Engagement requirements for this level of significance are limited to those specifically affected. Engagement requirements are also subject to the Naming of Reserves and Facilities Policy 1993.  Given interments of individuals originating from all areas of the city, public consultation with a recommendation to council for public consultation is recommended as appropriate.  A decision to change the name of a cemetery is made under section 7 of the Burial and Cremation Act, and requires the Minister's approval, so it is likely the Minister will want to know the result of Council consultation about a name change.

 

7.16    Impact on Mana Whenua

7.16.1 This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

7.17    Community Views and Preferences

7.17.1 Friends of Avonhead Cemetery, the local community and the families of those who are interred are specifically affected by this option.  Other than the Friends of Avonhead Cemetery, their views are yet to be ascertained. 

7.17.2 There were no submissions received on a name change for the cemetery during the recent consultation on the Cemeteries Bylaw and Handbook review.

7.18    Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.18.1 This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.18.2 The Naming of Reserves and Facilities Policy 2013 outlines:

“4. Reserves having local or major status, naming proposals, including options shall in the first instance be referred to the appropriate Community Board. To the extent deemed necessary, proposals will then be referred to the community for comment prior to formal adoption and recommendation, to the Council.”

7.19    Financial Implications

7.19.1 Cost of implementation – To consult with the community to determine a preferred name for the Cemetery would require approximately 40 hours of associated staff time to consult on a name change.  Implementation of physical signage if the name of the Cemetery is changed would be required.

7.19.2 Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – none.

7.19.3 Funding Source – No funding has been set aside in the Council’s Long Term Plan.

7.20    Legal Implications

7.20.1 This report has been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

7.20.2 The legal considerations in relation to changing the current name concern the power in section 7 of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 to change the name of a cemetery.  The Council is the decision-maker (the Council has not delegated this power), and Ministerial approval is required to change the name.

7.20.3 The legal consideration is <enter text>

7.21    Risks and Mitigations

7.21.1 There is a risk that changing the name, particularly incorporating the word “memorial” may offend families of those interred in the earthquake interment site (or potentially others as well). 

7.21.2 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment is implemented will be Medium.

7.21.3 There is no mitigation possible given the reason for the suggested change to include the word “memorial” is to reflect the view of the Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust that the earthquake interment site is a memorial.

7.21.4 There is a risk that changing the name to include the word “memorial” could result in confusion with the existing Memorial Park Cemetery.

7.21.5 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment is implemented will be Medium.

7.21.6 Staff would need to be wary of the potential confusion and double check the correct cemetery was being discussed, an interment was required at which cemetery, etc.

7.22    Implementation

7.22.1 Implementation is subject to the consultation and reporting process described above.

7.22.2 Implementation timeframe -  compiling a list of stakeholders, contacting the stakeholders, consultation and reporting would take approximately 6 months.  Contacting the families of those interred could be quite time consuming. Installation of signage (and update of websites etc) would be dependent on the allocation of budget in line with a decision on signage priorities.

7.23    Option Summary – Advantages and Disadvantages

7.23.1 Advantages:

·        The Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust would approve. No other advantages are apparent.

7.23.2 Disadvantages:

·     If an alternative name is approved for the Cemetery funding would be required to update physical signage. No funding has been allocated in the Councils 2018-2028 Long Term Plan for this.

·     If an alternative name is approved for the Cemetery it would require amending Council records, web-site and documents as they were due for renewal such as the Cemeteries Handbook and Masterplan.

8.   Entrance of Avonhead Park Cemetery

Background

8.1       The Friends of Avonhead Cemetery Trust provided a deputation to the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board on 10 April 2017.  One of the issues the Trust raised was their desire to upgrade the Cemetery entrance on Hawthornden Road.

8.2       Staff responded to the request by email on 4 July 2017 and providing a memo to the Community Board on the 2 November 2017. The email and memo outlined the procedure for refurbishing the entrance, in that a landscape plan would need to be developed and consulted on then a report to the Community Board seeking to approve the landscape plan. There is currently no funding allocated in the LTP to investigate, design, consult or implement any changes to the entrance of the Cemetery.

8.3       In the interim, staff organised for the entrance walls to be cleaned. This was seen as the first logical step rather than resurfacing or painting as this could attract tagging would require more frequent maintenance.

8.4       Subsequently, legal advice has been provided which states that the delegation for works such as fences and the like (section 8(a) Burial and Cremation Act 1964) is to staff.  Part A - Section 6 of the Council Delegations register states that all of the responsibilities, duties and powers of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 are delegated to staff, except naming of cemeteries under section 7, making of bylaws under section 16, erecting a crematorium under sections 38 and 39, and the making of bylaws under section 40.  Works to alter the entrance to the cemetery is therefore not a matter for a Community Board decision.

8.5       This section is therefore excluded from the options section of the report. Some options have however been prepared. See Attachment 2.  The Community Board’s views are welcomed on each option and will be taken into account when a decision is made to alter, repair or otherwise maintain the entrance.  Any significant changes to the entrance would be consulted on and the Community Board informed.  Note that the 3rd option on Sheet 2 would require engineering advice to determine the structural requirements of the wall.  Also, the cost of the first option shown on the attachment indicates “nil” but there would be a maintenance cost associated with these activities.

8.6       Currently the entrance walls appear to be in good condition. Recent cleaning of the walls and planting has improved the appearance of the entrance.  It is envisaged the current appearance will be maintained as a minimum option.  There is no specific budget allocation for entrance enhancement in the current LTP and any future allocation would be subject to an assessment of overall cemetery development priorities.

8.7       The Cemeteries Master Plan 2013 lists planning and/or management proposals. The planning and management proposals do not constitute a commitment on the Council to implement, rather only indicating the Council’s willingness to progress further investigation into the planning and management proposals. One of the actions listed was to enhance the entrance, including signage and modifications to the concrete entrance wall. This was rated as a low priority.

8.8       One associated issue of alleged confusion among motorists confusing the cemetery for Avonhead Park could potentially be improved with the raising of the lettering as shown in the second option.  Another option could be to improve the entrance signage for the park by making it more prominent and trim the adjacent vegetation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Attachment 1 Avonhead Cemetery lawn area

 

b 

Attachment 2 Avonhead Cemetery frontage

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Blows - Parks Planner

Eric Banks - Senior Network Planner Parks

Approved By

Kate Russell - Acting Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

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14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 11 December 2018

 

13.    Halswell Junction Road - Legalisation of Land Acquired for Road

Reference:

18/1326851

Presenter(s):

Justin Sims, Property Consultant

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Delegate to the Chief Executive, the power to apply to the Minister of Lands for the land identified in the table below and in Attachments A to D of the agenda report, excluding the area of the railway siding easement (identified as Lot C, I and J DP482703), to be declared as road under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981, and to give the written consent of the Council under section 114(2)(h) of that Act; and

2.         That the Chief Executive Officer may sub-delegate this power.

Legal Description

Certificate of Title Reference

Area

Lot 6 DP 482703

681014

612 sq. m

Lot 1 DP 80136

CB45D/927

2,134 sq. m

Sec 1 and 2 on Scheme Plan

Part 679400

134 sq. m

Sec 3 on Scheme Plan

Part 679402 and 679403

16 sq. m

501 and 502 on Scheme Plan

Part CB34A/131

129 sq. m

Lot 601 DP 472402

644190

15,664 sq. m

 

DO NOT DELETE THIS LINE

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Halswell Junction Road - Legalisation of Land Acquired for Road

66

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Lot 1 and 6 - Aerial

72

b

Proposed Land to be Acquired - Sec 1, 2 and 3 - Plan

73

c

Lot 502 - Plan

74

d

Lot 601 - Plan

75

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

Halswell Junction Road - Legalisation of Land Acquired for Road

Reference:

18/1186404

Presenter(s):

Justin Sims, Property Consultant

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to recommend to the Council to delegate to the Chief Executive Officer, the power to apply for, and consent to, land for the Halswell Junction Road realignment being declared road under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following the acquisition, or agreement to acquire, various parcels of land relating to the Halswell Junction Road diversion project which need to be legalised as road.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy because the new road can still be used by the public whether it is legalised as road or not. A decision not to legalise the road therefore has no significant effect on users of the road.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined in accordance with the significance and engagement matrix.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Delegate to the Chief Executive Officer the power to apply to the Minister of Lands for the land identified in the table below and in Attachments A to D of the agenda report, excluding the area of the railway siding easement (identified as Lot C, I and J DP482703), to be declared as road under section 114 of the Public Works Act 1981, and to give the written consent of the Council under section 114(2)(h) of that Act; and

2.         That the Chief Executive Officer may sub-delegate this power

Legal Description

Certificate of Title Reference

Area

Lot 6 DP 482703

681014

612 sq. m

Lot 1 DP 80136

CB45D/927

2,134 sq. m

Sec 1 and 2 on Scheme Plan

Part 679400

134 sq. m

Sec 3 on Scheme Plan

Part 679402 and 679403

16 sq. m

501 and 502 on Scheme Plan

Part CB34A/131

129 sq. m

Lot 601 DP 472402

644190

15,664 sq. m

 

Do not delete this line

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Strategic Planning and Policy

·     Level of Service: 17.0.11.2 A strategic vision for transport to guide the planning and delivery of transport programmes - All pertinent projects in the 2018 LTP are aligned with the Council’s business cases.

4.2       This report only has one option as there is no reason not to declare land acquired for a road improvement project to be legalised as road where it is practical and economically viable to do so. If this option is not supported then the land remains held in fee simple for road purposes:

·     Option  – Declare the land as road

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The land will be legalised as road.

·     It is in line with best practice.

·     Administration of the road will be undertaken in accordance with the rest of the road network, such as parking enforcement.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     None identified

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The Council has a project to realign Halswell Junction Road which will provide both safety and logistical benefits to the community and to the Waterloo Business Park (which is still in the process of being constructed) providing a safer more direct route for heavy goods vehicles to the new industrial/commercial areas.

5.2       The Council at its meeting on 9 October 2014 approved the acquisition and declaration as road of a number of land parcels to enable this diversion which was to include a new rail crossing. The land covered in this report formed the area shaded blue on the plan below.

5.3       The area shaded green on the plan above was subsequently bought under staff delegation to complete what was thought, at the pre-detailed design stage, to be all the land required for the project.

5.4       As the design of the new road has progressed, other land parcels were identified as being required to complete the road realignment, some of which to accommodate a new traffic island that KiwiRail demanded close to the crossing and some to enable the better delivery of the project.

5.5       The Council has subsequently entered into sale and purchase agreements to acquire all the additional land required, shaded yellow on the plan above and identified as Lot 501 and 502 on the attached plan.

5.6       All land required for the project should therefore be legalised as road so it can be administered in accordance with the rest of the road network.

5.7       A railway siding easement running parallel to the railway crosses part of the land for the project, delineated in pink on the plan above, and due to the number of benefited properties to this easement the resultant cost and difficulty surrendering this, the intention is not to legalise this part as road.

5.8       Additionally, as part of the development of Waterloo Business Park, Waterloo Rd was relocated into the development and the original Waterloo Rd was stopped and swapped with the developer as part of the transaction.

5.9       The majority of the new Waterloo Rd was vested in Council as road as part of the sub-division but one parcel identified as Lot 601 DP 472402 was transferred to Council rather than being vested on deposit of the plan. This parcel also therefore needs to be declared road.

5.10    Attachment A-D shows the various land parcels that need to be declared road as referred to above.


 

6.   Option 1 – Declare as road, land acquired for Halswell Junction Road

Option Description

6.1       Declare as road, those land parcels acquired for the Halswell Junction Road realignment.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       There are no engagement requirements for this level of significance as the users of the road would not be affected by a change in its legal status.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The decision to legalise land as road has no material effect on users of the road and therefore the community is not specifically affected by this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – the cost to declare the land as road is minimal

6.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – covered by maintenance of the road network

6.9       Funding source – road maintenance budgets

Legal Implications

6.10    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision. The procedure to declare land as road has been used on many occasions and is set out in the Public Works Act 1981.

6.11    The process under section 114 requires the Council to apply to the Minister of Lands, and the Minister of Lands, by notice in the Gazette, to declare the land to be road. 

6.12    Under section 114(2) of the Public Works Act 1981, part of the process involves the Council providing written consent to the Minister of Lands to the land becoming road.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.13    There are no risks with declaring the land as road.

Implementation

6.14    Implementation dependencies  - obtaining Council approval

6.15    Implementation timeframe – six months

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   The land will be legalised as road.

·   It is in line with best practice.

•   Administration of the road will be undertaken in accordance with the rest of the road  network, such as parking enforcement.

6.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   None identified

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Lot 1 and 6 - Aerial

 

b 

Proposed Land to be Acquired - Sec 1, 2 and 3 - Plan

 

c 

Lot 502 - Plan

 

d 

Lot 601 - Plan

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Justin Sims - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


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Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 29 January 2019

 

14.    Notice of Motion - Halswell Swimming Pool Operating Hours

Reference:

19/95450

Presenter(s):

Mike Mora, Chairperson

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Consideration

 

Debbie Mora moved:

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board ask the Council to seek advice from the Chief Executive on a proposal for extending the operating hours for the summer months of the Halswell Swimming Pool.

With the agreement of the mover, and a majority of the members present, the motion was altered as recorded below.

 

2.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

1.         That the Council seek advice from the Chief Executive on a proposal for extending the operating hours for the summer months of the Halswell Swimming Pool, including investigating the possibility of funding from Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board sources in the 2019/2020 financial year should operational expenses not be met by the Annual Plan. 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Notice of Motion - Halswell Swimming Pool Operating Hours

78

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Staff Memorandum - Halswell Swimming Pool

79

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

Notice of Motion - Halswell Swimming Pool Operating Hours

Reference:

19/50223

Presenter(s):

Peter Dow

 

 

Pursuant to Section 22 of Christchurch City Council’s Standing Orders, the following Notice of Motion is submitted by Debbie Mora:

1.    That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board ask the Council to seek advice from the Chief Executive on a proposal for extending the operating hours for the summer months of the Halswell Swimming Pool.

 

1.   Recommendation to Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decide to:

1.         Accept for consideration, the Notice of Motion from Debbie Mora regarding the extension of operating hours of the Halswell Swimming Pool.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 


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14 February 2019

 

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Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 3 December 2018

 

15.    Mt. Pleasant Sea Scouts Building - Gift & New Lease

Reference:

19/34467

Presenter(s):

Luke Rees-Thomas, Property Consultant

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Original staff recommendations accepted without change

Part C

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

 

1.         Note that at time of writing the staff report no submissions on the proposed lease of an area of Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to the Scout Association of New Zealand had been received as a result of the public notification process undertaken under Sections 119-120 of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.         Request that in the event that if any objections are receive on the proposed lease of an area of Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to the Scout Association of New Zealand are received and cannot be satisfied, staff follow the procedure under the Reserves Act 1977 to convene a Reserves Act Hearings Panel to consider any such objections and make a recommendation to the Council for a decision,

3.         Resolve in the event that there are no objections to the proposed lease that cannot be satisfied, to approve the grant a lease of an area of approximately 260 square metres, of Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road, being the land encompassing the Mt Pleasant sea Scout building footprint) to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ for a term up to 33 years, and:

a.         recommend that  the Chief Executive in her capacity as delegate of the Minister of Conservation's Delegation, gives consent to the lease in accordance with 54(1) (b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

b.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager to manage and conclude all issues, processes and documentation associated with the lease of the property.

4.         Note that approval of the ground lease to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ is consistent with Council policy (“to publicly tender properties for sale or lease unless there is a clear reason for doing otherwise"), as there are clear reasons for doing so, being:

a.         The group has had long tenure at the site.

b.         The group’s activity offers a unique local benefit.

c.         The group has made a financial contribution towards a refurbishment of the building and

d.         Should the Council sell the building currently on the site to the group, ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ will be the logical Lessee of the land.

 

2.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original staff recommendations accepted without change

Part A

That the Council:

 

5.         Receive and consider the results from the public notification process tabled at the meeting as required under Section 78 of the Local Government Act 2002, as related to the transfer of the building located at Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road):

a.         Unless the results of the public notification process give cause to determine otherwise, sell the Mount Pleasant Sea Scout building located at Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ for the nominal sum of $1, noting the group will refurbish the building including an investment of $120,000 + GST.

b.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager to manage and conclude all issues, processes and documentation associated with the transfer of the property.

6.         Note that to authorise the sale of the building to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ is consistent with policy “to publicly tender properties for sale or lease unless there is a clear reason for doing otherwise", as there are clear reasons for doing so, being:

a.         The group’s long tenure at the site

b.         The group’s unique local benefit offered by their activity

c.         The group’s financial contribution towards a refurbishment of the building and

d.         Should the Council sell the building to the group, ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ will be the only logical Lessee within the granting of a new ground lease.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Mt. Pleasant Sea Scouts Building - Gift & New Lease

83

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Building & Site Photos

96

b

Group Proposal

99

c

Group Financial Statement

106

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

Mt. Pleasant Sea Scouts Building - Gift & New Lease

Reference:

18/1122774

Presenter(s):

Luke Rees-Thomas, Property Consultant

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to:

1.1.1   Recommend to Council, that the building located at Old School Reserve which is currently occupied by the Mount Pleasant Sea Scout Group, be transferred to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ for a nominal sum of $1.

1.1.2   Should the building be gifted, the Community Board approve the granting of a new ground lease to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’, over land encompassing the building footprint for a period of up to 33 years.

1.1.3   Note the commitment of the Scouts group to refurbish the building once the transfer and new lease has been implemented.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated and originates from a discussion with the Lessee around a necessary refurbishment of the building. Subsequently, a request for transfer of building ownership was tabled by the Lessee. The granting of a new ground lease is necessary to enable future occupation on the reserve.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the relatively low level of public specifically affected by these decisions e.g. group membership and users of the public reserve. There is no change proposed which would affect public access to the reserve.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

 

1.         Note that at time of writing the staff report no submissions on the proposed lease of an area of Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to the Scout Association of New Zealand had been received as a result of the public notification process undertaken under Sections 119-120 of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.         Request that in the event that if any objections are receive on the proposed lease of an area of Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to the Scout Association of New Zealand are received and cannot be satisfied, staff follow the procedure under the Reserves Act 1977 to convene a Reserves Act Hearings Panel to consider any such objections and make a recommendation to the Council for a decision,

3.         Resolve in the event that there are no objections to the proposed lease that cannot be satisfied, to approve the grant a lease of an area of approximately 260 square metres, of Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road, being the land encompassing the Mt Pleasant sea Scout building footprint) to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ for a term up to 33 years, and:

a.         recommend that  the Chief Executive in her capacity as delegate of the Minister of Conservation's Delegation, gives consent to the lease in accordance with 54(1) (b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

b.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager to manage and conclude all issues, processes and documentation associated with the lease of the property.

4.         Note that approval of the ground lease to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ is consistent with Council policy (“to publicly tender properties for sale or lease unless there is a clear reason for doing otherwise"), as there are clear reasons for doing so, being:

a.         The group has had long tenure at the site.

b.         The group’s activity offers a unique local benefit.

c.         The group has made a financial contribution towards a refurbishment of the building and

d.         Should the Council sell the building currently on the site to the group, ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ will be the logical Lessee of the land.

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to the Council to:

 

5.         Receive and consider the results from the public notification process tabled at the meeting as required under Section 78 of the Local Government Act 2002, as related to the transfer of the building located at Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road):

a.         Unless the results of the public notification process give cause to determine otherwise, sell the Mount Pleasant Sea Scout building located at Old School Reserve (172 Major Hornbrook Road) to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ for the nominal sum of $1, noting the group will refurbish the building including an investment of $120,000 + GST.

b.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager to manage and conclude all issues, processes and documentation associated with the transfer of the property.

6.         Note that to authorise the sale of the building to ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ are consistent with policy (“to publicly tender properties for sale or lease unless there is a clear reason for doing otherwise"), as there are clear reasons for doing so, being:

a.         The group’s long tenure at the site

b.         The group’s unique local benefit offered by their activity

c.         The group’s financial contribution towards a refurbishment of the building and

d.         Should the Council sell the building to the group, ‘The Scout Association of New Zealand’ will be the only logical Lessee within the granting of a new ground lease.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Community Development and Facilities

·     Level of Service: 4.1.27.2 Community development projects are provided, supported and promoted - Community Board plans are developed and implemented.

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Approve building gift and new lease (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Decline building gift and only grant new lease

·     Option 3 - Decline both building gift and new lease

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The building will be transferred to an established community group with a long history at the site.

·     The building will receive a much needed refurbishment and the appearance of the reserve will be enhanced.

·     The group’s membership and local community will benefit in the form of an upgraded facility.

·     The group will be able to provide a better offering to their members which may increase numbers as a result.

·     The Council will be relieved of any further maintenance obligations over the building.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The Council will relinquish ownership rights and control over the asset.

·     Under the proposed arrangement, the Council will only receive a nominal sum for the transfer.

·     Under existing policies, the new lease will only generate a minor income for the Council.

 

5.   Context/Background

Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts Group

5.1       The Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts operate under the umbrella of Scouts New Zealand and are the only Scout group servicing the Redcliffs and Mount Pleasant area. This group holds a long history dating back 70 years and offers a comprehensive Sea Scout programme for youth, boys and girls aged 6-19.

5.2       The group utilises 2 buildings in the area, a concrete double garage on Scott’s Park (owned by the group, which houses their fleet) and their main scout hall on Old School Reserve, Mount Pleasant which is leased from the Council and the subject of this report. The Scouts group have occupied this particular building for 49 years.

5.3       As a result of the Canterbury earthquakes, the group incurred a reduction in membership numbers, however these numbers have since steadily replenished and future growth looks promising. The group currently has 67 youth members, comprising of 23 Cubs, 33 Scouts and 11 Venturers. There is a waiting list to join these sections of 21.

5.4       More information is available on the group’s website - https://sites.google.com/site/mtpleasantseascouts/Home

Land and Building Details

5.5       The building in question is located within Old School Reserve, Mount Pleasant. This land is classified as Recreation Reserve and defined as Lot 28-29 DP 3416 within Computer Freehold Register 651489. Access is gained via Major Hornbrook Rd, the building shares an open access carpark along with a Council public toilet block. The land is administered by the Council in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

Shown in image below:

1 - Main Scout Den / Premises

2 – Scouts Storage Shed (owned by Scouts)

3 – Public Toilets

 

5.6       The original building was developed in the 1940’s with the structure consisting of a concrete ring foundation, timber frame, weatherboard cladding and iron roof. A garage extension was added comprising of concrete block and similar roof materials. The total building floor area is noted as approximately 216m2. Please refer to photos within Attachment A.

5.7       The building suffered minor cosmetic damage during the Canterbury Earthquake events. A scope of repair works was completed on the building by City Care to a total of $5,096 + GST. There is no evidence of a Detailed Engineering Assessment being completed on the main Scout building.

5.8       The Council holds an internal book value for the building at $35,000 (valued 30 June 2018). A market valuation has recently been sourced which places a value of $60,000 on the building/improvements in its current state. It is not feasible to transfer the reserve land within the building footprint therefore this component has not been included in the market valuation report.

5.9       The building is now in a dilapidated condition and in dire need of refurbishment. Many weatherboards are rotten and require replacement, the roof leaks and requires replacement and the interior requires a full repaint. The Tenant has managed to maintain continuation of their programmes despite the building condition however there are now areas which could force vacancy if not attended to in the near future.

5.10    The small storage shed to the west is also in a dilapidated condition. The Scouts group own this structure and have indicated this may be past its ‘used by date’ and may be demolished.

Proposal and Gift of Building

5.11    The Sea Scouts approached Council in 2017 and initiated discussions on the process (and financial implications) for upgrading the building to a fit for purpose state. Council staff indicated they would support a recommendation to the Community Board that a new lease could be granted over the building in order to allow the repairs to be undertaken. On this basis, the Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts sought estimates for the necessary repairs and then applied to Scouts NZ for funding. These details are included within the group’s proposal as Attachment B.

5.12    Scouts NZ have agreed to fund a building capital investment on behalf of the Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts group to a total of $120,000 + GST. However approval for this funding is conditional upon the Sea Scouts group negotiating a greater level of tenure, rather than a lease.

5.13    The option of Council transferring the building to the group was then raised with staff. A nominal transfer sum has been proposed and rationalised on the basis of the group being a not for profit organisation that solely exists to service the community.

5.14    The parks unit (as operational asset owner within the Council) hold no objection to the transfer proposal as this structure would be consistent with other sports clubs that own buildings located on reserve land.

5.15    The proposal solely includes the existing building improvements that are occupied by the Sea Scouts group. No new developments are proposed and no reduction of public access to the reserve will be incurred.

5.16    Should the Council elect to transfer the building to the Sea Scouts, the Council would be relieved of building insurance and renewal costs. Council staff would also ensure the group’s commitment to refurbish the building (as scheduled in Attachment B) is captured as a contractual obligation within the new lease.

5.17    When considering the decision to sell the building, the Council must take into account the views of any affected parties, this process is further explained within the report.

New Lease

5.18    The Mt Pleasant Scouts Group have occupied the building at Old School Reserve by way of perpetual licence since 1969. This tenure is ongoing however is not satisfactory when referencing the current occupation and usage. As mentioned above, Scouts NZ also require a higher level of certainty over the space before committing to the financial outlay for a building upgrade.

5.19    Should the Council agree to sell the improvements to the Group, a new ground lease will be required covering the building footprint, being approximately 260m2 in area (including an additional area for the garage ramp and car parking).

5.20    Staff have included Option 2 within this report, which provides for the Community Board to grant a new lease over the building if the transfer of building ownership is not palatable but wish to support the group’s continued occupation.

5.21    The Council has adopted a policy in setting rents to sports groups that own their own buildings on parks or reserves.  If the building was owned by the group, the expected annual rental would be approximately $225 per annum plus GST based on the building footprint size. For comparison, an approximate commercial rental of the space has been valued at $10,400 + GST per annum (gross).

5.22    There is currently no rental policy set for determining rents to sports groups and organisations occupying Council-owned buildings. To set rentals for these types of occupations, a market valuation is undertaken and then discussed with the internal Council asset owner and based on the lessee’s ability to pay rent.

5.23    The Club has limited income earning capacity and relies on donations, fundraising and levies to meet their operational costs. For the financial year ending September 2018 the Club had a net surplus of $695.47, this was a reduction from the year ending 2017 being $759.68. A copy of the financial statement is appended to this report in Attachment C. These financial statements confirm that the Club is not in a position to pay a market rental for the building.

5.24    The purposed term of 33 years is the maximum term permissible under the Reserves Act and is in keeping with similar sports clubs of a recreational nature.

Community Board Delegations

5.25    The Community Board does not hold a delegation to dispose of property including land or buildings. Such decision would be made by the Council.

5.26    The Council has granted Community Boards the delegated authority to grant leases on Recreation Reserves in accordance with Section 54 of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.27    Section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977 makes provision for the administering body to grant leases to any voluntary organisations for any stands, pavilions, gymnasiums, other buildings or structures already on the reserve subject to the provisions set out in Schedule 1 of that Act relating to leases of recreation reserves provided that a lease granted with the prior consent of the Minister of Conservation given on the grounds that it is considered to be in the public interest for sports, games or public recreation not directly associated with outdoor recreation.

The structure in question is an existing building and the recreational activities and training undertaken by the group fits within the intention of this section of the Reserves Act.

5.28    As there is no approved reserve management plan for Old School Reserve, the administering body (the Council) must give notice in accordance with sections 119 and 120 of the Reserves Act 1977 of the intention to grant a lease with any objections and submissions to be heard by a hearings panel. This delegation excludes the hearing and determining of submissions or objections; such panel would be convened by the Council.

Minister of Conservation Delegation

5.29    On 12 June 2013, the Minster of Conservation delegated to all territorial authorities powers, functions and duties where the territorial authority is the administering body of the relevant reserve. The Council has sub-delegated that power to the Chief Executive.

5.30    In exercising the Minister’s delegation, the administering body (i.e. the Council) must give consideration to those matters previously applied by the Minister, for example ensuring that:

·        The land has been correctly identified;

·        The necessary statutory processes have been followed;

·        The functions and purposes of the Reserves Act have been taken into account in respect to the classification and purpose of the reserve as required under section 40 of the Act;

·        The administering body has considered submissions and objections from affected parties and that, on the basis of the evidence, the decision is a reasonable one;

·        Pursuant to the requirements of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987, the administering body has consulted with and considered the views of tangata whenua or has in some other way been able to make an informed decision.

·        Council officers have publically notified the Council’s intentions to consider granting the group a lease for up to 33 years.

5.31    Council officers are satisfied that the proposed lease will comply with the Minister’s requirements.

Legal Considerations - Dealing Unilaterally

5.32    There are a number of matters that need to be considered when contemplating unilateral dealings to sell the building and grant a new lease.

5.33    First and foremost, the Council must consider and meet the requirements of Section 14 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA), in particular:

·   (1)(a) Conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner,

·   (1)(f) Undertake any commercial transactions in accordance with sound business practices.

·   (1)(g) Ensure prudent stewardship and the efficient and effective use of its resources in the interests of its district or region, including planning effectively for the future management of its assets.

5.34    Secondly, the Council must also ensure that it complies with its relevant policies. In this instance there are two adopted policies recorded:

Property – Disposal of Council Property

“That the Council’s policy of publically tendering properties for sale unless there is a clear reason for doing otherwise be confirmed as applying to all areas of the City with the exception of the area in which the (interim) Central City Board is active in pursuit of Council revitalisation goals”. (Adopted 16 December 2000)

Property – Leasing Council Property

"Where the Council recognises there is only one logical lessee for a public property, the Council will unilaterally deal with that lessee.”

This includes facilities linked to contracts including but not limited to buildings on parks and reserves and not for profit organisations. (Adopted December 2015).

5.35    The clear reason(s) to deal unilaterally regarding a sale of the building is; the long tenure of the group, the unique local benefit offered by their activity and their financial contribution to a refurbishment.

5.36    Subsequently, should the Council elect to sell the building to the group, they will be the only logical Lessee within the granting of a new lease. This is a clear reason to deal unilaterally regarding a new lease.

5.37    Staff are of the view that the group’s proposal benefits the community and outweighs any benefits that may be realised from an open tender process.

Legal Considerations – Public Views and Preferences

5.38    There are a number of relevant legal considerations when making a decision about the proposal received and the future use of the property - Decision Making sections 76 – 82 LGA:

·   Section 76 provides that “Every decision made by a local authority must be made in accordance with such of the provisions of sections 7778, 8081 and 82 as are applicable”.  In summary those sections provide:

·   Section 77 a local authority must, in the course of the decision-making process, seek to identify all reasonably practicable options for the achievement of the objective of a decision and in doing so assess the options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages.

·   Section 78 the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter must be considered.

·   Section 79 provides that in considering how to achieve compliance with sections 77 and 78 they must consider the significance of the matter in accordance with its Significance and Engagement Policy.

·   Section 80 sets out the matters that need to be clearly identified when making a decision that is inconsistent i.e. the inconsistency, reason for it and any intention of the local authority to amend the policy or plan to accommodate the decision.

·   Section 81 provides contributions to decision making by Maori.

·   Section 82 sets out the principles of consultation.

5.39    Section 78 does not require the Council to undertake a consultation process in itself but the Council must have some way of identifying the views and preferences of interested and affected persons. Therefore in this instance, staff have advertised the intention to transfer the building and grant a new lease in The Press newspaper (5 November and 7 November). Staff have also completed a mail drop to houses in the immediate area and contacted the Mount Pleasant Residents Association for comment. The public have until 30 November to provide feedback on the proposed actions, the results of which will be presented to the Community Board and Council at the time this report is considered.

5.40    Section 97 LGA provides that if the Council is proposing to transfer the control of a “strategic asset” to or from the Council, the Council must not make that decision, unless:

·   The decision is explicitly provided for in its LTP; and

·   The proposal to provide for the decision was included in a consultation documents in accordance with section 93E.

5.41    The Significance and Engagement Policy sets out the list of “strategic assets”.  In particular, the Policy lists as “strategic assets”, community facilities as follows:

Community Facilities

(i)     Christchurch Town Hall;

(j)     Christchurch Art Gallery and its permanent collection;

(k)    all land and buildings comprising the Council's social housing portfolio;

(l)     all public library facilities;

(m)  all parks and reserves owned by or administered by the Council;

(n)    all public swimming pools;

(o)    all waterfront land and facilities owned or operated by the Council, including wharves, jetties, slipways, breakwaters and seawalls;

(p)    cemeteries and listed heritage buildings and structures.

 

“All” or “its” means the asset as a whole.

5.42    Where a “strategic asset” is a network or has many components, decisions may be made in respect of individual components within the network without those components being regarded as strategic, unless such decisions are considered to significantly alter the level of service provided by the Council.

5.43    Paragraph 5.27 (m) uses the word “all”, and it suggests that parks and reserves are treated separately.

5.44    The disposal of this building is not considered a strategic asset as the Council will be maintaining ownership of the land. The decision to dispose of the building would not be considered to significantly alter the level of service provided by the Council.

6.   Option 1 - Approve building gift and new lease (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The Community Board recommends that Council agree to transfer the building to the Group for a nominal Sum. The Group will refurbish the building including an investment of $120,000 + GST.

6.2       The Community Board will grant the Group a new ground lease over the building foot print for a term up to 33 years including renewals, subject to Council agreeing to gift the building.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are being met via standard public consultation processes. Specifically, advertisements in The Press as outlined within the body of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       The Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts group and users of the public reserve are specifically affected by this option due to the change in ownership. However no reduction in access to the reserve is being incurred and the building appearance will be improved by refurbishment. Their views have been considered via the necessary consultation processes required under Section 78 of the Local Government Act.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation – Staff time to process transfer and new lease.

6.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Lease management.

6.10    Funding source – Existing budgets.

Legal Implications

6.11    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision

6.12    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit

6.13    The legal consideration is the legal documentation required to effect the transfer and new lease.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.14    There is a risk that the group does not proceed with the building refurbishment after transfer.  This may result in a park building becoming further dilapidated. Therefore the Council will include the refurbishment as a contractual requirement within the new lease.

Implementation

6.15    Implementation dependencies - Council decision and then processing of documentation.

6.16    Implementation timeframe – 2 months from Council decision.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   The building will be transferred to an established community group with a long history at the site.

·   The building will receive a much needed refurbishment and the appearance of the reserve will be enhanced.

·   The group’s membership and local community will benefit in the form of an upgraded facility.

·   The group will be able to provide a better offering to their members which may increase numbers as a result.

·   The Council will be relieved of any further maintenance obligations over the building.

6.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The Council will relinquish ownership rights and control over the asset.

·   Under the proposed arrangement, the Council will only receive a nominal sum for the transfer.

·   Under existing policies, the new lease will only generate a minor income for the Council.

7.   Option 2 - Decline building gift and only grant new lease

Option Description

7.1       The Community Board recommends that Council does not transfer the building to the group.

7.2       The Community Board elects to grant the group a new lease over the building for a term up to 33 years including renewals.

7.3       This option will record the Community Board’s preference to retain a park asset whilst still providing future occupation rights for the historical Lessee.

7.4       The group are unlikely to lead a refurbishment of the building and a request may come for Council to contribute this project.

Significance

7.5       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.6       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are being met via standard public consultation processes. Specifically, advertisements in The Press as outlined within the body of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.7       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.8       The Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts group and users of the public reserve are specifically affected by this option due to the granting of a new lease. No reduction in access to the reserve is being incurred. Their views have been considered via the necessary consultation processes required under Section 78 of the Local Government Act.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.9       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.10    Cost of Implementation – Staff time to process new lease. Potential contribution towards building refurbishment.

7.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Continued building renewals costs, lease management.

7.12    Funding source – Existing budgets.

Legal Implications

7.13    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.14    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

7.15    The legal consideration is the drafting of new lease documentation.

Risks and Mitigations  

7.16    There is a risk that the Scout building will continue to deteriorate which may result in the structure not being fit for purpose. The group are required to maintain the premises under a lease, however this is limited to fair wear and tear with the building owner being responsible for renewals.

Implementation

7.17    Implementation dependencies - Council decision and then processing of documentation.

7.18    Implementation timeframe - 2 months from Council decision.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.19    The advantages of this option include:

·   The group will be granted secure tenure to remain in occupancy via a long term lease.

·   The Council will continue to receive the current rental income.

7.20    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The group will not proceed with a refurbishment of the building. The Council has no budget available for this work and even if this was sourced, the Council’s rental policy would not allow for any increase as calculation is based on floor area.

·   As the building is not being refurbished, the group will limited in their ability to provide suitable facilities and recruit new members.

·   The appearance of the reserve will not be enhanced.

8.   Option 3 - Decline both building gift and new lease

Option Description

8.1       The Community Board recommends that Council does not transfer the building to the Group. No refurbishment of the building will take place.

8.2       The Community Board elects not to grant the Group a new lease over the building. The group may remain in occupation on a holding over basis under their existing lease agreement. The group may provide one months’ notice to vacate at any time.

8.3       Selecting this option will not address any of the core issues outlined within the report. This may result in the group seeking alternative accommodation, leaving the Council with a substantial cost to make the building fit for further occupation.

Significance

8.4       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.5       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are being met via standard public consultation processes. Specifically, advertisements in The Press as outlined within the body of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.6       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.7       The Mount Pleasant Sea Scouts group and users of the public reserve are specifically affected by this option as the outstanding issues are not being addressed. No reduction in access to the reserve is being incurred however the building may continue to deteriorate. Their views have been considered via the necessary consultation processes required under Section 78 of the Local Government Act.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.8       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

8.9       Cost of Implementation – Likely nil as no action being taken. However if the tenants vacates then the Council will incur cost to upgrade or demolish the building.

8.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Building renewals costs as per current.

8.11    Funding source – Existing budgets.

Legal Implications

8.12    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.13    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations  

8.14    There is a risk that the group may elect to vacate the building and the structure will continue to fall into disrepair.

Implementation

8.15    Implementation dependencies - No action being taken under this option.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   The Council can take time to reassess any other uses for the building and reserve. However this could be at the expense of the existing tenant who holds a 49 year history at the site.

8.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The building will not receive a much needed refurbishment.

·   The Council will not be considering and supporting the group’s history at the site.

·   The Group will not receive any certainty around their future occupation and may need to consider other options.

·   If the Group vacates the premises, the Council will incur cost upgrading the building and time to source a new occupant.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Building & Site Photos

 

b 

Group Proposal

 

c 

Group Financial Statement

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Luke Rees-Thomas - Property Consultant

Russel Wedge - Team Leader Parks Policy & Advisory

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Kate Russell - Acting Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 4 February 2019

 

16.    Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

Reference:

19/117250

Presenter(s):

Andy Richards, Project Manager - Transport

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to Council to:

1.         Receive the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to commence engagement with the community on the recommendations contained within the draft plan.

 

2.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to commence engagement with the community on the recommendations contained within the draft plan.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

110

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Downstream Effects Management Plan Draft

112

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

Reference:

19/88719

Presenter(s):

Andy Richards, Project Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to request the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  recommend to Council the endorsement of the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan and for staff to undertake consultation on the recommendations contained within the plan.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following initial engagement with the community and completion of a draft plan suitable for consultation.

1.3       This report was presented to the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board on 25 January 2019 and they resolved:

“That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.    Receives the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan.

That the Council:

2.         Receives the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to commence engagement with the community on the recommendations contained within the plan.”

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of high significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected, both directly and indirectly, and the high level of community interest.  This preparation of the Downstream Effects Management Plan is also a condition of an Environment Court ruling in 2016.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to Council to:

1.         Receive the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to commence engagement with the community on the recommendations contained within the draft plan.

4.   Key Points

4.1       Under the conditions for the relevant Consent Order, Christchurch City Council is required to:

4.1.1   Address the downstream effects relating to traffic arising from the operation of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

4.1.2   Engage an Independent Traffic Expert to recommend appropriate traffic mitigation measures in the form of a Management Plan

4.1.3   Engage with affected owners and occupiers (as identified in the Plan) and specified persons/groups regarding the Independents Expert’s recommendations

4.1.4   Carry out ongoing monitoring and identify the anticipated future increase in traffic as a result of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

4.1.5   Carry out any recommended traffic mitigation measures if traffic volumes are anticipated to increase by over 30% on any street. Council will need to implement mitigation measures as soon as reasonably practicable and in accordance with the timeframes required by the Consent.

4.2       At the request of the Independent Traffic Expert Council staff have completed a first phase of community engagement to understand community concerns about expected increased traffic growth and potential traffic mitigation measures. The findings from this engagement have fed into the attached draft Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan that has been prepared by the Independent Traffic Expert.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Downstream Effects Management Plan Draft

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Andy Richards - Project Manager

Ann Campbell - Senior Engagement Advisor

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

Diane Keenan - Head of Public Information and Participation

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

Report from Papanui-Innes Community Board  – 25 January 2019

 

17.    Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

Reference:

19/85481

Presenter(s):

Andy Richards, Project Manager Transport

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board recommends to Council to:

1.         Endorse the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to undertake consultation on the recommendations contained within the plan.

2.   Board Comment

 

The Community Board are aware that the draft Downstream Effects Management Plan is a base from which to work with the community on solutions to the traffic flows from the Christchurch Northern Corridor.  As such, the Board looks forward to comments from the community as per the Environment Court ruling processes and until the Community has had their say on the document the Community Board decided to only receive the report at this time. 

 

3.  Papanui-Innes Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Receives the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan.

 

4.  Papanui-Innes Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Receives the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to commence engagement with the community on the recommendations contained within the plan.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

236

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Downstream Effects Management Plan Draft

238

 

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

Christchurch Northern Corridor Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan (Draft)

Reference:

18/1068453

Presenter(s):

Andy Richards, Project Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to request the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board  recommend to Council the endorsement of the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan and for staff to undertake consultation on the recommendations contained within the plan.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following initial engagement with the community and completion of a draft plan suitable for consultation.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of high significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected, both directly and indirectly, and the high level of community interest.  This preparation of the Downstream Effects Management Plan is also a condition of an Environment Court ruling in 2016.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board recommend to Council to:

1.         Endorse the Draft Downstream Effects Management Plan for staff to undertake consultation on the recommendations contained within the plan.

4.   Key Points

4.1       Under the conditions for the relevant Consent Order, Christchurch City Council is required to:

4.1.1   Address the downstream effects relating to traffic arising from the operation of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

4.1.2   Engage an Independent Traffic Expert to recommend appropriate traffic mitigation measures in the form of a Management Plan

4.1.3   Engage with affected owners and occupiers (as identified in the Plan) and specified persons/groups regarding the Independents Expert’s recommendations

4.1.4   Carry out ongoing monitoring and identify the anticipated future increase in traffic as a result of the Christchurch Northern Corridor.

4.1.5   Carry out any recommended traffic mitigation measures if traffic volumes are anticipated to increase by over 30% on any street. Council will need to implement mitigation measures as soon as reasonably practicable and in accordance with the timeframes required by the Consent.

4.2       At the request of the Independent Traffic Expert Council staff have completed a first phase of community engagement to understand community concerns about expected increased traffic growth and potential traffic mitigation measures. The findings from this engagement have fed into the attached draft Downstream Effects Mitigation Plan that has been prepared by the Independent Traffic Expert.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Downstream Effects Management Plan Draft

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Andy Richards - Project Manager

Ann Campbell - Senior Engagement Advisor

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

 

18.    District Licensing Committee member resignation and recruitment process.

Reference:

19/74800

Presenter(s):

Megan Pearce, Hearings and Council Support Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to be informed of the resignation of a member of the District Licensing Committee (DLC) and to approve recruitment for replacement membership.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive Mr Lawn’s resignation as Chair and List Member from the District Licensing Committee.

2.         Approve that Council officers commence a recruitment process to appoint a replacement Chair and List Member on the District Licensing Committee.

3.         Extend the period of Mr David Blackwell’s temporary appointment as Chair of the District Licensing Committee to cover the recruitment period and until a replacement member can commence duties.

4.         Delegate to the Hearings and Council Support Manager the responsibility to undertake the recruitment process and to report to Council for the appointment of the successful candidate/s.

 

3.   Resignation

3.1       At its meeting of 13 September 2018, the Council approved a six month leave of absence request from DLC Chair and List Member Al Lawn. Mr Lawn’s leave was to allow him to continue with the Ashburton Regional Control Centre’s response to the Mycoplasma Bovis outbreak. Mr Lawn was to return to his DLC duties mid-March.

3.2       In Mr Lawn’s absence, List Member David Blackwell was temporarily approved as Chair and appointed as Commissioner to cover the period of the vacancy.

3.3       On 20 January 2019, Mr Lawn tendered his resignation from the DLC in order to take up other opportunities. There is now a vacancy within the DLC for a Chair and List Member (as a Chair holds both roles).

4.   Recruitment Process

4.1       It is recommended that four Chairs and an additional three List Members is an appropriate number of members for the DLC (this was the state prior to the leave of absence). There needs to be adequate membership to cover non-availability and any issues arising from conflict of interest. It is therefore recommended that a full recruitment process be undertaken to appoint a replacement Chair and List Member.

4.2       There are currently three incumbent List Members who may wish to be considered for the Chair role. Should it occur that one of these applicants be successful in obtaining the role of Chair there would be a subsequent vacancy of a list member. It is therefore recommended that recruitment be undertaken in such a way as to allow appointment of a List Member should a vacancy arise noting that a full open recruitment process is being undertaken with no predetermined outcome. Once the recruitment process is complete, a recommendation of appointment will be reported to Council for approval.

4.3       Under section 192 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act (SSAA), the Council must establish, maintain and publish a list of persons approved to be members of the Council’s DLC. Persons on the list must have experience relevant to alcohol licensing matters i.e. experiences which include knowledge of alcohol licensing, experience in legal and regulatory alcohol environments and knowledge of the SSAA (there are some eligibility disqualifications that apply).

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Megan Pearce - Hearings and Council Support Manager

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

19.    2018/19 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund

Reference:

19/80069

Presenter(s):

Gray Watson (Manager Community Partnerships & Planning)

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to consider an application for funding from the 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

58617

Living Springs

New Water Treatment System

$50,000

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated as a result of applications being received.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Declines a grant from the 2018/19 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund to Living Springs towards a new water treatment system.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2018/19

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

 $138,238

$101,392

$36,846         

$36,846

 

4.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

4.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2018-19 Metropolian Discretionary Response Fund Living Springs Decision Matrix February 2019

365

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Nicola Thompson - Community Funding Advisor

Bryony Armstrong - Community Funding Advisor

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

 

20.    Chief Executive's Report - December 2018 and January 2019

Reference:

19/58230

Presenter(s):

Karleen Edwards, Chief Executive

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       This Chief Executive’s Report provides a summary of the Council’s organisational performance for December 2018 and January 2019.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council:

1.         Receive the report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chief Executive Report December 2018 - January 2019

368

 

 

Signatories

Author

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

  


Council

14 February 2019

 

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Council

14 February 2019

 

 

21.  Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

14 February 2019

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

22

Earlham Street Options

s7(2)(a), s7(2)(b)(ii), s7(2)(g), s7(2)(i)

Protection of Privacy of Natural Persons, Prejudice Commercial Position, Maintain Legal Professional Privilege, Conduct Negotiations

This report includes options that could adversely affect property negotiations.

On the Chief Executive being satisfied there are no longer any grounds in the LGOIMA for withholding the information.  Any subsequent release would be subject to the removal of personal information.