Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Thursday 1 March 2018

Time:                                    9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Jamie Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

23 February 2018

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

Christopher Turner-Bullock

Committee Advisor

941 8233

christopher.turner@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 5

2.       Declarations of Interest............................................................................................................ 5

3.       Public Participation.................................................................................................................. 5

3.1       Public Forum....................................................................................................................... 5

3.2       Deputations by Appointment............................................................................................... 5

4.       Presentation of Petitions......................................................................................................... 5

Banks Peninsula Community Board

5.       Whakaraupō / Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan....................................... 7

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

6.       Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council................................................ 59

7.       Proposed 40km/h Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square................................................. 65

Papanui-Innes Community Board

8.       Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council.......................................................... 77

Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board

9.       Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council.............................. 83

10.     Jet Place, Harewood - Land to be dedicated as Road.......................................................... 87

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

11.     Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council..................................... 99

12.     Halswell Junction Road Extension Project.......................................................................... 103

Coastal-Burwood Community Board

13.     Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council................................................... 139

Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

14.     Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council................................. 147

15.     Chief Executive's Report....................................................................................................... 155

Strategic Capability Committee

16.     Strategic Capability Committee Minutes - 19 February 2018........................................... 163

STAFF REPORTS

17.     Zone Committees quarterly reports.................................................................................... 167

18.     Heathcote River Dredging Stage 1 Report.......................................................................... 173

19.     Resolution to Exclude the Public......................................................................................... 192  

 

 

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation

3.1  Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2  Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

3.2.1

Yvette Couch-Lewis will speak regarding item 5 - Whakaraupō / Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan

 

4.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.  

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

Report from Banks Peninsula Community Board  – 12 February 2018

 

5.        Whakaraupō / Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan

Reference:

18/153728

Presenter(s):

Kelvin McMillan, Senior Policy Planner

 

 

 

1.  Banks Peninsula Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Staff Recommendation accepted without change.

Part C

That the Banks Peninsula Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the Whaka-Ora Healthy Harbour, Ki Uta Ki Tai, Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan report.

 

2.  Banks Peninsula Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Adopt the Whaka-Ora Healthy Harbour, Ki Uta Ki Tai, Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Whakaraupō / Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan

8

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Whaka-Ora Healthy Harbour, Ki Uta Ki Tai.  Whakaraupo/ Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan

10

 

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

Whakaraupō / Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan

Reference:

17/1490063

Contact:

Kelvin McMillan

kelvin.mcmillan@ccc.govt.nz

9418692

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Banks Peninsula Community Board to endorse and recommend that the Council adopt the Whaka-Ora Healthy Harbour, Ki Uta Ki Tai, Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Plan.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Banks Peninsula Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the Whaka-Ora Healthy Harbour, Ki Uta Ki Tai, Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan report.

2.         Recommend that the Council adopt the Catchment Management Plan.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       The Lyttelton Port Recovery Plan (CERA, 2015) records a commitment by Christchurch City Council, Canterbury Regional Council (Environment Canterbury), Lyttelton Port Company Limited, Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, and Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu as Tāngata Tiaki (the Partners) to work together to develop a catchment management plan for Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour in accordance with the philosophy ki uta ki tai (from the mountains to the sea).

3.2       The Partners recognise Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke as tangata whenua holding mana whenua and mana moana for Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour.

3.3       The Partners have agreed that the plan (Attachment A) will aim to restore the ecological and cultural health of Whakaraupō/ Lyttelton Harbour as mahinga kai, whilst also addressing other environmental, cultural and social concerns, including the needs of recreational users, as well as the needs of a working port (Lyttelton Port Recovery Plan 5.1).

3.4       Issues that most affect the harbour include soil erosion (leading to harbour siltation which affects marine life), storm water runoff, pollution and biodiversity loss throughout the catchment.

3.5       In late 2017 the plan was made available for public consultation and received widespread support from harbour communities. The catchment management plan has been accordingly amended and finalised, and is now ready for adoption by the partner organisations including the Council. 

3.6       The key kaupapa (purpose) of this plan is mahinga kai. The concept of mahinga kai is broken down into the three clear goals (whāinga) of ensuring we have a healthy mahinga kai environment, an abundant mahinga kai environment, and one we are all interconnected to so that we can share in its treasures.

3.7       The Plan has identified three pou (guiding principles) that will help determine how to reach these goals, and shares some of the stories and histories that make Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour such a special place.  

3.8       These Pou are: change-making; Mō tātou, ā, mō kā uri ā muri ake nei (for us and our children after us); and collaboration.

3.9       The whole plan is nestled within the metaphor of weaving a korowai, with each step linked to a different step in the process of making a traditional korowai, from harvesting                                        and working the raw materials, to weaving different natural fibres and feathers from throughout the catchment into our korowai, creating the patterns upon it that represent key focus areas for us, and finally wrapping it around our Harbour and maintaining it for generations to come.

3.10    A comprehensive series of actions covering erosion and sedimentation, pollution, terrestrial biodiversity, marine biodiversity, research and monitoring and supporting actions have been recommended to restore the harbour for current and future generations.

3.11    The partners’ Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) sets out a commitment to collaborating on a long term basis in the delivery, implementation and the review of this plan. Funding of $600,000 is already committed through to 2018 for initial implementation of the Plan. The MOU contains a commitment to confirm funding and resources for the following three-year period (out to June 2021).  Council’s major financial contribution will be through sewerage and storm water network upgrades which are already included in the existing 2015 and draft 2018, LTP’s.  Implementation of the plan will ultimately require the involvement of the whole community for it to be effective.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Whaka-Ora Healthy Harbour, Ki Uta Ki Tai.  Whakaraupo/ Lyttelton Harbour Catchment Management Plan

 

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Kelvin McMillan - Senior Policy Planner

Clive Appleton - Team Leader Natural Environment

Approved By

Helen Beaumont - Head of Strategic Policy

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

 

6.        Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/135409

Presenter(s):

Karolin Potter, Community Board Chairperson
Melanie Coker, Community Board Deputy Chairperson
Arohanui Grace, Community Governance Manager, Spreydon-Cashmere

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receives the Community Board report for January and February 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held meetings on 29 January and 16 February 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·    Approval of the removal of one street tree to allow the Colombo & Beckenham Street. Wastewater Project to be fully implemented and a tree planting plan comprising three replacement street trees.

·    Approval of a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Millicent St Clare Smith towards participation in the 2017-2018 New Zealand Under 18 Women’s  Ice Hockey Challenge Cup of Asia competition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from the 7th March to the 12th March 2018. 

·    Approval of a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Te Marino Violet Rose Roberts towards participation in the Canterbury Under17 Girls National Softball Tournament in Dunedin from the 17-21 January.

·    Approval that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Dyers Pass Road commencing at a point 260 metres south west of its intersection with
Sulby Road Place, and extending in a south westerly direction for 10 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

·    Approval that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Dyers Pass Road commencing 260 metres south west of its intersection with Sulby Road Place, and extending 10 metres south westerly.  

·    Approval that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on school days from 8:20 to 9:00 and from 14:30 to 15:15  on the south west side of Maryhill Avenue commencing 86 metres south west of its intersection with Wyn Street and extending 46 metres south westerly.

·    Approval that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on school days from 8:20 to 9:00 and from 14:30 to 15:15  on the south east side of Maryhill Avenue commencing 86 metres south west of its intersection with Wyn Street and extending 46 metres south westerly.

·    Approval that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Upland Road commencing 160 metres south west of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, and extending four metres south westerly.

·    Approval that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes on school days from 8:15 to 9:15 and from 14:30 to 15:30, on the north side of Sandwich Road commencing 133 metres west of its intersection with Eastern Terrace and extending 52 metres westerly direction.

·    Revocation of the parking restrictions on the west side of Eastern Terrace commencing six metres north of its intersection with Sandwich Road and extending 118 metres northerly.

·    Approval that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, on the west side of Eastern Terrace commencing 59 metres north of its intersection with Sandwich Road and extending
15 metres northerly.

·    Approval that a marked bus stop be installed, on the west side of Eastern Terrace commencing 74 metres north of its intersection with Sandwich Road and extending 44 metres northerly.

·    Approval of the landscape plan for the Hoon Hay Park basketball courts.

·    Approval of the landscape plan for the Curletts Stream flood storage and stormwater treatment project at 201 Annex Road, which includes approximately 98,000 metres square of native vegetation areas (including significant woodland areas), noting that consideration will be given to Board suggestions on species to be planted.

·    Approval of the removal of approximately 107 healthy and structurally sound trees (in areas
1, 2 and 3) to allow the Curletts Stream flood storage and stormwater treatment project to be fully implemented.

·    Decision to hold the 2018 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Pride Garden Awards Ceremony on Tuesday 27 March 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Cashmere Club, Sydenham Room.

Decision to hold the 2018 Spreydon-Cashmere Edible Garden Awards Ceremony will be held on Tuesday 17 April 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Old Stone House.

Recommendations to Staff were:

·    Recommendation to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park as per Attachment A, subject to:

a.      The approval and use of the lighting being subject to the lights being connected to an     automatic timer set to switch-off at 9pm every evening.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

·    Proposed 40 kilometre/hour Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

                   

5.1       The re-opening of the Old Stone House

The Old Stone House was officially re-opened by the mayor on 7 February 2018 following a two million dollar Restoration.  First built in 1870 by Sir John Cracroft Wilson as worker accommodation the building was partially destroyed by fire in 1971.  Through the efforts of community members it was rebuilt in 1979 and became a much-loved and well used community facility for meetings, craft groups, clubs and as a premiere wedding and function venue.  Damage sustained in the February 2011 earthquake forced closure of the building.

The Old Stone House required extensive repairs and earthquake strengthening work to be done to meet 67 percent of the New Building Standard.  The work included installing new diaphragm walls and roof connections, deconstruction and reconstruction of the chimneys, replacement of the stone lintels and sealing the concrete walls and foundations with pressure injected epoxy.

The re-opening ceremony was attended by descendants of the original owners and occupants of the building among others.

5.2       Manuka Cottage building

The Addington community development project known as “Manuka Cottage’ has operated in Addington since the 1990s with the support of the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board.  As a result of the earthquakes Manuka Cottage was forced to re-locate from its former premises at
45 Dickens Street and has been in temporary accommodation since.  Continuation of this community development project has been critical to both the support of a highly vulnerable population group as well as positive and productive civic engagement. 

"Manuka Cottage” was the first community development project to benefit from the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board bids to the Capital Endowment Fund for property purchase in 2012.  A site on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve has been identified as the site of a new cottage style community centre under Council ownership. Consultation has been undertaken and a tendering process for the design and build of the new Manuka Cottage on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve carried out.  The evaluation process to determine the successful tenderer still is currently underway.

Project Management staff will continue to actively manage the development in consultation with a steering group comprising staff, members of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and representatives of the Manuka Cottage legal entity: Addington Community House.

It is hoped that the development will be complete and the building ready for occupation later this year.

5.3       Coronation Hall

Coronation Hall located on Spreydon Domain on Domain Terrace was built in 1911 to commemorate the coronation of George V. In 1997 the hall was leased as dedicated club rooms to the Keruru Sports and Cultural Club.  The building survived the Canterbury Earthquake sequence of 2010-2011 but was badly damaged by fire on 8 October 2015 and the Keruru Sports and Cultural Club subsequently vacated the premises.  Repair would require the replacement of the main roof structure and ceiling, and the reconstruction of part of the southern wall with some window replacement.  The building has not to date been repaired and remains unoccupied.

The Board and local staff have over recent months received enquiries from various groups in need of accommodation and interested use of the hall.  At a meeting in May 2017 a local theatre group that lost its former theatre as result of the earthquake and has been in temporary accommodation since addressed the Board.  The group is in need of new permanent premises and raised with the Board the possibility that Coronation Hall be restored, and leased for use as a community theatre. The Board requested that staff investigate and provide advice on the proposal.

The Coronation Hall has now been included in a public engagement process seeking interested people or groups who may want have a use for one of a number of heritage buildings across the city.  The Board has been advised that Coronation Hall has been included in this process due to it requiring funding for repair and because any future use of the building needs to comply with the reserve classification of the land.  The role of the Community Board in the determining the future of the Hall is unclear.

 

 

5.4       Curletts Road Stormwater retention basin

At its meeting on 16 February 2018 the Board considered a landscape plan for the proposed Curletts Stormwater retention basin.  The Board was pleased with proposals for planting of the area in largely native species.  At the suggestion of members the project team agreed to investigate the inclusion of Totara in the plantings and to identify and work with any community groups that may wish to be involved in the planting and maintenance of the basin.

5.5       Addington Speed Limits     

The Addington community has for some time advocated for reduced speed limits in the vicinity of St Mary’s Church Square. Following investigation by staff the Board considered a report and recommendation at its meeting on 16 February 2018.

Staff in attendance spoke to the accompanying report and answered questions from members. The Board considered among other things whether the speed limit around the Church Square itself should be set at 30 kilometres per hour rather than 40 kilometres per hour as recommended by staff.  It was in the end agreed that it would be preferable for a 40 kilometres per hour limit to be put in place and monitored for 12 months and then the question of a reduced speed limit around the square revisited if necessary.

A report presenting the Board’s Part A recommendations to the council on the proposal is included in this agenda.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

 

6.1       Pancake Races at St Mary's Church, Addington

Each year on Shrove Tuesday St Mary's Anglican Church in Church Square provides an evening fete for local families. As well as live musicians, The Faerie Circle, games, free sausages and pancakes supplied by church members, the evening feature event assembles teams of locals to compete in pancake running and flipping races.  This year over 200 people attended, and some eight teams of young and old amused the crowd through heats to the finals.  The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board complemented the activities by supporting free entertainment for children with an Off the Ground Fund grant.

6.2       Spreydon Cashmere Edible Gardens Awards Update

In July 2015 the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board decided to investigate initiating an annual edible/sustainable/rain garden award for the ward.  Staff researched the proposal including information about the edible garden award model and partnership underway with at least two other Community Boards and the Canterbury Horticultural Society. In 2017 the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board decided to initiate an edible gardens awards programme delivering the event via a partnership with the Canterbury Horticultural Society.  The award is focussed on food production, but recognises also special gardening approaches such as organics and sustainability.

The programme was launched in October 2017 with promotional material distributed and available online encouraging participation by individuals, families, community groups, schools, and businesses.  Judging will occur during March.  The awards will congratulate and encourage existing, new, or potential gardeners in the area, working together or as individuals.

The 2018 Spreydon-Cashmere Edible Garden Awards Ceremony will be held on Tuesday 17 April 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Old Stone House.

 

 

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Following engagement with almost 350 people in May-June 2017 the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan 2017-19 was produced and published as printed booklets and is also available for viewing on line.  In addition to the full plan the Board has published a number of single page pamphlets that include summary information about the plan, and provide contact details for Board members and guidance on how to engage with the Board and Council.

The Plan outlines local issues, ambitions and concerns that the Board plans to address, pursue and try to resolve.  Work is underway on many of the matters identified in the Plan and the Board together with local Community Governance staff are about to embark on a process of reviewing the progress made to date and considering what still needs to be done in terms of achieving or advancing the Plan’s objectives.

 

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest 

8.1       Spreydon Neighbourhood Network

Community Seminar on Alcohol Related Matters

In early December, the Board aware of local interest in alcohol related matters passed on to Spreydon-Cashmere residents’ groups an invitation to the Safer Christchurch Alcohol Harm Forum and encouraged them to attend.  At least four of the resident groups had representatives present including the Spreydon Neighbourhood Network. Aware of extensive local interest in an application for an alcohol retail outlet in Barrington Street the Network used the occasion to learn and to link with health, enforcement, and Community Law experts.

Shortly afterwards the Spreydon Neighbourhood Network pre-empted a local community seminar on alcohol planned by the Board and organised a local workshop for its residents and business owners who had made submissions on or were interested in the proposed new off-licence application. The focus of the workshop was to help inform and prepare submitters who wished to speak at the pending hearing. Around 20 people in total spent their early evening learning how to make the best of a local decision-making opportunity.

Household Emergency Preparedness Plan

The resourceful and hardworking Spreydon Neighbourhood Network has in addition recently developed an Emergency Preparedness Plan template for use by individual households. Based on resources developed by the South Shore Resident’s Association the template provides for residents to list their important contacts /details; to record the details of household residents and set out an emergency plan; to identify the whereabouts of survival items and lists items to be considered as part of an evacuation kit.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

Report from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  – 16 February 2018

 

7.        Proposed 40km/h Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square

Reference:

18/159978

Presenter(s):

John Dore, Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends that Council:

1.         Approve that pursuant to Section 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, speed limits be revoked and set as listed below in clauses 1.a to 1.c and include the resulting changes in the Christchurch City Register of Speed Limits & Speed Limit Maps:

a.         Revoke the 50 kilometres per hour speed limit of Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street, Church Square and Grove Road.

b.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 50 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Moorhouse Avenue and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Harman Street.

c.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 40 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Harman Street and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Church Square.

d.         Approve that the speed limit of; Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street and Church Square be set to 40 kilometres per hour.

2.         Approve that the speed limit changes listed above in clauses 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d come into force following the date of council approval and installation of signs shown on Attachment A. (Approximately April 2018.)

 

2.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

 

1.         Approves that pursuant to Section 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, speed limits be revoked and set as listed below in clauses 1.a to 1.c and include the resulting changes in the Christchurch City Register of Speed Limits and Speed Limit Maps:

a.         Revoke the 50 kilometres per hour speed limit of Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street, Church Square and Grove Road.

b.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 50 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Moorhouse Avenue and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Harman Street.

c.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 40 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Harman Street and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Church Square.

d.         Approve that the speed limit of; Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street and Church Square be set to 40 kilometres per hour.

2.         Approves that the speed limit changes listed above in clauses 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d come into force following the date of council approval and installation of signs shown on Attachment A. (Approximately April 2018).

3.         Requests staff to monitor the 40 kilometres per hour speed zone and report back in 12 months on its efficacy, particularly in the vicinity of Church Square.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Proposed 40km/h Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square

67

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

74

b

Measured Speeds

75

c

Traffic Volumes

76

 

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

Proposed 40km/h Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square

Reference:

16/1382067

Contact:

John Dore

John.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board’s recommendation that Council approves a change from 50km/h to 40km/h around the St Mary’s Church Square area as shown on Attachment A.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommend that Council:

1.         Approve that pursuant to Section 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, speed limits be revoked and set as listed below in clauses 1.a to 1.c and include the resulting changes in the Christchurch City Register of Speed Limits & Speed Limit Maps:

a.         Revoke the 50 kilometres per hour speed limit of Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street, Church Square and Grove Road.

b.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 50 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Moorhouse Avenue and extending in a southerly to its intersection with Harman Street.

c.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 40 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Harman Street and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Church Square.

d.         Approve that the speed limit of; Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street and Church Square be set to 40 kilometres per hour.

2.         Approve that the speed limit changes listed above in clauses 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d come into force following date of council approval and installation of signs shown on Attachment A. Approximately April 2018.

 

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users – minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

·     Levels of Service: 10.0.36 Promote modal shift: Increase the percentage share of cycling trips

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Change the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h as shown on Attachment A (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Aim to lower actual speeds further

·     Aligns posted speed limit with actual speeds in the area

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     There are no known disadvantages

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       At is meeting 8 June 2016, The Spreydon – Cashmere Board resolved that:

That the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board decided to request that staff provide a report on the introduction of a 30 kilometre per hour speed limit around St Mary's Church Addington and in wider Addington between Selwyn Street and Spencer Street, including the latter but not the former, and from Brougham Street to Lincoln Road.

5.2       The study area is shown on Attachment A. The roads within the study area and nearby are classified within the road network as noted below:

·    Brougham Street (SH76) is classified as a major arterial road and is part of the strategic freight network

·    Lincoln Road and Memorial Avenue are classified as major arterial roads

·    Selwyn Street, Harman Street is classified as a collector route

·    The balance of roads within the study area are classified as local roads

5.3       The land use within the study area is predominately residential with some industrial between Harman Street and Hazeldean Street. Recorded traffic volumes are shown on Attachment C.

5.4       The Little Rive Major Cycle Route has recently been completed along Collins Street and Grove Road and includes a two way off road cycle facility. This work also included banning left turns from Brougham Street into Collins Street.

5.5       Traffic calming features such as road humps and narrowing’s are on the majority of streets within the area.

5.6       Recorded mean operating speeds are shown on Attachment B.

NZTA Speed Management Guide

1.1       The NZTA Speed Management Guide was published in November 2016 and has been followed up by a revision of, Land Transport Rule (The Rule): Setting of Speed Limits 2003. The revised Land Transport Rule: has been active since 21 September 2017.

1.2       The guide is an integral part of the Safer Journeys Safer Speeds Programme. The overall goal of the safer speeds programme, which sets the direction for speed management in New Zealand, in line with the governments Safer Journeys Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020 is to:

Reduce death and serious injuries, and support economic productivity through travel speeds that are safe and appropriate for road function, design, safety and use.

1.3       The Speed Management Guide introduces a modern approach to speed management in New Zealand roads. The 2017 Rule formalises the approach to speed management in the Guide. In particular the Rule: -

·    Requires RCAs to set speed limits that are, in the RCAs view, safe and appropriate; and

·    Encourages a consistent approach to speed management throughout New Zealand; and

·    Replaces the methodology of the 2003 Rule with assessment criteria and outcome statements based on the approach in the Guide.

1.4       Application of the guide to the study area identifies opportunities to improve credibility of speed limits. These are streets where road users already travel at a safe and appropriate speed, but where the posted speed limit is out of alignment. 


 

6.   Option 1 - Change the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h (preferred)

Option Description

Change the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h as shown on Attachment A.The proposed speed limit change to 40km/h aligns posted speed limit with actual speeds and gives the speed limit credibility and is in accordance with NZTA speed management guidance.Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance included, a letterbox drop to the local community, publication on the Have Your Say website and notification to the Addington Times.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       In accordance with the NZTA Land Transport Rule – Setting Speed Limits, NZTA and Police were consulted with prior to consultation and provided their support for this project. In addition, any local and territorial authorities were informed of the consultation. This included the NZAA, E-Can, Spokes, Road Transport Association New Zealand and the Taxi Federation.

6.7       There is local community interest in this project as any changes would have the greatest effect on those living locally.  Their views are outlined below.

6.8       Engagement was undertaken from Monday 20 November 2017 – Monday 11 December 2017.

6.9       A total of 1300 leaflets were hand delivered to properties in Church Square, Collins Street, Cotterill Street, Dickens Street, Emerson Street, Feast Place, Grove Road, Harman Street, Lincoln Lane, MacAulay Street, Meredith Street, Parlane Street, Spencer Street, and sections of Barrington Street, Brougham Street, Hazeldean Road, Jerrold Street North, Lincoln Road, Moorhouse Avenue, Poulson Street, Selwyn Street and Ward Street. 

6.10    The consultation leaflets were also sent to 151 key stakeholders and 480 absentee owners.

6.11    Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, Beckenham Service Centre, Spreydon Community Library and Pioneer Recreation and Sport Centre.

6.12    During the course of the engagement, Council received feedback from 117 people. Of the 117 submissions, 78 submitters were in support of the proposal, 27 were in support but had some concerns, six did not support the proposal and six did not state their preference. Of the 117 submissions, five identified as being part of an organisation.

6.13    The following outlines the main themes of the feedback:

Requests for the speed limit to be reduced further

·    31 submitters commented that the speed limit should be reduced further than 40km/hr

Safety concerns/suggestions

·    25 submitters noted safety concerns or made suggestions to improve the road layout, such as making streets one-way or removing on-street parking

Unnecessary

·    Nine submitters commented that the speed reduction was unnecessary

 

Support for the speed reduction

·    15 submitters included in their comments their support for the speed reduction

Requests for the area to be adjusted

·    Nine submitters requested additional streets be included

·    Two submitters requested Harman Street be excluded from the reduced speed restriction area

·    One submitter requested the speed limit be reduced to 40km/hr for Harman Street and Ward Street and 30km/hr for the other streets.

6.14    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Board meeting and how they can request speaking rights. Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback summary with project team responses.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.15    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.16    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $9,500 to supply and install signs, poles and any repeater road markings.

6.17    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effect will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.18    Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget.

Legal Implications

6.19    Speed limits must be set in accordance with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 and subsequent amendments. 

6.20    Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010 provides Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.21    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits. 

6.22    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.23    Not applicable.

Implementation

6.24    Implementation dependencies - Council approval.

6.25    Implementation timeframe - Approximately four weeks following Council approval.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.26    The advantages of this option include:

·   Aim to lower actual speeds further

·   Aligns posted speed limit with actual speeds in the area

6.27    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   No known disadvantages

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing speed limit.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       In accordance with the NZTA Land Transport Rule – Setting Speed Limits, NZTA and Police were consulted with prior to consultation and provided their support to reduce the speed limit. In addition, any local and territorial authorities were informed of the consultation. This included the NZAA, E-Can, Spokes, Road Transport Association New Zealand and the Taxi Federation.

7.5       There is local community interest in this project as any changes would have the greatest effect on those living locally. 

7.6       During the course of the engagement, Council received feedback from 117 people. Of the 117 submissions, 78 submitters were in support of the proposal, 27 were in support but had some concerns, six did not support the proposal and six did not state their preference. Of the 117 submissions, five identified as being part of an organisation.

7.7       Of the 117 submitters, eight submitters commented that the speed reduction was unnecessary.

7.8       This option is inconsistent with the community board request and would not achieve safety improvements associated with a speed limit change.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.9       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.10    Cost of Implementation - $0

7.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $0

7.12    Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.13    Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

7.14    Not applicable.

Implementation

7.15    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.16    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   Has no impact on existing speed limit.

7.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Speeds on streets within the area that do not have traffic calming are likely to remain at current levels.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Preferred Option

 

b 

Measured Speeds

 

c 

Traffic Volumes

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Lori Rankin - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

 

8.        Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/147644

Presenter(s):

Ali Jones, Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Papanui-Innes Community Board report for February 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Papanui-Innes Community Board held a meeting on 9 February.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Approval of the following grants:

$500 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to Belfast School towards the costs of School Prefects and House Captains attending the Leadership Camp at the Papanui Youth Development Trust Youth facility in March 2018.

$150 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to Christchurch Boys High School towards the costs of a pupil competing in the World Schools Rugby Festival in South Africa in April 2018.

$250 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to Kyla-Jaye Ngahireka Bartlett towards the cost of attending the Aotearoa Maori National Netball Oranga Healthy Lifestyle Tournament in Gisborne in April 2018.

·   The nomination of Pauline Cotter and Emma Norrish to attend the Canterbury Water Management Strategy Zone Committee Workshop on 26 February.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A Recommendations to Council.

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Edgeware Village Streetscape

A meeting of the key stakeholders has been held at with discussion on the proposed Edgeware Village streetscape and movement improvement project options and the possibility of a trial.

5.2       MacFarlane Park Community Centre

Both the Resource Management Application and the Building consent have been approved and the removal of the building from the site at St Albans to MacFarlane Park has been completed.

The Lions Club International Fund is funding the full building relocation (including insurances etc.) and half the deck/ramp/steps reinstatement.

A blessing of the building will be held at MacFarlane Park on the morning of 9 March at 11.30am. The projected handover date of the new Community Centre to the community to provide a much needed social hub is 29 June 2018.

5.3       St Albans Community Centre

St Albans Residents Association (SARA) vacated the facility on the 26th of January and have relocated to the St Albans Tennis Club. Local staff will bring together the St Albans working party as soon as there is more information on the progress of the rebuild of the facility

5.4       280 Westminster Street

Staff have continued to work with the community around the possible use of this property by community organisations. The building requires a resource consent and repairs if the property is to be occupied in the future.

5.5       St Albans Park and Pavilion

The St Albans sport field remediation is progressing. Drainage is about to be installed, the irrigation system upgraded and the playing surface remediated. Previously drainage issues affected the playing surface and the ability to use the park in winter months. The playground is available for use until the drainage work starts.

The skate park and flying fox are remaining open during construction and portable toilets have been installed for public use. The new pavilion is being erected under a separate contract and work on this and the sport field will run concurrently.

A tender has been accepted for the construction of the new pavilion and work is planned to begin in February with completion for both projects expected to be In July/August.

Start work notices have been distributed to neighbours and signage has been placed on the fencing around the project.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Air Quality Cranford Street

Concerns have been expressed in the community regarding the impact of increased traffic due to four-laning on the air quality of Cranford Street. Environment Canterbury Councillors and staff have discussed this issue with the Board at a seminar in February.

6.2       Belfast Skate Jam

Belfast Skate Jam was held in January with good numbers participating. Feedback from the event reported that 99% of respondents were happy with the event and would like to see this happen again next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.3       Belfast Family Pool Days

Belfast Community Network held four Family Pool Days in January 2018.  The events had a fantastic turn out with an average of 200 people attending each day.  Games were played both in and out of the pool and Belfast Rotary ran a BBQ and games.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.4       Edible Garden Awards 2018

There are 36 confirmed entries for this year’s awards. For the 2017 awards the total entries numbered 48 which was an all-time high and an increase from the 2016 total of 35 entries, however a number of previous older entrants have decided not to enter this year’s awards citing age and health issues.

Schools, early learning centres and community organisations have continued to be involved thus ensuring that the younger members of our Community Board area are being introduced to the concept of growing, harvesting and preparing their own food and the life-long learning that surrounds this process.

The Awards will be presented at a function at 6pm on Thursday 22 March at the Chapel Street Centre, corner Harewood Road and Chapel Street, Papanui.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Nil to report

 

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest 

8.1       None at this time.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

Judith Pascoe - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

9.        Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/76965

Contact:

Matt McLintock
David Cartwright

Community Governance Manager
Community Board Chairperson

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board report for February 2018.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held a meeting on 29 January 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017–18 Discretionary Response Fund Application – The Village Community Centre – The Board approved a grant of $2,500 from its 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to The Village Community Centre towards the establishment costs for a weekly community Market Day.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund Application – St Patrick’s School Bryndwr After School Care Programme – The Board resolved to decline the application for funding from the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund from St Patrick's School Bryndwr After School Care Programme towards wages for the programme supervisor.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017-18 Youth Development Fund Application - The Board approved a grant of $200 from its 2017-18 Youth Development Fund to Ella Jean MacDonald towards the costs of competing in the Touch New Zealand National Tournament in Auckland from 9 to 11 February 2018.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Area Report – January 2018 – The Board received, for record purposes the minutes of its 15 January 2018 Recess Committee meeting The Board also requested that staff investigate a design option for bollards at the exit of the Stream Walkway that was provided by a local resident and present it to local residents prior to installing the bollards and signage in Coldstream Court.

·   The Board received correspondence from:

-      Mr Purcell regarding the traffic issues in the Glandovey/Idris/Straven Road area.

-      Glandovey Idris Straven Residents Association regarding traffic issues in the Glandovey/Idris/Straven Roads area.

-      Papanui Baptist Church thanking the Board for its support during 2017.

-      Chief Executive, Christchurch City Council supporting the involvement of Council staff and Development Christchurch Limited leading an integrated approach in progressing the regeneration of Bishopdale Mall.

·   The Board received a deputation from Mr Martin regarding safety issues at the Coldstream Court Walkway exit into Coldstream Court.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report presenting Part A recommendations from the Board is included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Jet Place, Harewood – Land To Be Dedicated As Road

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of the Jet Place, Harewood – Land to be Dedicated As Road report will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 1 March 2018.

 

5.   Significant Community Issues

5.1       Community Issues

A wide range of issues continued to be raised by residents with staff and elected members.  These issues are actioned an individual basis.

 

6.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Jeffrey’s Suction Tank

Staff have worked through the information received from the Community Feedback process.   A further round of consultation will be undertaken over the coming weeks which outlines another, more favourable option. 

6.2       Jellie Park Upgrade and Earthquake Repair

Work is progressing on the Jellie Park Upgrade and Earthquake Repair programme which is being carried out in stages to keep the disruption to users to a minimum.

The first phase of repairs is expected to be completed by December 2019 and work is currently underway on the Sauna, Spa and Steam Room, due for completion in March 2018, and the outdoor Hydroslide, due for completion in May 2018.

 

7.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

7.1       Christchurch City Councils’ Youth Pool Party 2017  

We could not have hoped for better weather for the Youth Pool Party on Friday 8 December 2017 at Jellie Park.  Two hundred and sixty local youth thoroughly enjoyed the night organised by Council staff working alongside key youth organisations and their leaders.  The event was hi-lighted by the 'best' bomb competition and free Hellers sausages that were all devoured (thanks Hellers!)

 

A big thank you to all the local CCC staff, Jellie Park staff and youth workers who assisted and to the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood and Papanui-Innes Community Boards for supporting such a great event.

 

 

 

7.2       Community Pride Garden Awards 2018

Judging was undertaken for this year’s Community Pride Garden Awards 2018 between 13 and 29 January 2018.  Judges from the Christchurch Beautifying Association selected award-winning gardens that are visible from the street taking into account effort, overall tidiness and the impact of the garden on the street.  Gardens meeting the standard will be awarded a certificate.

The Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Community Pride Garden Awards 2018 ceremony will be held at the Fendalton Bowling Club on 14 March 2018 and certificates and trophies will be presented.

7.3       Culture Galore 2018

Staff are busy preparing for the upcoming Culture Galore 2018 event which will be held between 12 noon and 4pm on Saturday, 10 March 2018 at Ray Blank Park. Maidstone Road in Ilam.

Culture Galore is a celebration of culture, showcasing performing arts, crafts, demonstrations and global food.

 

8.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

8.1       Updates on its Community Plan 2017-19 are to be presented to the Board bi-monthly throughout 2018 to measure progress against the Board’s approved outcomes and priorities.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Lisa Gregory - Community Recreation Advisor

Margaret Henderson - Community Board Advisor

Maryanne Lomax - Community Development Advisor

Kay Rabe - Governance Support Officer

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

Report from Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board  – 29 January 2018

 

10.    Jet Place, Harewood - Land to be dedicated as Road

Reference:

18/98424

Contact:

Stuart McLeod

stuart.mcleod@ccc.govt.nz

941 8520

 

 

 

 

1.  Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Resolves to dedicate the Local Purpose Road Reserve, more particularly described as Lot 19 DP 375764 as road, pursuant to Section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Jet Place, Harewood - Land to be dedicated as Road

88

 

No.

Title

Page

a

304/5852 Attachment A

96

b

304/5852 Attachment B

97

 

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

Jet Place, Harewood - Land to be dedicated as Road

Reference:

17/1380752

Contact:

Stuart McLeod

stuart.mcleod@ccc.govt.nz

941 8520

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board to recommend to the Council that a Local Purpose Reserve (Road), namely Lot 19 DP 375764, is dedicated as road pursuant to Section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to a request from the lessee of the adjoining property (the applicant) to declare 180 square meters, being Lot 19 DP 375764 contained in Computer Freehold Register 305065 (Attachment A) as road.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by completing the Council template for recording significance assessments.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Resolves to dedicate the Local Purpose Reserve (Road) more particularly described as Lot 19 DP 375764 as road, pursuant to Section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

4.2       The following options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Dedicate Lot 19 DP 375764 as road (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Grant a right of way easement over the land

·     Option 3 – Do nothing.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Land earmarked for future road becomes road.

·     Dedicating land for road is a relatively simple process, there is specific provision in the Reserves Act 1977 to dedicate Local Purposed Reserve (Road) as road.

·     Costs are being met by the applicant.

·     The adjoining land owner (Environment Canterbury - Ecan) has consented to the land becoming road.

·     Will go some way to alleviate vehicle movement conflict on the Broughs Road to the north.

·     Avoids the potential need to grant multiple easements.

·     Is supportive of local business.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     None.

 

5.   Background/Summary

Background

5.1       Lot 19 DP 375764 is located at the very end of Jet Place off Logistic Drive as shown in Attachment B of this report.  All other adjoining land being owned by Environment Canterbury (Ecan). The Ecan land is held by them for the improvement and protection of the Waimakariri River and is zoned Industrial heavy.

5.2       Ecan subdivided its land in 2007 to allow for parts to be leased for industrial use in keeping with the zoning.  As part of this subdivision Lot 19 DP 375764 vested in Council as Local Purpose Reserve (Road).

5.3       Section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977 provides a statutory process whereby Local Purpose Reserve (Road) can be dedicated as road by Council resolution.

5.4       Ecan lease the property immediately to the north to Niagara Sawmilling Limited who are looking to enhance their business operations and minimise vehicle conflicts on Broughs Road by seeking alternative access on to Jet Place. 

5.5       Present access to the Niagara land is via another Local Purpose Reserve (Road) known as Broughs Road to the north, although this land has the appearance of road it is not a legal road and several vehicle accidents or near misses have occurred in this vicinity. 

5.6       Broughs Road cannot be dedicated as road until such time as NZTA have completed their final road design and works connecting McLeans Island Road with Sawyers Arms Road.

Summary

5.7       The practical options considered were to dedicate Lot 19 DP 375764 as road, grant a right of way easement and to do nothing, once the advantages and disadvantages of the options were considered it become obvious the most practical approach which is both cost efficient and reasonably quick to implement is to dedicate Lot 19 DP 375764 as road.

 


 

6.   Option 1 – Dedicate Lot 19 DP 375764 as road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977 provides a specific statutory mechanism to dedicate Local Purpose Reserve (Road) to be dedicate as road by Council resolution.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report

6.3       There is no engagement requirement for this statutory process.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Only the applicant is specifically affected by this option. Their view is Lot 19 DP 375764 should be dedicated as road.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is Consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – None – the applicant is meeting all costs.

6.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Future maintenance.

6.9       Funding source – Roads and footpaths LTP Vol I page 136

Legal Implications

6.10    Section 111 provides a specific mechanism for Local Purpose Reserves (Road) to be dedicated as road by Council passing the appropriate resolution. An extract of the resolution is lodged at Land Information New Zealand and the title to the land is cancelled.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.11    There is low risk in following this procedure.

Implementation

6.12    Implementation dependencies  - Obtaining Council resolution

6.13    Implementation timeframe – 3 months

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.14    The advantages of this option include:

·        Land earmarked for future road becomes road.

·        Dedicating land for road is a relatively simple process, there is specific provision in the Reserves Act 1977 to dedicate Local Purposed Reserve (Road) as road.

·        Costs are being met by the applicant.

·        The adjoining owner has consented to the land becoming road.

·        Will go some way to alleviate vehicle movement conflict on the Broughs Road.

·        Is supportive of local business.

·        Avoids the potential need to grant multiple easements.

6.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   None.


 

7.   Option 2 – Grant a right of way easement

Option Description

7.1       Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 provide for the grant of rights of way and other easements over reserves.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium because granting of rights of way easements over reserves is likely to required public consultation.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       The views of the wider community would only be sought is this option was adopted in which case the views of the wider public would be sought through a public consultation process.  

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – None, the applicant would meet all costs.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – None, the applicant would be liable for the upkeep of the easement.

7.9       Funding source – none.

Legal Implications

7.10    The public consultation provisions in Section 119 and 120 of the Reserves Act 1977 would have to be followed. 

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    There is a risk a low risk of objections being received.   

7.11.1 If any objections were received then the Council would have to complete the process in the Reserves Act and assess the objection(s). There can only be one of two outcomes, either the objections are allowed in which case the process is at an end or the objections are dismissed in which case the process continues.

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies  - Compliance with the statutory requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

7.13    Implementation timeframe – 1 year.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   The applicant would get access to Jet Place.


 

 

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Extended time frame.

·   Survey costs.

·   Increased legal costs.

·   Hearing panel costs.

·   Potential need to grant additional easements e.g. electricity, water.

·   Does not achieve the best outcome – granting easements over a Local Purpose Reserve (Road) is not sensible when it could be dedicated as road.

·   There could be a future application to dedicate the land as road meaning Council would have wasted resources granting easements.


 

8.   Option 3 – Do nothing

Option Description

8.1       Doing nothing leaves the status quo.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       The applicant is specifically affected by this option because they would not gain access to Jet Place.  The view non progression as a disappointment and anti-business.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies:

8.6.1   Inconsistency – Economic Development LTP Vol I page 73 and Roads and Footpaths LTP Vol I page 136.

8.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – Infrastructure does not support sustainable economic growth and increased vehicle operating costs.

8.6.3   Amendment necessary – no.

Financial Implications

8.7       Cost of Implementation – staff time.

8.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – none.

8.9       Funding source – none.

Legal Implications

8.10    None.

Risks and Mitigations

8.1       There is a risk no action will result in negative publicity.  

8.1.1   Residual risk rating: Remains low.

8.1.2   Explanation to applicant that Council is not obliged to dedicate land as road.

Implementation

8.2       Implementation dependencies  - None.

8.3       Implementation timeframe – two months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.4       The advantages of this option include:

·   Status quo maintained.


 

 

8.5       The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Not supportive of local business.

·   Further applications to dedicate Lot 19 DP 375764 as road could be received.

·   People may illegally access adjoining site across Lot 19 DP 375764.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

304/5852 Attachment A

 

b 

304/5852 Attachment B

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Stuart McLeod - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

11.    Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/120406

Presenter(s):

Mike Mora, Chairperson
Gary Watson, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board report for January and February 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held meetings on 30 January 2018 and 13 February 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Granting of easement over local purpose reserve at 23R Brusio Drive.

·   Approval of bus stop and intersection sightline improvements for Lodestar Avenue/Stark Drive intersection.

·   Approval of a bus stop and associated parking restrictions in Skyhawk Road.

·   Allocation of Youth Development Funding to one recipient.

·   Allocation of Discretionary Response Funding to two local organisations.

·   Approval of the following road names:

                                         Riccarton Park (RMA/2017/2099) - 165 Racecourse Road

·        Manakura Street

·        Grey Way Road

·        Horoeka Street

                                         Quarry View (RMA/2017/894) - 31 Provincial Road

·        Leyland Lane

                                      Country Palms (RMA/2016/3297) - 43 Country Palms Drive

·        Gammack Drive

·        Sheehan Street

·        Billington Drive

·        Flynn Lane

·        Saxby Lane

·        Fairbairn Close

·   Approval to prohibit the stopping of vehicles at any time on the southern side of Cashmere Road at the entrance to Oderings Garden Centre.

·   Approval of angled parking changes in Ayr Street.

·   Approval of tree removals at the Sutherlands Basins and Sparks Wetland sites.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report presenting Part A recommendations from the Board, are included in this agenda for the Council’s consideration:

4.1       Halswell Junction Road Extension Project  

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Strengthening Community Fund Projects

5.1.1   Oak Development Trust's Men 2 Cook programme has been placed on hold as the programme facilitator has relocated back to Australia.  The Trust is presently seeking another chef/cook to facilitate the running of the 'for men, by men' programme.

5.1.2   The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Pride Garden Awards 2018 function hosted by the Board, is being held on Monday 12 March 2018 at 4.30pm at the Hornby Working Men's Club.

5.2       Other partnerships with the community and organisations

5.2.1   Proposed Riccarton Business Association.

Since the commencement of the road works to improve the infrastructure on Riccarton Road, a number of businesses have publically expressed concerns about the adverse effects these works are having on their trading.

With the works set to continue for the foreseeable future it has been suggested that a business association be established. The purpose of doing this is to connect Riccarton Road businesses with each other and provide a forum for development and support, in addition to acting as a conduit between individual businesses and the Council.

The advantages of establishing an association include more direct representation of smaller businesses, providing support to ESOL business owners/operators, advocacy and lobbying on issues relevant to businesses, and a more effective and efficient ‘one-stop-shop’ for resources, experience, advice and knowledge.

This would be a community-led initiative with support from the Council.

5.2.2   The Chairpersons and Deputy Chairpersons of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton and the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Boards attended a meeting with the University of Canterbury's Vice-Chancellor to discuss parking related issues in the areas around the university.

Attendees acknowledged the pressures on parking in and around the university areas and are keen to work together, where appropriate.

5.3       Local Infrastructure projects underway

5.3.1   Picton Reserve – Installation of the additional play equipment is underway at the Picton Reserve.

5.3.2   Harrington Park Public Toilet – A staff briefing on progressing this project will be made to the Board in the near future.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Heritage in Halswell

6.1.1   The small local heritage group remains active and is now contributing to the monthly Halswell Newsletter as well as having display boards available to view in the former Singleman’s Quarters building at the Halswell Quarry.   

6.2       City Harvest

6.2.1   City Harvest is the largest food rescue organisation in Christchurch.  It was established in 2016 by John and Janice Milligan in Manchester Street.  It has recently moved location to 29 Kilmarnock Street, in the rear of the former Kilmarnock Enterprises building. 

The organisation is actively diverting 16 to 17 tonnes of food from the waste stream and distributing the food to 34 local organisations.  They have two vans collecting from most New World and Countdown supermarkets in Christchurch and a Pak 'n' Save.  They have a large pool of volunteers who assist with the sorting and redistribution of the food. 

6.3       Westside Walkers

6.3.1   A new walking group, Westside Walkers has been established in Hornby. The group meet at the Hornby Community Centre each Saturday at 10am for a short walk in the area.

The activity is aimed at all ages, but it is expected that it will predominantly be older adults who wish to maintain a good level of fitness, and women who are interested in getting back to fitness after pregnancy.

The walks are free to attend and open to all, with an optional strengthening and toning circuit class afterwards for a fee of $5. 

6.4       Up-Coming Local Events

6.4.1   Connect 2018 – Prize giving and fun activities aimed at connecting students and local residents is on Saturday 3 March 2018 from 4pm to 6pm at Harrington Park.

6.4.2   Culture Galore – a multi-cultural annual festival celebrating our city's diversity through food, arts, crafts, music and performances is being held on Saturday 10 March 2018 from 12noon to 4pm at Ray Blank Park in Ilam.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Updates are to be presented quarterly to the Board throughout 2018 on its Community Plan 2017-19 (March, June, September and December) to measure progress against the Board’s approved outcomes and priorities.

 

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest 

8.1       The Board continues to follow developments around quarries in the area and the possible impact on the communities.

8.2       The reclassification of Denton Park is of high interest to all members.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Gary Watson - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 30 January 2018

 

12.    Halswell Junction Road Extension Project

Reference:

18/98898

Contact:

Sandra Novias

sandra.novias@ccc.govt.nz

941 8018

 

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change with the addition of clause 28 below)

Part C

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

9.         Approve the general layout of the Halswell Junction Road extension (new link) as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda, including new kerb alignments, landscaping, surface treatments and line markings.

10.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with the Main South Road, and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 80 metres north of Waterloo Road (east), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

11.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Foremans Road (west), commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 119 metres, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

12.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Halswell Junction Road (east), commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 38 metres, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

13.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes at the north eastern most end of Halswell Junction Road (east), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

14.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Waterloo Road at the previous intersection with Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

15.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Waterloo Road at the intersection with Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

16.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Halswell Junction Road, at a point 16 metres north of Foremans Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

17.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Halswell Junction Road, at a point 6 metres south of Foremans Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

18.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Foreman Road (west), at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

19.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Halswell Junction (east), at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

20.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Foremans Road (east), at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east), in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

21.       Revoke the Stop control on Waterloo Road where it meets Halswell Junction Road.

22.       Revoke the Stop control on Foremans Road (east) where it meets Halswell Junction Road.

23.       Approve that a Give Way control be placed against Foremans Road east approaching Halswell Junction Road (east), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

24.       Revoke the Stop control on Foremans Road (west) where it meets Halswell Junction Road.

25.       Approve that a Stop control be placed against Foremans Road (west) approaching Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda.

26.       Approve that a Stop control be placed against Halswell Junction Road (east) approaching Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda.

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

27.       Make the following resolutions relying on its powers under the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 and Part 21 of the Local Government Act 1974.  For the purposes of the Board’s resolutions below, the following notations apply: 1. An intersection of roadways is defined by the prolongation of the kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and 2. The resolutions are to take effect from the commencement of the physical road works associated with the project, as detailed in the submitted report.

a.   Revoke any existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with Main South Road and, and extending in a northerly direction to its intersection of Foremans Road.

b.  Revoke any existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with Main South Road and, and extending in a northerly direction to its intersection of Foremans Road.

c.   Revoke any existing parking and stopping restrictions on Waterloo Road, at its current intersection with Halswell Junction Road.

d.  Revoke the marked bus stop on the north side of Halswell Junction Road (east) directly across from its intersection with Foremans Road (east) and extending in a south westerly direction for a distance of 15.5 metres.

e.  Revoke the marked bus stop on the south side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at a point 12.5 metres northeast of its intersection with Foremans Road (east) and extending in a north easterly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

f.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 70 metres northwest of its intersection with Main South Road and extending in a northbound direction for a distance of 93.5 metres.

g.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the southwest corner of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 13 metres.

h.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south side of Foremans Road (west) commencing at the south west corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in a west bound direction for a distance of 25 metres.

i.    Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the northwest corner of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 30.5 metres.

j.    Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 44 metres north of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 253 metres.

k.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an east bound direction for a distance of 39 metres.

l.    Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 30 metres.

m. Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 43.5 metres north of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 159 metres.

n.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south side of Waterloo Road commencing at the south east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an east bound direction for a distance of 91 metres.

o.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north side of Waterloo Road commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an east bound direction for a distance of 77 metres.

p.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Waterloo Road and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 90 metres.

q.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at a point 210.5 metres north east of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an north easterly direction for a distance of 25 metres including around the cul-de-sac head.

r.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at a point 222 metres north east of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an north easterly direction for a distance of 11 metres.

s.   Approve that the parking of vehicles be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person's parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.4.1 of the Land Transport - Road User Rule 2004, on the west side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at a point 13 metres south of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a south bound direction for a distance of 16.5 metres.

t.   Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 30.5 metres north of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 13.5 metres.

u.  Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 30 metres north of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 13.5 metres.

28.       Approve the removal of the trees as described and marked in red in the staff memorandum (dated 23 January 2018) accompanying the report to the Board meeting of 30 January 2018 with the exception of the trees outside 344 Waterloo Road (HJR10 and HJR11) which are to remain.

 

2.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

 

1.         Approve the scheme design for the Halswell Junction Road Extension (new link), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda.

2.         Approve that detailed design is progressed and progress with the physical works tender that is conditional on adequate funding being available in the next Long Term Plan.

3.         Approve that the intersection of Halswell Junction Road and Waterloo Road be controlled by traffic signals in accordance with the Land Transport Act – Traffic Control Devices: 2004, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

4.         Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of north bound cycles only, be established on the west side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with Main South Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 266 metres. This special vehicle lane is to be located against the west side kerb line and west side mobility parking space, detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles.

5.         Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of south bound cycles only, be established on the east side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing 55 metres north of Main South Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 173 metres. This special vehicle lane is to be located against the east side kerb line and east side parking lane, detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles.

6.         Approve that a bi directional shared path be installed on the north west side of Halswell Junction Road for the use of north east and south west bound cyclists and pedestrians commencing  at a distance of 18 metres from its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north easterly direction to its intersection with Waterloo Road (west).

7.         Approve that a bi directional shared path be installed on the south east side of Halswell Junction Road for the use of north east and south west bound cyclists and pedestrians commencing a distance of 20 metres from its with intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north easterly direction to its intersection with Waterloo Road.

8.         Approve that a bi directional shared path be installed on the south east side of Halswell Junction Road for the use of north east and south west bound cyclists and pedestrians commencing at its intersection with Waterloo Road (east) and extending in a north easterly direction to its intersection with Waterloo Road (west).

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Halswell Junction Road Extension Project

108

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Halswell Junction Road Extension - New Link- Plans for Approval

122

b

Halswell Junction Road Extension - New Link - Public Information Leaflet

127

c

Halswell Junction Road Extension - New Link - Feedback Form

131

d

Consultation Plans - Preferred Option 1

133

 

 


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

Halswell Junction Road Extension Project

Reference:

17/1290794

Contact:

Sandra Novais

sandra.novais@ccc.govt.nz

941 8018

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to advise the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board on the outcome of community consultation and to request the Board to approve the Halswell Junction Road extension project to proceed to detailed design, tender and implementation subject to approval of extra funds and also to recommend to the Council that it approves the traffic controls and cycle facilities to allow the installation of a traffic signal controlled intersection where the new link and old Waterloo Road meet by the new level crossing (refer Attachment A).

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board following the completion of the consultation process. The Board was last updated on this project at a Seminar held on 27 June 2017.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the significance matrix and in particular factors including the positive impact of the proposed link on the local transport network and also risks relating to Council funding.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

         That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommends to the Council that it:

 

1.         Approve the scheme design for the Halswell Junction Road Extension (new link), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda.

2.         Approve that detailed design is progressed and progress with the physical works tender that is conditional on adequate funding being available in the next Long Term Plan.

3.         Approve that the intersection of Halswell Junction Road and Waterloo Road be controlled by traffic signals in accordance with the Land Transport Act – Traffic Control Devices: 2004, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

4.         Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of north bound cycles only, be established on the west side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with Main South Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 266 metres. This special vehicle lane is to be located against the west side kerb line and west side mobility parking space, detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles.

5.         Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of south bound cycles only, be established on the east side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing 55 metres north of Main South Road and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 173 metres. This special vehicle lane is to be located against the east side kerb line and east side parking lane, detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles.

6.         Approve that a bi directional shared path be installed on the north west side of Halswell Junction Road for the use of north east and south west bound cyclists and pedestrians commencing  at a distance of 18 metres from its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north easterly direction to its intersection with Waterloo Road (west).

7.         Approve that a bi directional shared path be installed on the south east side of Halswell Junction Road for the use of north east and south west bound cyclists and pedestrians commencing a distance of 20 metres from its with intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north easterly direction to its intersection with Waterloo Road.

8.         Approve that a bi directional shared path be installed on the south east side of Halswell Junction Road for the use of north east and south west bound cyclists and pedestrians commencing at its intersection with Waterloo Road (east) and extending in a north easterly direction to its intersection with Waterloo Road (west).

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

9.         Approve the general layout of the Halswell Junction Road extension (new link) as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda, including new kerb alignments, landscaping, surface treatments and line markings.

10.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with the Main South Road, and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 80 metres north of Waterloo Road (east), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

11.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Foremans Road (west), commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 119 metres, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

12.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Halswell Junction Road (east), commencing at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 38 metres, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

13.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes at the north eastern most end of Halswell Junction Road (east), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

14.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Waterloo Road at the previous intersection with Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

15.       Approve the road marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Waterloo Road at the intersection with Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

16.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Halswell Junction Road, at a point 16 metres north of Foremans Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

17.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Halswell Junction Road, at a point 6 metres south of Foremans Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

18.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Foreman Road (west), at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

19.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Halswell Junction (east), at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road, in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

20.       Approve that a pedestrian refuge island crossing facility be constructed on Foremans Road (east), at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east), in accordance with Attachment A of the agenda;

21.       Revoke the Stop control on Waterloo Road where it meets Halswell Junction Road.

22.       Revoke the Stop control on Foremans Road (east) where it meets Halswell Junction Road.

23.       Approve that a Give Way control be placed against Foremans Road east approaching Halswell Junction Road (east), as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda. 

24.       Revoke the Stop control on Foremans Road (west) where it meets Halswell Junction Road.

25.       Approve that a Stop control be placed against Foremans Road (west) approaching Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda.

26.       Approve that a Stop control be placed against Halswell Junction Road (east) approaching Halswell Junction Road, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda.

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

27.       Make the following resolutions relying on its powers under the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 and Part 21 of the Local Government Act 1974.  For the purposes of the Board’s resolutions below, the following notations apply: 1. An intersection of roadways is defined by the prolongation of the kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and 2. The resolutions are to take effect from the commencement of the physical road works associated with the project, as detailed in the submitted report.

a.   Revoke any existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with Main South Road and, and extending in a northerly direction to its intersection of Foremans Road.

b.  Revoke any existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at its intersection with Main South Road and, and extending in a northerly direction to its intersection of Foremans Road.

c.   Revoke any existing parking and stopping restrictions on Waterloo Road, at its current intersection with Halswell Junction Road.

d.  Revoke the marked bus stop on the north side of Halswell Junction Road (east) directly across from its intersection with Foremans Road (east) and extending in a south westerly direction for a distance of 15.5 metres.

e.  Revoke the marked bus stop on the south side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at a point 12.5 metres northeast of its intersection with Foremans Road (east) and extending in a north easterly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

f.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 70 metres northwest of its intersection with Main South Road and extending in a northbound direction for a distance of 93.5 metres.

g.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the southwest corner of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 13 metres.

h.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south side of Foremans Road (west) commencing at the south west corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in a west bound direction for a distance of 25 metres.

i.    Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the northwest corner of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 30.5 metres.

j.    Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 44 metres north of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 253 metres.

k.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an east bound direction for a distance of 39 metres.

l.    Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 30 metres.

m. Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 43.5 metres north of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 159 metres.

n.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south side of Waterloo Road commencing at the south east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an east bound direction for a distance of 91 metres.

o.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north side of Waterloo Road commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an east bound direction for a distance of 77 metres.

p.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at the north east corner of its intersection with Waterloo Road and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 90 metres.

q.  Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at a point 210.5 metres north east of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an north easterly direction for a distance of 25 metres including around the cul-de-sac head.

r.   Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south side of Halswell Junction Road (east) commencing at a point 222 metres north east of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an north easterly direction for a distance of 11 metres.

s.   Approve that the parking of vehicles be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person's parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.4.1 of the Land Transport - Road User Rule 2004, on the west side of Halswell Junction Road, commencing at a point 13 metres south of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a south bound direction for a distance of 16.5 metres.

t.   Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the west side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 30.5 metres north of its intersection with Foremans Road (west) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 13.5 metres.

u.  Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Halswell Junction Road commencing at a point 30 metres north of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road (east) and extending in a north bound direction for a distance of 13.5 metres.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Roads and Footpaths

·     Level of Service: 16.0.3 Maintain resident satisfaction with roadway condition

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – New Link (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Improvement of current road link

·     Option 3 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Reflects the status as a local freight route providing a direct route to the Hornby Freight Hub.

·     Provides a new connection to the northern section of Halswell Junction Road north of Waterloo Road that has been constructed by Waterloo Business Park.

·     Waterloo Business Park are prepared to grant $1M to the Christchurch City Council to see this option constructed.

·     Enhances the residential amenity for residents in Halswell Junction Road between Foremans Road and Waterloo Road.

·     Allows the removal of the existing level rail crossing at the existing Halswell Junction Road/Waterloo Road intersection and closure of this difficult intersection.

·     Provides a mix of on-road and off-road cycle facilities.

·     Provides opportunities for landscaping along the route.

·     Achieves a positive benefit/cost assessment.

·     Is compatible with the South Express Major Cycle Route in the future.

·     Accommodates the current public transport route.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The closure of Halswell Junction Road at Waterloo Road will restrict access for some residents.

·     Present cost estimate exceeds the available budget however is within the current Long Term Plan funding.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Halswell Junction Road Extension Project

5.1       This report documents the scheme design investigations for a Network Management Improvements project to complete a local freight route that supports the Strategic Freight Network and the Roads of National Significance (RoNS) programme.  The concept design developed in 2012 includes an extension of Halswell Junction Road from Foremans Road to Waterloo Road and a new level railway crossing.  The existing level crossing on Halswell Junction Road would be closed.

5.2       Figure 1 shows the location of the project in the context of the surrounding area, the blue dashed line is the entire Halswell Junction Road extension between Foremans Road and Pound Road.

5.3       The extension of the Halswell Junction Road corridor is being jointly developed by the Christchurch City Council (CCC) and the adjacent Waterloo Business Park (WBP) as follows:

·   Pound Road to Industry Avenue - has been constructed by Waterloo Business Park

·   Industry Avenue to Waterloo Road - to be constructed by Waterloo Business Park

·   Waterloo Road to Foremans Road – to be constructed by the Council.

5.4       A scheme investigation that focused on where the Halswell Junction Road extension would intersect with Waterloo Road was undertaken in 2015. This investigation was undertaken to determine the appropriate type of intersection given the proximity to a new level rail crossing and to gain ‘Approval in Principle’ (AIP) from KiwiRail for the crossing.

5.5       The scheme investigation concluded that the intersection should be traffic signal controlled and co-ordinated with the rail signals and subsequently, KiwiRail has granted its ‘Approval in Principle’ for the crossing.

5.6       The works to facilitate a level crossing at this location include relocation of a siding and associated land purchase.  The costs are estimated by KiwiRail to be approximately $3 million.  This work was not allowed for in the original project budget. An alternative of improving the existing route and retaining the existing level crossing has also been investigated.

Figure 1 – Location Map

Project Objectives

5.7       The high level objectives of the project are to:

·   1. Provide a direct route to the Hornby Freight Hub.

·   2. Provide a connection to the northern section of Halswell Junction Road north of Waterloo Road that has been constructed by Waterloo Business Park.

5.8       The design objectives to allow assessment of the options are:

·   1. Reflects the route’s status as a local freight route.

·   2. Ensures railway level crossing design reflects best safety practice.

·   3. Does not significantly impact the overall efficiency of the adjacent network.

·   4. Does not significantly impact the overall safety of the adjacent network.

·   5. Ensures the cycle facilities reflect best practice.

·   6. Accommodate the South Express Major Cycle Route in the future.

·   7. Ensures the pedestrian facilities reflect best practices.

·   8. Accommodates the current public transport route.

Community Consultation

5.9       Consultation on the Halswell Junction Road Extension project was undertaken from 1 to 25 September 2017.  The submission form asked submitters to indicate whether yes, they generally support the plan or no, they generally do not support the plan.  There was also an opportunity to add any additional comments or concerns on the plans.

5.10    Approximately 1,100 consultation leaflets (refer Attachments B and C) were hand delivered to properties along the vicinity of the new road and Waterloo Business Park, or sent to City Council libraries and service centres, including 250 absentee land owners.  The project was also posted on the Council’s “Have Your Say” website.

5.11    At the close of the consultation, 81 submissions were received with 58 (72 per cent) generally supporting the plan.

 

6.   Option 1 – New Link (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Extend Halswell Junction Road north of the Foremans Road intersection to connect with the new roundabout north of the railway line.  New level rail crossing and closure of the existing level crossing. Attachment D includes the scheme plans for this option.

6.2       This option involves the following works:

6.2.1   Upgrading the existing road between Main South Road and Foremans Road (west).

6.2.2   Creating a new link between Foremans Road and Waterloo Road on a 16 metre wide road corridor that has been agreed with the land owners.

6.2.3   Provision of a signalised intersection at Waterloo Road (east) and level crossing as agreed with KiwiRail.

6.2.4   Closure of Halswell Junction Road near the current level crossing.

6.2.5   Closure of the current level crossing.

6.2.6   Realignment of Waterloo Road near the current level crossing.

6.2.7   Property acquisition to meet the need of the design. 

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is medium, consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance included a letter box drop to the local community, drop-in session on site, and meetings, as requested.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Businesses and residents in the Hornby/Islington area are specifically affected by this option due to the location of the proposed new link road and railway crossing on Halswell Junction Road.

6.7       Consultation on the proposed plans was undertaken from 1 to 25 September 2017. More than 850 leaflets were delivered to households and businesses in the vicinity of the new road and Waterloo Business Park, or sent to Council libraries and service centres. Project information was also posted or emailed to 250 absentee owners, as well as other key stakeholders.

6.8       Twelve people attended a drop-in session at the Hornby Rugby League Clubrooms on Tuesday 12 September 2017 from 4.30 to 6.30pm. Issues raised were mainly related to parking, access and vegetation. Strong support was expressed for the new link.

6.9       Of the 81 submissions received, 58 respondents generally supported the proposed plans, with 12 saying they wanted the plans implemented as soon as possible. Twenty three submitters expressed concerns about a range of issues including facilities for cyclists, access, parking availability and landscaping.

6.10    Those who supported the proposed plans said benefits included:

6.10.1 Replacement of the existing substandard railway crossing;

6.10.2 Improved road safety by providing a more direct route for road users, especially large      trucks;

6.10.3 Capacity for future growth in Waterloo Business Park, without congestion;

6.10.4 The new link will take local traffic off the state highway by providing a major connection to the surrounding area and community.

6.10.5 The proposal will enable good access to Waterloo Business Park, a key part of the area’s business district.

6.11    Cyclists. Six submitters expressed concern about facilities for cyclists from Waterloo Road to Foremans Road, and the road layout on the approach to Main South Road.

6.12    Feedback that south bound cyclists would need to cross the road from the shared path to access the south bound cycle lane was considered and the scheme revised so that crossing the road is not required.  The revised scheme now includes shared paths on both sides of the new link road between Waterloo Road and Foremans Road.  The paths will be 2.5 metres wide which is sufficient given the likely low volume of pedestrians and very few driveways in this section of new road.

6.13    Feedback that the type of cycle facilities in the two sections of Halswell Junction Road varies (shared path in new link and cycle lanes in existing southern section) was also considered.  The two sections of road have different characteristics in terms of corridor width, adjacent activity and accesses, and the design reflects this.  Providing a consistent facility would only be feasible if cycle lanes were added to the new link. However, the north bound cycle lane would need to go off road prior to the rail level crossing due to need for a right turn lane. Shared paths in the new link are therefore considered to offer cyclists an appropriate facility and provide good connections to the shared path north of Waterloo Road and the potential major cycleway on Waterloo Road east.

6.14    The proposed plan between Foremans Road and Main South Road includes the existing layout for cyclists. Additional cycle facilities in this section are outside the scope of this project and a revised road layout requires reserve land. This is currently being investigated by the Council’s Asset Planning (Transport) section.

6.15    The transitions between on-road cycles and the shared paths will be clarified to cyclists.  In particular, north bound cyclists have two options to join the shared path depending on whether a bus is at the bus stop.  If there is no bus they use the cut down just north of the stop. When a bus is in the stop they have the option of using the widened cut down prior to the bus stop that allows them to use the shared path behind the bus shelter.

6.16    The south bound bus shelter has been moved slightly south to allow the new shared path to be located behind the shelter, removing any conflict with bus passengers.

6.17    Parking. Several submitters were concerned about the loss of parking near the intersection of Halswell Junction Road and Foremans Road. Currently motorists park informally on the road verge on the south side of Foremans Road accommodating approximately eight cars.  The scheme by formalising this car parking, it will be able to accommodate 15 cars.  The proposed plans for approval would result in the loss of 10 car parking spaces on Halswell Junction Road south of Foremans Road. This results in an overall loss of three spaces.

6.18    If all day car parking along the proposed cul-de-sac section of Halswell Junction Road becomes a problem for residents and businesses, the Council will introduce parking restrictions.

6.19    The Fulton Hogan weighbridge is to be removed. This has allowed the right angle customer parking outside the Fulton Hogan office on the corner of Halswell Junction Road and Foremans Road to be replaced with customer parking in the area that is currently accommodating the weighbridge. An indented mobility space will be located outside the office.

6.20    Access. The proposal to close the existing railway crossing to pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles concerned eight submitters. KiwiRail has advised that it opposes any crossing facility remaining at this location.

6.21    The kerb alignment in the corner of Waterloo Road and the new link road, has been amended to address concerns about property access.

6.22    Vegetation. Orion New Zealand Limited raised a number of issues about the location of trees in relation to existing cables and overhead power lines.  The company has been advised that it will be consulted prior to the detailed design phase of the project. Any new plantings will need to be 2.5 metres clear of the 33kv cable and meet City Council guidelines. Exact locations will be adjusted during detailed design.

6.23    Changes to the consultation plans as a result of feedback and further technical advice, are:

6.23.1 The revised scheme now includes shared paths on both sides of the new link road between Waterloo Road and Foremans Road.

6.23.2 The south bound bus shelter has been moved slightly south to allow the new shared path to be located behind the shelter, removing any conflict with bus passengers.

6.23.3 The road has been widened slightly to the north of the new level crossing to allow a wider flush median that can be used by vehicles turning into the new driveway for 370 Waterloo Road.

6.23.4 An indented mobility space will be located on Halswell Junction Road outside the premises of Fulton Hogan.

6.24    Submitters were sent information about the comments received and project team responses, details of the Community Board meeting and how to apply for speaking rights if they wished to do so.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.25    This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.26    Cost of Implementation – $ 8.5 million

6.27    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – there will be a small additional costs to maintain and operate the new assets. This can be funded within current operating budgets.

6.28    Funding source – The project is currently funded in the Council’s Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP). The total project budget is currently $4.8 million leaving a shortfall of $3.7 million which is included in the draft proposal for the FY18-28 LTP. Waterloo Business Park has offered a grant of $1 million for this project subject to a completion date, which while challenging, can be achieved.  The grant agreement is in the process of being confirmed and drawn up into a legal document. 

Given the public interest in this project, it is proposed to continue with design and tender, subject to the approval of the additional funds in the next LTP. This will mean construction will start as soon as possible following final LTP approval.  A construction contract will not be committed until budgets are confirmed as available.

Legal Implications

6.29    Community Boards have delegated authority for general aspects of this option. Council needs to approve aspects related to new traffic signals by new level crossing and new cycle facilities.

6.30    KiwiRail Deed of Grant for the construction of the level crossing and closure of existing level crossing by Haswell Junction Road. This will be obtained at the completion of the detailed design process.

6.31    Waterloo Business Park have offered a grant of $1 million towards the project subject to completion early to mid 2019, this is currently being drawn up into a legal document.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.32    The project is funded in the current 2015-2025 LTP but the budget does not match the scheme cost estimate. Additional funds are being requested in the new LTP.

6.33    Delayed completion could negate the grant from Waterloo Business Park. Works are currently on track to meet timeframes.

6.34    Opening of the new road will be subject to KiwiRail having completed their works prior.  The Council is in regular contact with KiwiRail regarding its works.

6.35    KiwiRail decline the ‘Deed of Grant’. This risk is considered low as the project team is working very closely with KiwiRail and there is an Approval in Principle document already in place.

Implementation

6.36    Implementation dependencies - the new link project is dependent upon the completion of signals and train infrastructures design. These works are expected to be completed by mid 2018.

6.37    Property purchase – this is expected to be completed in December 2017.

6.38    Implementation timeframe - the construction of the new link is planned to commence in the second half of 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.39    The advantages of this option include:

·   Reflects the status as a local freight route providing a direct route to the Hornby Freight Hub.

·   Provides a new connection to the northern section of Halswell Junction Road north of Waterloo Road that has been constructed by Waterloo Business Park.

·   Waterloo Business Park are prepared to grant $1M to the Christchurch City Council to see this option constructed.

·   Enhances the residential amenity for residents in Halswell Junction Road between Foremans Road and Waterloo Road.

·   Allows removal of the existing level rail crossing at the existing Halswell Junction Road Waterloo Road intersection and closure of this difficult intersection.

·   Provides a mix of on road and off road cycle facilities.

·   Provides opportunities for landscaping along the route.

·   Improves pedestrian connectivity.

·   Is compatible with the South Express MCR in the future.

·   Accommodates the current public transport route.

6.40    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The closure of Halswell Junction Road at Waterloo Road will restrict access for some residents.

·   Current cost estimate exceeds current budget however is within the current LTP proposed funding.

7.   Option 2 – Improvement of current road link

Option Description

7.1       Upgrade Halswell Junction Road and Waterloo Road on current alignments to best practice and signalise the existing level crossing.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Community views were not obtained on this option. They were only obtained for the preferred option. There is general support from the community on the preferred option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s 2015-2025 LTP.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $4.1 million which is within the current project budget.

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - there would be additional maintenance cost related to extra landscaping/assets incorporated in the street but, this would be balanced within existing operating budgets.

7.8       Funding source - funded within the existing project budget.

Legal Implications

7.9       Community Boards have delegated authority for general aspects of this option and Council needs to approve aspects related to new traffic signals by new level crossing and new cycle facilities.

7.10    KiwiRail approval of the controlled level crossing signals of existing level crossing by Haswell Junction Road.

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    Negative feedback from the community due to lack of improvements to the freight network.

7.12    Agreement with KiwiRail for signalised level crossing.

7.13    This option does not achieve a positive benefit cost ratio and is therefore unlikely to attract New Zealand Transport Agency subsidy.

Implementation

7.14    Implementation dependencies - approval of signals by level crossing by KiwiRail.

7.15    Implementation timeframe – construction completed by mid to late 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   Provides a route that reduces impact on local connectivity and accessibility for some residents of Halswell Junction Road.

·   Meet current budget.

7.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not provide a new connection to the northern section of Halswell Junction Road north of Waterloo Road that has been constructed by Waterloo Business Park.

·   Does not provide a direct route to the Hornby Freight Hub.

·   Does not achieve positive ‘economic analysis’ results.

8.   Option 3 – Do nothing

Option Description

8.1       The existing Haswell Junction Road section from Foremans Road to Waterloo Road to remain as it is and no new link constructed.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.4       Community views were not obtained on this option because it does not meet the requirements of the Council’s current Long Term Plan.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.5       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies, specifically the Long Term Plan 2015-2025, which includes the new link.

Financial Implications

8.6       Cost of Implementation – nil

8.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Due to the condition of the road and the increase in heavy vehicles using it, maintenance costs can be expected to increase.

8.8       Funding source – Not applicable

Legal Implications

8.9       Does not meet the requirements of the Council’s current Long Term Plan.

Risks and Mitigations    

8.10    The key risk for the ‘do nothing’ option is that the Council is not providing a new link in accordance with the LTP and Council strategies.

8.11    There is a risk to the Council’s reputation, having consulted on the new link proposal with no budget available, to not complete these works given the current network situation.

8.12    There is an increasing crash risk as the volume of heavy vehicles continues to grow, using the intersection at Waterloo Road which has an undesirable alignment adjacent to the rail crossing.

Implementation

8.13    Implementation timeframe – Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   No change

8.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Option does not meet the requirements for the Council’s network plan.

·   This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies, specifically the Long Term Plan 2015-2025, which includes this new link.

·   Negative feedback from the community due to a lack of improvements to the freight network.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Halswell Junction Road Extension - New Link- Plans for Approval

 

b 

Halswell Junction Road Extension - New Link - Public Information Leaflet

 

c 

Halswell Junction Road Extension - New Link - Feedback Form

 

d 

Consultation Plans - Preferred Option 1

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Sandra Novais - Project Manager

Jennie Hamilton - Senior Engagement Advisor

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


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13.    Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/147210

Presenter(s):

Kim Money, Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for February 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Burwood-Coastal Community Board held meetings on 5 and 19 February 2018.  At the time of writing, only the 5 February meeting had been held therefore this reports on that meeting.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved the granting of a lease to Development Christchurch Limited over a portion of New Brighton Beach for a period of eighteen (18) months with a six-month right of renewal term, if required, to enable development of the Hot Pools which are part of the New Brighton Foreshore Development Project.

·   The Board decided not to consider the placement of donated second-hand equipment in Muka Park. The Board felt that there are already numerous play equipment and exercise equipment items available and encouraged the member of the public who requested this to consider other location options for the equipment.

·   The Board sought confirmation from staff that the material being used for stop banks construction, particularly from            Bassett Street and eastwards, was appropriate. Further, it was noted that stop banks sides in Anzac Drive were overgrown.

·   The Board requested that staff carry out a safety review of Thomson Park including assessing the need for security cameras (possibly portable) and lighting and arrange for Neighbourhood Watch to include the Park on their visiting schedule.

·   The Board requested that a meeting is arranged with staff to discuss in detail the Roy Stokes Hall document prepared by members of the community that was received by the Board at its meeting on 5 February 2018.

·   The Board requested that staff from the Land Drainage Team attend a site meeting with Mr Frank White at his property at 78 McBratneys Road to discuss the ongoing flooding issue along with members of the Coastal-Burwood Community Board and Poto Williams MP.    Staff are requested to supply the Board with all necessary background information on the issue prior to the site meeting.

·   The Board requested that staff from the Land Drainage Team attend a Board site visit to the South Brighton Holiday Park to discuss the proposal from the Camp lessees, Morhawk Limited (2017), which would lessen the flooding risk at the Camp.

·   The Board noted the deputation from the New Brighton Community Hall Trust at item 13.1 and requested that a further extension until the end of July 2018 is requested from the Ministry of Education to enable time for any community group to prepare a suitable proposal to take management of all or part (such as the Roy Stokes Hall) of the Central New Brighton School site.

·   The Board decided, with reference to the Rothesay Road Parking Bays matter (item 5.3.1 of the 5 February 2018 Community Board Area Report refers), to request that staff monitor the effectiveness of the installed road markings and inform the Board of results in due course; also, for staff to provide an updated traffic count for that portion of Rothesay Road.

·   The Board requested staff to seek an extension of time for feedback to be received on the Regenerate Christchurch Integrated Assessment Criteria, to enable the Board to submit their view.

·   The Board requested that staff write to the New Brighton Business and Land Owners Association to propose that relevant shops consider remaining open during events in the area.

·   The Board requested that staff supply a rubbish bin emptying schedule for the ward area including the New Brighton Beachside Playground.

·   The Board requested that staff consider any maintenance necessary in Marine Parade between North Beach and New Brighton in advance of the Kathmandu Coast to Coast event (10 February) and the Duke New Brighton Festival Launch (9 March).

·   The Board requested that staff write a letter of thanks to the Land Drainage Team for the temporary bunds that prevent flooding on Rocking Horse Road and South Brighton Domain during the recent storm/high tide event.

·   The Board requested that staff consider the future of Network meetings after noting that the Burwood/Pegasus Network meetings had lapsed due to lack of attendance.

·   The Board requested that compliance staff consider monitoring the Thomson Park and Coastal-Burwood beach area carparks for freedom campers.

·   The Board requested an urgent safety audit of trees along the Estuary Edge in the South New Brighton Domain. The Board noted that this is a recreation area used by many and due to the current condition of some of the trees some are in danger of falling, causing a safety risk.

·   The Board requested a meeting with staff from Council, Regenerate and ECan to determine what measures are needed to progress a short-term solution to repair the South Brighton Estuary edge.

·   With reference to the late 2017 workshops that the Council held on Coastal Hazards, it was noted that one of the main questions was around the ability to build within a hazard area however resource consent staff were not present at the workshops. The Board requested a workshop with resource consent staff to discuss this matter.

Funding for Community Projects in the Coastal-Burwood Area:

·     $300 towards a young person attending the New Zealand Symphonic Winds events in Auckland from January 23-26 2018 and in Wellington from July 17-21 2018.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A Recommendations to Council.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area       

5.1       Southshore and South New Brighton Regeneration

5.1.1   Development of the engagement plan by the How Team

The How Team is a community-led group developed by Renew Brighton that is currently working on the development of an engagement plan for Regenerate Christchurch which will outline the ways in which Regenerate Christchurch can engage with the community.

Regenerate Christchurch, with support from the Christchurch City Council and Environment Canterbury, will lead the development of the Southshore and South New Brighton regeneration strategy. This will address how the community, Crown, City and Regional Council, and property owners can best adapt over time to the effects of climate change and sea-level rise.

There are twelve How Team members including the Convenor. Nine of these members are from the community and were chosen by a panel of community leaders following an application process. Three of the How Team members come from the agencies that the group is working with.

5.2       QEII Recreation & Sport Centre

The Community Board had a site tour of the QEII Recreation and Sport Centre on 14 February. The site was looking impressive with work set to be completed approximately by Queens Birthday.

The Board also saw the progress being made at the Ministry of Education site where Avonside Girls’ and Shirley Boys’ High Schools are being built. 

 

The Community Board on a site tour of the QEII Recreation & Sport Centre

Progress on the new QEII Recreation & Sport Centre

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       South Brighton Estuary Edge

As reported previously, the erosion around the South Brighton estuary edge area has resulted in mature trees falling and others in danger of falling, the recreational track eroding in places and plant losses.  The Board has requested a safety audit of these trees and a meeting is being organised for the Community Board, Council staff, along with Regenerate Christchurch, to look at short-term options to address the erosion.

6.2       Opening of the Spencer Park Surf Lifesaving Club

The Spencer Park Surf Life Saving Club have completed the development of their new clubhouse and community centre.  The completion of this project is an important milestone for the club and for the Spencer Park area and community. The opening event was held on Friday 16 February.

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people standing, sky, cloud, house and outdoor

Grant Edwards, Daryl Poulsen and Richard Newbold outside the new Spencer Park Surf Life Saving Club Building

(Grant and Richard are the Clubhouse Redevelopment Project Management Team and Daryl is the Club President)

 

The new viewing platform from inside and out

 

6.3       Queenspark Disc Golf trial project

This project is being led by Parklands Residents Association in partnership with the Christchurch Disc Golf Club who have a permanent facility at Jellie Park. The nine hole course which the Community Board approved for a trial in November 2017 has now been installed in the Queenspark Reserve. 

6.4       I love New Brighton 2018 (held on Waitangi Day)

This event saw thousands of people attend Thomson Park for a huge variety of activities and entertainment for families to enjoy.  The day saw 20+ community groups involved to make it happen - plus the many businesses and individuals that supported the event. 

 

Image may contain: 2 people, crowd and outdoor

Image may contain: one or more people, people on stage, sky, crowd and outdoor

I Love New Brighton 2018

 

6.5       Parklands@Play 2018

This event was held on Sunday 18 February at 12pm at Parklands Reserve, Queenspark Drive, and included have-a-go sports with local sports clubs, wacky fun with pedalmania, mega slides, bike obstacle course, Zumba, pre-schoolers activities with Toy Library ride-ons, story times, bouncy castle, and messy play. The atmosphere was relaxed with sounds to sooth and a selection of food. Entertainment was provided by local bands and talent including music and dance.

 Image may contain: 6 people, people smiling, people standing, people on stage, crowd, sky, outdoor and nature

Parklands@Play 2018

 

6.6       Garden Pride Awards

The Coastal-Burwood Community Board hold the Community Pride Garden Awards every two years. This year a total of 139 certificates will be given out, with 77 of those being presented at a ceremony to be held on Saturday 17 March.

The awards celebrate the work of gardeners throughout the Coastal-Burwood area.

6.7       South Brighton and Southshore Event

The Coastal-Burwood Community Board are holding an event to celebrate the recently completed works in the South Brighton/Southshore area.

The Jetty, Boardwalk and Carpark area are wonderful assets for the Community and the Board and community will celebrate with them at a small event to be held on Sunday 25th February at the South Brighton Reserve.

There will be a short ribbon cutting ceremony followed by a free sausage sizzle.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board approved the Coastal-Burwood Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 16 October 2017. This Plan, can be found at the following link:

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Community-Boards/Coastal-Burwood-Community-Board-Plan-2017-19.pdf

7.2       Progress against the Community Board Plan will be included in the Board’s April 2018 report to the Council, and thereafter reported on quarterly.

 

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest 

8.1       Central New Brighton School site and Roy Stokes Hall for Community Use

 

At its meeting on 5 February 2018, the Board requested a further extension of time to enable time for any community group to prepare a suitable proposal to take management of all or part (such as the Roy Stokes Hall) of the Central New Brighton School site. The Ministry of Education has consented to the request which will enable further work to be carried out by the community.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Peter Croucher - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

14.    Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/11348

Contact:

Sally Buck, Chairperson
Shupayi Mpunga

sally.buck@ccc.govt.nz
shupayi mpunga@ccc.govt.nz

03 941 6605

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report for February 2018.

2.         Submit on the Environment Canterbury Long Term Plan 2018-2028 specifically on the proposed reduction of passenger bus services and fare increases.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held meetings on 29 January and 14 February 2018. 

Decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved:

·   Edmond Street to Edmonds Street.

·   Proposed Bus Passenger Shelter Installations and Bus Stop Line Marking

·   Parking Restrictions in:

·   Holly Road – Timed Restrictions

·   Stanmore Road – Mobility Parking Space

·   Ōpāwa Village on Ōpāwa Road

·   Madras Street near Ely Street, Moa Place and Melrose Street

·   St Asaph Street (removal of P5 loading zone and new No Stopping)

·   Springfield Road, St Albans.

·     The Board allocated funding from the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to:

·     Avebury House Community Trust to contribute towards covering wages until March 2018 without any change in the proposed levels of funding through the Community Resilience Partnership Fund.

·     Waltham Community Cottage towards wages for the Cottage Project until March 2018 without any change in proposed levels of funding through the Community Resilience Partnership Fund.

·   Funding contributions from the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Youth Development Fund for young people to attend World Schools Rugby Festival in South Africa from 2 to 7 April 2018 and U19 Korfball World Cup in the Netherlands.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to the Council

4.1       There were no Part A recommendations from the Board to the Council in February 2018.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Infrastructure projects underway

5.1.1   Major Cycle Routes – Rapanui-Shag Rock Stage 2 – the Board have been advised that work has commenced on Stage 2 of the Rapanui-Shag Rock Cycleway, with works on the centre of Linwood Avenue and the construction of a temporary wall to enable the contractors to work next to the canal at Dyers Road/Linwood Avenue having begun.

5.1.2   Linwood/Woolston Pool – Two Board Workshops have been held to discuss the Board’s requirements for the upcoming community consultation. A report will be presented to the Board’s 26 February 2018 meeting prior to community consultation.

5.1.3   Ōpāwa Volunteer Library Rebuild – the Board were advised previously it is uneconomic to rebuild the Ōpāwa Volunteer Library which was damaged in the earthquakes. Since the building sustained damage the Library has been co-located with the Ōpāwa Children’s Library but there is not enough room for both to display their entire collections. The damaged building will need to be demolished and replaced with a new building that will house both the Volunteer Library and Children’s Library.

A Working Group, which includes library representatives, a patron of the libraries, two Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board members and Council staff, has been established to provide feedback and advice on the architectural scope of work to be included in the Request for Proposal (RFP) going out to contractors seeking a Design & Build method of project delivery to construct a new building.

5.1.4   Redcliffs School Site – Retention of Assets for New Park – In preparation for the Redcliffs School build on Redcliffs Park, the Board considered a report at its 14 February 2018 meeting to recommend to the Chief Executive current assets on the current Redcliffs School be retained for use within the new Redcliffs Park.

At a recent Board seminar the Board were advised of proposed traffic improvements if the proposed Redcliffs School is built on Redcliffs Park.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Inner City East Revitalisation Project. The Board received an update on the Inner City East Revitalisation Project at 29 January and 14 February meetings.

29 January Update

6.1.1   The project team established a four stage process over the next two years to complete the revitalisation plan.

Stage 1: November 2017-February 2018. Widespread consultation with the community to further establish hopes, aspirations and concerns, raise awareness of the plan and establish a detailed project plan. Further analysis of the demographic and statistical characteristics of the area. Develop a project action plan and budget including principles, scope, approach and timeframes.

Stage 2: March 2018-June 2018. Establish a broadly representative working/governance group and terms of reference to guide the revitalisation process.  More formal surveying and consultation methods to gather further information from the community. Establish draft priorities for action, possible solutions and strategies. Identify early actions that can be taken for “quick wins”. Seek funding and resourcing to implement solutions and initiatives. This will likely include a submission to the Council during the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan consultation period.

Stage 3: July 2018-December 2018. Discuss draft priorities for action widely within the community. Develop an Action Plan to reflect community aspirations, issues and priorities. Investigate how solutions and initiatives can be put into action. Undertake early actions identified in Stage 2.

Stage 4: 2019 - Implementation. Throughout all stages of the project an iterative process of engage > analyse > feedback > engage will be used to ensure the plan remains on track with community aspirations. Regular updates will be provided to the community via a monthly newsletter and other information.

6.1.2   Regular community events and meetings, targeted consultations (e.g. with local Business owners and those without homes), discussions at community facilities such as the café and arts centre, articles in the News on ICE newsletter and general networking opportunities have been used to establish and develop the community’s priorities.  These will be used to develop the survey and more formal consultation methods to be undertaken in Stage 2.

6.1.3   Consultations to date have reinforced many of the issues previously identified and many of the same reasons that people like living in the area.  Additional aspirations have been expressed in the areas of: opportunities for obtaining affordable food; keeping the community safe; opportunities for community activities and development; further arts development opportunities; green space and landscaping opportunities and developing community spaces

6.1.4   The Greening the Rubble project at 108 Stanmore Road will be further developed over the next few months to build on the community garden, play space and stage area already there. The Council Urban Regeneration team are working on a new collaborative project to activate the remainder of the site for community use. This will include the existing assets and incorporate some new “Tiny Shops” for community and commercial use. One of the spaces will be available for the relocation of the Te Ao community café from across the road.  This will provide a larger space, including indoor seating, which will enable the establishment of a presence in the area for more hours during the week and the opportunity to try out and discuss possible functions for a future community hub and/or community centre.

6.1.5   Discussions have begun to provide more recreation and positive engagement activities in the area.  This will help to reactivate the area and provide an opportunity for community members to see what some of the possibilities are for fully implementing the revitalisation plan.

6.1.6   Regenerate Christchurch will continue to perform the interim facilitation role until the working/governance group is formed. Regenerate will then become a member of that group.  The extent of the future involvement of Regenerate Christchurch has not been considered by the Regenerate Board. It is planned for this to happen in February 2018.   

6.1.7   A further grant of $20,800 has been obtained from the Ministry of Social Development to pay for the facilitation, events costs and administration during the formal community consultation phase.

14 February 2018 Update

6.1.8   As reported in January 2018 the first stage of the revitalisation plan was to concentrate on widespread consultation with the community to further establish their hopes, aspirations and concerns.  As of 22 January approximately 50 consultations have taken place with community members at local events, with most of the owners and/or managers of businesses at the Linwood Village and with those attending day programmes at the City Mission.

6.1.9   Further consultations are planned via:

·     A specific newsletter to all households in the area

·     An article in the Inner City East Community newsletter

·     A weekly drop-in at the Stanmore Road Post Shop

·     Focus groups with existing community groups

·     Continued consultations at community events such as the Linwood village Market and Inner City East Multicultural festival

6.1.10 Most of the people consulted to date have heard of the Revitalisation Plan but have requested further information on the process. Community members have also been asked what they hope might come out of it, and how they would like themselves and other in the Community to be involved.

6.1.11 Issues raised to date have largely mirrored what is already known about the community including information from the survey conducted in the summer of 2016-17.  Issues identified include: lack of affordable housing; rubbish; safety and perceptions of safety; loss of businesses in the Linwood Village area; the new cycle lanes and the loss of car parking and poverty inequality and homelessness.

6.1.12 Hopes raised also reflect previous consultations including: the need for a united, inclusive and diverse community; events and facilities to help bring the community together; improvements to the environment including more trees and green spaces and more opportunities and support for those that are struggling.

6.1.13 Other relevant initiatives include:

Positive opportunities in Linwood Village area

The City Mission, Te Whare Roimata, Collective for the Homeless and the Council have begun collaborating on providing positive recreation and other opportunities for the more marginalised in the community including the homeless and those sleeping rough.  Work on this is ongoing.

Christchurch Housing First initiative

6.1.14 Negotiations with the Ministry of Social Development are well advanced to establish Housing First initiative in Christchurch.  Once established the project will focus on providing permanent homes for those who are chronically homeless or sleeping rough.  Part of the proposal is to establish an urban marae, probably in the Christchurch east area, with associated outreach services.  Over the medium term the initiative will provide homes for many of the homeless and those with vulnerable housing situations, many of whom identify the inner city east as an important community connection

6.2       Temporary Alcohol Ban in Linwood Village

6.2.1   At its 6 November 2017 meeting the Board recommended that the Council instruct staff to urgently investigate the introduction of a temporary alcohol ban in the Linwood Village area including Doris Lusk Reserve to take affect for the 2017/18 summer onwards.

6.2.2   A report concerning the temporary alcohol ban was considered by the Council at its meeting of 20 December 2017.  The Council resolved to institute the ban from the date of the meeting for a period of six months.  The area covered by the ban is Fitzgerald Avenue (east side), Armagh Street, England Street and Hereford Street.

6.2.3   Three organisations presented deputations to the Council regarding the ban: the Collective for the Homeless, Te Whare Roimata and the New Zealand Police. The Collective were supportive of both a temporary and permanent alcohol ban in the area, to ensure public safety.  They also requested the Council to consider other supportive measures including public toilets at Doris Lusk Reserve being open 24 hours, the availability of showers for “streeties” and more positive engagement with streeties.  Te Whare Roimata was primarily concerned that the process of instituting the ban did not allow for the development of more positive community-based solutions to the safety and drinking issues.  The Police were strongly in favour of the ban as it allows for proactive policing in the area and will assist the Police to defuse issues before they are escalated to more serious situations. The Police undertook to enforce the ban on a regular basis.

6.2.4   All residents and businesses in the area have been informed of the ban via a letter box drop to all households and businesses with premises in the area. Posters have also been placed in strategic locations.

6.2.5   Staff will report back to the Council in early 2018 on the effectiveness of the ban and future options.

6.3       Research on Māori living hard in the Inner City East of Christchurch

6.3.1   In early 2017 Te Whare Roimata was commissioned by Te Puni Kōkiri to research the experience and needs of Māori who were homeless or in adequate housing in the Inner City East area.  Interviews were conducted with 21 participants (15 men and six women) in March-June 2017 and the research completed in July 2017.  The research provides important insights relevant to both the Inner City East Revitalisation Plan and the plans to establish a Housing First initiative in Christchurch to provide housing for the homeless.

Findings 

6.3.2   For many of those interviewed, the effects of colonisation, such as separation from whanau and whenua, intergenerational trauma, and racism were significant issues. The research found that adaptations of Māori concepts to street life are common. The concept of “street whanau” was important to many. Some members of the street community have adopted leadership roles much like those traditionally held by kaumātua.  The importance of the streets of the Inner City East to the street community can be seen as similar to the importance of tribal whenua, a finding which is supported by other research.

6.3.3   The use of drugs and alcohol was a serious issue amongst those interviewed, particularly in the street community.  It was seen as a way of dealing with the hardships of life on the street such as the cold and the emotional pain. Mental health issues such as depression and suicidal thoughts are also common. Problems with mental health were connected to a number of issues, including separation from whanau, abuse and trauma, including unresolved trauma from the earthquakes, and the hardships of being on the street. Mental health issues are both a cause and effect of homelessness.

6.3.4   The experiences of men and women who are homeless were different. Women were seen to keep a lower profile, reflecting the vulnerability of homeless women, particularly those on the street. Men were more likely to attribute their homelessness to a lack of access to sufficient or appropriate work while the women attributed their homelessness to relationship difficulties.

Issues

6.3.5   Needs varied amongst the different categories of homelessness. Both men and women living on the street expressed the need for access to facilities such as cooking facilities, showers, a place to wash clothes, store belongings and send mail. Some thought these could be all located in a drop-in centre.  Those in shelters and inadequate housing needed access to appropriate accommodation they could afford.

6.3.6   Many of those interviewed found the current system did not assist them to get a home, a more stable life or even access the bare minimum entitlements from government agencies. Work and Income processes were often seen as hard to understand, unhelpful and sometimes punitive and benefits insufficient to meet basic needs.  Many also found that wages available didn’t cover basic expenses. The job market was often perceived as competitive, unsafe and unpredictable, with a number experiencing racism and being forced to take lower-paying casual work. Pressure to take up work opportunities often does not take into account the potential impact on mental or physical health. Rules for accessing social housing often do not take into account the needs of those living hard, such as maintaining important connections to their community and whanau. Some found that social housing rules which did not recognise their childcare arrangements, or housed people individually, with the expectation that they would leave their whanau and dogs on the street. Some made slightly too much money to access social housing, but could still not afford private rentals.

6.3.7   There are very important existing supports including service provided through the churches and community groups, donations and support from the public, charity meals and the services provided by libraries.  The effect of many of these is to make homelessness a little less onerous rather than ending homelessness. One of the big concerns that participants had about existing services was that they were not well coordinated, so there could be a “feast or famine” situation e.g. with community provided meals. Interviewees reported that the Police were sometimes supportive and sometimes the source of harassment.

Recommendations

6.3.8   Any plan to end homelessness in the Inner City East area will need to take into account the need for whanau and whanau-like relationships in any proposed housing arrangements and the cultural needs of those who are homeless.  The development of an urban papakainga, combining a variety of housing options to meet different needs, with connections to an urban marae, community development and housing services is an option that would be in tune with most of the findings from the research.

6.3.9   Based on the comments of the interviewees, it is important that all responses to homelessness take a Treaty-based, cultural perspective and are culturally safe. This includes both increasing opportunities for services to be offered by Maori, for Maori, and increasing the cultural competency of non-Maori providers.

6.3.10 This research suggests that an effective plan to address homelessness in the Inner City East needs to be integrated across sectors, and at local, regional and national levels and include further data collection. It should include strategies for prevention and early intervention and address both immediate needs and structural causes.  These structural causes include both national issues such as the lack of services for those exiting prison and local issues such as the loss of bedsits and other affordable housing and the widespread availability of alcohol and other drugs. The right to choice in housing is essential. An effective plan will need to reflect the voices of those who are homeless, address the physical, social, and spiritual dimensions of homelessness, and acknowledge the wide variety of housing and non-housing needs for people across the severe housing need spectrum.

6.3.11 Providing for the housing needs of those who are currently homeless in the area will be an essential element in the Inner City East Revitalisation Plan to ensure an inclusive community for all.

6.4       Linwood Youth Festival Experience (LYFE) –Youth wanting to be involved in planning LYFE have attended an event management workshop and are working with the coordinator and various youth focused organisations to plan and deliver this popular event.

6.5       Zumba in the Park. In partnership with Linwood Community Arts Centre, free Zumba classes will be offered on Fridays from 19 January until 2 March to increase the positive use of Doris Lusk Reserve and support a low income community have access to a fun, healthy activity that also enlivens the neighbourhood. Suggestions for other activities/initiatives will also be discussed with participants during this period.

6.6       Linwood Ave Community Pool in partnership with Linwood Avenue School and Youthtown is open from 4 to 29 January, 11am to 6pm, weather permitting. Entry is $1 or free for ages five and under and supervised by qualified lifeguards.  Swimming lessons are also being offered during this time.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       There is nothing to report at time of writing this report.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest 

8.1       Environment Canterbury (ECAN) Long Term Plan 2018-2028 – the Board have become aware through the news media that Environment Canterbury are proposing to cut six passenger bus services and increasing bus fares in the upcoming ECAN Long Term Plan.  The Board would like to encourage the Council to submit on Environment Canterbury’s Long Term Plan to advocate for the city’s communities that will be impact by the proposal.

8.2       District Licensing Committee Hearing – the Board will be presenting to a District Licensing Committee Sale of Alcohol Application Hearing for a proposed off licence premises at 375 Ferry Road in late March 2018.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Shupayi Mpunga - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

15.    Chief Executive's Report

Reference:

18/164902

Presenter(s):

Karleen Edwards, Chief Executive

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       This Chief Executive’s Report provides a summary of the Council’s organisational performance for February 2018.

1.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council:

1.         Receive the report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chief Executive Report February 2018

156

 

 

Signatories

Author

Karleen Edwards - Chief Executive

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

 

16.    Strategic Capability Committee Minutes - 19 February 2018

Reference:

18/164811

Presenter(s):

Christopher Turner-Bullock, Committee Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The Strategic Capability Committee held a meeting on 19 February 2018 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

2.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council receives the Minutes from the Strategic Capability Committee meeting held 19 February 2018.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Strategic Capability Committee - 19 February 2018

164

 

 

Signatories

Author

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Committee Advisor

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

 

17.    Zone Committees quarterly reports

Reference:

17/1464049

Contact:

Diane Shelander

diane.shelander@ccc.govt.nz

941 8304

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to be updated on the activities of the three water management zone committees.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the zone committees’ reports.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       The previous update was 9 November 2017.

3.2       The zone committees’ quarterly update report is attached as Attachment A.

3.3       Matters of particular note for this Council include:

3.3.1   Improved connections between the zone committees and the community boards

3.3.2   Zone committee support for restoration planting following the Port Hills fires

3.3.3   Zone committee support for reduced vegetation cutting along river banks

3.3.4   Consultation on the Whakaraupo Catchment Management Plan.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Zone Committee updates March 2018

168

 

 

Signatories

Author

Diane Shelander - Senior Policy Analyst

Approved By

Helen Beaumont - Head of Strategic Policy

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

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01 March 2018

 

 

18.    Heathcote River Dredging Stage 1 Report

Reference:

18/179944

Presenter(s):

Keith Davison

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to approve the Stage 1 Ōpāwaho / Heathcote River dredging physical works between Radley Street and the Woolston Cut barrage in FY18 and the acceleration of dredging between Radley Street and Hansen Park.

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the Heathcote River Dredging Stage 1 Report.

2.         Approve that Stage 1 of the Ōpāwaho / Heathcote River dredging physical works between Radley Street (upstream) and the Woolston Cut barrage (downstream) be fast-tracked to begin in FY18 utilising reprioritised Land Drainage Recovery Programme budgets.

3.         Approve that delegation be granted to the General Manager City Services to award the Land Drainage Recovery Programme construction contract for the Stage 1 dredging works.

4.         Approve the acceleration of dredging Stages 2 and 3 in the Heathcote subject to consenting and request staff to identify substitutions for inclusion in the final Long Term Plan.

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       Since the Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee considered the Stage 1 Dredging report on 12 February 2018 (attached), staff have been developing a new proposed programme for stages 2 and 3 (Radley St to Brougham St and Brougham St to Hansen Park) to follow Stage 1 (Woolston Cut to Radley St).

3.2       The Long Term Plan (LTP) proposal for dredging has Stage 2 commencing in 2019 and completed in 2020, and Stage 3 commencing in 2020 and completed in 2021.

3.3       A new proposed programme is achievable that has Stage 2 completed over the period 2018/19, and Stage 3 commenced in 2019 and completed in 2020. This high priority programme would be subject to LTP approvals and consenting, but if agreed would deliver the flood risk reduction benefits from dredging the lower Heathcote early.

3.4       Financially, a net nil rates impact can be achieved by deferring other Capex renewal projects to offset. These will be identified for inclusion in the final LTP.

3.5       If Stages 2 and 3 are accelerated, these changes will be reflected in the Final LTP Capital Programme.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Heathcote River Dredging - Stage 1

175

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Keith Davison - Manager Land Drainage

Bruce Moher - Manager Planning & Reporting Team

Approved By

John Mackie - Head of Three Waters and Waste

Carol Bellette - General Manager Finance and Commercial (CFO)

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Council

01 March 2018

 

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Council

01 March 2018

 

 

19.  Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

01 March 2018

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

20

Public Excluded Strategic Capability Committee Minutes - 19 February 2018

 

 

Refer to the previous public excluded reason in the agendas for these meetings.

 

21

Canterbury Sports Ltd, 466-482 Yaldhurst Road - Technical Assessment

s7(2)(e), s7(2)(i)

Prevention of Material Loss, Conduct Negotiations

CSL have not yet signed the agreement to pay costs of technical assessments (agreement letter was sent in December 2017). The report should not be disclosed to CSL before agreement is signed.

1 May 2018

Cost Agreement is signed by CSL

22

Major Events

s7(2)(h)

Commercial Activities

Points to be discussed are comercially sensitive

Upon direction from ChristchurchNZ to align with the Festival announcement