Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Friday 8 December 2017

Time:                                    8am

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

5 December 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 5

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 5

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 5

B       4.       Public Forum.................................................................................................................... 5

B       5.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 5

B       6.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 5  

B       7.       Staff Briefings................................................................................................................. 15

Joint Meeting - Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

C       8.       Joint Meeting - Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Minutes - 24 November 2017............................................................................ 17

STAFF REPORTS

C       9.       Rapaki Rd and Vernon Tce - Proposed Parking Restrictions..................................... 21

C       10.     Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - Wrights Road.................................................. 41

C       11.     Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - Hendersons/Rowley....................................... 47

C       12.     Thorrington School, Centaurus Road - School Patrol................................................ 55

C       13.     Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation - Stage 1 Landscape Plan and Tree Removals........................................................................................................................ 65

C       14.     Spreydon-Cashmere:  Proposed Bus Passenger Shelter Installation...................... 151

C       15.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund - Application - Rowley Avenue School Breakfast Club............................................... 159

C       16.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Application - Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan)....................... 163

C       17.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Youth  Achievement and Development Scheme 2017/18 -Application - Asafo Sa Gali, Shane McPhail, James Hemera and Joshua Burgess....................................................................................................................................... 167

C       18.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Appliction - Christchurch Boys High School ............................................................. 171

C       19.     Spreydon - Cashmere Community Board - Recess Committee 2017/18................. 175

C       20.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report.............................................. 177

C       21.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Meeting Schedule.................................... 183

B       22.     Elected Members’ Information Exchange.................................................................. 186 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Friday, 24 November 2017 be confirmed (refer page 6).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes may be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

It is intended that the public forum session will be held at <Approximate Time>

OR

There will be no public forum at this meeting

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 


 

 

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                     Friday 24 November 2017

Time:                                    8am

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

24 November 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

There were no apologies.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00168

Community Board Decision

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Tuesday, 7 November 2017 be confirmed.

Phil Clearwater/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                             Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

Leta Quartermain addressed the Board, on behalf of the Cashmere/Port Hills Community and Business          Association. Ms Quartermain outlined the activities of the association, which is a not for profit    organisation to promote community and business. 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.    

8.   Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Spreydon-Cashmere Board Projects

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00169 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves an allocation of $3,000 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 to the Board’s Communicating with the Community fund 2017/18.

2.         Approves a grant of $6,000 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 towards the Community Awards project 2017/18 .

Melanie Coker/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                          Carried

 

9.   Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Application - Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan)

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $2,000 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 to the Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan) towards the Be Active Pasifika project.

 

Board Consideration:

The staff member in attendance spoke to the accompanying report and indicated that clarification of the application had been sought.

 

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00170

Part B

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         The Board decided that the report lie on the table for consideration at the Board’s next meeting on 8 December 2017.  

Phil Clearwater/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                Carried

 

 

10. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Youth Achievement and Development Scheme 2017/18 - Application - Connor McLaughlin and Jak Howman

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00171 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development scheme to Connor McLaughlin towards participation in the Mainland Eagles Basketball Tour 2017 in Las Vegas, America from the 6 December to 24thDecember 2017 .

2.         Approves a grant of $300 from its 2017/18 Youth Development Fund to Jak Howman towards participation in the Craig Foster International Cup Futsal tournament in Australia from 18 January to 21 January 2018.

 

Melanie Coker/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                          Carried

 

11. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18- Community Service Memorial Plaque

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00172 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board approves a grant of $345 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 towards the purchase and installation of a Memorial Plaque to recognise community service.

 

Karolin Potter/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                                               Carried

 

12. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Application - Family Sponsorship for West Spreydon Community and School Swimming Pool

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00173 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board approves a grant of $1,980 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 to West Spreydon School towards Sponsorship of Families for use of West Spreydon Community and School Swimming Pool.

 

Tim Scandrett/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                  Carried

 

 

 

 

7.   Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - Leamington Street, Athelstan Street, Intersection of Hendersons / Barrowclough Street.
Proposed Give Way Control - Hunter Terrace.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00174 (Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

Leamington Street – Attachment A

2.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north west side of Leamington Street commencing at a point 55 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending in a north easterly direction for 10 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

3.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north west side of Leamington Street commencing at a point 65 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending in a north westerly direction for 5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

4.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north west side of Leamington Street commencing at a point 71 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending in a north easterly direction for 6 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

5.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north west side of Leamington Street commencing at a point 71 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending in a north westerly direction for 15 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

Athelstan Street – Attachment B

6.         Revokes the parking restriction on the south east side of Athelstan Street commencing at a point 63 metres north east of its intersection with Barrington Street and extending in a north easterly direction for a distance of five metres.

7.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Athelstan Street commencing at a point 63 metres north east of its intersection with Barrington Street and extending in a north easterly direction for a distance of five metres.

Intersection of Hendersons Road and Barrowclough Street - Attachment C

8.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north-east side of Hendersons Road commencing at its intersection with Barrowclough Street and extending in a north-westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres.

9.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north-east side of Hendersons Road commencing at its intersection with Barrowclough Street and extending in a south-easterly direction for a distance of 19 metres.

10.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north-west side of Barrowclough Street commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in a north-easterly direction for a distance of 17 metres.

11.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south-east side of Barrowclough Street commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in a north-easterly direction for a distance of 17 metres.

 

 

Hunter Terrace – Attachment D

12.       Approves the installation of a Give Way Control on Hunter Terrace at the intersection of the                             South Library exit, Hunter Terrace and the legally closed portion of Hunter Terrace.(as shown on                  Attachment D to the staff report).

Lee Sampson/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                                  Carried

 

 

13. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

 

Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update.

2.         Agrees the items to be reported by the Chairperson in her report to the Council

3.         Appoints a member to participate in a joint Community Board and Infrastructure Transport and Environment Committee meeting to consider a report on the proposal for Prohibited Times On Road restrictions on the Summit Road Proposal on behalf of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board.  The purpose of the meeting is to consider the report, hear any deputations, and make a recommendation to the Council on the proposal.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00175

Part B

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update.

2.         Agrees that the following items be reported by the Chairperson in her report to the Council on 7 December 2017

·            2017 Heritage Ambassador Award to Addington Neighbourhood Association

·            Publication of the Community Board Plan and Brochure

·            Hoon Hay Fiesta

·            Christina Loughton Memorial Plaque

·            Ōpāwaho Heathcote River Flooding Mitigation Proposals

·            Pacific Series and Rugby League World Cup

·            Addington Fair

·            Adventure Park re-opening on 5 December.

3.         Appoints Melanie Coker to participate in a joint Community Boards and Infrastructure Transport and Environment Committee meeting to consider a report on the proposal for Prohibited Times On Road restrictions on the Summit Road  on behalf of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board.  The purpose of the meeting is to consider the report, hear any deputations, and make a recommendation to the Council on the proposal.

4.         The Board decided to install a cast bronze plaque on a bus seat in the Athelstan Street bus shelter as a memorial to local resident Christina Loughton.  The inscription to read:

“In memory of Christina Loughton 19 August 1938 to 31 December 2015”

 An unveiling of the plaque is to be arranged early in the New Year.

Tim Scandrett/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                  Carried

 

 

14. Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

Board Members exchanged the following information:

·   The Christchurch Adventure Park, closed since the port Hills fires officially re-opens on 5 December 2017.

·   Heathcote Catchment Flooding Mitigation Measures have been approved by the Council.

·   There is continued local concern about pedestrian access across the road reserve area at the intersection of Dyers Pass Road and Hackthorne Road being impeded.

·   There have been discussions with the new Housing Minister around housing issues in the city including “Housing First” an initiative for housing people who are chronically homeless.

·   There have been discussions with the District health Board about “Thrive” – a programme that offers a community development response to mental health issues

·   Hoon Hay Community Association held its  first Annual General Meeting last week.

·   The Summit Road Protection Society has appointed a  new secretary

·   The Predator Free Port Hills programme is continuing.

·   The Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Network is applying for  incorporation

·   The Hohepa Trust is encouraging its community members to advocate for themselves

·   The success of the Hoon Hay Fiesta and the work of staff was acknowledged.

 

14.1   Rowley School Breakfast Club

 

The Board noted the Breakfast Club that is being run at Rowley School and agreed that this is a worthwhile initiative.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00176

Part B

The Board decided to:

1.       request staff advice on any support that the Board could provide to the Rowley School Breakfast club initiative. 

2.         write to the Minister of Education indicating its support for Rowley School and highlighting the schools urgent need for repair.

Karolin Potter/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                                               Carried

 


 

 

14.2   Dark Sky Areas

 

There was discussion on the desirability of dark skies areas in Christchurch

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00177

Part B

The Board decided to  request that staff provide advice on any current or proposed regulatory or other controls on lighting levels in Christchurch, with a view to the need to establish dark sky “reserves” in the city.

Karolin Potter/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

   

Meeting concluded at 9.53am.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 8 DAY OF DECEMBER 2017

 

Karolin Potter

Chairperson

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

7.        Staff Briefings

Reference:

17/1361123

Contact:

Faye Collins

Faye.collins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The Board will be briefed on the following:

Subject

Presenter(s)

Unit/Organisation

Shape Your Place Toolkit

Janine Sowerby

Urban Regeneration, CCC

 

 

 

 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Notes the information supplied during the Staff Briefings.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

8.        Joint Meeting - Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Minutes - 24 November 2017

Reference:

17/1424865

Contact:

Faye Collins

faye.collins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The Joint Meeting - Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held a meeting on 24 November 2017 and is circulating the Minutes recorded to the Council for its information.

 

2.   Recommendation to Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board receives the Minutes from the Joint Meeting - Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held 24 November 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

A

Minutes Joint Meeting - Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board - 24 November 2017

18

 

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

9.        Rapaki Rd and Vernon Tce - Proposed Parking Restrictions

Reference:

17/411516

Contact:

John Dore

john.dore@ccc.govt.nz

9418875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Linwood Central Heathcote Board to approve the installation of 'No Stopping' restrictions in accordance with Attachment A and B.

1.2       Rapaki Road and Vernon Terrace are located within the road network as shown on Attachment C.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated in response to requests from local residents on Rapaki Road and Vernon Terrace.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

·        The level of significance (11) was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

·        The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

Approve no stopping restrictions as shown on Attachment A, B and described below.

Rapaki Road, Even Properties 2-68 - No Stopping Restrictions

1.         Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 548 metres.

2.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road commencing at its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 111 metres.

3.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at a point 232 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 30 metres.

4.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at a point 268 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 14 metres.

5.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at a point 322 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 46 metres.

6.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at a point 408 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 16 metres.

7.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at a point 480 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 17 metres.

8.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Rapaki Road, commencing at a point 536 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 12 metres.

Vernon Terrace - No Stopping Restrictions

9.         Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the western side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 624 metres.

10.       Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the eastern side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 624 metres.

11.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Vernon Terrace commencing at its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 52 metres.

12.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 108 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 104 metres.

13.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 259 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 47 metres.

14.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the western side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 610 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 14 metres.

15.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the eastern side of Vernon Terrace commencing at its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 33 metres.

16.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the eastern side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 49 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 83 metres.

17.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the eastern side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 153 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 26 metres.

18.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the eastern side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 218 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 82 metres.

19.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the eastern side of Vernon Terrace, commencing at a point 610 metres south of its intersection with Centaurus Road and extending in a southerly direction for 14 metres.

 

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

·        Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

·        Activity: Parking

·     Level of Service: 10.3.8 Optimise operational performance

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install No Stopping Restrictions (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

·        The advantages of this option include:

·     Allows for emergency vehicle access

·     Allows additional room for vehicles to manoeuvre

·        The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes some residential kerbside car parking spaces.

·     Small amount of parking will spill out into the surrounding area during peak times.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Rapaki Track provides walking and cycle access to the Port Hills and is popular with recreational users. Subsequently Rapaki Road and parts of Vernon Terrace experience high on street parking demands generated by recreational users of Rapaki Track.

5.2       High levels of on street parking particularly during summer weekends and weeknights after 5:30pm are creating accessibility issues for residents and emergency vehicles.

5.3       A council no stopping restriction scheme presented to the public in November 2016 aimed to resolve accessibility issues on Rapaki Road. Key feedback and themes from consultation were:

·    Restricting parking on Rapaki Road will push parking demand onto nearby streets and relocate the problem

·    Vernon Terrace is experiencing similar problems to Rapaki Road.

5.4       A revised and expanded scheme to include Vernon Terrace has been prepared based on feedback from the public and is shown on Attachment D. Key features include:

·        No stopping restrictions to provide a minimum 3m available lane width allowing for emergency vehicle access.

·        No stopping restrictions to provide areas for cars to pull over and informally give way to oncoming traffic

5.5       Following public consultation in August 2017, the scheme was further revised based on feedback received. These revisions are shown on the preferred option on Attachment A and B. The changes are clearly shown within the red clouded areas.

Parking Demand Surveys

5.6       Parking demand surveys undertaken by council staff from November 2016 to February 2017 show:

·        Peak recreational parking demand on a weekend at various times between 9:30am and 3:00pm

·        Peak residential parking demand during a weeknight at various times from 8:45pm-9:00pm

5.7       A tabled summary of peak parking data is included as Attachment E.

5.8       Six parking surveys were completed, two surveys captured resident parking demand during a weeknight evening and four surveys captured recreational parking demand during the weekend. The maximum parking demand for each road was used to conservatively estimate expected parking demand.

5.9       The Attachment E table clearly shows that peak parking demand was concentrated on Rapaki Road, Vernon Terrace from Centaurus Rd to outside number 30 and on Aynsley Tce from Centaurus Rd to the first bend (outside 79).

5.10    Centaurus Rd and the balance of Vernon Terrace also have a slightly higher demand than the wider area.

5.11    Other streets surveyed around the Mt Vernon Carpark have low levels of parking demand compared to Rapaki and Vernon.

Changes to Parking Demand in Surrounding Area

5.12    The majority of the proposed changes occur on Rapaki Road  and Vernon Terrace from Centaurus Rd to outside property 30.These are the heaviest parked streets in the area. The proposal allows for approximately 72 carparks on these streets, compared to a surveyed parking demand of 69.

5.13    Four surveys were undertaken during peak parking times and the demand of 69 parked vehicles includes the maximum demands recorded on roads at different times and is therefore a more conservative estimate of demand.

5.14    It is reasonable to expect that available parking will not be 100% occupied, assuming an occupancy rate of 85%, approximately eight vehicles are estimated to overspill into the surrounding streets. There is kerbside parking available within a short walk of Rapaki Road to accommodate the parking overspill.

5.15    It is reasonable to expect these eight vehicles to park in the nearest possible available park on a surrounding street. Within 250m (approximately 3.5minute walk) of the intersection of Rapaki Road and Centaurus Road

5.16    Within 250m from Rapaki Road there is approximately 30 kerbside parking spaces available, that can accommodate any parking overspill as a result of the proposed changes.

5.17    Peak parking demand from Centaurus Road from Rapaki to Hillsborough Terrace had a surveyed peak parking occupancy of approximately 55%. There are approximately 22 spaces within 250m from Rapaki Road, at 55% peak occupancy approximately 10 spaces remain available.

5.18    Peak parking demand on Aynsley Terrace from Centaurus Road to the first right hand bend on Aynsley terrace is 100%. From this bend to outside 59 Aynsley there is approximately 13 kerbside parks available, surveys indicate 22% occupancy in this area leaving a total of about 9 kerbside parking spaces available.

NZTA Crash Risk and Crash History

5.19    NZTA have developed a crash risk assessment methodology for urban roads using recorded crash data. Council use a software package that calculates the assessed risk for sections of road and intersections. Risk is broken into five categories ranked from High to Low. The below table summarises Collective and Personal risk in the area.

LOCATION

COLLECTIVE RISK

PERSONAL RISK

Rapaki Road, Vernon Terrace, Aynsley Tce, Erewhon Tce

Low

Low

Centaurus Rd west of Rapaki

Low

Low

Centaurus Rd east of Rapaki

Low Medium

Medium

Intersection of Rapaki/Centaurus/Aynsley

Low

Low

Intersection of Vernon/Centaurus

Low

Low

 

5.20    The difference between Personal and Collective risk is that personal factors in traffic volumes.

5.21    Overall the road safety risk is assessed as low, notable exception is Centaurus Rd to the east of Rapaki Road.

5.22    The NZTA crash database reports 13 crashes in the area shown on Attachment F from 2007-2017.

5.23    Ten of the crashes were recoded from 2007-2009, and the balance from 2012-2017. It is noted that the traffic islands on Centaurus Rd and at the intersection of Vernon were constructed around June 2010.

5.24    The crashes are clustered at the intersection of Rapaki/Vernon/Aynsley and Centaurus. No crashes were recorded on Rapaki Road and Vernon Terrace.

5.25    The most recent crash five year crash period from 2012-2016 reports three crashes resulting in two minor injuries. All three crashes involved a collision with a crossing vehicle. Two occurred at the intersection with Rapaki /Centaurus and the third on Centaurus Rd.

Estimated Traffic Volumes

5.26    Intersection counts at Rapaki and Vernon were not undertaken during the peak summer period, however from peak parking data and the number of residential households an estimate of daily traffic has been completed. The tables on Attachment G summarises estimated daily traffic volumes.

5.27    The estimated traffic volumes are higher than expected for a local road of this nature given the high recreational parking demand in the area. However, the total estimated traffic volumes are not excessive and can be accommodated in Rapaki and Vernon Terrace when heavily parked.

5.28    There will be conflicts between vehicles travelling in opposite directions. The proposed scheme allows locations for vehicles to pull over and let on coming traffic pass as shown on Attachment A and B. This is an improvement from the current situation and can expect better accessibility on both Vernon and Rapaki.


 

6.   Option 1 - Install No Stopping Restriction (preferred)

Option Description

Install no stopping restrictions as shown on Attachment A and B.6.2       The option restricts parking to allow for additional room for vehicles manoeuvring along roads, maintain access for emergency vehicles and to improve safety.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Community and key stakeholders were engaged via two rounds of consultation regarding this project. The first round was November 2016 and included Erewhon Terrace, Montgomery Terrace, Rapaki Road and the closest end of Vernon Terrace only. From the feedback received, it was quickly apparent that further investigations, traffic counts and a wider study area would be beneficial. Hence, a second round of consultation undertaken August 2017 included the addition of Vernon Terrace, Hillsborough Terrace, The Crescent, Centaurus Road, Aynsley Terrace and Glenelg Spur.  A public drop in session was also available on 14 August 2017 for the opportunity to speak with staff and attended by 27 visitors.

6.6       86 submissions were received during the consultation period. 29 (33.7%) respondents were in general support, 40 (46.5%) respondents support but have concerns, 16 (28.6%) do not support and one respondent provided comments only.

6.7       A large amount of written feedback was received through the submission process. Feedback was catergorised into themes and the main ones are identified below along with the repetition number. The project team responses too large to be included here can be viewed in Attachment H.

6.8       Themes arising Rapaki Road

Problem of parking demand exceeding supply has not been addressed                      14

Resident only parking                                                                                                                         14

Improve the parking on Aynsley Terrace (fix up verge)                                                        11

Provide a parking facility somewhere                                                                                          9

Further develop the car park at end of Hillsborough as an alternative                           6

Reduce speed limit to 30km and provide signage                                                                   6

Plan shifts problem onto neighbouring streets                                                                        5

More regular parking enforcement required at weekends                                                5

 

6.9       Themes arising Vernon Terrace

No stopping should be both sides of street at the bends (22-42)                                                 9

The adjusted plan has achieved no stopping, both sides at this bend

No stopping lines should extend both sides (up to no. 8) at Centaurus road end     7

The adjusted plan has some extension of no stopping lines so that parking can not occur both sides at once up to no 8

Vernon is no exit so the traffic passes through twice                                                            5

One way section does not need yellow lines                                                                                         5

The adjusted plan has removed these yellow lines

 

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.10    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.11    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $2000 - $2500 to road markings and timber sight rail.

6.12    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effect will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.13    Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget.

Legal Implications

6.14    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

6.15    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

6.16    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.17    Not applicable.

Implementation

6.18    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval from Spreydon Cashmere and Linwood Central Heathcote Boards.

6.19    Implementation timeframe - Approximately four weeks once the area contractor receives the request.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.20    The advantages of this option include:

·    Allows for emergency vehicle access

·   Allows additional room for vehicles to manoeuvre.

6.21    The disadvantages of this option include:

·    Removes some residential kerbside car parking spaces.

·   Small amount of parking will spill out into the surrounding area during peak times

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with community requests for improvement.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $0

7.8       Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Not applicable.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Has no impact on existing on-street parking.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not address the accessibility issues on Rapaki Road and Vernon Terrace

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option - Rapaki Rd

30

b

Preferred Option - Vernon Tce

31

c

Location Plan

32

d

Consulted Option - Rapaki Rd and Vernon Tce

33

e

Parking Survey Table

35

f

Crash Diagram

36

g

Estimated Traffic Volumes

37

h

Consultation Responses

38

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Kim Swarbrick - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

10.    Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - Wrights Road

Reference:

17/1330178

Contact:

John Dore

john.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.2       To approve the installation of 'No Stopping' restrictions Wrights Road outside property numbers 13-15 as shown on Attachment A. This site is near its intersection with Lincoln Road.

 

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated in response to requests from the community.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Wrights Road commencing at a point 97 metres north west of its intersection with Lincoln Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for 37 metres.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

3.1.1   Activity: Parking

·     Level of Service: 10.3.8 Optimise operational performance

3.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – As shown on Attachment A

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

3.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages  (Preferred Option)

3.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Reduces the risk of a crash by improving egress sightlines from a relatively busy traffic generator.

3.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes some kerbside parking spaces.

 

 

4.   Context/Background

4.1       A member of the Kingdom Halls of Jehovah’s Witnesses at 15 Wrights Rd has raised concerns regarding existing on street parking restricting vehicle visibility at the Wrights Road exit to the church.

4.2       The church is estimated to generate up to 360 vehicle trips a day during the weekend when a number of services are being held daily.  This is considered high for an access/egress and warrants improved visibility similar to a local road / local road intersection.

4.3       Kerbside parking will be removed from directly in front of the church, the church has adequate parking off street to meet demand.

4.4       The high generating church egress warrants a higher level of available visibility, improving overall road safety.

4.5       Wrights Road from Birmingham St to Lincoln Rd is classified as a collector road, the land on the immediate area is predominantly residential.

4.6       The section of Wrights Road near the subject site has an average weekday traffic volume of approximately 15,000 vehicles per day.

4.7       Wrights Rd has an assessed safety risk of medium. Medium is in the middle of the five risk categories ranging from High to Low. Risk is assessed based on Kiwi Rap methodology developed by NZTA and software created by Abley Consultants.

5.   Option 1 - Install No Stopping Restriction (preferred)

Option Description

5.1       Install 'No Stopping' restrictions, as shown on Attachment A.

Significance

5.2       The level of significance of the proposal is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

5.3       The proposals shown on Attachment A do not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

5.4       The church support this proposal, no other properties are directly affected.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

5.5       These options are consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

5.6       Cost of Implementation – No more than $100 to install road markings.

5.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effect will be minimal to the overall asset.

5.8       Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget.

Legal Implications

5.9       Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

5.10    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

5.11    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

5.12    Not applicable.

Implementation

5.13    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval.

5.14    Implementation timeframe – Approximately one month following board decision.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

5.15    Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages  (Preferred Option)

5.15.1 The advantages of this option include:

·     Reduces the risk of a crash by improving egress sightlines from a relatively busy traffic generator.

5.15.2 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes some kerbside parking spaces.

6.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

6.1       Retain existing

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       This option is inconsistent with community requests for improvement.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

6.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $0

6.8       Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

6.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

6.10    Not applicable.

Implementation

6.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

6.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Has no impact on kerbside parking.

6.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not address the issues identified.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Wrights Rd - Preferred Option

45

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

11.    Proposed No Stopping Restrictions - Hendersons/Rowley

Reference:

17/1375273

Contact:

John Dore

john.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board, to changes to approved ‘No Stopping' restrictions at the intersection of Hendersons Road and Rowley Avenue. 

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests from the community.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the northern side of Rowley Avenue commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in an easterly direction for 26 metres.  

2.         Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the southern side of Rowley Avenue commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in an easterly direction for 20 metres.  

3.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northern side of Rowley Avenue commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in an easterly direction for 16 metres.  

4.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southern side of Rowley Avenue commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending in an easterly direction for 16 metres.  

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

3.1.1   Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

3.1.2   Activity: Parking

·     Level of Service: 10.3.8 Optimise operational performance

3.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – As shown on Attachment A – Revised original proposal.

·     Option 2 - As shown on Attachment B – Original proposal, approved by board in June 2017.

·     Option 3 – Revoke restrictions shown on Attachment B – Do Nothing.

3.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages  (Preferred Option)

Revised Original Proposal– Attachment A

3.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Retains intersection sight lines of previously approved option

3.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Loss of some kerbside parking, however less than the original proposal. More than adequate kerbside parking available for residents.

 

4.   Context/Background

4.1       The Spreydon Cashmere board approved No Stopping restrictions as shown on Attachment B, in June 2017. The No Stopping restrictions were intended to prevent parked cars from prohibiting buses and large vehicles straddling speed humps on Rowley Avenue. Residents have raised concerns about vibration and noise created by buses traversing the speed humps.

4.2       The approved No Stopping restrictions have not been marked on the road.

4.3       Following approval and during construction set out a directly affected resident that initially raised concerns regarding bus vibrations spoke with council staff and does not want restrictions as shown on the proposal, as he does not believe it will resolve the problem.

4.4       The resident is still experiencing vibrations from buses even when cars not parked near the speed bumps on Rowley St and is also concerned about loss off on street parking for visitors.

4.5       Large vehicles travelling over the existing speed bumps flex the pavement and create vibration and noise. One possible solution is to dig out, repair the pavement and reconstruct the speed bumps with flatter ramps and longer tops to minimise noise and vibrations. This work would need to be completed as part of the road maintenance programme and is dependent on maintenance priorities and funding. Road maintenance staff are aware of the issue.

4.6       The proposal shown on Attachment B is typical for a T intersection with a collector road to improve visibility. In this case further no parking restrictions along Rowley Avenue have been proposed to prevent parked vehicles from stopping a bus straddling the speed bumps.

4.7       Following recent feedback the preferred option is to maintain some of the original parking restrictions proposed, the revised scheme is shown on Attachment A. The revised scheme improves visibility and reduces the level of kerbside parking being removed as shown on original proposal. The issues regarding vibrations from buses has been passed onto road maintenance staff.

 

5.   Option 1 – Revision of Original Proposal (preferred)

Option Description

5.1       Install 'No Stopping' restrictions, as shown on Attachment A.

5.2       This option improves intersection visibility, removes less kerbside parking compared to Option 2 (No Stopping restrictions approved by the Board in June) as shown on Attachment B, however does not allow larger vehicles such as buses to straddle speed humps and reduce noise and vibrations if cars parked near them.

Significance

5.3       The level of significance of the proposals is low and is consistent with community requests for improvements.

Impact on Mana Whenua

5.4       The proposals shown on Attachment A do not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

5.5       The original proposal shown in attachment B is not supported by a directly affected resident. The revised preferred option reduces the extents of no stopping restrictions allowing for more on street parking. This option will improve intersection visibility but does not address the issue of noise and vibration generated by buses travelling over the existing speed humps.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

5.6       These options are consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

5.7       Cost of Implementation – No more than $100 to install road markings.

5.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effect will be minimal to the overall asset.

5.9       Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget.

Legal Implications

5.10    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

5.11    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

5.12    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

5.13    Not applicable.

Implementation

5.14    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval.

5.15    Implementation timeframe – Approximately one month following board decision.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

5.16    Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages  (Preferred Option)

5.16.1 The advantages of this option include:

·     Retains intersection sight lines of previously approved option

5.16.2 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Loss of some kerbside parking, however less than the original proposal. More than adequate kerbside parking available for residents.

 

6.   Other Options - (Option 2) Continue with previously board approved Attachment B.  (Option 3) Revoke Attachment B No Parking Restrictions.

Option Description

6.1       Revoking attachment B parking restrictions is no change from the existing situation. Continuing with previously board approved attachment B will improve intersection visibility and increase the chances of a bus straddling speed bumps and reducing noise and vibrations.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of these options is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       These options do not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       Option 2 - The original proposal shown in attachment B is not supported by a directly affected resident, as he does not believe it will resolve the problem and will reduce available kerbside parking.

6.5       Option 3 – Supported by directly affected resident, however this option does not improve intersection visibility.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation:

·        Option 2 - approximately $100 to install road markings (previously committed).

·        Option 3 - $0

6.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $0

6.9       Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

6.10    Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

6.11    Not applicable.

Implementation

6.12    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

6.13    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.14    The advantages of  Option 2 include:

·   Improved intersection visibility

·   Allows a larger vehicle to straddle the kerbside speed humps, reducing the chances of vibration and noise.

6.15    The disadvantages of Option 2 include:

·   Removes more kerbside parking than option 1 (Preferred Option).

6.16    The advantages of option 3 include:

·   No impact on kerbside parking

6.17    The disadvantages of option 3 include:

·   Does not improve intersection visibility

·   Does not allows a larger vehicle to straddle the kerbside speed humps if cars parked nearby, creating vibration and noise.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option - Revised Original Proposal

52

b

Original Proposal - Hendersons Rd and Rowley Ave

53

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

12.    Thorrington School, Centaurus Road - School Patrol

Reference:

17/1241207

Contact:

John Dore

john.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to seek approval from council to install a School Patrolled Crossing on Centaurus Rd as shown on Attachment A.

1.2       The site is located within the road network as shown on Attachment B. A school patrol crossing includes swing out stop signs on a marked zebra crossing point.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated following concerns raised by Police and community.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to Council that:

1.         In pursuance of the powers vested in it by Section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule- Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council authorises the head teacher of Thorrington School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Centaurus Road crossing point as shown on Attachment A, located at a point more or less 27 metres southeast of its intersection with Holliss Avenue.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users – minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install a school patrol crossing on Centaurus Road as shown on Attachment A.

·     Option 2 – Pedestrian Refuge Island or Signalised Crossing

·     Option 3 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides supervision and priority for children of all school ages, when needing to cross Centaurus Rd before and after school.

·     Cost effective solution to providing road safety for school children.

·     Improves visibility of crossing during busy pedestrian periods.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     No known disadvantages.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Thorrington Primary School staff, community members and Police have raised concerns regarding the current operation of the existing pedestrian crossing outside 55 Centaurus Road. Concerns include; traffic not stopping for pedestrians, traffic braking late, and occasionally drivers overtaking stopped vehicles.

5.2       The existing location, and a slight crest in the road, is causing difficulty for driver’s visibility of the crossing on the westbound approach.

5.3       Council staff have undertaken investigations into possible improvement options to achieve the below objectives:

·   Improve visibility of painted pedestrian crossing for westbound vehicles

·   Provide an improved level of service for pedestrians and drivers

·   Reduce the risk of a pedestrian crash

5.4       The preferred option as shown on Attachment A includes the below features:

·   Infrastructure for a school patrol

·   Street lighting upgrade

5.5       A patrolled crossing provides an improved level of safety for pedestrians before and after school, meets the objectives and provides value for money.

5.6       Christchurch City Council can approve the installation of school patrolled crossing points , provided the crossing comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (the rule).

5.7       NZTA traffic note 29 revision 2 provides guidance on how the rule should be applied including the range of vehicle and pedestrian volumes where a kea crossing is effective (Warrants).

5.8       The site complies with the Rule and meets the lower threshold and is within the upper warrant threshold. The NZ Police are also comfortable with operating a school patrol at this location.

Observations, Traffic Data and Warrants

5.9       General observation is a zebra crossing is not expected within the road environment given no shops, schools, parks or playgrounds nearby.

5.10    The crossing is well used by pedestrians on route to Thorrington School.

5.11    Poor forward visibility of the painted crossing was noted on the westbound approach, and is not satisfactory for vehicles travelling at the posted speed limit or higher.

5.12    Centaurus Road from Colombo St to Port Hills Rd is classified as a minor arterial and has an average weekday traffic volume of approximately 10,000.

5.13    Sloane Tce, Hollis Ave, Landsdowne Tce and Bowenvale Ave are all classified as local roads will relatively low daily traffic volumes.

5.14    The surrounding land is residential and the section of Centaurus Rd from Sloan Tce to Major Aiken Dr is bound along its northern boundary by the Heathcote River.

5.15    Thorrington School is close by and can be accessed via Sloan Tce. A high number pedestrians cross Centaurus Rd on route to Thorrington School. Other smaller pedestrian generators in the immediate area include:

·   Walking and cycling access to Bowenvale Valley via Bowenvale Ave

·   Recreation use of the Heathcote River and access to walkways on the Heathcote

5.16    This section of Centaurus Road is a popular recreational cycle route.

5.17    Council staff completed pedestrian count surveys in April 2017 on a weekday during school time.

5.18    From 2:45pm to 3:30pm a total of 50 pedestrians were recorded crossing. It is noted that this count was completed on a wet day and that may have mis represented pedestrian numbers. It was also noted that approximately 20 of the recorded pedestrians were from a pre school, this may not have been typical on a school day.

5.19    Strong survey demand of 20 pedestrian per hour was also recorded from 4pm to 6pm.

5.20    A second pedestrian survey was undertaken on 26 June 2017, a total of 29 pedestrians (20 children, 9 adults) were recorded from 8:30 am to 8:50 am.

5.21    A traffic counting tube located outside 34 Centaurus Road to the east of the site in 2003 recorded the below speeds and traffic volumes:

·   Mean speed of 51km/h

·   85% speed of 56.5km/h

·   From 8-9am, 1000 vehicles

·   From 2-3pm, 600 vehicles

·   From 4-6pm, 1000 vehicles

5.22    The NZTA crash database reports four crashes on Centaurus Rd between Holliss Ave and Landsdowne Tce from 2007-2017. None of the accidents involved the existing pedestrian crossing or pedestrians.

5.23    The four accidents resulted in one serious injury and 2 minor injuries.

5.24    Two accidents involved failing to give way at driveway or priority controlled intersections, two accidents suspected alcohol, and vehicles colliding with parked cars.

5.25    From road safety risk mapping software based on NZTA KiwiRap methodology, Centaurus Rd has a Low medium collective corridor risk, and low collective intersection risk at Holliss Ave, Sloan Tce and Landsdown Tce.

 


 

6.   Option 1 - Install School Patrol Crossing (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install a school patrol crossing for Thorrington School on Centaurus Rd as shown on Attachment A.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       The Thorrington School Board of Trustees (BOT), have formally agreed to the establishment and operation of a school patrol.

6.5       The NZ Police community constable has been consulted and agrees that a school patrol can be operated in the proposed location and children/staff be trained to operate.

6.6       An adjoining residential property owner and council staff have discussed the possibility of trimming back an existing hedge.

6.7       No other parties have been consulted, the proposal has no effect on surrounding properties. The proposal is an improvement to the existing crossing location.

6.8       The original scheme consulted on with Thorrington School and NZ Police included coloured surfacing on approaches to the crossing, aimimg to improve visibility of the crossing on approaches. This scheme is shown on Attachment C.

6.9       This part of the scheme has been removed in the interim due to the level of pavement repairs required to ensure a reasonable design life of the red surfacing. Red surfacing will be considered again when maintenance work is scheduled in this area. The School Patrol will provide a significant improvement to visibility during busy pedestrian times, red surfacing supports visibility improvements when the patrol is not operating.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.10    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.11    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $40,000 to design, install the school patrol crossing equipment and street lighting improvements.

6.12    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - approved Council Maintenance budget.

6.13    Funding source – Traffic Operations Capital Budget.

Legal Implications

6.14    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations    

6.15    None identified.

Implementation

6.16    Implementation dependencies - dependent on approval by Council to legalise the school patrol operation and training of the school patrollers and staff by the Police Community Education Officer.

6.17    Implementation timeframe –. Plan to complete installation of street lighting and school patrol crossing equipment by May 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   Provides supervision and priority for children of all school ages, when needing to cross Centaurus Rd before and after school.

·   Cost effective solution to providing road safety for school children.

·   Improves visibility of crossing during busy pedestrian periods.

6.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   No known disadvantages.

7.   Option 2 - Pedestrian Refuge or Signalised Crossing

Option Description

7.1       Widen road to accommodate a pedestrian refuge or construct signalised pedestrian crossing.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       The reasons for discounting these options were discussed with Thorrington School staff and the BOT. The BOT support a school patrol and associated work as shown on Attachment A.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – Approximately $100,000 for a Pedestrian Refuge and approximately $300,000 for signalised pedestrian crossing.

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable

7.8       Funding source – No applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.10    Ongoing concern from school about road safety.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable.

7.12    Implementation timeframe – not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   A signalised crossing provides the best level of pedestrian service.

·   A pedestrian refuge shortens the crossing distance and breaks the crossing into two, providing a safe place to wait in the centre of the road.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Relatively high costs to install signals, other sites across the city are a higher priority for signals and this site may never be a priority when there is a suitable alternative.

·   Traffic may not be used to stopping at signals in this location due to the lower pedestrian demand between school peaks. If signals are not activated regularly drivers can develop the expectation that pedestrians will not be crossing, leading to safety issues.

·   A pedestrian refuge island works best when not on a painted pedestrian crossing so that it is clear that vehicles have right of way, and pedestrians need to wait until there is a suitable gap to cross. When a pedestrian refuge island is installed on a painted pedestrian crossing, motorists may expect a pedestrian to wait at the refuge and not stop, while pedestrians expect to have the right of way. This can create conflict and safety issues.

8.   Option 3 – Do nothing

Option Description

8.1       No changes to existing road.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.4       This option is inconsistent with the school request and concerns raised by the community.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

8.6       Cost of Implementation – $0

8.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable

8.8       Funding source – No applicable

Legal Implications

8.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations   

8.10    Ongoing concern from school about road safety.

Implementation

8.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable.

8.12    Implementation timeframe – not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No additional cost to Council.

8.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not respond to the needs of the school community.

·   Does not address the noted visibility issues of the existing crossing.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

62

b

Location Plan

63

c

Consultation Plan

64

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

13.    Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation - Stage 1 Landscape Plan and Tree Removals

Reference:

17/1254467

Contact:

Keith Davison

keith.davison@ccc.govt.nz

941 8071

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board for:

·   The Stage 1 Landscape Plan for the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation project, which includes 122 new trees

·   The removal of 35 healthy and structurally sound street and park trees for Stage 1 of the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation project (this includes 15 small trees that are less than 6.0 metres height).

1.2       Decisions on the removal of healthy and structurally sound trees is delegated to the Community Board, under Part D, Sub-part 1, 5.15  of the Council’s delegations register:

·   “Determine to plant, maintain and remove trees on reserves, parks and roads under the control of the Council within the policy set by the Council."

1.3       The purpose of this report is to also inform the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board regarding the removal of 28 street trees that are in unhealthy or structurally unsound.

1.4       Decisions on the removal of unhealthy and structurally unsound trees and trees causing infrastructure damage is delegated to the Head of Parks, under Part B, Sub-part 3, 20 Parks/Trees of the Council’s delegations register:

·   “In consultation with any other units affected, to authorise the following work on any tree from any reserve, park, open space or road corridor: planting and maintenance; removal of structurally unsound and unhealthy trees, trees causing damage to infrastructure or other safety concerns where there is no viable alternative other than to remove the tree.  The relevant Community Board is to be informed of any removals that have been carried out under this delegation.”

Origin of Report

1.5       This report is staff generated.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by a score of 16 (Low) based on the significance criteria used by the Council.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

2.1.3   Not approving the removal of the trees would increase the level of significance to Medium (determined by a score of 27), due to the inability to fulfil the project requirements, potential risks of flooding in some areas, and returning to the Council for further endorsement and resolution.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves the Stage 1 Landscape Plan for the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation project, including the replacement tree planting plan, comprising 122 new trees.

2.         Approves the removal of 35 street and park trees to allow the Stage 1 of the project to be fully implemented.

3.         Existing Ashgrove Terrace – Parking and Stopping Restrictions

a.    Revokes parking restrictions on the south side of Ashgrove Terrace, commencing at a point 192 metres west of its intersection with Barrington Street, and extending in a westerly direction for 142 metres.

b.    Revokes parking restrictions on the south side of Ashgrove Terrace, commencing at a point 96 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street, and extending in a westerly direction for 56 metres.

c.     Revokes parking restrictions on the north side of Ashgrove Terrace, commencing at a point 101 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street, and extending in a westerly direction for 46 metres.

4.         New Ashgrove Terrace – Parking and Stopping Restrictions

a.    Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Ashgrove Terrace, commencing at a point 192 metres west of its intersection with Barrington Street, and extending in a westerly direction for 142 metres.

b.    Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Ashgrove Terrace, commencing at a point 96 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street, and extending in a westerly direction for 56 metres.

c.     Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Ashgrove Terrace, commencing at a point 101 metres west of its intersection with Colombo Street, and extending in a westerly direction for 46 metres.

 

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Flood Protection and Control Works

·     Level of Service: 14.1.5 Implement Land Drainage Recovery Programme works to reduce flooding

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Approve the Stage 1 landscape plan and tree removals (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Decline the landscape plans and tree removals

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Enables to bank stabilisation works to proceed without delay

·     Benefits of more stable banks, less channel restriction, and greater flood flow conveyance achieved sooner

·     Increased vegetative planting along the banks

·     Facilitation of the Mid-Heathcote River/ Ōpawaho Linear Park Masterplan objectives

·     The proposed planting plan will result in 59 more trees being planted than the total number of trees that are to be removed for this project

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The removal of 35 trees that are in a good and fair condition and the immediate loss of tree cover and amenity where this occurs (this includes 15 small trees that are less than 6.0 metres height)

·     Immediate loss of tree cover and amenity where this occurs

4.4       Consultation – The project team are engaging with affected stakeholders through the implementation of the Project Communications and Engagement Plan.

 

5.   Context/Background

Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation

5.1       Land Drainage Recovery Programme (LDRP) investigations into earthquake damage in the Upper and Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River were undertaken in 2015 and 2016.

5.2       The investigations identified a number of areas that were considered to require repair or remediation to ensure long term bank stability. The type of instability observed related to both earthquake damage and other naturally occurring processes.

5.3       It was identified through the investigation that while slumping and other instabilities have been a feature of the Heathcote River for a long time, the earthquakes have accelerated this process and caused more widespread instability than would usually be present.

5.4       Bank stabilisation works were prioritised according to the likely time to failure and the implication of failure. Works categorised with a priority of ‘very high’ (response required immediately or <1 year) or ‘high’ (response required within 5 years) were bundled into work packages and a design brief prepared. This is the work package for the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation project.

5.5       An example of work identified as ‘very high priority’ is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1 ‘Very high’ priority works on Eastern Terrace

5.6       The areas covered by the works overlap with the Mid-Heathcote River / Ōpawaho Linear Park Masterplan (‘Masterplan’) area, although there are some work areas outside of the Masterplan as well. The stabilisation works have used the Masterplan to guide the design, and will enable future Masterplan development, e.g. through leaving space for footpaths.

5.7       The works have also been designed to add river capacity wherever possible, and to ensure a neutral or positive effect on river conveyance.

5.8       The proposed works cover an extensive area. The consultation booklet has been included as Attachment A as this shows the landscape planting, tree removals and proposed bank treatments.

Tree Removals

5.9       A tree assessment has been carried out within the vicinity of the areas where the works are to occur to assess the condition of the trees, and inform the design to minimise potential adverse effects on trees that are healthy and structurally sound (refer Attachment B: tree report from Arbor Vitae Ltd, dated 24 November 2017).

·   Established trees have been identified as providing an essential role in bank stabilisation, and healthy and structurally sound trees will be retained and protected wherever possible.  There are a total of approximately 205 trees within the near vicinity of the Stage 1 works, and the majority of the trees within the vicinity of the works can be retained and protected.

·   Based upon the project design there are a total of 63 street trees identified as requiring removal for the Stage 1 works and/or due to the poor condition of some trees.

·   35 of the 63 trees are in a healthy and structurally sound condition, and are directly affected by the proposed works (27 of the total trees to be removed are less than 6.0 metres in height).

·   The healthy and structurally sound trees that have been identified to be removed are in areas where the extent of works required cannot be achieved without removing the trees.

 

5.10    The condition of each tree was evaluated using the Christchurch City Council tree assessment system.  At the time of the tree survey, the condition of the trees that will be removed included the following:

·   6 trees in Good condition

·   29 trees in Fair condition

·   23 trees in Poor condition

·   5 trees in Very Poor condition

5.11    Relocating trees has been investigated:

·   6 trees can be relocated to allow the works to occur

·   It may be possible to relocate an additional 2 trees, although these trees are currently included in the 35 healthy and structurally sound trees to be removed.

5.12    The overall condition of a tree is assessed using the table below:

Very Good

1

Good

2

Fair

3

Poor

4

Very Poor

5

 

·   The score relates to the health and form of a tree:

·     Form includes the structural integrity (the ability to hold together under load) of the tree.

·     Health (vigour and vitality) is generally measured through branch growth increments, foliage colour/discolouration, bud size etc.

·   The overall condition rating for a tree is calculated by taking the worst score from either health or form to establish the overall assessment rating (e.g. if a tree scores good for health and poor for form then the condition rating will be poor overall for the tree).

5.13    Alternative design options have been considered that would allow for the retention of the trees that are required to be removed.  No feasible alternative alignment, design and construction options were identified that would allow for the retention of the trees due to site constraints, including locations where there is limited space between the river edge and the trees, and the extent of works required to achieve the project outcomes.

 

Tree Planting

5.14    Extensive tree planting is planned to be carried out as part of the project, and a landscape plan has been developed which includes the planting of 122 new trees within the project area.  This exceeds the requirements of the replacement tree planting policy.

5.15    Wherever possible the new trees will be planted as close as possible to the locations of the trees that are removed. 

5.16    The Stage 1 Landscape Plan has been developed in alignment with the Mid-Heathcote River / Ōpāwaho Linear Park Masterplan (2009) and the Christchurch City & Lowland Canterbury Streamside Planting guide, and will include a mix of native and exotic tree species.

 

6.   Option 1 – Approve the Stage 1 landscape plan and tree removals (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Proceed with:

·   The Stage 1 Landscape Plan for the stabilisation works

·   The removal of 35 healthy and structurally sound street and park trees to enable the works for the project (this includes 15 small trees that are less than 6.0 metres height).

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance is formal consultation with the community.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

6.5       Staff consulted with Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga through Mahaanui Kurataiao Limited (MKT). The feedback on the project was positive, with the Rūnanga agreeing to the proposed conditions under which the works would be undertaken.

6.6       A Cultural Values Statement will be drafted by MKT to accompany the archaeological authority application (required from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga).

Community Views and Preferences

6.7       Community engagement for this project was undertaken from Friday 3 November to Friday 24 November 2017.

6.8       Flyers advising of the consultation, where information was available (Libraries and online) and drop in session details, were delivered to all properties along both sides of the Heathcote River from Ashgrove Terrace to Tennyson Street.  This information was also sent via our e-newsletter to the Heathcote River database advising of the consultation.

6.9       A drop in session was held at the Beckenham Service Centre on Wednesday 15 November and was attended by approximately 18 people, including representatives of the Ōpāwaho-Heathcote River Network.

6.10    A school visit was held at Beckenham School where members of the project team presented to years 7 and 8, years 5 and 6 and an environmental group.  The team gave the students some history of the Heathcote River and how the river has changed and what we are now doing to help with the flooding issues.  Students were asked what was important to them about the Heathcote River and we received the following feedback:

·   Wildlife – fish and birds

·   Nature

·   Willow trees and lots of trees

·   Keeping the river clean and being able to swim in it

·   Rope swing and tree houses

·   Preventing flooding

·   Seating

·   Bridges

 

6.11    During the course of the engagement we received 23 submissions with the following feedback:

FEEDBACK

PROJECT RESPONSE

Access to the river both physically and visually is very important to the community

In most places, where space and other constraints permit, then the access to the river is improved as the bank will be less steep with a vegetated edge. There is currently no plan to install specific access structures as these form part of the Masterplan.

Will we be deepening the river profile while we undertake widening?

No deepening will take place as part of the bank stabilisation works. The widening proposed is above the current water line.

Look for opportunities for more seating and picnic tables

The project has not included these elements, but does not exclude them from being placed later.

A number of submitters supported further opportunities to undertake road narrowing in order to widen the riverbanks

The approach taken is to ensure that any future plans to narrow the roads are not compromised, but to focus on the bank edges as a first priority. Road narrowing can take part during the implementation of the Masterplan works.

The area around and the Colombo Street bridge itself needs addressing

This project is focused on addressing the worst areas of instability. No high or very high priority areas were identified in this vicinity.

Parking should generally be banned on the river side to reduce ongoing damage – use of bollards or strategic planting

The project team agrees that this would reduce the impact on the banks. However, this is outside the scope of this project.

How are we going to manage stormwater runoff from mature subdivisions?

Stormwater runoff from recent subdivisions is managed through basins, both for treatment and reducing peak flows. The Upper Heathcote Storage scheme will provide further storage over and above this.

Ensure ongoing maintenance of invasive weed species

This comment has been passed through to the Land Drainage Operations Team.

Concern at the amount of battering as this is detrimental to habitat for larger eels – consider larger pipes or hollow logs in some areas

The project has sought to preserve as much of the current bank as possible to minimise the impact on habitat. In addition it is planned to place some larger rocks in front of the main line of rocks to provide additional spaces for eels and other creatures to inhabit. Larger pipes or hollow logs may reduce the structural integrity of the bank, and for this reason smaller pipes are proposed.

Ensure consistency with the Mid Heathcote River/Ōpāwaho Linear Park Masterplan

The works have been designed to be consistent with the Masterplan as far as possible. The project also aims to facilitate future works, such as leaving space for footpaths in the future.

Timeframes of when works will be undertaken

Earthworks and construction is planned to start in January 2018

 

6.12    Trees and landscaping

FEEDBACK

PROJECT RESPONSE

Ensure that all proposed plantings provides an ecological continuum along the river corridor and is consistent with the Mid Heathcote River/Ōpāwaho Linear Park Masterplan

The Master Plan has been used a guiding document during the development of the landscape plan and will adhered to as much as possible

Concerns regarding the removal of healthy and structurally sound trees

Healthy and structurally sound trees will only be removed where there are no alternatives in meeting the project objectives

Feedback received about the native/exotic ratio, some wanting more exotics while other preferred more natives

Plantings will be consistent with the Mid Heathcote River/Ōpāwaho Linear Park Masterplan and the ratio of native/exotic trees species will reflect this

 

6.13    Where we have received questions related to a specific site, the project team will contact that resident directly.

6.14    The project team will continue to liaise with the Ōpāwaho Heathcote River Network regarding the landscape planting.

6.15    A verbatim copy of all feedback received has been circulated to elected members separately to this report.

6.16    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising of the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Community Board meeting, and how they can speak to their submission if they wish.  Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback received and the Community Board report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.17    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.18    Cost of Implementation - The cost of the landscape planting and the removal and replacement of the trees is included within the construction of these projects.

6.19    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The proposed works are anticipated to be cost-neutral. Currently the banks are cut periodically and sediment removed from where slumps have occurred. The contract has a two-year landscape maintenance period to ensure good plant establishment, and once vegetation is established operational costs are likely to less than current costs.

6.20    Funding source - The construction costs of this projects has been approved by Council through the 2016/17 Annual Plan within the Land Drainage Recovery Programme.

Legal Implications

6.21    Resource consent for the physical construction works is required from both Environment Canterbury and Christchurch City Council.

6.22    Resource consent will be required for the removal of some of the trees.

6.23    No other legal implications were identified.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.24    No significant risks have been identified.

Implementation

6.25    Implementation dependencies - Implementation is dependent on approval from the Community Board.

6.26    Implementation timeframe – The tree removals will occur as part of the earthworks and construction, which is planned to start in January 2018.  Landscape planting will take place as works packages are complete, with the first planting taking place during the 2018 planting season.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.27    The advantages of this option include:

·   Enables to bank stabilisation works to proceed without delay

·   Benefits of more stable banks, less channel restriction, and greater flood flow conveyance achieved sooner

·   Increased vegetative planting along the banks

·   Facilitation of the Mid-Heathcote River/ Ōpawaho Linear Park Masterplan objectives

·   The proposed planting plan will result in 59 more trees being planted than the total number of trees that are to be removed for this project

6.28    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The removal of 35 trees that are in a good and fair condition and the immediate loss of tree cover and amenity where this occurs (this includes 15 small trees that are less than 6.0 metres height)

7.   Option 2 - Decline the landscape plans and tree removals

Option Description

7.1       Decline the landscape plans and tree removals.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is mediumwhich differs from section 2 of this report due to the inability to fulfil the project requirements, potential risks of flooding in some areas, and returning to the Council for further endorsement and resolution.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are likely to involve further consultation with the community.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

7.5       The runanga have expressed support for Option 1, and feedback on not proceeding with the works would need to be sought.

Community Views and Preferences

7.6       This option is not consistent the community views and preferences expressed at the public meetings and through the consultation. In particular, it is unlikely to meet the expectation that restrictions in the river are removed and that the flood channel is made wider wherever possible.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.7.1   Inconsistency – Level of Service: 14.1.5 Implement Land Drainage Recovery Programme works to reduce flooding would not be fully implemented.

7.7.2   Reason for inconsistency – The bank stabilisation works may not proceed.

7.7.3   Amendment necessary - The design would require revision and further options would need to be investigated.

Financial Implications

7.8       Cost of Implementation – Additional costs in the re-design of the works.

7.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – no change from current situation.

7.10    Funding source – The re-design costs will be taken from the LDRP budget.

Legal Implications

7.11    No significant legal implications have been identified.

Risks and Mitigations

7.12    No significant risks have been identified.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - Implementation of the works will be dependent on re-design of the works.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – This option will result in a delay to the project.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Avoiding the removal of up to 35 healthy and structurally sound trees

·   No immediate loss of tree cover and amenity

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Delays to works which provide increased conveyance of river flow

·   Less riparian vegetation along the river banks

·   Less opportunity to implement the Masterplan works

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation Consultation Booklet

76

b

LDRP518 Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation Project Stage 1 Tree Report - 1 November 2017

104

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Peter Christensen - Senior Water Resources Engineer

Kamal Narang - Project Manager

Ann Campbell - Senior Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Peter George - Programme Manager

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

John Mackie - Head of Three Waters and Waste

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

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14.    Spreydon-Cashmere:  Proposed Bus Passenger Shelter Installation

Reference:

17/1362046

Contact:

Brenda O'Donoghue

Brenda.odonoghue@ccc.govt.nz

941 8583

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to approve the installation of a bus passenger shelter at an existing bus stop located at 75 Halswell Road that has received no objection by the owner or occupier of the adjacent property.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated. Where no objection (either by approval or no feedback) to the shelter has been presented by the owner or occupier of an affected property, the relevant Community Board for that area has the delegated authority to approve the installation of the proposed shelter.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve the installation of a bus shelter at 75 Halswell Road

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Public Transport Infrastructure

·     Level of Service: 10.4.4 Ensure user satisfaction with the number and quality of bus shelters

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - The preferred option, install a bus passenger shelter at 75 Halswell Road, adjacent to an existing bus stop, as described in section 6 of this report.

·     Option 2 - Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Protection from weather,

·     Seating provided within the shelter, and

·     Increase the visibility and legibility of public transport

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increase in the number of bus passenger shelters to be maintained by the Council.

·     During the peak times of public transport usage, the shelter can only provide shelter for a limited number of people, however this is the case with most bus shelters.

4.4       Consultation has been undertaken with the owner and/or occupier of the property adjacent to the proposed shelter.  Only a shelter where the owner or occupier of the adjacent property has provided feedback indicating approval or where there was no response received to the consultation, is included within this report.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       A bus passenger shelter is proposed for the bus stop at 75 Halswell Road due to the average weekday passenger boardings, which is about 61 ave.pax/weekday.  The location of the bus stop, and hence the proposed shelter at 75 Halswell Road, relative to the surrounding locality is indicated in Figure 1.

Figure 1:  Location of proposed shelter relative to the wider area

5.2       Council staff propose to install a shelter in the location outlined in the attached bus passenger shelter plan (refer to Attachments A). 

5.3       Environment Canterbury (ECan) is responsible for providing public transport services.  The Christchurch City Council is responsible for providing public transport infrastructure.  The installation of this shelter is supported by ECan.

5.4       Under s339 of the Local Government Act 1974, the Council may erect on the footpath of any road a shelter for use by intending public transport passengers or taxi passengers provided that no such shelter may be erected so as to unreasonably prevent access to any land having a frontage to the road.  The Council is required to give notice in writing to the occupier and owner of property likely to be injuriously affected by the erection of the shelter, and shall not proceed with the erection of the shelter until after the expiration of the time for objecting against the proposal or, in the event of an objection, until after the objection has been determined.

5.5       Staff confirm the shelter will not prevent vehicular or pedestrian access to any land having a frontage to the road, as a result of the proposed shelter installations.

5.6       Consultation has been carried out with the affected property.  The consultation period occurred from Tuesday 7 November 2017 to Tuesday 21 November 2017.  During this period the owner of 75 Halswell Road contacted staff to enquire about the type of shelter proposed, as the preference by the property owner would be to have a shelter composed of metal rather than glass.  Staff have confirmed that the material type of the shelter will be metal (mesh panels), not glass (or Perspex).  No objection to the shelter has been indicated, either verbally or through written feedback by the property owner.

6.   Option 1 - Proposed Bus Passenger Shelter Installations

Option Description

6.1       Installation of a bus passenger shelter at an existing bus stop located at 75 Halswell Road.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance includes the consultation with occupier and owner of property likely to be injuriously affected by the erection of the shelter.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       The property of 75 Halswell Road is specifically affected by this option due to the proximity of the property to the proposed shelter.  Consultation notice and a feedback form were delivered by hand to 75 Halswell Road on Tuesday 7 November 2017, requesting the owners or occupiers feedback of approval or objection to the bus passenger shelter at the bus stop outside the property they own or occupy.  The consultation process closed Tuesday 21 November 2017.

6.5       During the consultation period the owner of 75 Halswell Road contacted staff to enquire about the type of shelter proposed, as the preference by the property owner would be to have a shelter composed of metal rather than glass.  Staff have confirmed that the material type of the shelter will be metal (mesh panels), not glass (or Perspex).  No objection to the shelter has been indicated, either verbally or through written feedback by the property owner.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Staff professional services costs - $800, which covers planning, consultation and approval process incurred irrespective of the Community Board’s decision or recommendation.

6.8       Cost of Implementation – The supply and installation of the bus passenger shelter, in additional to other bus stop remedial work is estimated to cost $12,000. 

6.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Costs will be met from the Passenger Transport Maintenance budget.

6.10    Funding source - The cost will be met from the Passenger Transport Infrastructure budget available for the installation of shelters.

Legal Implications

6.11    Where no objection to the shelter has been presented by the owner or occupier of an affected property, the relevant Community Board for that area has the delegated authority to approve the installation of the proposed shelter.

Risks and Mitigations

6.12    The shelter is not installed, leading to a poor level of service for passengers waiting for a bus.

6.13    Increased street clutter. Where street clutter has been identified through site assessments (e.g. rubbish bins located by the kerb edge (i.e. in less than ideal locations), excess number of public transport related poles, etc.), these footpath obstacles will be relocated to an appropriate location in close proximity to the shelter (e.g. the rubbish bin), and the number of poles reduced by maximising the use of the shelter (e.g. attaching the Real Time Information device 'bus finder' to the shelter).  This will help provide a de-cluttered footpath environment by the bus stop and improve the level of service for pedestrians passing the shelter and for passengers waiting for a bus.

Implementation

6.14    Implementation dependencies - approval by the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board.

6.15    Implementation timeframe - dependant on the contractor's workloads, but the shelter should be installed within three months of being approved.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   Protection from weather,

·   Seating provided within the shelter,

·   Additional seating provided outside shelter,

·   Increase the visibility and legibility of public transport, and

·   Provide a positive contribution to the overall streetscape.

6.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Increase in the number of bus passenger shelters to be maintained by the Council,

·   During the peak times of public transport usage the shelter can only provide shelter for a limited number of people, however this is the case with most bus shelters.

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       No bus passenger shelter is installed at the location identified in section 3 of this report. 

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.  As there is no bus passenger shelter proposed, the engagement requirements for this level of significance does not involve any consultation.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Not applicable

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

7.5.1   Inconsistency - It does not ensure user satisfaction with the number and quality of bus shelters

7.5.2   Reason for inconsistency - Bus passengers will not be provided shelter to wait for a bus

7.5.3   Amendment necessary - No amendment needed to the Council's Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Staff professional services costs - $800, which covers planning, consultation and approval process incurred irrespective of the Community Board’s decision or recommendation.

7.7       Cost of Implementation – not applicable

7.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - not applicable

7.9       Funding source - not applicable

Legal Implications

7.10    Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    The existing passenger waiting facilities remain, leading to no improvement to the level of service for passengers waiting for a bus.

7.12    It may reduce bus patronage on wet days, as passengers may choose another mode of travel as there is no shelter provided at the bus stop.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - not applicable

7.14    Implementation timeframe - not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   No advantages to this option.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It is inconsistent with Council's Plans and Policies.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bus Passenger Shelter Plan for Approval - 75 Halswell Road

157

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Brenda  O'Donoghue - Passenger Transport Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

15.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund - Application - Rowley Avenue School Breakfast Club

Reference:

17/1409142

Contact:

Jay Sepie

Jay.sepie@ccc.govt.nz

5102

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

57393

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Rowley Avenue School Breakfast Club

$500

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding a donation towards equipment and operating costs of the Rowley Avenue School Breakfast Club.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $500 to Rowley Avenue School towards equipment and operating costs of the Rowley Avenue School Breakfast Club .

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$72,985

$67,195

$66,695

 

3.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

3.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017-18 - Decision Matrix - Rowley Avenue School

161

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Jay Sepie - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

16.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Application - Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan)

Reference:

17/1329294

Contact:

Emma Pavey

Emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

941 5107

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

#57366

Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan)

Be Active Pasifika

$11,744

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from the Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan).

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $2,000 to the Seventh Day Adventist Church (Addington Samoan) towards the Be Active Pasifika project.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$72,985

$67,195

$65,195

 

3.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

3.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Seventh Day Adventist Church Decision Matrix

165

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

17.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Youth  Achievement and Development Scheme 2017/18 -Application - Asafo Sa Gali, Shane McPhail, James Hemera and Joshua Burgess

Reference:

17/1396028

Contact:

Emma Pavey

Emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

941 5107

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider applications received from Asafo Sa (Crusader) Gali, Shane McPhail, James Hemera and Joshua Burgess for the Board's 2017/18 Youth Development Fund.

1.2       There is currently $3,400 remaining in this fund.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from Asafo Sa (Crusader) Gali, Shane McPhail, James Hemera and Joshua Burgess.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Asafo Sa Gali towards the Abel Tasman Leadership Tramping 2017.

2.         Approves a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Shane McPhail towards the Abel Tasman Leadership Tramping 2017.

3.         Approves a grant of $300 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to James Hemera towards the Super City U16 Baseball tournament.

4.         Approves a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Joshua Burgess towards the U16 National Touch Rugby Tournament.

 

 

3.   Applicant 1 – Asafo Sa (Crusader) Gali

3.1       Asafeo Sa (Crusader) Gali is 18 years of age and a student at Hillmorton High School.  Crusader lives in Rowley with his mother, brothers and sisters.

3.2       Crusader became a key member in his community three years ago when he was involved with a group of youth who advocated to have lights installed on the local basketball court on Hoon Hay Park.  From here Crusader has grown his personal skills by joining the Hoon Hay Hoops committee and the Hoon Hay Fiesta committee.  Crusader has undertaken personal development by attending a Get Set Go Workshop which teaches the basic skills involved in event management.

3.3       Crusader is further looking to develop his leadership skills by attending the Abel Tasman Tramp which is being held at the Abel Tasman National Park from the 13th – 17th December.  The tramp will provide leadership training for a number of local leaders who will be tramping and camping through the National Park. 

3.4       Crusader has a passion for music and has just finished his last year at Hillmorton High School with a view to seek further education in his chosen field.  Crusader also plays rugby for the local team and plays basketball informally with other youth at Hoon Hay Park.

3.5       Financial considerations have been taken into account for this application.

3.6       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Asafo Sa (Crusader) Gali:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Registration and Travel

$150

Food

$50

Equipment

$150

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$350

 

3.7       This is the first time the applicant has applied for funding.

4.   Applicant 2 – Shane McPhail

4.1       Shane McPhail is 19 years of age and lives in Rowley with his parents.  Shane is not currently employed but is actively seeking employment.

4.2       Shane has applied to further his personal growth and leadership by attending the Abel Tasman Tramp which is being held at the Abel Tasman National Park from the 13th – 17th December.  The tramp will provide leadership training for a number of local leaders who will be tramping and camping through the National Park. 

4.3       Shane is captain for the Suburbs Colts Rugby Team and has represented Canterbury Rugby.  Shane is passionate about Maori development and barbering and in the future would like to open his own shop.

4.4       Shane has been mentoring the younger members of his rugby team to help them progress by sharing his knowledge.

4.5       Financial considerations have been taken into account for this application.

4.6       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Shane McPhail:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Registration and Travel

$150

Food

$50

Equipment

$150

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$350

 

4.7       This is the first time the applicant has applied for funding.

5.   Applicant 3 – Joshua Burgess

5.1       Joshua is 15 years of age and lives in Spreydon with his parents and attends Christchurch Boys High School.  Joshua has two older brothers who have left home.

5.2       Joshua has been selected to play for the U16 National Touch Rugby Tournament at Bruce Pullman Park in Auckland from the 8th – 10th February 2018.

5.3       Joshua has been playing touch rugby for seven years and enjoys all aspects of the sport.  This will be the sixth year that Joshua has represented Canterbury and has progressed to coaching the U12 Canterbury Development Team.  Joshua's goal is to represent New Zealand.

5.4       Joshua has other interests but rugby is his passion and any free time is spent playing, training or kicking a ball around.

5.5       Financial considerations have been taken into account for this application.

5.6       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Joshua Burgess:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Tournament Costs

$265

Uniforms

$155

Admin/Prizes/Fundraising

$95

Accommodation

$240

Travel

$390

Food

$130

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$1,275

 

5.7       This is the first time the applicant has applied for funding.

6.   Applicant 3 – James Hemera

6.1       James is 16 years of age and lives in Hillmorton with his parents and is in year 11 at Hillmorton High School.  James also has an older sister who does not live at home.

6.2       James has been interested in baseball since he was eight years of age when he played whilst visiting family overseas.  He learned more skills on his return to Christchurch from adults playing baseball but there was not an age grade for him to play in.  In March 2013 James started to play in the Bayswater Classic baseball tournament and was selected at a representative player.  James is now on the Senior Development Team and trains two to three times a week.

6.3       Aside from playing James is committed to the baseball community and helps to maintain the grounds for Canterbury Baseball Association and has attended umpiring and coaching clinics to develop his skills.  His personal goal is to attend college in the United States of America by possibly gaining a baseball scholarship.

6.4       James is also interested in jiu jitsu, plays in a band and enjoys reading.  He is also fixing up a 1960 Willys Jeep which belonged to his late uncle.

6.5       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for James Hemera:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Flights, Travel, Accommodation, Food, Fees

$2,605.39

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$2,605.39

 

6.6       This is the first time the applicant has applied for funding.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

18.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 - Appliction - Christchurch Boys High School

Reference:

17/1397894

Contact:

Emma Pavey

Emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

941 5107

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

#57388

Christchurch Boys High School

World Schools Rugby Festival

$136,500

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from Christchurch Boys High School.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $1,500 to Christchurch Boys High School towards the World Schools Rugby Festival.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$72,985

$67,195

$65,695

 

3.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

3.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Christchurch Boys High School Decision Matrix

173

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

19     Spreydon - Cashmere Community Board - Recess Committee 2017/18

Reference:

17/1428193

Contact:

Faye Collins

Faye.collins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

This report is a staff initiated report to seek the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board’s approval to put in place delegation arrangements for the making of any required decisions (including applications for funding) that would otherwise be dealt with by the Board, covering the period following the Board’s final scheduled meeting for the year on 8 December 2017 until its next ordinary meeting on 30 January 2018.

Origin of Report

1.1       This report is staff generated.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

It is recommended that the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

3.1       Appoints a Recess Committee comprising the Board Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson and any two Board members available, to be authorised to exercise the delegated powers of the Spreydon- Cashmere Community Board for the period following the Board’s final scheduled meeting for the year on 8 December 2017 until its next ordinary meeting on 30 January 2018.

3.2       Requires that the exercise of any such delegation by the Recess Committee be reported back to the Board for record purposes.

3.3       Notes that any meeting of the Recess Committee will be publicised and details forwarded to all Board members.

 

 

4.   Key Points

In previous years it has been the practice of the Board and the previous Spreydon- Cashmere Board to resolve to provide delegated authority to a Recess Committee to cover the period between the Board’s last scheduled meeting of 2017 and its first scheduled meeting for 2018. Last year the Board appointed a recess committee comprising the Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson and any two other members available, to make any needed decisions on the Board’s behalf during the Christmas/New Year holiday period.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

20.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

Reference:

17/1428199

Contact:

Faye Collins

Faye.Collins@ccc.govt.nz

03 9415108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to resource the Community Board to promote a pro-active partnership approach to decision-making between the Council and Community Boards working together to achieve the best outcomes for the city with decisions being made with a good understanding of community views.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receive the Area Update.

2.         Request staff to arrange a City Sounds event to be held in Victoria Park, or another venue within the Spreydon-Cashmere area if Victoria Park proves unsuitable, on a Sunday afternoon in early 2018. 

 

 

 

2.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

2.1       Community Board Plan update against outcomes

2.1.1   Nothing to report.

2.2       Memos/Information reporting back on Community Board matters

2.2.1   Concern about pedestrian access adjacent to the Hackthorne/Dyers Pass Road intersection was raised in elected members’ information exchange at a previous Board meeting.  Concerns about this have also been raised by the Cashmere Residents’ Association.  Staff are currently investigating the status of land in front of the Cashmere Masonic Centre and will provide advice.

2.3       The provision of strategic, technical and procedural advice to the Community Board

2.3.1   Access way adjacent to the properties at 17 to 25 Parklands Drive.

A presentation on behalf of the Parklands Drive residents was made to the Community Board on 19 September seeking support for a council contribution to the maintenance of access way adjacent to the properties at 17 to 25 Parklands Drive. Staff advice previously provided to the residents was made available to the Board at the time.  Following the presentation the Board requested staff advice on the maintenance responsibility for the access way. A staff memorandum has now been received and is attached for consideration.

2.3.2   Staff advice is that in terms of its current policy the Council is not responsible for the maintenance of access way adjacent to the properties at 17 to 25 Parklands Drive as the main purpose of this is to provide access to private properties.

 

2.3.3   City Sounds

The Board has identified in the Community Board Plan an objective of hosting a metropolitan event in the Board area.  City Sounds is a programme of events that provides local bands, musicians and buskers the opportunity to perform in various locations across the city.  The programme started on Friday 1st December 2017 and will continue until the end of March 2018.  Each event provides an opportunity for people to come together, enjoy great music, fun games and enjoy barbecue food.  City Sounds is sponsored by The Hits radio station and is well promoted.

The Community Recreation Advisor has investigated with the Events Team the possibility of holding a City Sounds event in Victoria Park, or at another venue within the Spreydon-Cashmere area if Victoria Park proves unsuitable.  This event could be planned for a Sunday afternoon towards the end of March and will likely attract people from across the city. 

The Board is invited to consider whether it wishes to host a City Sounds event in Victoria Park.

 

2.4       Board area Consultations/Engagement

2.4.1   Hoon Hay Park proposed upgrades

Hoon Hay Park proposed upgrades, including the proposal for Basketball court lighting is open for feedback: 24th November 2017 - 18th December 2017.

Once the consultation period has closed, the project team will analyse the feedback and produce a staff report for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board, who will then make a recommendation to the Council Head of Parks for final decision.

2.4.2   Dyers Pass Road proposed safety improvements

The Dyers Pass Road proposed speed limit change and no passing lines are open for feedback: 21st November 2017 - 18th December 2017.

Once the consultation period has closed, the project team will analyse the feedback and produce a staff report which will go to the Spreydon-Cashmere and Banks Peninsula Community Boards, who will then make the final decision on no passing lines and make a recommendation to council regarding the speed limit.

2.4.3   Church Square and surrounds proposed speed limit change

Following community requests, Council staff have investigated a reduction in the speed limit for the streets around Church Square.  Council are proposing to reduce the posted speed limit to 40km/hr.  The proposal is open for feedback 20th November 2017 - 11th December 2017.

Once the consultation period has closed, the project team will analyse the feedback and produce a staff report which will go to the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board for a recommendation to Council who will then make the final decision.

3.   Significant Community Issues

3.1       Maintenance of Community Planting Areas.

3.1.1   Status

There has been ongoing concern expressed about careless maintenance undermining the efforts of volunteers in community planting areas. Examples are strimming damaging trees and other plantings being weeded out.

3.1.2   Action

Local parks staff and service contractors are working with groups on an individual basis to develop maintenance plans for specific areas. Following discussion the terms of the service contracts are varied to exclude certain activities and/or certain areas from the works undertaken by contractors.

Staff advise that the contractors have also introduced an alert system to minimise the incidence of misunderstanding of the scope of works required in community planting areas.

3.1.3   Timeframe

Ongoing.

 

 

3.2       Westmorland Subdivision to Worsley’s link road formation

3.2.1   Status

Following the raising of this issue in Elected Members exchange, staff have asked for information on this matter.  

 

4.   Major Community and/or Infrastructure Projects

4.1       Community Facilities

The repair of the Old Stone House is almost complete.  Planning is underway for a re-opening on 7th February 2018.

                        

4.2       Events Report Back

Pacific Series 2017

The Pacific Series, is an annual celebration of Christchurch Pacific, Maori and Ethnic communities through a rugby league tournament and cultural event.  The Series aims to nurture and grows Pacific, Maori and other Ethnic community connections and to celebrates cultural identity, and utilises rugby league as the vehicle to engage these grassroots communities. The 2017 series was held in Hoon Hay Park over the weekend of 16-19 November.

Discretionary Response Fund grants to the staging of this city wide event were made by the Spreydon-Cashmere, Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Coastal-Burwood Community Boards.

The Tournament brought together 600 participants over 30 teams. The 60 games were played enthusiastically and in good spirit and were watched by approximately 10,000 spectators over the three days of the event.

The Pacific Series participants and supporters engaged in a formal evening (fono) prior to the tournament, where there was a focus on suicide prevention and mental health to address the high incidence of Youth suicide experienced by the Pacific and Maori populations. 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parklands Memo

181

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Jay Sepie - Community Development Advisor

Sol Smith - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

21.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Meeting Schedule

Reference:

17/1429737

Contact:

Faye Collins

faye.collins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider approving a schedule of ordinary meetings for the period January 2018 to December 2018 inclusive.

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated to enable the Board to consider the adoption of a meeting schedule for 2018.

1.3       During the year, the Board can review its meeting arrangements, if required.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment against the Significance and Engagement Policy criteria.  

2.1.2  Community engagement and consultation is not applicable.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Adopts the following meeting schedule for January to December for 2018:

Tuesday 30 January           5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 16 February             8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 6 March                5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 16 March                   5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 3 April                    5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 20 April                      8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 1 May                    5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 18 May                       8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 5 June                    5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 15 June                      8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 3 July                      5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 20 July                        8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 7 August               5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 17 August                 8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 4 September      5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 21 September         8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 2 October                         5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 19 October               8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Tuesday 6 November       5.00pm          Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 23 November          8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

Friday 7 December                         8.00am           Beckenham Service Centre Boardroom

 

 

4.   Meeting Schedule

 

4.1       The staff recommendation in this report, for the Board to adopt a meeting schedule through to December 2017, has been developed based on a number of factors:

Ÿ Informal feedback from Board members

Ÿ The holding of two Board meetings per month where practicable

Ÿ Consideration of other commitments on the Council calendar, e.g. Council and Committee meetings, community weeks and Council recesses.

Ÿ A desire to avoid day/time clashes with other Community Board meetings

4.2       It is intended that each meeting of the month be a full business meeting to allow all items of business to be progressed on a regular basis.  The minutes/report of each meeting will be included on the agenda of the following meeting for confirmation and then referred to the next appropriate Council meeting.

4.3       In addition to decision making Board meetings, seminars or workshops will be scheduled at the conclusion or prior to the commencement of meetings or at other times as required to provide an opportunity for Board members and staff to receive information and have an informal discussion on issues where no decision is required at the time.

4.4       The Boards meeting schedule for 2019 will be considered later in 2018.

4.5       It is suggested that Board meetings regularly be held at 5pm on the first Tuesday and 8am on the third Friday of each calendar month with both meetings being full business meetings. Exceptions to this will be the first meeting of 2018 which will be on Tuesday 30 January because the first Tuesday in February will be Waitangi day and the second meeting in November, which it is proposed will be on the last Friday of the month, the 23November, Show Day.  It is proposed that the final meeting of the year be held on the second Friday of the month, the 7 December at 8am, to allow for a sufficient interval between meetings.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

   


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

08 December 2017

 

 

22.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.