Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Thursday 7 December 2017

Time:                                    9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Jamie Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

1 December 2017

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

Christopher Turner-Bullock

Committee Advisor

941 8233

christopher.turner@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 5

2.       Declarations of Interest............................................................................................................ 5

3.       Public Participation.................................................................................................................. 5

3.1       Public Forum....................................................................................................................... 5

3.2       Deputations by Appointment............................................................................................... 5

4.       Presentation of Petitions......................................................................................................... 5

Banks Peninsula Community Board

5.       Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council......................................................... 7

Coastal-Burwood Community Board

6.       Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council..................................................... 15

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

7.       Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council..................................... 21

8.       Halswell Ward- Recently Vested Reserves Through Subdivisions - Namings and Classifications.................................................................................................................................................. 27

Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board

9.       Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council.............................. 45

10.     Breens Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit.............................................. 51

Papanui-Innes Community Board

11.     Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council.......................................................... 59

12.     Acceptance of gift of building................................................................................................ 67

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

13.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council................................................ 79

14.     Intersection Improvement - Cashmere,Hoon Hay, Worsleys.............................................. 87

Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

15.     Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council................................. 155

16.     Linwood Village - Proposed Liquor Ban.............................................................................. 161

17.     Linwood/Woolston Aquatic Facility - Best Practice Accessibility Standards.................. 163

18.     Wilson Park - Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Institute of Canterbury Campus......... 165

STAFF REPORTS

19.     Appointment of Recess Committee 2017/18...................................................................... 175

20.     Remuneration Authority Local Government Review Consultation Document Part three - Draft Council Comment........................................................................................................ 177

21.     2017/18 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund........................................................ 247

22.     Linwood/Woolston Pool...................................................................................................... 251

23.     Dudley Creek Flood Remediation........................................................................................ 257

24.     Resolution to Exclude the Public......................................................................................... 262  

 

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation

3.1  Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.1.1         Kerry Laundon regarding Straw-Free Christchurch

3.1.2         Dougal Holmes regarding the New Brighton foreshore development

3.2  Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared 

4.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.  

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

5.        Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1318145

Contact:

Christine Wilson, Chairperson, Penelope Goldstone and Joan Blatchford

penelope.goldstone@ccc.govt.nz
joan.blatchford@ccc.govt.nz

941 5689
941 5643

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October and November 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Banks Peninsula Community Board held meetings on 30 October and 13 November.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   High Community Participation in Akaroa Pedestrian Safety and Accessibility Improvements

There was a high level of community participation in this project. 8 people and community organisations made deputations to the Board, and there were 55 respondents during consultation.

Many comments highlighted the value of preserving Akaroa’s unique heritage. To reflect this heritage, the Board decided to approve white tactile pavers instead of the standard yellow pavers.

·   Charteris Bay Matters

      Bill Studholme, Chairperson of the Charteris Bay Residents Association, made a deputation to the Board on various matters.

The Board referred the issues raised in the deputation to staff for an urgent response, with an initial response to the next meeting of the Board, with particular urgency noted regarding:

 

1.1   Status of global consent offered to gravity fed users in Charteris Bay, in particular those who have already connected

1.2   Low user uptake of the Charteris Bay wastewater system, including resulting gases in the system

1.3   Adequacy of stormwater system in Bayview Road, with particular consideration of the impact of having connected to the water system and consequential increased flows of rainwater

1.4   Unsatisfactory state of repairs to the road following installation of  the wastewater scheme

1.5   State of maintenance or repair of the Paradise Beach track with regard to both amenity and public safety

1.6   Wider stormwater considerations relating to Charteris Bay and the southern bays of Lyttelton Harbour in general.

 

·   Funding for Community Projects Across Banks Peninsula

The Board approved funding for community projects, which will support priority outcomes in our Community Board Plan by strengthening communities, building resilience and enhancing our environment.

·     $3,318 to the Little River Craft Station towards Information for Visitors website

·     $1,000 to the Banks Peninsula Presbyterian Church towards the Banks Peninsula Community Lunches and Community Garden project

·     $150 towards a young person attending the Spirit of Adventure 10 Day Development Course

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration.

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

       Allandale Hall Reopens with Community Celebration       

5.1       Status

5.1.1   The repair of Allandale Hall was completed in November. This popular community facility, managed by the Allandale Reserve Management Committee and closed since 2011 was reopened on 4th December 2017.

5.2       Action Required

5.2.1   Nil.

5.3       Timeframe – Complete.

       Takapūneke Reserve – A Place of Outstanding Cultural Heritage       

5.4       Status

5.4.1   At the Board’s previous presentation, the Council requested additional information on the intention to seek National Reserve status for Takapūneke Reserve.

5.4.2   Takapūneke Reserve, near Akaroa, is a site of immense cultural significance to Ngāi Tahu and, in particular, to local iwi Ōnuku Rūnanga. Up until the arrival of Europeans to New Zealand in the early 19th century, Takapūneke was a major trading village. In 1830, a significant event involving the massacre of many Ngāi Tahu people resulted in the reserve becoming tapu.

5.4.3   Surviving Ngāi Tahu in the Akaroa basin established their main settlement at Ōnuku, meaning ‘at a distance’. It was at Ōnuku that the memory of events at Takapūneke were kept alive, creating a strong connection between the land at Takapūneke and Ōnuku.

5.4.4   In 2002 the reserve was registered as wāhi tapu (place of outstanding historical or cultural heritage value) by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. The registration recognised the values of the site to Ngāi Tahu and provided tangata whenua with a platform from which to advocate for the protection and conservation of these values.

5.4.5   In 2006 the Banks Peninsula District Council resolved that National Reserve status should be sought for Takapūneke Reserve.

5.4.6   In 2007 the Banks Peninsula Landscape Study classified Takapūneke as a cultural heritage landscape, recognising that Takapūneke has the highest rating according to the standards of the International Council on Monuments and Sites.

5.4.7   In 2009, Takapūneke was classified as an Historic Reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

5.4.8   In 2012, the Council and Ōnuku Rūnanga worked in partnership, with the assistance of other stakeholders, to prepare the Takapūneke Conservation Report, which highlighted the cultural and heritage values of Takapūneke to Ōnuku Rūnanga, Ngai Tahu and the public. In December 2012 the Council adopted the Conservation Report.

5.4.9   In February 2015 the Akaroa/Wairewa Community Board received a report on the intention to prepare Reserve Management Plan, which summarised the findings of the Conservation Report. The Board resolved to:

Approve the public notification of the intention to prepare a reserve management plan for Takapūneke Reserve and endorsed the proposal to notify the Minister of Conservation through the Department of Conservation for the intention to apply for National Reserve classification for Takapūneke Reserve.

5.4.10 In May 2015 a letter was sent to the Department of Conservation advising the intention to prepare the Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan as a prerequisite for Takapūneke Reserve to be considered as a National Reserve, in compliance with section 13, Reserves Act 1977.

5.5       Action Required

5.5.1   After the Council has gathered public comments and suggestions, all submissions will be considered.

5.6       Timeframe

5.6.1   The Board has approved the draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan for consultation from 11 October to 15 December.

       Growing Banks Peninsula’s Trees and Forests  

5.7       Status

5.7.1   The Board was briefed on work to date and proposed pre-engagement for the Tree and Urban Forest Plan, which will provide a long term vision and strategy to maximise the health and sustainability of trees and forests in the City and Banks Peninsula, and increase the benefits we get from them.

5.7.2   We highlighted Banks Peninsula’s existing policy to plant indigenous species in the first instance, unless there are acceptable reasons to the contrary, and to maintain and where possible restore our valued remaining native habitats.

5.8       Action Required

5.8.1   The Board requested a seminar session to workshop outcomes and actions for the Tree and Urban Forest Plan that benefit Banks Peninsula.

5.9       Timeframe – Late-January 2018.

       Lyttelton Gets Active in Recreation Centre     

5.10    Status

5.10.1 The Lyttelton Recreation Centre reopened in early-2016, and the occupancy statistics have increased quite significantly over the past year. In June 2016 the hours booked per month were 75.30, in October 2017 the hours have increased to 188 per month. 

5.10.2 This has been due to the establishment of new programmes such as Lyttel Tumblers, the Youth Programme and private bookings.  The re-opening of Trinity Hall within the Centre has also seen the return of previous programmes booking this space such as regular yoga classes.

5.11    Action Required

5.11.1 Staff are working with Project Lyttelton about encouraging further use of the Recreation Centre. First steps include identifying what the community wants, and if there are any gaps that the Centre could fill.

5.11.2 For example, the Youth Programme run at the Centre is helping fill a gap left by the closure of the Lyttelton Youth Centre.

Timeframe – Ongoing.

       Progress with Remediation of Numerous Slips on Banks Peninsula    

5.12    Status

5.12.1 Similar to many other areas of the City, Banks Peninsula experienced heavy rain and flooding in July and August. Numerous slips occurred on roads and tracks, with some tracks still closed and roads reduced to one lane.

5.12.2 The Board was briefed on the progress with remediating these slips, including those around Diamond Harbour, Pigeon Bay and the Akaroa Lighthouse.

5.13    Action Required

5.13.1 Staff will provide a detailed progress summary, including timeframes, to the Board to distribute to affected communities.

5.14    Timeframe – Christmas 2017-Winter 2018     

       Historic Governors Bay Explored in the Breeze Walking Festival         

5.15    Status

5.15.1 The October 2017 Breeze Walking Festival included three walks in the Banks Peninsula area.  Unfortunately, due to bad weather, two of those walks were cancelled. 

5.15.2 However, the Historic Governors Bay walk was well attended with 14 participants and provided walkers who were all from the City side with an understanding of the rich heritage left by the early settlers.

5.16    Action Required

5.16.1 Nil.

5.17    Timeframe – Complete.   

       New Eco-Burial Site First of Its Kind

5.18    Status

5.18.1 A new eco-burial site opened in November within the Diamond Harbour Memorial Gardens Cemetery. 

5.18.2 This is the first eco-burial site to open in the Christchurch and Banks Peninsula area. Families of those buried in this area will be able to take part in planting over the plots with native trees.

5.19    Action Required

5.19.1 Nil.

5.20    Timeframe – Complete.

       Community Interest Grows in Head to Head Walkway     

5.21    Status

5.21.1 Community interest in the Head to Head Walkway around Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour continues to grow, with the appointment of the Diamond Harbour Community Association Chairperson to the Working Party.

5.21.2 Progress continues on this aspirational project to create a continuous walkway around Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour.

5.22    Action Required

5.22.1 The most recent Working Party meeting was held in November 2017.

5.23    Timeframe – Ongoing.

6.   Significant Community Issues

       Akaroa Awarded “Kiwi’s Choice” in Keep New Zealand Beautiful Awards  

6.1       Status

6.1.1   Akaroa was recently awarded “Kiwi’s Choice” in the 2017 Keep New Zealand Beautiful Awards. This award recognises a favourite public spot in New Zealand.

6.1.2   Akaroa is a historic ocean side town, a short drive from Christchurch. It has beautiful and pristine water, with opportunities to go crab spotting in and around the rock pools on the water’s edge as well as see rare Hectors dolphins that swim in the harbour.

6.2       Action Required

6.2.1   Nil.

6.3       Timeframe – Complete.

       Communities Concerned with Freedom Camping on Banks Peninsula        

6.4       Status

6.4.1   Freedom camping started early this season with many people already camping around Banks Peninsula by October.

6.4.2   Communities around Banks Peninsula have expressed concern with people continuing to camp in restricted areas, and freedom campers leaving behind litter in towns and scenic rural areas.

6.5       Action Required

6.5.1   The Board was briefed by Compliance staff in November and will encourage residents to report breaches of the bylaw to Council.

6.6       Timeframe – Ongoing

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board approved its Banks Peninsula Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 31 July 2017. This Plan, developed by talking with the community, is the Board’s vision for Banks Peninsula’s future.

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/how-the-council-works/elected-members/community-boards/banks-peninsula/

7.2       Progress against the Community Board Plan will be reported quarterly.

7.3       Long Term Plan Matters

The Board identified two of the seven outcomes in our Community Board Plan as the highest priority outcomes for the Long Term Plan.

Modern and robust infrastructureThe Board’s first priority outcome is that a modern and robust infrastructure and community facilities network is provided, well-maintained and future-proofed.

Healthy environmentThe Board’s second priority outcome is that the environment is well-managed, sustained and enhanced.

The Board appreciates the opportunity to continue to work with the Council to advocate for a Long Term Plan that reflects Banks Peninsula communities’ vision and priorities.

 

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Virtual Meetings Would Enable Good Board Decision-Making

Equipping our three Boardrooms in Akaroa, Little River and Lyttelton with virtual meeting capabilities would enable us to be well-supported with good information and advice from staff, which in turn would allow us to make good decisions.

Staff are sometimes unable to attend our meetings in-person due to safety risks in winter or time constraints, for example it can be prohibitive to travel three hours for a 10 minute briefing. Likewise, community members wanting to participate in the process through the public forum or a deputation, cannot always travel to the meeting venue which rotates around the three locations. Enabling citizen participation through technology is also important.

One of the key considerations around the decision to combine the two Banks Peninsula Boards into one Board was to ensure that technology supported a combined Board. We expect to be well-supported regardless of geography, so that we are able to make robust decisions for the good of our communities.

Progress Update

A Skype for Business trial is being implemented to test the capability of this programme for the Peninsula.  It is being trialled for staff based in Little River, Akaroa and Lyttelton Recreation Centre.  Equipment is being installed in the meeting room at the recreation centre to enable team meetings plus for Board agenda meetings.

8.2       Project Lyttelton Granted Community Resilience Partnership Funding

Project Lyttelton was recently granted Community Resilience Partnership funding to run community programmes and workshops and extend its Timebank. These projects aim to improve social connectedness and encourage active participation in community life.

8.3       Community & Board Advocacy Result in Retention of Public Transport Services

The Diamond Harbour Community Association and Board expressed concern with Lyttelton Port Company’s proposal to move one of the bus stops from the Lyttelton wharf, which services the Diamond Harbour ferry, further afield to make room for LPC’s new staff car park.

Following two urgent briefings to the Board, Lyttelton Port Company (LPC) decided to retain both bus stops on the Wharf, meaning there will be no change for people using the 28 bus service to access the ferry. The 535 will pick-up and drop-off people wanting to catch the ferry further afield on Norwich Quay.

The Community Association and Board expected that users of the ferry who are elderly, disabled, have young children or need to drop-off goods should continue to be allowed to drop-off and pick-up people by car from the wharf bus stop. LPC is happy to facilitate access for these people.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Approved By

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

6.        Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1390748

Contact:

Kim Money, Chairperson
Jo Wells

jo.wells@ccc.govt.nz

941 6451

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in November 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Coastal-Burwood Community Board held meetings on 6 and 20 November 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved a new ground lease to New Brighton Silver Band Incorporated for a period of up to 33 years less, broken into three terms of 11 years each pursuant to Section 54 (1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, over approximately 320m2, being part of Rawhiti Domain.

·   The Board appointed a representative to the Customer Advisory Panel being set up by Orion New Zealand Limited. 

·   The Board requested that Automated External Defibrillators within the ward are considered as part of the Community Resilience planning.

·   The Board agreed that Youth Development Fund recipients be encouraged to report back on their event to the Board as a Public Forum presentation.

Funding for Community Projects in the Coastal-Burwood Area:

·   $2,000 towards the Aranui Junior Touch Summer Module.

·   $3,000 towards the Pacific Series 2017 event. The Board requested that staff advice be provided on the eligibility of this application for Metropolitan given the nature of the event.

·   $4,000 towards the 2018 Parklands @ Play event.

·   $6,000 towards the 2018 I Love New Brighton event.

·   $2,900 towards the purchase of an Automated External Defibrillator for the Southshore/ South Brighton area, on the condition that members of the community have 24 hour access to the defibrillator. 

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration.

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

 

5.1       QEII Masterplan

 

In 2018 Council, in collaboration with the community, will begin developing a Masterplan that will help guide the future use of QEII Park.  The Masterplan will cover what can be built in the park and how the park is used.

 

With the project recently initiated, the project team will be preparing an update which will go out to the community in the coming weeks.  Community engagement will begin in the new year.

 

5.2       QEII Recreation and Sport Centre

 

The QEII Recreation and Sports Centre is on budget and on track for completion in mid-2018.  As the centre takes shape, the multiple benefits for the community are already in sight. The structural steel frame and pool hall roof are in place, while the hydroslide tower is due to be installed. The concrete floor slabs and blockwork for the wet changing areas have also been completed.  Work on the learn to swim pool, the 25-metre 10-lane main pool and the hydrotherapy pool is well under way, while the suspended concrete roof slab for the mechanical plant deck has been poured.  Work continues on the 200-space car park and a new entry off Travis Road.  Contractors are also working on the revised Bower Avenue entrance.

 

Image may contain: sky, cloud and outdoor

The QEII Recreation and Sport Centre is on track for completion in mid-2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.   Significant Community Issues

 

6.1       Southshore and South New Brighton Regeneration

 

6.1.1   Southshore and South New Brighton Regeneration Strategy

Regenerate Christchurch is leading the development of a Regeneration Strategy for Southshore and South New Brighton.

The Southshore and South New Brighton Regeneration Strategy is a collaboration between Christchurch City Council and Regenerate Christchurch.

The regeneration strategy will focus on short, medium and long term responses to adapt to the effects of climate change and sea-level rise, alongside the social and economic needs of the community.

Regenerate Christchurch will engage with local communities to address overlapping issues and opportunities. This may range from looking at the future of the residential red zone in Southshore through to partnering with the community to plan how we adapt to new challenges.

 

The Board has been meeting with Regenerate Christchurch on a regular basis to develop an understanding of Regenerate’s project plan.

 

6.1.2   Council's South New Brighton Regeneration Project

This project is looking at earthquake related damage issues for the area of South New Brighton, for the purpose of this study, defined as the area extending west from Estuary Road where it intersects with Jervois Street and Beatty Street.

Over the past few months, Council staff have been pulling together technical information on legacy earthquake-related issues in this area, looking at increased vulnerability to three hazards - flooding (river and coastal), liquefaction and high groundwater.

When the technical work is complete, the extent of vulnerability to the three hazards and likely affected areas can be determined. The three hazard study will be used to develop and clarify the earthquake-related issues to be addressed. A report will then go to the Council outlining feasible options to address the issues.

The Board has requested that they be kept informed of the progress of this project and that they are included in any briefings on the project.

 

6.1.3   Southshore Short Term Floodplain Management

Following construction of the emergency works along parts of the Southshore Estuary during the July 2017 flood, Council are currently preparing a resource consent application to retrospectively consent these works, further stabilisation works and construction of approximately 850m of new bund south of Bridge Street.  A cultural impact assessment (CIA) has been requested by the rūnanga which will be prepared by their nominated writer in early 2018.  Following receipt of the CIA, the consent application is planned to be lodged in April 2018.

Given the urgency of the works and the high public interest, the team is progressing the design in parallel to the consenting process.  Hydraulic modelling which is currently underway, will confirm the necessity or otherwise, for stop logs at the road ends and a swale on the landward side of the bund, to allow any water that accumulates behind the bund to drain. Landscape plans are being developed for the bund through the salt marsh and the new northern bund South of Bridge Street.  The team have been onsite with Parks Rangers to plan the route for the northern bund, to make best use of high ground and minimise impact on existing plantings.  Landscape plans, along with tree removal approvals are expected to be presented to the Community Board in April 2018.

The Community Board have requested consideration of accessibility on and off of the bunds and these are currently being considered by the design team.

While the design is being carried out, Contractors working on behalf of LINZ and with support from Council, have top soiled, grassed and reinstated fencing at the road ends after the emergency works.  Staff are meeting with the Ihutai Trust in December to discuss the planned works.

 

6.2       Roy Stokes Hall, Central New Brighton School Site and other School Sites

6.2.1   Roy Stokes Hall and Central New Brighton School Site

In response to concerns raised by members of the community, the Board agreed to contact Land Information New Zealand to establish if the Crown disposal process of the Central New Brighton School can be suspended to enable the Community:

a.      to consider options for the use of the Roy Stokes Hall and;

b.      to consider options for the use of the balance of the school site.  

The Board has been advised that the Ministry of Education and its agents has agreed to allow time to enable the Council to better understand community wishes and options. The Board is meeting with staff to determine the next steps.

6.2.2   Aranui School

The Board agreed to write to the Ministry of Education to request a meeting to discuss the demolition plans for Aranui School. This was for the purpose of requesting that not all buildings be demolished so as to allow community groups to occupy buildings, noting there is an urgent need for community meeting spaces in the area due to the earthquakes.

6.2.3   Action on School Sites

The Board has requested advice from the Property Unit of how the Community Board can be involved in the number of school sites in the Coastal-Burwood Board area that are subject to a Crown disposal process.  The Board is meeting with the Property Unit to discuss this.

6.3       Combined Coastal-Burwood and Papanui-Innes Community Board Styx River Catchment Working Party

The working party arose out of a two year community conversation and has meet monthly since August 2017. The process has been very successful in strengthening community capacity through providing a means for the community to engage with the Council technical staff. There are currently seven community members on the working party.

The meetings are a mix of discussion around technical advice, research evidence and community concerns and solutions. The meeting culture has evolved into a positive conversation enabling collaborative forward looking strategies to be explored. There has been positive feedback from elected members, staff and community.

The most recent meeting covered continued weed harvesting, targeted dredging, bank works and root removal. An excellent presentation on water level trends and weed harvesting effectiveness generated questions and community ideas. 

This research work has identified interesting water level variations and further planning work is required to fully understand what is happening with the river water systems. This additional understanding of the catchment is required to plan a holistic way forward. In the meantime operational work will continue with targeted bank works, dredging and root removal under the current operational budget.  

The working party is planning to work on the further development of the long term Styx River Vision. The next meeting will hear a presentation update on the current Styx River vision. This will provide a platform for further community involvement.

The operational maintenance work will continue while further background research is undertaken to further understand the river and add to the catchment management plan. The community input will continue and evolve into work to develop further the long term vision for the river. 

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

 

The Board approved the Coastal-Burwood Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 16 October 2017. This Plan, can be found at the following link:

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Community-Boards/Coastal-Burwood-Community-Board-Plan-2017-19.pdf

 

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Styx River Working Party Site Visit 

The purpose of the site visit was to enable members of the Styx River Working party as well as members of the Coastal-Burwood and Papanui-Innes Community Board, and key staff to visit the key locations that have a bearing on the Styx River.  The tour included looking at the Prestons Retention Ponds, Prestons Water measurement, the weed harvesting site, dredging and tree removal site as well as the tide gates. 

 

  

A site tour was held on Monday 27 November 2017 to look at a number of sites in relation to the Styx River.

 

8.2       Coastal-Burwood Residents Association Forum

 

The second Coastal-Burwood Residents Association Forum was held on 28 November 2017 and was well attended by Resident’s Association members from across the ward.   The evening was an opportunity for networking with the Board and other Residents Association members as well as for Residents Associations to share what they are working on and for the Board to provide an overview of the Community Board Plan.  At previous forum held in June 2017, attendees provided feedback to the Board for the development of the Community Board Plan. 

 

The Coastal-Burwood Residents Association Forum was held on 28 November 2017

 

8.3       Coastal-Hazards Drop in Sessions

Four drop in sessions are being held in the Coastal-Burwood Ward during November / December 2017, including in the following locations:

·    Burwood

·    South Brighton

·    Spencerville

·    New Brighton

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Katie MacDonald - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

7.        Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/477096

Contact:

Mike Mora, Chairperson
Gary Watson

gary.watson@ccc.govt.nz

941 8258

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in November 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held meetings on 14 November 2017 and 28 November 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The approval of No Stopping Restrictions on Gallaghan Close, Bibiana Street, Mustang Aveune, Milnebank Street, Rushden Rise and Middlepark Road/Craven Street Roundabout.

·   The approval of four new bus stops within central Wigram (Deal Street, The Runway, Corsair Drive and Keene Street).

·   The approval of a bus stop on Patterson Terrace.

·   An allocation of $1,578 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund towards the Board’s Give Gear Get Great project.

·   A grant of $4,000 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Hei Hei Broomfield Community Development Trust towards Taekwondo equipment.

·   A grant of $300 from the Board’s 2017-18 Youth Development Fund to the Yaldhurst Rangers Unit towards the attendance of Rachel Anderson at the 2018 National Ranger event in Masterton.

·   A grant of $500 from the Board’s 2017-18 Youth Development Fund to Thomas Chao towards attending the British Junior Elite Gymnastics training camp in Essex, England.

·   The approval of removing redundant bus stops on Kirk Road.

·   A grant of $10,000 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Halswell United Football Club towards the upgrading of its floodlights at Halswell Domain.

·   A grant of $2,500 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Seventh Day Adventist Church towards the Be Active Pasifika project. 

·   A grant of $2,000 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Deans Avenue Precinct Society towards the costs of upgrading and updating the Brockworth Walkway murals.

·   A grant of $5,500 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund towards the costs of a Crime Through Prevention Environmental Design report in the general area of Division Street/Riccarton Road.

·   Denton Park – Changes in Reserve Classification and Management Plan:

 

1.      Under section 24(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, that the process to change the classification from 'Recreation Reserve' to 'Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve' in respect of that part of Denton Park being part of Rural Section 41304, as shown outlined in yellow and marked "A" on the plan attached as Attachment A to the staff report from which this resolution emanates, be commenced and that the proposed change be publicly notified in accordance with section 24(2) of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.      Approves the draft Non-Comprehensive Review of the Denton Park Management Plan in the form attached to the report from which this resolution emanates, and;

3.      Directs, pursuant to section 41(9) of the Reserves Act 1977, that public input into the preparation of the draft changes to the Management Plan not be sought under section 41(5) of the Reserves Act 1977.

4.      Approves the release of the draft changes to the Denton Park Management Plan for public consultation in accordance with section 41(6) of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.      Approves that the combined period for public input in relation to 1. and 4. above, commence on 20 January 2018 and conclude on 24 March 2018. 

6.      That in tandem with progressing towards reclassification of 9,766 square metres of Denton Park (as per Attachment A) a fast tracking towards a conclusive answer to the two  additional 24 August 2017 Council resolutions regarding traffic and safety, and sports clubs accommodation, is requested. Note: This is to clarify the interdependencies of the reclassification, the resolutions and the management plan/plans changes.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Halswell Ward – Recently Vested Reserves Through Subdivisions – Namings and Classifications  

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives (e.g. major community or infrastructure projects)

5.1       Central Riccarton

5.1.1   The Board received a memorandum at its meeting on 28 November 2017 responding back on the Board’s recommendations arising from its Division Street Working Party’s investigations to address public safety in the vicinity of the southern bus lounge in central Riccarton.

5.2       Riccarton Road Corridor

5.2.1   The Board will receive a report at its meeting on 12 December 2017 providing an update on the Riccarton Road Corridor project.

6.   Significant Community Issues

Upper Riccarton War Memorial Library

6.1       Status

6.1.1   The Upper Riccarton War Memorial Library building at 372 Riccarton Road has been deemed to be earthquake prone following an engineering assessment.  The Library organisation was provided with an s124 notice on Thursday 26 October, giving notice that for safety reasons the building needed to be closed immediately.

6.1.2   Officers of the Upper Riccarton War Memorial Library were able to remove some items before necessary fencing was installed around the building.  This fencing blocks off access through the alleyway that runs alongside the Library building.

6.1.3   The building owned by the Upper Riccarton War Memorial Library is situated on Christchurch City Council land, for which the organisation has a lease.

6.2       Action

6.2.1   Staff have met with Library trustees and committee members and are providing support in moving forward.

6.2.2   A meeting was scheduled for Saturday 2 December for library members and the community to discuss options for the future running of the Upper Riccarton War Memorial Library.  This has included, but is not limited to, consideration of future options for both the building and the organisation.

6.2.3   As the building is owned by the Upper Riccarton War Memorial Library, it is their decision as to the repair status of the building.

6.2.4   Books, memorabilia and other contents will be placed in storage for the Library pending decisions from the organisation on future directions.

6.3       Timeframe

6.3.1   Rannerdale Veterans Home have offered to be the venue to host the 2018 ANZAC Day dawn service that the library organises.  This would be in addition to the later morning service run by Rannerdale.

 

6.4       Residents’ Associations - Updates

6.4.1   Steadman Road Residents’ Association – this group is becoming active again to have a more collaborative voice on the upcoming Racecourse housing development.

6.4.2   Ilam and Upper Riccarton Residents’ Association - in August 2017, this group based around the University of Canterbury, was on the verge of winding up.  Staff have worked with the organisation to build capacity with two public meetings having been held, including an Annual General Meeting, with over forty people attending each meeting.  A committee of eleven has been voted in and the group are working on promoting awareness of the group and how they can continue to be a voice for their local area.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Reporting of progress against priorities has begun and will be reported back to the Community board on a regular basis.

 

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Templeton Community Day

The Templeton Residents' Association once again organised the annual Templeton Community Day.  Over 800 attendees enjoyed entertainment from local organisations, pony rides, petting zoo, a bouncy castle with a free sausage sizzle and refreshments provided.  A colouring competition which was judged by Board Chairperson Mike Mora and ward Councillor Jimmy Chen proved to be popular.

  

 

8.2       Riccarton Community Street Party

Each year during Neighbourhood Week, the Riccarton Community Church runs a Street Party, closing off a block of Elizabeth Street between Clarence and Division Streets. Hundreds of people enjoyed the sunshine, entertainment and food on offer.  Magician El Gregoe and local young musicians were part of the stage entertainment.  In addition to the free bouncy castle, sausages, candyfloss, fruit, face painting, pony rides and clothing, local community groups provided ethnic food and baking. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.3       The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board granted funding to the University of Canterbury Foundation in June 2017 for the Young Community Builders Programme, where university students work with school students to identify issues, then pitch an idea that will make a difference in their local area.  Six groups of university and school students developed ideas and put them to a panel.  The six ideas, with the first three being the ones selected, were:

·     An anti-bullying programme

·     The painting of a water treatment pump house in Shand Reserve

·     A portable volleyball net that would enable more active participation at Harrington Park

·     A set of portable team building games that could be used in local communities

·     A riding for the disabled awareness event

·     A ‘How to Kit’ for organising community events

Image may contain: outdoor                        

The Shand Reserve water pump house above, was painted on Saturday 11 November 2017.

8.4       The Halswell Heritage Group ran a community evening on 1 November 2017 to seek feedback on priorities for the group and to give some direction for future projects. A number of eligible projects emerged and the group will need to discuss with the Halswell Community Project about working together to implement them as they are the obvious partner.  An oral history project was deemed a priority. 

8.5       The Halswell Residents' Association is actively initiating a memorial to the servicemen who lost their lives in the Wigram Air Crash of 1953.  They are working with the Council staff to get a seat and plaque placed in the vicinity of the crash site and also with other interested parties to raise funds for the project. 

8.6       Crockfords Bridge Club in Riccarton had good numbers attend their final Learners Classes of 2017 with a total of 37 new members registered on the course. The club is happy to report that membership numbers continue to grow as a result of the Strengthening Communities Funding they received from the Community Board to deliver the three courses. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.7       The following community organised 2017 Christmas Carol events are taking place in the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board area:

8.7.1   Carols in the Halswell Quarry, Halswell Quarry, Sunday 3 December, 4.30pm, organised by the Lions Club of Halswell.

8.7.2   Carols by Treelight, Friday 8 December, 6pm at St John of God, organised by St John of God Hauora Trust.

8.7.3   Carols @ Westlake, Saturday 9 December, 5pm Westlake Reserve, organised by South Christchurch Christian Community Trust.

8.7.4   Carols at Riccarton Bush, Sunday 10 December, 6.30pm, Riccarton House and Bush by the Scout Den, organised by the Riccarton-Spreydon Anglican Parish

8.7.5   Carols in Harrington, Harrington Park, Peverel Street, Tuesday 12 December, 7pm, organised by Riccarton Baptist Church (80 Rattray Street if wet).

8.7.6   126 On the Corner Community Carol Service, Friday 15 December, 5.45pm, 126 Hei Hei Road, organised by Hei Hei Broomfield Community Development Trust.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Gary Watson - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Peter Dow - Community Board Advisor

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Noela Letufuga - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 28 November 2017

 

8.        Halswell Ward- Recently Vested Reserves Through Subdivisions - Namings and Classifications

Reference:

17/1421585

Contact:

Sarah Blows

sarah.blows@ccc.govt.nz

941 8714

 

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend to the Council to:

1.         Approve the proposed reserve names as listed below:

Proposed Name

Legal Description

Reserve Classification

 

Birchgate Subdivision – Halswell Junction Road

Alvaston Drainage Reserve

Lot 18 DP 453973

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 19 DP 79892

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 21 DP 79892

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

 

 

Owaka Road

Owaka Reserve 1

Lot 1 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 2 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 3 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Owaka Reserve 2

Lot 1 DP 447519

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 2 DP 447519

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Wilmers-Owaka Drainage Corridor

Lot 1 DP 424965

Fee Simple

 

Fletcher Living Subdivision Section 7

Kōpiko Reserve

Lot 402 DP500883

Recreation Reserve

Lot 405 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 406 DP500883

Recreation Reserve

Lot 403 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 404 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Knights Stream – Fulton Hogan Subdivision

Opouria Reserve

Lot 992 DP 506967

Recreation Reserve

Lot 920 DP 479877

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Horoeka Reserve

Lot 1051 DP 496148

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 1050 DP 496148

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Flagstaff Drainage Reserve

Lot 986 DP 492237

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Awatea Park

Kānuka Drainage Reserve

Lot 123  DP 500899

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 125 DP 500899

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Kānuka Reserve

Lot 122  DP 500899

Recreation Reserve

Lot 124  DP 500899

Recreation Reserve

 

Maugers Mining Limited Subdivision

Akeake Reserve

Lot 35 RMA/2015/2333

Recreation Reserve

Lot 36  RMA/2015/2333

Recreation Reserve

Akeake Drainage Reserve

Lot 39  RMA/2015/2333

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 38

RMA/2015/2333

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Wigram Estates Limited Stage 2

Upper Heathcote True Left Esplanade Reserve

Lot 64 DP 489410

Local Purpose (Esplanade) Reserve

Lot 70 DP 489410

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

 

2.         Approve the proposed classification of the reserves in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 section 16(2A), as specified above in clause 1.

 

2.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council to:

1.         Approve the proposed reserve names as listed below with the amendments underlined below:

Proposed Name

Legal Description

Reserve Classification

 

Birchgate Subdivision – Halswell Junction Road

Birchgate Alvaston Drainage Reserve

Lot 18 DP 453973

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 19 DP 79892

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 21 DP 79892

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

 

 

Owaka Road

Owaka Reserve 1

Lot 1 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 2 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 3 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Owaka Reserve 2

Lot 1 DP 447519

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 2 DP 447519

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Wilmers-Owaka Drainage Corridor

Lot 1 DP 424965

Fee Simple

 

Fletcher Living Subdivision Section 7

Kōpiko Reserve

Lot 402 DP500883

Recreation Reserve

Lot 405 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 406 DP500883

Recreation Reserve

Lot 403 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 404 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Knights Stream – Fulton Hogan Subdivision

Opouria Reserve

 

Board Note: That this proposal lie on the table pending the formal naming of the nearby new primary school.

Lot 992 DP 506967

Recreation Reserve

Lot 920 DP 479877

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Horoeka Reserve

Lot 1051 DP 496148

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 1050 DP 496148

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Flagstaff Drainage Reserve

Lot 986 DP 492237

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Awatea Park

Kānuka Drainage Reserve

Lot 123  DP 500899

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 125 DP 500899

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Kānuka Reserve

Lot 122  DP 500899

Recreation Reserve

Lot 124  DP 500899

Recreation Reserve

 

Maugers Mining Limited Subdivision

Akeake Reserve

Lot 35 RMA/2015/2333

Recreation Reserve

Lot 36  RMA/2015/2333

Recreation Reserve

Akeake Drainage Reserve

Lot 39  RMA/2015/2333

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 38

RMA/2015/2333

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Wigram Estates Limited Stage 2

Upper Heathcote True Left Esplanade Reserve

Lot 64 DP 489410

Local Purpose (Esplanade) Reserve

Lot 70 DP 489410

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

 

2.         Approve the proposed classification of the reserves in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 section 16(2A), as specified above in clause 1.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Halswell Ward- Recently Vested Reserves Through Subdivisions - Namings and Classifications

31

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Halswell Ward - Proposed Reserve Names and Classifications

38

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

Halswell Ward- Recently Vested Reserves Through Subdivisions - Namings and Classifications

Reference:

17/881278

Contact:

Sarah Blows

sarah.blows@ccc.govt.nz

941 8714

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to:

a.         Recommend to the Council to approve the proposed reserve names as listed in Attachment A, and;

b.         Recommend to the Council to approve the proposed classification of the reserves in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, section 16(2A), specified in Attachment A.

1.2       The Council Policy Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities, outlines the procedure for the naming of reserves, which is for the proposed reserve names to be referred to the Community Board in the first instance and then to the Council for adoption.

1.3       Under section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, any land vested with the Council can declare that land to be a reserve providing it has been given a classification through a Council resolution.

Origin of Report

1.4       This report has been generated by Council staff to ensure the naming and classification of reserves follows the Council Policy Register.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the significant matrix.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend to the Council to:

1.         Approve the proposed reserve names as listed below:

Proposed Name

Legal Description

Reserve Classification

 

Birchgate Subdivision – Halswell Junction Road

Alvaston Drainage Reserve

Lot 18 DP 453973

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 19 DP 79892

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 21 DP 79892

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

 

 

Owaka Road

Owaka Reserve 1

Lot 1 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 2 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 3 DP 475076

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Owaka Reserve 2

Lot 1 DP 447519

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Lot 2 DP 447519

Local Purpose (Access) Reserve

Wilmers-Owaka Drainage Corridor

Lot 1 DP 424965

Fee Simple

 

Fletcher Living Subdivision Section 7

Kōpiko Reserve

Lot 402 DP500883

Recreation Reserve

Lot 405 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 406 DP500883

Recreation Reserve

Lot 403 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 404 DP500883

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Knights Stream – Fulton Hogan Subdivision

Opouria Reserve

Lot 992 DP 506967

Recreation Reserve

Lot 920 DP 479877

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Horoeka Reserve

Lot 1051 DP 496148

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 1050 DP 496148

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Flagstaff Drainage Reserve

Lot 986 DP 492237

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Awatea Park

Kānuka Drainage Reserve

Lot 123  DP 500899

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 125 DP 500899

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Kānuka Reserve

Lot 122  DP 500899

Recreation Reserve

Lot 124  DP 500899

Recreation Reserve

 

Maugers Mining Limited Subdivision

Akeake Reserve

Lot 35 RMA/2015/2333

Recreation Reserve

Lot 36  RMA/2015/2333

Recreation Reserve

Akeake Drainage Reserve

Lot 39  RMA/2015/2333

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

Lot 38

RMA/2015/2333

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

Wigram Estates Limited Stage 2

Upper Heathcote True Left Esplanade Reserve

Lot 64 DP 489410

Local Purpose (Esplanade) Reserve

Lot 70 DP 489410

Local Purpose (Utility) Reserve

 

 

2.         Approve the proposed classification of the reserves in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 section 16(2A), as specified above in clause 1.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Neighbourhood Parks

·     Level of Service: 6.0.1 Neighbourhood Parks are maintained to specifications so parks are clean,  tidy, safe and functional

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Proposed Reserve Names and Classifications are recommended to the Council (preferred).

·     Option 2 - The reserves are not named or classified.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The reserve has an official name that can be used in locating and promoting the reserve.

·     The reserve can be entered into the Council’s database enabling it to be given a park identifier and added to a maintenance contract.

·     The classification of the reserve confirms the vested purpose and use of the reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     There are no disadvantages identified.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       A number of new reserves have been vested in the Christchurch City Council as part of subdivision developments in the Halswell Ward. The Council Policy Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities, states that all reserves vested in or under the control of the Council shall be given an appropriate name. New reserves are required to be allocated a name before they can be entered into the Council's maintenance contracts.

5.2       Under the Reserves Act 1977, section 16 (2A), any land that has been vested with the Council can be declared a reserve providing it has been given a classification through a Council resolution. The classification of the reserve will provide the basis as to how the reserve should be managed and administered, for example, a recreation reserve compared to a drainage reserve.


 

6.   Option 1 - Proposed Reserve Names and Classifications are Recommended to the Council (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The proposed names are for reserves that have been vested with the Council at the time of the development of the subdivision. The classification of the reserve through a Council resolution complies with the Reserves Act for providing the basis of how the reserve is managed and administered.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       Mana Whenua were consulted on the proposed reserves names and the recommended names have been incorporated in Attachment A.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       The reserve land has been vested in the Council at the time of the development of the subdivision. The naming of the reserves usually commences before the land titles have been issued both for the proposed reserve and any adjoining prospective residential land owners, which has meant it has not been possible to consult with adjoining residents, neighbourhood or residential groups.

6.5       The location of the reserve and often the draft landscape plans with the subdivision's proposed reserve name (originated by the developer) are available to prospective property buyers.

6.6       The naming of reserves in subdivisions follows a similar process to the Community Board consideration of appropriating names for public roads within a subdivision.

6.7       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation - There are no direct financial implications associated with the allocation of reserve names or the classification of a reserve, which are administrative processes undertaken as an operational expense.

6.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - There is a requirement for reserves to be named before they can be entered into the Council’s database and allocated to a maintenance contract.

6.10    Funding source - Not applicable

Legal Implications

6.11    There are no negative legal implications to the naming and classification of the Council land as a reserve. The land has already been vested under the Reserves Act 1977 as a reserve. The classification of the land endorses the purpose the land was acquired in accordance with section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977. The naming of the reserve complies with the Council Policy Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities.

Risks and Mitigations

6.12    There are minimal, if any risks as the name of the reserves complies with the Council Policy Register: Naming of Reserves and Facilities.

Implementation

6.13    Implementation dependencies - no known dependencies.

6.14    Implementation timeframe - approximately one month after the names have been approved by Council.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The reserve has an official name that can be used in locating and promoting the reserve.

·   The reserve can be entered into the Council’s database enabling it to be given a park identifier and added to a maintenance contract.

·   The classification of the reserve confirms the vested purpose and use of the reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

6.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   There are no disadvantages.

7.   Option 2 - the Reserves Are Not Named or Classified

Option Description

7.1       The Community Board may determine they will not name the parks or recommend to the Council the classification of the reserves.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       The community are specifically affected by this option as there would be no maintenance of the parks carried out under the negotiated contract rates. Maintenance of the parks would be at a higher financial cost to the community and ratepayers than if the park was part of a maintenance contract. The parks would not be able to be entered in the Council SAP system and could therefore not be given a park identifier or entered into the parks maintenance contract.

7.5       The community views are for the parks to be maintained and at a reasonable financial rate.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

7.6.1   Inconsistency - the Council's Level of Service is to maintain Council parks to the specified standard.

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - the parks would not be able to be entered into SAP and could not therefore be added to the parks maintenance contract.

7.6.3   Amendment necessary - to name the parks to enable them to be entered into SAP, given a park identifier and added to the parks maintenance contract.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation - If the reserves cannot be maintained under the parks maintenance contact the Council is charged a much higher rate for them to be maintained as a one-off activity.

7.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - the Council is charged a much higher rate to maintain reserves if they are not included in the Council's negotiated parks maintenance contracts.

7.9       Funding source – parks operational budget.

Legal Implications

7.10    The Council is obliged to maintain the Council reserves in accordance with the Levels of Service, notified to the public through the Long Term Plan (LTP) process as required by the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    To not name the reserves is high risk as the reserves cannot be maintained under the parks maintenance contracts and if they are not maintained to the specified Levels of Service, there could be a conflict with the Council’s LTP and the LGA. Or the parks are maintained to the specified Levels of Service but the Council is charged a higher rate to maintain the parks as they are not part of the negotiated parks maintenance contract.

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies - no known dependences.

7.13    Implementation timeframe – not applicable if reserve names not approved.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   There are no advantages for not naming the reserves.

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The reserves cannot be entered into the Council’s database, provided with a park identifier.

·   The reserves cannot be added to the parks maintenance contract.

·   The maintenance of the reserves would be charged at a higher rate.

·   If the reserves are not maintained, they would not comply with the Levels of Service, LTP or LGA.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Halswell Ward - Proposed Reserve Names and Classifications

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Sarah Blows - Student Monitoring & Research

Approved By

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

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Council

07 December 2017

 

 

9.        Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1345944

Contact:

Matt McLintock
David Cartwright, Chairperson

matt.mclintock@ccc.govt.nz

941 6231

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held meetings on 13 and 27 November 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·        Bishopdale Park - Application for Court Lighting by Bishopdale Tennis Club - The Board recommended that the Head of Parks approve the application by the Bishopdale Tennis Club Incorporated to install fourteen new lighting poles on Bishopdale Park subject to a number stipulated requirements.

·        Ōrauwhata Bishopdale Library - Parking Restrictions - The Board approved the installation of P10 90 degree angel parking restrictions and 90 degree P60 Mobility Parking restrictions outside the Bishopdale Library.

·        Proposed Road names - Highsted on Tulett Park - The Board approved Walter Case Drive, Kinnerton Lane, Seville Lane and Eleanor Place as road names in the Highsted on Tulett Park subdivision at 135 Claridges Road, also asking that the Developers consider placing plaques at both ends of Walter Case Drive stating the history and why the road was so named.

·        Gardiners Road Pedestrian Safety Initiative - The Board approved the  installation of a central pedestrian refuge island on Gardiners Road near the intersection with Fairford Street and the removal of a ribbonwood tree outside 53 Gardiners Road to allow for the construction of the pedestrian refuge crossing.

·        Cavendish Road Improvements - The Board resolve to install a central pedestrian refuge on Cavendish Road near the intersection with Barnes Road, along with a new parking bay and a new bus stop.

·        Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund - The Board approved a total of $8,749 from its 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to three community groups towards a variety of projects and events.

·        Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017-18 Youth Development Fund - The Board approved a total of $1,050 from its 2017-18 Youth Development Fund to assist  six young people attend various events.

·        Staff Briefings - The Board heard from the Libraries and Information Unit regarding the recent Bishopdale Documentary Project which opened on 28 November at the Ōrauwhata Bishopdale Library.

·        Public Forum - The Board heard from a local resident in relation to the process around the recent Alcohol License Hearing for the 2D Trafford Street Alcohol License application.

·        Correspondence - The Board received correspondence from the following:

-      The Christchurch City Council - in response to the Board’s submissions on the Proposed Amendments to the General Bylaw 2008, the Proposed Marine, River and Lake Facilities Bylaw 2017, Stock on Roads Bylaw 2017 and the Traffic  and Parking Bylaw 2017.

-      Glandovey Idris Straven Residents Association Incorporated - introducing the new association and outlining their objectives.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

·        Breens Road - 40 Kilometres per hour Variable Speed Limit.

 

5.   Significant Community Issues

5.1       Traffic Issues

Traffic issues are an ongoing issue in the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board area. It is hoped that the recent opening of the new Memorial Gateway Bridge will relieve some issues including heavy traffic using residential streets.  There is concern, however, that the Cranford Street upgrade will have a negative impact on the traffic flow through Fendalton.

On Monday, 27 November 2017 Board members and Council staff met informally with representatives from the local community to discuss issues relating to traffic in the Glandovey/Idris/Straven Road area.

 

6.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

5.1       The Christchurch Documentary Project:  Bishopdale 2017

The Christchurch Documentary Project: Bishopdale, 2017 exhibition opening was held on Tuesday, 28 November 2017 in Ōrauwhata: Bishopdale Library and Community Centre and will be in place until 22 December 2017.

The Christchurch Documentary Project is a five year project that will provide a snap shot of a different community in the Christchurch area on each of those years.  Halswell was the focus of last year’s project and in 2018 the focus will be on the central city and the people living there, with the southern side of the city the focus of the following year.

Five interns from the University of Canterbury were selected for the Bishopdale 2017 project, all of them in their third year of study.  The Brief was to provide a well-rounded snap shot of the Bishopdale community.

Contact was made with local groups and residents and the interns were invited to events and into people’s homes and over 400 images have been received for Bishopdale 2017, with over 1,000 images received to date, across the city.

 

5.2       Jellie Park Repair work

Repair work at Jellie Park is scheduled to begin on 11 December 2017.  Some contractors will be on site in the lead up to the works starting to prepare the contractor compound and do some investigative works.

There will also be a contractors’ site compound on the front lawn at Jellie Park, in the area of the temporary carpark.  This will be used for the contractors over the next year or so to support the works and will not be available for car parking or public use during this time.

5.3       Celebrate Bishopdale 2017

A great day for the community of Bishopdale.  The Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board's annual Celebrate Bishopdale event was extremely popular over the Sunday of Show Weekend, attracting about 2,000 people and involvement from over 55 organisations.

Community Recreation at its best as the sun was shining and there was delicious food, colourful performances and exciting free activities on offer for the kids.  Local groups and organisations had a great opportunity to fundraise and promote their services and the local sports clubs hopefully signed up some budding footballers and baseball players!

Feedback from the public and groups involved have all indicated they will be back again to support the event in 2018 and it is such a valuable day for the people in Bishopdale.

 

       

 

5.4       Burnside Park Barbeque

The Burnside Park Barbeque, donated by the Riccarton Lions Club, was officially opened on Friday 24 November 2017 by the Board’s Deputy Chairperson and the President of the Riccarton Lions Club.  Members from the local community, along with Lions Club representatives, joined Board members and Council staff in a Board hosted barbeque at 5pm.

The barbeque installation is another example of the Board, Council staff and community groups working together to achieve something for the local area. 

                            

 

         5.5       The Elmwood Club Promotional Video

With support from the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board, The Elmwood Club have produced a promotional video to support the development of their Sports Hub Development project. 

         5.6       Christmas Events

                      The following community organised 2017 Christmas Carol events are taking place in the                           Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board area:

5.5.1   Community Carols @ The Park, Crosbie Park, Sunday 17 December 2018 from 5.30pm until 8pm.   This local community event is organised by volunteers from the five local churches in the Board area.  This small scale event is in its second year and aims to attract the local community to come along for a picnic and carol singing.  There will be a band on stage and this year the event will feature Elgregoe, a well-known Christchurch magician and entertainer.

                      5.5.2   Merivale Precinct Society Christmas Carols, normally held in the second week of December at the Merivale Reserve in Rugby Street.  Carols involve people of all ages and provide an opportunity for local residents to meeting for an informal evening where they can mix with others from their community.  Residents from a wide range of cultures attend the event.  The evening includes a band, magician, pony rides, photo booth and food stalls.  The evening begins with a barbecue and there is plenty of entertainment for the children. Up to 300 residents are expected to attend the event.

                                   Other activities undertaken by the society during the year include a clean-up of the Village Green and they also assist with plantings and flower baskets around the Merivale Mall.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Kay Rabe - Governance Support Officer

Margaret Henderson - Committee Advisor

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Maryanne Lomax - Community Development Advisor

Lisa Gregory - Community Recreation Advisor

Bronwyn Frost - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board  – 13 November 2017

 

10.    Breens Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit

Reference:

17/1355391

Contact:

Wayne Anisy

wayne.anisy@ccc.govt.nz

941 8346

 

 

 

 

 

1.   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change.)

That the Council:

1.         Approve the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour Variable Speed Limit on Breens Road and Bonita Place (school zone), Land Transport Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2017, and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit
(40 kilometres per hour School Speed zone) apply on:

a.         Breens Road, commencing at a point 144 metres south-west of its intersection with Lochmore Street and extending in a south-westerly direction for a distance of
265 metres.

b.         Bonita Place from its intersection with Breens Road to the end of Bonita Place, in accordance with Attachment A of the staff report.

3.         Approve that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 and 2 above, the above mentioned variable speed limit shall come into force on completion of infrastructure installation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Breens Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit

52

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Ward - Breens Intermediate School Speed Zone - Breens Road - Plan tg132048

57

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

Breens Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit

Reference:

17/978698

Contact:

Wayne Anisy

wayne.anisy@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board to consider the installation of a new Variable Speed Limit (40 kilometres per hour) on Breens Road and Bonita Place opposite Breens Intermediate as shown on Attachment A, and make a recommendation to the Council for approval and its inclusion in the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated, in response to community requests and this site being a top priority on the Council’s approved school zone implementation priority list.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option. The decision is easily reversible.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approves the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour Variable Speed Limit on Breens Road and Bonita Place (school zone), Land Transport Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2017, and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approves that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed zone) apply on:

a.         Breens Road, commencing at a point 144 metres south-west of its intersection with Lochmore Street and extending in a south-westerly direction for a distance of 265 metres.

b.         Bonita Place from its intersection with Breens Road to the end of Bonita Place, in accordance with Attachment A.

3.         Approves that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 and 2 above,  the above mentioned variable speed limit shall come into force on completion of infrastructure installation.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users - minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install 40km/h variable speed limit (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Likely reduction in operational speed, therefore improving the safety in the area during the school hours.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increased amount of signage on the traffic route.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Traffic Operation team have an ongoing programme of installing 40km/h variable speed limits outside schools. The signs operate for short periods before and after school, and aim to reduce vehicle speeds at times when on-road school related activity is high - making it safer for school children to cross busy roads near their school.

5.2       Potential sites must meet a specified criteria set by NZTA and are prioritised using  a methodology process endorsed by Council on 25 August 2011 as the most appropriate method of improving road safety outside certain schools, where no other traffic control device(s) are practical or feasible.

5.3       A 40km/h variable speed limit on Breens Road outside Breens Intermediate ranks as a priority for implementation in the 2017/2018 financial year.

5.4       The proposed 40km/h variable speed limit meets the warrant and control method criteria specified by NZTA.

5.5       Breens Road is classified a collector route with an average weekday traffic volume of around 3000 vehicles and an 85th percentile speed of 55.8km/h.

5.6       As shown on Attachment A variable signs are located on Breens Road, with static ‘School Zone Ends’ signs on the opposite side of the road. Bonita Place has also been included in the variable school zone as it is a short cul-de-sac with low speeds.


 

6.   Option 1 – Install a 40km/h Variable Speed Limit School Zone on Breens Road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install the 40km/h Variable Speed Limit School Zone on Breens Road and Bonita Place as shown on Attachment A.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Key Stakeholder Engagement was carried out with the NZTA, NZ Police and Breens Intermediate. The NZ Police, NZTA and Breens Intermediate have provided written support for the proposal.

6.6       On Tuesday 3 October 2017, an information leaflet was delivered to all properties along Breens Road between Charnwood Crescent and Isleworth Road which included a plan of where the new signage was to be located and contact details should any residents have any concerns regarding this proposal.

6.7       There was one comment received about the close location of the northern variable speed sign to the Bishopdale Community Preschool.  This preschool is located at the north-east corner of the school site and it has its own vehicular entrance and car park.  The proposed variable school sign is located approximately 20 metres north of the car park entrance.

6.8       The proposed variable school speed zone only operates between the hours of 8:20-8:50am and 2:55-3:15pm on school days only.  The preschool operates from 7.30am to 5:00pm and operates over the school holidays.  The variable school speed zones can only legally operate at these times and are solely designed for operating outside of schools rather than preschools.  Therefore it is not proposed to shift the location of the northern variable speed sign.

6.9       Bonita Place was included in the school speed zone after consultation.  It is a short cul-de-sac with low speeds and when included in the school speed zone there is no need for the large static signs on Bonita Place.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.10    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.11    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $40,000 to supply, install and commission signs.

6.12    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - covered under the area maintenance contract.

6.13    Funding source - School Speed Zone Signs budget.

Legal Implications

6.14    Speed limits must be set in accordance with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 and subsequent amendments. 

6.15    Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010 provides Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.16    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits. 

6.17    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284).

Risks and Mitigations    

6.18    None identified.

Implementation

6.19    Implementation dependencies - dependent on endorsement by the Community Board and approval by Council to legalise school speed zone.

6.20    Implementation timeframe - Installed by March 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.21    The advantages of this option include:

·     Likely reduction in operational speed, therefore improving the safety in the area during the school hours.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

6.22    The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increased amount of signage on the traffic route.

7.   Option 2 – Do nothing

Option Description

7.1       Do nothing.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       This option was not consulted on.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.6.1   Inconsistency - it does not address the concerns raised by the school and community.

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - it does not offer any protections to vulnerable road users.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation - $0.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Not applicable.

7.9       Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.10    Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.11    The risk of an accident and the severity of it is increased with this option.

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.13    Implementation timeframe – Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·     No additional cost to Council.

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·     It does not address the safety concerns of the school and that of the community.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Ward - Breens Intermediate School Speed Zone - Breens Road - Plan tg132048

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Anisy - Traffic Engineer

Penny Gray - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

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Council

07 December 2017

 

 

11.    Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1379368

Contact:

Ali Jones, Chairperson
Christine Lane

christine.lane@ccc.govt.nz

941 5408

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in November 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Papanui-Innes Community Board held meetings on 10 and 24 November 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved the revoking of all parking restrictions on the south-east side of Paparoa Street 15m in a north-easterly direction from the intersection with Papanui Road. The Board also approved the no stopping of vehicles on the south-east side of Paparoa Street for a distance of 21m in a north-easterly direction from the intersection with Papanui Road. This is to avoid the conflict between motorists travelling along Paparoa Street and the cars currently parking on the south-east side of the street.

·   The Board agreed to submit a project to build a skate park in the Papanui Ward for consideration in the Long Term Plan and asked for additional youth facilities to be included in the consultation process. Staff have identified a number of sites within the Papanui Ward that could be suitable for a skate park installation as a result of a requests from young people involved in the Te Ora Hou Otautahi Inc. programme.

·   Approved the removal of a small woodlot of approximately 55 pine and eucalyptus trees to enable the completion of the restoration planting on the Styx River Reserve No. 2 at 303 Radcliffe Road. The site currently contains 8ha of native forest planting plus a series of naturalised water bodies and is bordered by the Styx River and the Ka Putahi/Kaputone Creek and is a site of Ecological Significance in the Christchurch District Plan.

·   The Board approved the acceptance of the generous gift by the Lions Club International Foundation of the building currently located at 1049 Colombo Street, St Albans for relocation to MacFarlane Park for the use of the community. The building is currently being used as the St Albans Transitional Community Centre and was provided by the Lions Club International Foundation following the demolition of the previous St Albans Community Centre as a result of the 2011 earthquake. The building needs to be removed to make way for the construction of the new St Albans community facility.

·   The Board agreed to support in principle the native forest regeneration of the Papanui Bush in the Bridgestone Reserve. Staff have been requested to provide a feasibility study in order to progress this project.

·   The Board agreed to support with a letter the request by Age Concern to reinstate the bus route through Grants Road to the city and also support Age Concern at any deputation they may make to the Greater Christchurch Public Transport Joint Committee. This has been requested by the residents of the Ngaio Marsh Retirement Village who now have to walk some 650m to the nearest bus stop.

·   The Board approved the landscape plan for MacFarlane Park Community Centre to be located at 17 Acheson Avenue, Mairehau. The building is currently located at 1049 Colombo Street, St Albans and has been gifted to the Council by the Lions Club International Foundation. The building is to be located near the playground on the corner of Acheson Avenue and Skipton Street.

 

The proposed building, decks and paths go across an area of existing playground equipment (swing set and rocking horse). This play equipment will be removed and a new rocking horse and swing set will be installed beside the existing modular play equipment.

·   Grants approved included:

$450 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to Kirah Wilems to compete in the Australian National and World 420 Sailing Championships in Perth.

$400 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to Violette Perry to compete in the Australian All Schools Games.

$300 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to William Tait, Luisa Dewar and Christobel Hovens to attend the Staveley Scout Adventure Camp.

$450 from the Positive Youth Development Fund to Owen Dabkowski to attend the Gold Coast Summer Classic U14 Baseball Tournament in Australia.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Acceptance of gift of building

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of Acceptance of gift of building will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 7 December 2017.

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

5.1       Community Engagement re Christchurch Northern Corridor (CNC) Project

At their 10 December meeting the Board asked for information on the ways that residents of Cranford Street between Main North Road and Innes Road are being kept informed on the progress of the CNC project. The CNC Alliance Community and Stakeholder Engagement Manager has provided information on the process which has been circulated to the Board.

5.2       St Albans School Warning Signs

Status:  St Albans School has identified traffic issues on Cranford Street with motorists not recognising children are present. The School is on the Council list for school warning signs and these should be funded and installed in the 2018/19 financial year.

Action:  Staff could be requested to aim for the installation of these signs early in the new financial year (starting July 2018) given the urgency of the concerns with traffic and pending the opening of the Northern Arterial road.

Timeframe: Ongoing.

5.3       Request to Monitor Air Quality on Cranford Street

Concern has been expressed to the Board regarding the air quality along the southern section of Cranford Street between Innes Road and Bealey Avenue after the Northern Arterial becomes operational.

Action: A resident of Cranford Street has asked that the Board consider making a request to Environment Canterbury that the air quality along this area of Cranford Street be monitored to establish base data to measure any differences with change in usage. Similar air quality monitoring data is available from Environment Canterbury for Cranford Street from Innes Road to the Main North Road.

5.4       Redwood Plunket Rooms

Staff met with the Northcote Community Worker and Belfast Community Network on site on 21 November to discuss the refurbishment of the building for community use.

5.5       280 Westminster Street

The Community Governance team are following up on where the proposal is at for the organisations that came to the Community Board and expressed an interest in the use of these premises.

5.6       St Albans Park and Pavilion Fields

A detailed design for the drainage of the sports field (including the playground) and the irrigation system has been completed and the final design approved by the sponsor. The project tender closed on 22 November. Turf may be sprayed off in December and physical works may start in January/February 2018.

The Pavilion/Toilet rebuild demolition works have been completed and the resource consents needed for the pavilion rebuild have been granted. Details for any potential savings are being considered as part of the budget process before the project goes to tender at the end of November. Construction is programmed for January/February 2018. Project information signs are planned for the fencing that will surround the build site.

Both projects are planned to be completed in June 2018 subject to weather.


 

6.   Significant Community Issues

6.1       Light Party – Neighbourhood Trust

On 31 October two light parties were held by The Neighbourhood Trust and Shirley Community Trust respectively. Over 900 people attended the event at the Neighbourhood Trust which provided a wide range of activities for all ages and featured a magnificent “garden of Eden” canopy of ferns and birdsong.

 

 

6.2       Light Party – Shirley Community Trust

The event, run by Shirley Community Trust, although smaller in scale with approximately 300 attendees was marked by the novel and colourful costumes of the local children. The event was held at the Emmett Street Community Church which partnered with Shirley Community Trust to deliver the event. Council staff were present at both events.

 

 

6.3       Copy of Gala Day A4 copyGala Day – Community Focus Trust

Staff attended the Community Focus Trust, Gala day on Saturday 4 November. The event was well attended. Numerous activities, with a focus on children were provided plus a large selection of stalls, providing food, coffee and give away prizes were available.

 


 

6.4       SHINE in Shirley Event – Shirley Community Trust

The annual SHINE event run by the Shirley Community Trust was held on Saturday 4 November.  Approximately 800-900 attended this year. Trust staff, community volunteers and council staff worked hard to support a wonderful event.

 

6.5       Papanui Youth Development (PYD)

Papanui Youth Development are looking at the possibility of developing a Civil Defence Plan around the Papanui area in partnership with other local organisations.

 

6.6       Northcote Community Event – ‘Cause we Care’

The ‘Cause we Care’ event was held at Northcote School on 27 October. The event was a great success and the Northcote Community came out and celebrated the afternoon. There were performances from both the Northcote School and the Casebrook Intermediate Kapa Haka groups and lots of local talent took to the stage. The event was a collaborative approach between the local agencies that support the Northcote work and this event showcased this collaboration well to the local community.

6.7       Papanui Innes Leadership Day 2017

Good in This Hood FinalThe Papanui-Innes Leadership Day 2017 was a great success and the Community Governance Team received fantastic feedback on all elements of the day. The theme was “We’re all good in our Hood” and the keynote speakers, Denis Pyatt and Lyn Campbell QSM, were inspiring.

“Thanks very, very much for the wonderful day you have shared with us and our colleagues. It nourished our wellbeing (e.g. beautiful food, lovely people, inspiring speakers and an entertaining MC and great hosts). Most importantly it gave us a time to stop and reflect on our leadership. Maraming salamat to you all and for the Papanui-Innes Community Board for investing in people.”
Rhodora Sagles (Birthright)

 

“Just want to say a massive thank you for today - so good to get to be with other likeminded people. I really enjoyed Mr Pyatt’s talk, it was incredibly insightful and inspiring. Thanks for the gift - I thought there were so many others that were equally as deserving - but it was a lovely encouragement. You all do such an amazing job, and it’s very cool to be in your hood.”

Kim Button (Neighbourhood Trust)

 

“I just want to express my appreciation of this marvellous occasion. It was so nice to be treated like kings and queens last Thursday! The quiz, prizes, coffee, gifts and massages as well, of course, as the various speakers, made it such an affirming and relaxing day for us all. A great choice of MC also! Our work can be quite demanding and stressful, and this event reminds us again how important our work is. It was also wonderful to see so many of our fellow practitioners all together. Thank you again for putting on such a refreshing and inspiring day, and your support continues to be so valued by our organisation.”

Tony McCahon (Manager of Community Development Services)

 

“I know you are the team who put so much work into making Leadership Day so successful.  It had lots of variety, time to catch up and network, great catering and an ease about it that helped us relax. You did a great job and our team really valued what they learned and being able to meet with others doing some similar things to them.”

Ginny Larsen, (Neighbourhood Trust)

 

“Just wanted to say thank you so much for the Leadership Day - please also pass on out thanks to to your staff and everyone else involved. The value of this day to us is immeasurable - we get to connect with others working in the sector, hear some great speakers and it's also a great way to reward staff who work hard all year. Thanks again.”

Di Harwood (Manager, Tenants Protection Assn)

 

7.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest

7.1       Main North Road Bus Priority Changes between Harewood Road and Sawyers Arms Road

7.2       Monitoring of air quality on Cranford Street between Innes Road and Bealey Avenue to give a baseline reading.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

Judith Pascoe - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Papanui-Innes Community Board  – 24 November 2017

 

12.    Acceptance of gift of building

Reference:

17/1424813

Contact:

Dan Egerton

dan.egerton@ccc.govt.nz

941 8477

 

 

 

 

1.  Papanui-Innes Community Board Consideration

 

The Board noted the attendance of Mr Digby Prosser, representing Lions, at this meeting. The Chai and the Board asked Mr Prosser to convey their thanks to the Lions Club International for their generous gift of the building intended to be relocated to MacFarlane Park for the use of that community. The Board also thanked Mr Prosser for his personal support of this project.

 

2.  Papanui-Innes Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

The Papanui-Innes Community Board resolved to recommend That the Council pass the following resolutions:

1.         The Council thank the Lions Club International Foundation for their generous offer and accept the gift (i.e. for no consideration) of the building currently located at 1049 Colombo Street, St Albans which is currently being used as the St Albans Transitional Community Centre.

2.         That the Property Consultancy Manger is granted delegated authority to negotiate and determine at his sole discretion all arrangements necessary to give effect to the gifting and transferring as generally outlined in this report, or other location and purpose as determined as per clause 3 of this resolution below.

3.         The first and preferred outcome is to relocate the building to MacFarlane Park as set out in this report, however if this cannot be achieved then the Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnership will work with the Community Board to determine an alternative future location and use.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Acceptance of gift of building

68

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A

77

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

Acceptance of gift of building

Reference:

17/680969

Contact:

Dan Egerton

dan.egerton@ccc.govt.nz

941-8477

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Papanui-Innes Community Board to recommend to Council that it accepts a gift of a building from the Lions Club International Foundation (LCIF).  The building would ideally be relocated to MacFarlane Park for the purpose of a community facility and would be operated by the Shirley Community Trust under a lease.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to an unsolicited proposal from LCIF to gift a building they no longer have use for to the Council.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the significance matrix

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Papanui-Innes Community Board recommend to Council that it pass the following resolutions:

1.         Council thank the Lions Club International Foundation for their generous offer and accept the gift (i.e. for no consideration) of the building currently located at 1049 Colombo Street, St Albans which is currently being used as the St Albans Transitional Community Centre.

2.         That the Property Consultancy Manger is granted delegated authority to negotiate and determine at his sole discretion all arrangements necessary to give effect to the gifting and transferring as generally outlined in this report, or other location and purpose as determined as per clause 3 of this resolution below.

3.         The first and preferred outcome is to relocate the building to MacFarlane Park as set out in this report, however if this cannot be achieved then the Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnership will work with the Community Board to determine an alternative future location and use.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Community Facilities

·     Level of Service: 2.0.1 Provide community facilities

 

 

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Unconditionally accept the gift of building (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do not accept the gift of building

·     Option 3 – Conditionally accept the gift of building

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Provision of a community facility in an area lacking such

·     Council receives a building structure at no cost

·     Provides certainty for LCIF

·     Provides flexibility for the Council

·     Supports, reciprocates and acknowledges the LCIF’s support

·     Frees up the site at 1049 Colombo Street for future development

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The cost of installation is circa $255,000

·     A play ground will need to be demolished, a time frame for reinstatement/relocation is not yet known

·     A resource consent has not yet been granted and it is not known, at this stage, whether a consent will be granted

·     Should MacFarlane Park not be achievable future location and use are not fully justified

·     Carries a risk of uncertainty and the possibility of a double shift if timing of decisions and site availability cannot be sequentially aligned

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Following the 2011 earthquakes, the Lions Club International Foundation (LCIF) provided support in various forms to the people of Christchurch. One of these initiatives included the provision of a transitional community centre in St Albans for a period of 5 years.

5.2       The LCIF are in the process of exiting that service and the building from which it was delivered. This is currently temporarily located at 1049 Colombo Street, St Albans and is still in use as the St Albans Transitional Community Centre operated by the St Albans Residents Association (SARA). LCIF have now offered the building as a gift to Council i.e. for no financial consideration.

5.3       The building cannot stay in its current temporary location as construction of the new community facility is proposed to commence on this site in due course. Should Council decline the gift and not “rehome” the community service LIFC will need to reconsider its options with an urgent necessity to relocate the building elsewhere.

5.4       There is still an ongoing need for the facility to support earthquake recovery services and the community particularly in the adjacent suburb of Shirley.  A suitable alternative location has been identified which meets community needs, being a recreation reserve known as MacFarlane Park. 

5.5       The building cannot be relocated to this location as of right, as the use does not comply with the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, or with the zoning of the City Plan.

5.6       To ensure timely delivery of services from this facility, the Chief Executive has exercised her powers pursuant to clause 5(c) of an Order in Council (OIC) to allow the Council to place the LCIF building on the MacFarlane Park Reserve for use as a community facility leased to the Shirley Community Trust (SCT).

5.6.1   The OIC, was issued in October 2011, and among various other matters grants Council powers to:

use a reserve or erect a structure on a reserve for any purpose not described in paragraphs (a) and (b), if the use or structure is necessary in the opinion of the council or the chief executive of the council to respond in a timely manner to any circumstances resulting from the Canterbury earthquakes:

5.7       The authority under the Order in Council expires in June 2021. Should the resolutions in this report be given effect and this occupation of the reserve be supported beyond this date then a change to the reserve classification as set out in section 24 of the Reserves Act will be required. This would need to be initiated as a separate process prior to the expiry date. Under this process there is no certainty of outcome, and Council cannot predetermine the outcome; accordingly, there is an element of risk, that when the Order in Council expires (June 2021), that the building will need to be removed from the reserve.

5.8       For the avoidance of doubt there are two separate processes which need to be completed in order to house the building on MacFarlane Park.

5.8.1   The first process is occupation of the reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977, which has been temporarily satisfied as per paragraph 5.6 above.

5.8.2   The second process is subject to the Resource Management Act 1991, in which a consent is required to place the building on the site.

5.9       LCIF have proposed gifting the temporary facility currently used as the St Albans Community Centre to the Council for a purpose related to a need arising as a consequence of the earthquakes and where a genuine community partnership exists that could be extended to ensure that the building is activated in partnership with the community.   

5.10    As part of this offer LCIF have also offered to contribute the following:

·        40m² of deck and ramps

·        Cost of relocation of building

·        Provision of foundations

·        50% of the cost to reinstate the deck/ramps

5.11    There is no delegation for staff to accept a gift unless it is provided for within Council’s Long Term Plan – this is not.

5.12    Accordingly staff are seeking a decision from Council to accept this gift from the LCIF.

5.13    LCIF are a reliable and valued partner who have offered the Council and the communities that the Council serves unwavering support over the past six years.

5.14    The rebuild of the St Albans Community Centre at 1049 Colombo Street, St Albans is due to commence in late 2017/early 2018 (subject to resource consent). Therefore a decision about relocation of the LCIF building is required a matter of urgency. If Council do not accept the offer and proposal to relocate it to MacFarlane Park then LCIF will need to look at other options for it future use and relocation.

5.15    A working group consisting of LCIF, Shirley Community Trust, The Shirley Rugby League Football Club Incorporated, Council technical staff and elected members has meet frequently to plan the placement of the building on MacFarlane Park.

5.16    The SCT is keen to work to strengthen its community partnership to ensure the building is fully activated and used by a range of community organisations to promote capacity building and foster resilience in the local community.

5.17    LCIF are keen for confirmation that the building will be located on MacFarlane Park in a reasonably expeditious period in order to fit in with their earthquake recovery international donors travel requirements to the city.

5.18    In the event that Council opts to accept the gift of building, appropriate management arrangements will need to put in place.  These may include a lease with SCT.

5.19    SCT have a long standing relationship with Council currently operating at MacFarlane Park delivering community activities and services. This building would serve as an extension to those activities. They are therefore deemed a suitable tenant for the property and warrant dealing with unilaterally in that regard.

Building

5.20    The building was constructed by Laing Properties to the Canterbury Education Board Unit System (CEBUS) design less than ten years ago (estimated 2008).

·   This is a standard 7.5m x 8.9m relocatable building. A photo of the building is attached as Attachment A.

5.21    The building has been inspected by Council’s Facilities Maintenance Team and no issues have been raised.

Resource Consent

5.22    A resource consent will need to be granted for the placement of the building on the land – this will be pursuant to the Resource Management Act 1991.

5.23    At the time of writing an external planning company has been briefed to commence the consent application.

5.24    There is an element of risk that a consent will not granted, however staff are of the opinion that this a relatively low risk.

6.   Option 1 – Accept the gift of building unconditionally (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The Christchurch City Council accepts the gift of building from the LIFC, irrespective of whether a future location and use is determined or not, i.e. in the unlikely event that it cannot be relocated to MacFarlane Park the Council still accept the gift of the building.

6.2       The first and preferred outcome is to relocate the building to MacFarlane Park but if this cannot be achieved then the Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnership will work with the Community Board to determine the future alternative location and use. 

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       The wider Shirley community are specifically affected by this option due to the building being proposed to be used as a Community Centre.  Their views are understood to be in support of this facility.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.8       Inconsistency: The proposal is not provided for within the LTP.

Financial Implications

6.9       Cost of Implementation - $255,000 (circa)

6.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $5,000 p.a.

6.11    Funding source – CMPS 45896 – has $255,000 allocated, subject to a change request approval, confirmation to be provided at the meeting.

Legal Implications

6.12    n/a

Risks and Mitigations    

6.13    A resource consent may not be granted.

6.14    Risk of a resource consent not being granted caused by the building location not being in accordance with the District Plan.  This will result in Council owning a building with no place to site the building, and an alternative location will need to be found.

6.14.1 Treatment: A resource consent application is currently underway.

6.14.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

6.15    Reserve classification may not change.

6.16    Council staff will seek to change the reserve classification from Recreation Reserve, to Local Purpose (Community Building) Reserve; there is a process to follow as outlined within the Reserves Act 1977, and the outcome is not able to be pre-determined. Should the classification not be able to be changed, then the building will have to be removed from the site in 2021.

6.16.1 Treatment: Council staff to procure a report to change the reserve classification.

6.16.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.17    Implementation dependencies - accept gift of building, resource consent, building consent.

6.18    Implementation timeframe – six weeks to eight months depending on consenting matters.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.19    The advantages of this option include:

·   Provision of a community facility in an area lacking such.

·   Council receives a building structure at no cost

·   Provides certainty for LCIF

·   Provides flexibility for the Council

·   Supports, reciprocates and acknowledges the LCIF’s support

·   Frees up the site at 1049 Colombo Street for future development

 

6.20    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The cost of installation is circa $255,000

·   A play ground will need to be demolished, a time frame for reinstatement/relocation is not yet known

·   A resource consent has not been granted as yet, and it is not known at this stage whether a consent will be granted.

·   Should MacFarlane Park not be achievable future location and use are not fully justified

·   Carries a risk of uncertainty and possibility of a double shift if timing of decisions and site availability cannot be sequentially aligned

7.   Option 2 – Do not accept the gift of building

Option Description

7.1       The Council does not accept the gift of building

7.2       Consideration was given to the Council accepting the building for an alternative purposes, however no such purpose, or location is known at this stage

7.3       Section 101 of the Local Government Act relates to Financial Management – subsection one states “A local authority must manage its revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, investments, and general financial dealings prudently and in a manner that promotes the current and future interests of the community.

7.4       It is not considered prudent to accept a building as a gift when there is no known use, or location, for such building, and accordingly, it may become a liability.

Significance

7.5       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.6       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are non-existent.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.7       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.8       The Shirley community are specifically affected by this option due to there not being an increase in community facilities within this area.  Their views are, understood to be, in support of accepting the building.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.9       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

7.10    Cost of Implementation – n/a

7.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – n/a

7.12    Funding source – n/a

Legal Implications

7.13    n/a

Risks and Mitigations    

7.14    n/a

Implementation

7.15    Implementation dependencies  - n/a

7.16    Implementation timeframe – n/a

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   Council will not incur costs associated with relocating the building.

·   A playground will not be displaced.

7.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   A community facility will not be provided in an area lacking in such.

·   Does not support LCIF.

·   Missed opportunity to get an asset for free.

8.   Option 3 – Accept the gift of building conditional on Council being granted a resource consent

Option Description

8.1       The Christchurch City Council accepts the gift of building from the Lions International Foundation, conditional on the building being able to be relocated to MacFarlane Park.

8.2       This option is very similar to the preferred option, with the exception that the acceptance of gift from the LICF is contingent on Council being granted a resource consent to house the building on MacFarlane Park.

8.3       Accordingly, all discussion below is subject to a consent being granted.

Significance

8.4       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.5       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are non-existent.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.6       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.7       The Shirley Community are specifically affected by this option due to there not being an increase in community facilities within this area.  Their views are, understood to be, in support of accepting the building.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.8       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

8.9       Cost of Implementation – $255,000 (circa)

8.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – $5,000 p.a.

8.11    Funding source – CMPS 45896 – has $255,000 allocated, subject to a change request approval, confirmation to be provided at the meeting

Legal Implications

8.12    n/a

Risks and Mitigations    

8.13    A resource consent may not be granted, in which case the Council would not accept the building.

Implementation

8.14    Implementation dependencies  - Consent being granted

8.15    Implementation timeframe – Four to six weeks until known

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   Council will not incur costs, or liabilities, until it is known whether or not the building is able to be housed on MacFarlane Park.

·   The future use and location is fully justified.

·   Provides a valuable community service.

8.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   n/a

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Attachment A

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Dan Egerton - Property Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

13.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1360612

Contact:

Faye Collins

faye.collins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in November.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held meetings on 7 and 24 November 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

3.1          Approving the installation of two new bus stops one adjacent to 12-14 Simeon Street and one                adjacent to 68-70 Milton Street.

3.2       Approving the following improvements to the Cashmere, Hoon Hay, Worsleys intersection:

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, for 78 metres north-west from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, for 20 metres north-west from its intersection with Blakiston Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, for 16 metres south-east from its intersection with Blakiston Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Hurunui Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, for 21 metres south-east from its intersection with Hurunui Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Worsleys Road, for 62 metres south-east from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Mavin Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road between its intersection with Mavin Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road for 15 metres west from its intersection with Kaiwara Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Cashmere Road, for 32 metres east from its intersection with Ferniehurst Street.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, for 94 metres west from its intersection with Worsleys Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Mavin Road, for 18 metres north from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Mavin Road, for 19 metres north from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Kaiwara Street for7 metres north of from intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Kaiwara Street for 19 metres north from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Blakiston Street for 30 metres west from its intersection with Hoon Hay Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Blakiston Street for 17 metres west from its intersection with Hoon Hay Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Hurunui Street for 26 metres west from its intersection with Worsleys Road.

·    Revoking the parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Hurunui Street for 19 metres west from its intersection with Worsleys Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, for 48 metres north-west from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving a bus stop on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, 48 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, extending 14 metres north westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, 62 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road extending 16 metres north westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, for 99 metres northwest from its intersection with Cashmere Road).

·    Approving a bus stop on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, 99 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road extending 14 metres north westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, 113 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road extending 35 metres north westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, for 101 metres west from its intersection with Hoon Hay Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, for 15 metres west from its intersection with Mavin Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, for 19 metres east from its intersection with Mavin Road. 

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road for 15 metres west from its intersection with Kaiwara Street.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road for 23 metres east from its intersection with Kaiwara Street.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south of Cashmere Road, for 80 metres west from its intersection with Worsleys Road.

·    Approving a bus stop on the south side of Cashmere Road, 80 metres west of its intersection with Worsleys Road, extending 14 metres westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Cashmere Road, 94 metres west of its intersection with Worsleys Road, extending 7 metres north westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road for 18 metres east from its intersection with Hoon Hay Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing 40 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, extending 27 metres easterly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, 81 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road extending easterly to its intersection with Ferniehurst Street.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Cashmere Road, north for 18 metres from its intersection with Ferniehurst Street.

·    Approving a bus stop on the west side of Cashmere Road, 18 metres north of its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, extending 14 metres northerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north east side of Worsleys Road, for 62 metres south east from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Worsleys Road, for 67 metres south east from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Worsleys Road, for 21 metres south from its intersection with Hurunui Street.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Worsleys Road, for 28 metres north west from its intersection with Hurunui Street.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Hurunui Street, for 26 metres west from its intersection with Worsleys Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Hurunui Street, for 19 metres west from its intersection with Worsleys Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Mavin Road, for 18 metres north from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the east side of Mavin Road, for 19 metres north from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Kaiwara Street, for 17 metres north from at its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the east side of Kaiwara Street, for 19 metres north from its intersection with Cashmere Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Blakiston Street, for 30 metres west from its intersection with Hoon Hay Road.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Blakiston Street, for 17 metres west from its intersection with Hoon Hay Road.

3.3       Approving a grant of $3,000 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Cross Over Trust towards the costs of the Cross Over Trust Evaluation project.

3.4       Approving a grant of $3,000 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Addington Neighbourhood Association towards the publication costs of the Addington History Book project.

3.5       Approving an allocation of $8,000 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund towards Community Events.

3.6       Approving an allocation of $3,000 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 to the Board’s Communicating with the Community fund 2017/18.

3.7       Approving a grant of $6,000 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 towards the Community Awards project 2017/18.

3.8       Approving a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development scheme to Connor McLaughlin towards participation in the Mainland Eagles Basketball Tour 2017 in Las Vegas, America from the 6 December to 24thDecember 2017 .

3.9       Approving a grant of $300 from its 2017/18 Youth Development Fund to Jak Howman towards participation in the Craig Foster International Cup Futsal tournament in Australia from 18 January to 21 January 2018.

3.10    Approving a grant of $345 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 towards the purchase and installation of a Memorial Plaque to recognise community service.

3.11    Approving a grant of $1,980 from its Discretionary Response Fund 2017/18 to West Spreydon School towards Sponsorship of Families for use of West Spreydon Community and School Swimming Pool.

3.12    Leamington Street no stopping restrictions

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north west side of Leamington Street 55 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending for 10 metres north easterly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north west side of Leamington Street 65 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending 5 metres north westerly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north west side of Leamington Street 71 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending 6 metres north easterly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north west side of Leamington Street commencing 71 metres north east of its intersection with Longley Place, and extending 15 metres north westerly.

3.13    Athelstan Street no stopping restrictions

·    Revoking the parking restriction on the south east side of Athelstan Street commencing 63 metres north east of its intersection with Barrington Street and extending five metres  north easterly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south east side of Athelstan Street 63 metres north east of its intersection with Barrington Street and extending five metres north easterly.

 

3.14    Intersection of Hendersons Road and Barrowclough Street

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north-east side of Hendersons Road commencing at its intersection with Barrowclough Street and extending 26 metres north-westerly

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north-east side of Hendersons Road commencing at its intersection with Barrowclough Street and extending 19 metres south-easterly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north-west side of Barrowclough Street commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending 17 metres in a north-easterly.

·    Approving that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south-east side of Barrowclough Street commencing at its intersection with Hendersons Road and extending 17 metres north-easterly.

 

3.15    Approving the installation of a Give Way Control on Hunter Terrace at the intersection of the South Library exit, Hunter Terrace and the legally closed portion of Hunter Terrace.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Intersection Improvement - Cashmere, Hoon Hay, Worsleys Roads

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

 

5.1 Memorial Plaque.   

5.1       Status

Local resident Christina Loughton an enthusiastic advocate for passenger transport services among other things and a regular attendee at Board meetings and community workshops unexpectedly passed away on 31 December 2015. Her contribution to the Spreydon-Cashmere community and her kind and generous spirit are much missed.

The Board has decided to recognise her service to the community over many years by installing a cast bronze memorial plaque on a bus seat in the Athelstan Street bus shelter.  The inscription on the plaque to read:

“In memory of Christina Loughton 19 August 1938 to 31 December 2015- A brave and tireless worker for the good of others”


 

5.2       Action Required

An order is to be placed for the plaque and engraving. Following receipt installation is to be arranged.

5.3       Timeframe

An unveiling of the plaque is proposed for early in the New Year.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues

 

Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River bank stabilisation - stage 1    

6.1       Status

             The risk of flooding continues to be a primary concern for many residents living in the vicinity of the Heathcote River. The Land Drainage Recovery Programme (LDRP) investigations into earthquake damage in the Upper and Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River undertaken in 2015 and 2016 identified a number of areas that were considered to require repair or remediation to ensure long term bank stability. Two community meetings were held by Land Drainage Recovery Programme staff to introduce the options that have been developed to residents and to provide an opportunity for discussion of these. The meetings, run in a workshop style were well attended, by approximately 180 residents over the two sessions.

Stage one of proposed bank stabilisation works along Ashgrove Terrace to Palatine Terrace / Eastern Terrace was open for feedback between 3rd November 2017 and 24th November 2017 with a drop in session for those interested to discuss the proposals with staff being held on 15 November.

In addition to agreeing to the Heathcote flood mitigation options the Council has decided that the Flood Intervention Policy will also be applied in the Heathcote River catchment. This recognises that a number of   people living along the Heathcote have had flood water through their homes many times since the earthquakes, each of them in a unique situations. The policy offers individual assistance to property owners who have experienced frequent above-floor flooding, which has been worsened by the earthquakes. The assistance includes a voluntary purchase offer for eligible properties.

 

6.2       Action Required

 

Land Drainage staff will contact all property owners who they consider to be eligible for individual assistance to provide an information booklet, and offer a meeting to discuss further.

Other residents in the area will be advised about the agreed options and the policy
through a Newsline article, an e-newsletter and a mail drop.

 

6.3       Timeframe 

The process of advising residents on Flood Intervention Policy is already underway.

A report on the stage one bank stabilisation works will be considered by the Board at its meeting on 8 December 2017. It is planned that staff will come to the Board in early December with the results of consultation on the proposed bank stabilisation works.

 

 

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan 2017-19 has been published as printed booklets and is also available for viewing on line.  In addition to the full plan the Board has published a number of single page pamphlets that include summary information about the plan, and provide contact details for Board members and guidance on how to engage with the Board and Council.  To launch the plan, all the published material together with the records of the Board’s May-June Community Board Plan engagement with almost 350 people was on display in the Beckenham Service Centre over the period 6 – 12 November 2017.

 

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Hoon Hay Fiesta

The annual “Hoon Hay Fiesta” was held in Hoon Hay Park on 16 November 2017. The event provided:

·    an opportunity for local community groups, sports clubs, organisations and agencies to promote their services and to raise funds.

·    An opportunity for bringing local residents together to connect with neighbours, support local organisations and find out what activities are services are available within their area and to have fun together.

·    a showcase for local talent with demonstrations and stage performances of music and dance.

·    entertainment for all age groups for a family outing in a safe, secure and healthy environment.

The event offered free activities for children, youth and families as well as various community stalls selling goods and promoting their services.  Local talent performed as part of a talent quest.  There was a number of competitions with great prizes.  The children were entertained with pony rides, bouncy castles, face painting and pedalmania whilst the youth took part in laser tag.  The event was a great success.

8.2       2017 Heritage Ambassador Award to Addington

The 2017 Heritage Ambassador Award was given to the Addington Neighbourhood Association and St Mary’s Church.  The award was bestowed at the official Beca Heritage Week October 12 launch  to recognise the heritage contributions made by this community partnership, in particular for the Addington Heritage Evening that they have organised and hosted for some 20 years.  This year the event presented speakers on the historic topics of the Lyttelton rail tunnel construction, the construction and repairs story of the Addington Water Tower, and the Reverent Bean of St Mary’s Church who was married to the daughter of Prime Minister Richard John Seddon.  The evening also included a musical homage to the Beatles’ Sergeants Pepper Lonely Hearts Club Band album, now 50 years old.

8.3       Addington Plan Fun Fair Engagement

The annual Addington Fun Fair was held this year at St Mary’s Church, Addington on Saturday 25 November 2017.

 Spreydon- Cashmere Community Board Chair Karoline Potter once again joined with the Addington community development worker in costume to engage with people attending the annual Addington Fun Fair.  This year over 50 people directly engaged in considering and discussing draft key actions for the Voice of Addington Plan that has been developed over several years of local consultation, and many provided further ideas or comments.  A clear majority totally supported the key actions that represent local aspirations for the most important aspects of Addington.  Speed limits, and the current speed change proposal were frequently mentioned.

8.4       Pacific Series 2017

The Pacific Series, is an annual celebration of Christchurch Pacific, Maori and Ethnic communities through a rugby league tournament and cultural event.  The Series aims to nurture and grows Pacific, Maori and other Ethnic community connections and to celebrates cultural identity, and utilises rugby league as the vehicle to engage these grassroots communities. The 2017 series was held in Hoon Hay Park over the weekend of 16-19 November.

Discretionary Response Fund grants to the staging of this city wide event were made by the Spreydon-Cashmere, Linwood-Central-Heathcote and Coastal-Burwood Community Boards.

The Tournament brought together 600 participants over 30 teams. The 60 games were played enthusiastically and in good spirit and were watched by approximately 10,000 spectators over the three days of the event.

The Pacific Series participants and supporters engaged in a formal evening (fono) prior to the tournament, where there was a focus on suicide prevention and mental health to address the high incidence of Youth suicide experienced by the Pacific and Maori populations. 

 

8.5       Christchurch Adventure Park re-opening

The Christchurch Adventure Park which was forced to close in the wake of the Port Hills fires is proposed to officially re-open on 5 December 2017.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  – 7 November 2017

 

14.    Intersection Improvement - Cashmere,Hoon Hay, Worsleys

Reference:

17/1334908

Contact:

Arohanui Grace

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

941 6663

 

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

For the purposes of the following resolutions: (1) an intersection is defined by the position of kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and (2) The resolution is to take effect from the commencement of physical road works associated with the project as detailed in this report; and (3) if the resolution states "(Note 1 Applies)", any distance specified in the resolution relates the kerb line location referenced as exists on the road immediately prior to the Community Board meeting of the 13th February 2016; and (4) If the resolution states "(Note 2 Applies)", any distance specified in the resolution relates the approved kerb line location on the road resulting from the resolution as approved.

 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board, recommends to the Council that it:

1.         Revokes all traffic controls on Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 148 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

2.         Revokes all traffic controls on Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 104 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

3.         Revokes all traffic controls on Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in an easterly direction for a distance of 86 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

4.         Revokes all traffic controls on Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 61 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

5.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Worsleys Road with Cashmere Road. (Note 1 Applies).

6.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Hoon Hay Road with Cashmere Road. (Note 1 Applies).

7.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Hurunui Street with Worsleys Road. (Note 1 Applies).

8.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of northwest bound bicycles only, be established on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 112 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

9.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of southeast bound bicycles only, be established on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 60 metres north of its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 96 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

10.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of eastbound bicycles only, be established on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 101 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

11.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of westbound bicycles only, be established on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 80 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

12.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of eastbound bicycles only, be established on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

13.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of northbound bicycles only, be established on the east side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

14.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of westbound bicycles only, be established on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a easterly direction for a distance of 410 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

15.       Approves that a pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with section 8.2 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004, on the Cashmere Road west approach left turn slip lane at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies)

16.       Approves that a pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with section 8.2 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004, on the Cashmere Road west approach left turn slip lane at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies).

17.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of southeast bound bicycles only, be established on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 30 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

18.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies).

19.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. (Note 2 Applies).

20.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street. (Note 2 Applies).

21.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Hurunui Street. (Note 2 Applies).

22.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place. (Note 2 Applies).

23.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Hurunui Street / Worsleys Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies).

24.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Mavin Road / Cashmere Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

25.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Kaiwara Street / Cashmere Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

26.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Blakiston Street / Hoon Hay Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

27.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associated line marking on Mavin Road between its intersection with Blakiston Street and Cashmere Road, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

28.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associated line marking on Kaiwara Street between its intersection with Blakiston Street and Cashmere Road, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

29.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associate line marking on Blakiston Street between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and Kaiwara Street, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

30.       Approves that the intersection of Cashmere Road, Hoon Hay Road and Worsleys Road be controlled by traffic signals in accordance with the Land Transport Act – Traffic Control Devices: 2004, as detailed on Attachment A.

31.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Cashmere Road west approach left turn movement, at the left turn slip lane approaching Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

32.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Cashmere Road east approach left turn movement, at the left turn slip lane approaching Worsleys Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

33.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Hurunui Street at its intersection with Worsleys Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

1.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 78 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

2.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Blakiston Street and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 20 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

3.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Blakiston Street and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 16 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

4.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place. (Note 1 Applies)

5.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Hurunui Street. (Note 1 Applies)

6.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Hurunui Street and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 21 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

7.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 62 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

8.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Mavin Road. (Note 1 Applies)

9.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Mavin Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street. (Note 1 Applies)

10.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

11.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. (Note 1 Applies)

12.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and continuing in an easterly direction for a distance of 32 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

13.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 94 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

14.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive. (Note 1 Applies)

15.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

16.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

17.       Revoke all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

18.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

19.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 30 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

20.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

21.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

22.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

23.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 48 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

24.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 48 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

25.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 62 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 16 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

26.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 99 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

27.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 99 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

28.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 113 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 35 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

29.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 101 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

30.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Mavin Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

31.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Mavin Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

32.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

33.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 23 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

34.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 80 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

35.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 80 metres west of its intersection with Worsleys Road, and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

36.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 94 metres west of its intersection with Worselys Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 7 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

37.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

38.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 40 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 27 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

39.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 81 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in an easterly direction to its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. (Note 2 Applies).

40.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

41.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the west side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 18 metres north of its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

42.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive. (Note 2 Applies).

43.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 62 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

44.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 72 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

45.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Hurunui Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 21 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

46.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Hurunui Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 28 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

47.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

48.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

49.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

50.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

51.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

52.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

53.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 30 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

54.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

 

2.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

For the purposes of the following resolution: (1) an intersection is defined by the position of kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and (2) The resolution is to take effect from the commencement of physical road works associated with the project as detailed in this report; and (3) if the resolution states "(Note 1 Applies)", any distance specified in the resolution relates the kerb line location referenced as exists on the road immediately prior to the Community Board meeting of the 13th February 2016; and (4) If the resolution states "(Note 2 Applies)", any distance specified in the resolution relates the approved kerb line location on the road resulting from the resolution as approved.

 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 78 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

2.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Blakiston Street and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 20 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

3.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Blakiston Street and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 16 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

4.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place. (Note 1 Applies)

5.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Hurunui Street. (Note 1 Applies)

6.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Hurunui Street and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 21 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

7.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 62 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

8.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Mavin Road. (Note 1 Applies)

9.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Mavin Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street. (Note 1 Applies)

10.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

11.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. (Note 1 Applies)

12.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and continuing in an easterly direction for a distance of 32 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

13.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 94 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

14.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive. (Note 1 Applies)

15.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

16.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

17.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

18.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

19.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 30 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

20.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

21.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

22.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

23.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 48 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

24.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 48 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

25.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 62 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 16 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

26.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 99 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

27.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 99 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

28.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 113 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 35 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

29.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 101 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

30.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Mavin Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

31.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Mavin Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

32.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

33.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 23 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

34.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 80 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

35.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 80 metres west of its intersection with Worsleys Road, and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

36.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 94 metres west of its intersection with Worsleys Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 7 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

37.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

38.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 40 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 27 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

39.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 81 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in an easterly direction to its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. (Note 2 Applies).

40.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

41.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the west side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 18 metres north of its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

42.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive. (Note 2 Applies).

43.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 62 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

44.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 67 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

45.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Hurunui Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 21 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

46.       Approves Road, commencing at its intersection with Hurunui Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 28 metres. (Note 2 Applies).

47.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

48.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Hurunui Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

49.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

50.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

51.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

52.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

53.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 30 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

54.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

Part B

55.       Requests that any trees planted as part of the intersection improvements, including replacements for those removed, be suitable native species.

 

3.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original staff recommendations accepted without change)

Part A

For the purposes of the following resolution: (1) an intersection is defined by the position of kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and (2) The resolution is to take effect from the commencement of physical road works associated with the project as detailed in this report; and (3) if the resolution states "(Note 1 Applies)", any distance specified in the resolution relates the kerb line location referenced as exists on the road immediately prior to the Community Board meeting of the 13 February 2016; and (4) If the resolution states "(Note 2 Applies)", any distance specified in the resolution relates the approved kerb line location on the road resulting from the resolution as approved.

 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to the Council that it:

1.         Revokes all traffic controls on Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 148 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

2.         Revokes all traffic controls on Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 104 metres. (Note 1 Applies)

3.         Revokes all traffic controls on Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in an easterly direction for a distance of 86 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

4.         Revokes all traffic controls on Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 61 metres. (Note 1 Applies).

5.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Worsleys Road with Cashmere Road. (Note 1 Applies).

6.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Hoon Hay Road with Cashmere Road. (Note 1 Applies).

7.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Hurunui Street with Worsleys Road. (Note 1 Applies).

8.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of northwest bound bicycles only, be established on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 112 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

9.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of southeast bound bicycles only, be established on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 60 metres north of its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 96 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

10.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of eastbound bicycles only, be established on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 101 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

11.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of westbound bicycles only, be established on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 80 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

12.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of eastbound bicycles only, be established on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

13.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of northbound bicycles only, be established on the east side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

14.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of westbound bicycles only, be established on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a easterly direction for a distance of 410 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

15.       Approves that a pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with section 8.2 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004, on the Cashmere Road west approach left turn slip lane at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies)

16.       Approves that a pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with section 8.2 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004, on the Cashmere Road west approach left turn slip lane at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies).

17.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of southeast bound bicycles only, be established on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 30 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. (Note 2 Applies).

18.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies).

19.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. (Note 2 Applies).

20.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street. (Note 2 Applies).

21.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Hurunui Street. (Note 2 Applies).

22.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place. (Note 2 Applies).

23.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Hurunui Street / Worsleys Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment A. (Note 2 Applies).

24.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Mavin Road / Cashmere Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

25.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Kaiwara Street / Cashmere Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

26.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Blakiston Street / Hoon Hay Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

27.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associated line marking on Mavin Road between its intersection with Blakiston Street and Cashmere Road, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

28.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associated line marking on Kaiwara Street between its intersection with Blakiston Street and Cashmere Road, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

29.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associate line marking on Blakiston Street between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and Kaiwara Street, as detailed in Attachment B. (Note 2 Applies).

30.       Approves that the intersection of Cashmere Road, Hoon Hay Road and Worsleys Road be controlled by traffic signals in accordance with the Land Transport Act – Traffic Control Devices: 2004, as detailed on Attachment A.

31.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Cashmere Road west approach left turn movement, at the left turn slip lane approaching Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

32.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Cashmere Road east approach left turn movement, at the left turn slip lane approaching Worsleys Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

33.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Hurunui Street at its intersection with Worsleys Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Intersection Improvement - Cashmere,Hoon Hay, Worsleys

102

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Drawing A

121

b

Attachment B - Drawing B

122

c

Attachment C - Consultation leaflet

123

d

Attachment D - Feedback form

127

e

Attachment E- Map of all submissions A3

129

f

Attachment F - Cashmere Road Intersection Improvements map of speed hump submissions

130

g

Attachment G - Consultation Analysis

131

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

Intersection Improvement - Cashmere,Hoon Hay, Worsleys

Reference:

17/1022853

Contact:

Andy Richards

andy.richards@ccc.govt.nz

941 8805

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is request that the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to:

1.1.1   Approve those parts of the attached scheme plan (refer attachment A and B) and traffic controls for which the Board has delegated authority, for the project Intersection Improvement Cashmere Road/Hoon Hay Road/Worsleys Road.

1.1.2   Recommend that the Council approve those parts of the attached scheme plan (refer attachment A and B) and those traffic controls, for which the Council has authority, for the project Intersection Improvement Cashmere, Hoon Hay, Worsleys.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board following the consultation process. The Board was previously advised of the project at a seminar held on
4 July 2016 (Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board).

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by using the engagement and significance matrix.  Staff have considered the significance of the decision to be made by the Council.  Their assessment is that the matter is of medium significance for the following reasons:

2.1.2   There is strong local community interest in this project and ongoing requests for improvements to be made at this intersection.  There has also been ongoing media interest in this intersection.

2.1.3   There is a benefit to the community and to tourists in improving this intersection for users of the Christchurch Adventure Park and in order to service the increased number of sub division developments in this area.

2.1.4   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect this assessment.


 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

For the purposes of the following resolutions: (1) an intersection is defined by the position of kerbs on each intersecting roadway; and (2) The resolution is to take effect from the commencement of physical road works associated with the project as detailed in this report; and (3) if the resolution states "Note 1 applies", any distance specified in the resolution relates the kerb line location referenced as exists on the road immediately prior to the Community Board meeting of the 13th February 2016; and (4) If the resolution states "Note 2 Applies", any distance specified in the resolution relates the approved kerb line location on the road resulting from the resolution as approved.

 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board, recommends to the Council that it:

1.         Revokes all traffic controls on Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 148 metres. Note 1 applies.

2.         Revokes all traffic controls on Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 104 metres. Note 1 Applies

3.         Revokes all traffic controls on Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in an easterly direction for a distance of 86 metres. Note 1 Applies.

4.         Revokes all traffic controls on Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 61 metres. Note 1 Applies.

5.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Worsleys Road with Cashmere Road. Note 1 Applies.

6.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Hoon Hay Road with Cashmere Road. Note 1 Applies.

7.         Revokes all intersection traffic controls at the intersection of Huruni Street with Worsleys Road. Note 1 Applies.

8.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of northwest bound bicycles only, be established on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 112 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

9.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of southeast bound bicycles only, be established on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 60 metres north of its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 96 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

10.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of eastbound bicycles only, be established on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 101 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

11.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of westbound bicycles only, be established on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 80 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

12.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of eastbound bicycles only, be established on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

13.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of northbound bicycles only, be established on the east side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

14.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of westbound bicycles only, be established on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a easterly direction for a distance of 410 metres, as detailed on Attachment B. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

15.       Approves that a pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with section 8.2 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004, on the Cashmere Road west approach left turn slip lane at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 Applies

16.       Approves that a pedestrian crossing be duly established and marked in accordance with section 8.2 of the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004, on the Cashmere Road west approach left turn slip lane at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A. Note 2 Applies.

17.       Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of southeast bound bicycles only, be established on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 30 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 13 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, and is therefore to be added to the Register of Roads or Traffic Lanes Restricted to Specific Classes of Vehicles. Note 2 Applies.

18.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment A. Note 2 Applies.

19.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. Note 2 Applies.

20.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street. Note 2 Applies.

21.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Huruni Street. Note 2 Applies.

22.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes on Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place. Note 2 Applies.

23.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Huruni Street / Worsleys Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment A. Note 2 Applies.

24.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Mavin Road / Cashmere Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. Note 2 Applies.

25.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Kaiwara Street / Cashmere Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. Note 2 Applies.

26.       Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes and road surface changes, at the Blakiston Street / Hoon Hay Road intersection, as detailed in Attachment B. Note 2 Applies.

27.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associated line marking on Mavin Road between its intersection with Blakiston Street and Cashmere Road, as detailed in Attachment B. Note 2 Applies.

28.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associated line marking on Kaiwara Street between its intersection with Blakiston Street and Cashmere Road, as detailed in Attachment B. Note 2 Applies.

29.       Approves the installation of speed humps and associate line marking on Blakiston Street between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and Kaiwara Street, as detailed in Attachment B. Note 2 Applies.

30.       Approves that the intersection of Cashmere Road, Hoon Hay Road and Worsleys Road be controlled by traffic signals in accordance with the Land Transport Act – Traffic Control Devices: 2004, as detailed on Attachment A.

31.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Cashmere Road west approach left turn movement, at the left turn slip lane approaching Hoon Hay Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

32.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Cashmere Road east approach left turn movement, at the left turn slip lane approaching Worsleys Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

33.       Approves that a Give Way control be placed against the Huruni Street at its intersection with Worsleys Road, as detailed on Attachment A.

 

 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

 

1.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 78 metres. Note 1 Applies

2.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Blakiston Street and continuing in a north westerly direction for a distance of 20 metres. Note 1 Applies

3.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Blakiston Street and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 16 metres. Note 1 Applies

4.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Greta Place. Note 1 Applies

5.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, between its intersection with Cashmere Road and its intersection with Huruni Street. Note 1 Applies

6.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Huruni Street and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 21 metres. Note 1 Applies

7.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a south easterly direction for a distance of 62 metres. Note 1 Applies

8.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Mavin Road. Note 1 Applies

9.         Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Mavin Road and its intersection with Kaiwara Street. Note 1 Applies

10.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. Note 1 Applies

11.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. Note 1 Applies

12.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and continuing in an easterly direction for a distance of 32 metres. Note 1 Applies

13.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 94 metres. Note 1 Applies

14.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive. Note 1 Applies

15.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. Note 1 Applies

16.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 1 Applies

17.       Revoke all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. Note 1 Applies

18.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 1 Applies

19.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 30 metres. Note 1 Applies

20.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. Note 1 Applies

21.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the north side of Huruni Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres. Note 1 Applies

22.       Revokes all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the south side of Huruni Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 1 Applies

23.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 48 metres. Note 2 Applies.

24.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 48 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. Note 2 Applies.

25.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south west side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 62 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 16 metres. Note 2 Applies.

26.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 99 metres. Note 2 Applies.

27.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 99 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. Note 2 Applies.

28.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north east side of Hoon Hay Road, commencing at a point 113 metres north west of its intersection with Cashmere Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 35 metres. Note 2 Applies.

29.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 101 metres. Note 2 Applies.

30.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Mavin Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. Note 2 Applies.

31.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Mavin Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 2 Applies.

32.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres. Note 2 Applies.

33.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Kaiwara Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 23 metres. Note 2 Applies.

34.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 80 metres. Note 2 Applies.

35.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 80 metres west of its intersection with Worsleys Road, and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. Note 2 Applies.

36.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the south side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 94 metres west of its intersection with Worselys Road, and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 7 metres. Note 2 Applies.

37.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 18 metres. Note 2 Applies.

38.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 40 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 27 metres. Note 2 Applies.

39.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the north side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 81 metres east of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and extending in an easterly direction to its intersection with Ferniehurst Street. Note 2 Applies.

40.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on the west side of Cashmere Road, commencing at its intersection with Ferniehurst Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. Note 1 Applies.

41.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the west side of Cashmere Road, commencing at a point 18 metres north of its intersection with Ferniehurst Street, and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 14 metres. Note 1 Applies.

42.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Cashmere Road, between its intersection with Worsleys Road and its intersection with Shalamar Drive. Note 2 Applies.

43.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north east side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 62 metres. Note 2 Applies.

44.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 72 metres. Note 2 Applies.

45.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Huruni Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 21 metres. Note 2 Applies.

46.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Worsleys Road, commencing at its intersection with Huruni Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 28 metres. Note 2 Applies.

47.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Huruni Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres. Note 1 Applies

48.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Huruni Street, commencing at its intersection with Worsleys Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 1 Applies

49.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 18 metres. Note 1 Applies

50.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Mavin Road, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 1 Applies

51.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the west side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. Note 1 Applies

52.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Kaiwara Street, commencing at its intersection with Cashmere Road and continuing in a northerly direction for a distance of 19 metres. Note 1 Applies

53.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 30 metres. Note 1 Applies

54.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Blakiston Street, commencing at its intersection with Hoon Hay Road and continuing in a westerly direction for a distance of 17 metres. Note 1 Applies

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       T:

4.1.1   Activity: Roads and Footpaths

·     Level of Service: 16.0.3 Maintain resident satisfaction with roadway condition

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Signalise the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection, allow parking on North Side of Cashmere Road, relocate the bus stop to Greta Place, install local traffic calming measures (preferred option).

·     Option 2 - Signalise the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection, allow parking on South Side of Cashmere Road, relocate the bus stop to Greta Place, install local traffic calming measures.

·     Option 3 - Signalise the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection, allow parking on North Side of Cashmere Road, relocate the bus stop to Greta Place, install local traffic calming measures, install east bound left turn slip lane into Hoon Hay Road from Cashmere Road.

·     Option 4 – Do Nothing.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Signalisation of the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worselys Road intersection

Allows greater control over the traffic movements for current and future traffic flows through the intersection.

Allows for safer control of future traffic flows

Allows improved journey time reliability and safety of passenger transport vehicles.

·     Installation of safe cycling facilities on all approaches to the intersection

·     Improved pedestrian safety.

·     Additional traffic calming on local roads, to slow vehicle speeds and discourage rat running.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The proposal includes the removal of 31 car parking spaces. These are from the following locations:

-      4 car parks on the north side of Cashmere Road outside the shops

-      10 car parks on the south side of Cashmere Road, between Worsleys Road and the bridge to the east.

-      1 car park on the south side of Cashmere Road to the west of its intersection with Worsleys Road

-      5 car parks on the north side of Cashmere Road to the west of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road

-      3 car parks on the west side of Worsleys Road

-      1 car park on the east side of Worsleys Road

-      1 car park on the west side of Hoon Hay Road

-      6 car parks on the east side of Hoon Hay Road

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       This project is an intersection improvements project. In developing the intersection improvements, allowance has been made for the expected increases in traffic volumes including cyclists using this intersection. Increased volume are forecast to occur as a result of:

·   New residential subdivisions and developments

·   The Christchurch Adventure Park

·   Connector roads to the Westmorland residential subdivision

·   Bus route #145 using Cashmere Road (east of intersection) and Hoon Hay Road

·   Bus route "Orbiter" using Cashmere Road (west of intersection) and Hoon Hay Road

Objectives

5.2       The main objectives of this project are to provide intersection improvements that will increase safety performance and meet the forecast increase usage of the intersection by:

·   Improving operational safety at the intersection for all road users

·   Increasing the operational performance of the intersection

Community Consultation

5.3       Consultation on the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection improvements project was undertaken from 31 July 2017 to 28 August 2017, on Options 1 and 2.  The submission form asked submitters to indicate whether yes they generally support the plan, yes they generally support the plan but have some concerns or no they generally do not support the plan for option 1 or option 2.  There was also an opportunity to add any additional comments on the project.

5.4       Approximately 1,200 consultation leaflets (refer attachments C and D) were hand delivered to properties along and surrounding the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection, including 213 absentee land owners.  These leaflets were also posted and emailed to 330 key stakeholders.  The project was also posted on the Council’s “Have Your Say” website https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/52 and posted on the Council Facebook and Twitter pages.

5.5       The Cracroft Residents Association included information on this project in their community newsletter and the Christchurch Adventure Park also posted information on this project on their website and Facebook pages to encourage people to provide feedback.

5.6       The project team met with WECCA (Westmorland Residents Association, Cracroft Residents Association and Cashmere Residents Association) on Monday 31 July 2017 to discuss this project and answer any questions they had.  At this meeting there was general support for the proposal, however there was a request to include an additional left turning lane at the intersection on Cashmere Road, to avoid the intersection congesting with straight ahead traffic.  This option is discussed in Section 8 of the report.

5.7       The project team were available to discuss the project and answer any questions at a drop in session held at the Silverbacks Café in the Cracroft Shopping Centre on Monday 14 August 2017 from 5 pm to 7 pm.  There were 33 residents who came along and spoke to the project team during the two hour period.  At this session concerns were raised by a number of residents around the relocation of the bus stop from Hoon Hay Road to Cashmere Road, the loss of parking and the lack of connection into the major cycle routes in the area for cyclists with the exclusion of a separate cycle lane.

Residents at the project drop in session on 14 August 2017

5.8       At the close of consultation, 186 submissions were received with 79 submitters generally supporting option 1, 66 submitters generally supporting option 1 but with concerns, 25 submitters who do not generally support option 1.  There were also 24 submitters who generally supported option 2, 18 submitters who generally support option 2 but with concerns, 89 submitters who generally do not support option 2.  Please refer to attachment E which contains a map providing the general location of submitters.

5.9       A detailed analysis of the consultation responses are provided in attachment G. In summary, the general distribution of responses were:

Option 1

No. of submitters

Option 2

No. of submitters

Yes – generally support

79 (42%)

Yes – generally support

24 (13%)

Yes – generally support, but with concerns

66 (35%)

Yes – generally support, but with concerns

18 (10%)

No – do not support

25 (14%)

No – do not support

89 (48%)

Not indicated/box blank

16 (9%)

Not indicated/box blank

55 (29%)

Total

186

Total

186

 

 

6.   Option 1 (preferred) Intersection Improvements

Option Description

6.1       Signalise the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection, allow parking on north side of Cashmere Road, east approach, relocate the bus stop to Greta Place, install local traffic calming measures (preferred option).

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is medium significance and is consistent with Section 2 of this report.

6.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect this assessment.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Residents located in the project area are specifically affected by this option due to changes to the street scape.  A detailed analysis of the consultation responses are provided in attachment G. The general themes of the consultation responses were:

·   Traffic Calming - There were 76 comments made relating traffic calming. There were 55 submissions generally opposing traffic calming and 21 submissions generally supporting traffic calming.

However, following community feedback the concept plan is unchanged in relation to the speed calming measures due to an existing speeding issue, with a recent survey showing the 85th percentile speed (The speed at which 85% of vehicles are travelling at or less than) being 54.4 km/h. Reducing the speed of vehicles will reduce the amount of vehicles which use these local roads for rat running to reduce their travel time. Furthermore, signalisation on the intersection will increase the problem of rat running, therefore the installation of traffic calming can be viewed as a proactive response.

·   Buses/Bus Facilities - There were 52 comments made relating to the location of the bus stops as part of this proposal. 29 responses did not support the bus stop moving from Hoon Hay Rd to Cashmere Rd, 6 responses would like Hoon Hay bus stop moved further down Hoon Hay Road, 8 responses would like to leave the bus stop where it is on Hoon Hay Road, the remaining 9 responses related to the bus stop at 170 Cashmere Road.

Following community feedback the concept plan has been amended in relation to the existing bus stop on Hoon Hay Road being relocated to Cashmere Road.  This bus stop is now proposed to be relocated to further down Hoon Hay Road, outside 345 Hoon Hay Road.

This option has also been discussed with the two properties closest to this proposed bus stop location who were not supportive of the bus stop being located due to loss of on street car parking. However, even without the relocation of the bus stop to outside 345 Hoon Hay Road the preferred option still involves the installation of yellow no parking lines at this location.

·   Cyclists/Cycling facilities - There were 39 comments made in relation to cycling. 16 responses supported a separate cycle lane instead of shared/connect into existing Major Cycleway Route; 12 responses would support a separate cycle lane/sharrow; 6 responses generally supported sharrows or cycleways; 2 responses do not support the inclusions of cycle lanes and 6 responses request to widen bridges/roads to accommodate cyclists

A shared lane on Worselys Road is an appropriate form of cycle facility due to the low vehicle flows and the low speeds which will result from the traffic calming. Worselys Road does provide access to a new sub division and the Christchurch Adventure Park, therefore the traffic flows are likely to increase. The future traffic flows are high and would make it difficult to share the road over long distances. However for the short section proposed between Huruni Street and the intersection this will be acceptable, subject to the proposed traffic calming being approved.

Linking the MCRs with the Adventure Park and the new subdivision was considered as part of this project. However this requires work around the Cashmere Road bridge and is outside the scope of this project. There is a future project which will consider connections to and from Major Cycle Routes. It is likely that this connection will be picked up in that project.

·   Parking - There were also concerns raised about the loss of car parking.  With the preferred option now being amended to relocate the bus stop outside 345 Hoon Hay Road, instead of on Cashmere Road near the Cracroft Shopping centre, this will provide a 6 car parks compared to the original proposal of 4 parks for option 1 during the consultation.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       The proposal is consistent with the following policies: The Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan (2012 - 2042) identifies the need to provide safe roads with cycling and walking infrastructure.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – The overall budget for this project is $3.765 million.

6.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Additional maintenance items in the proposed scheme include signals and renewing the green cycle lane paint.

6.9       Funding source – 15 September 2016 Council approved a resolution bringing the scheduled improvements for the Cashmere Rd/ Hoon Hay Rd / Worsleys Rd intersection forward in the Long Term Plan.

Legal Implications

6.10    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions, traffic restrictions and controls by resolution.

6.11    Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations. The list of delegations for the Community Boards included the resolution of parking and stopping restrictions, traffic restrictions and traffic control devices.

6.12    The installation of any signs and/or markings must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

6.13    Resource Consent must be applied for to remove one (number) tree, located on the North of the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection due to the height of the tree.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.14    There are no identified significant risks with this option.

Implementation

6.15    Implementation dependencies - Requires Community Board approval of kerb alignment changes, traffic controls and parking restrictions.

6.16    Requires Council approval of parking restrictions, traffic restrictions, cycle lanes and controls by resolution.

6.17    Resource Consent approval.

6.18    Implementation timeframe - Construction is proposed to commence in mid-2018 and last for approximately four to five months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.19    The advantages of this option include:

·   Signalisation of the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worselys Road intersection

Allows greater control over the traffic movements for current and future traffic flows through the intersection.

Allows for safer control of future traffic flows

Allows improved journey time reliability and safety of passenger transport vehicles.

Traffic calming on local roads to reduce speeds and reduce rat running.

·   Installation of safe cycling facilities on all approaches to the intersection

·   Improved pedestrian safety.

·   Additional traffic calming on local roads, to slow vehicle speeds and discourage rat running.

6.20    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The proposal includes the removal of 31 car parking spaces.

·   The installation of the traffic signal will likely see an increase in rat running through Mavin Road and Kaiwara Street, with this being a more time efficient route for vehicles travelling north from Cashmere Road western approach. Traffic calming is proposed to ensure lover speeds and discourage rat running.

7.   Option 2 Intersection Improvements (parking on south side Cashmere Rd)

Option Description

7.1       Signalise the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys intersection, allow parking on south side of Cashmere Road east approach, relocate the bus stop to Greta Place, install local traffic calming measures.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is medium significance and is consistent with Section 2 of this report.

7.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects this assessment.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Residents located in the project area are specifically affected by this option due to changes to the street scape.  A detailed analysis of the consultation responses are provided in attachment G. The general themes of the consultation responses were:

·   Traffic Calming - There were 76 comments made relating traffic calming. There were 55 submissions generally opposing traffic calming and 21 submissions generally supporting traffic calming.

However, following community feedback the concept plan is unchanged in relation to the speed calming measures due to an existing speeding issue, with a recent survey showing the 85th percentile speed (The speed at which 85% of vehicles are travelling at or less than) being 54.4 km/h. Reducing the speed of vehicles will reduce the amount of vehicles which use these local roads for rat running to reduce their travel time. Furthermore, signalisation on the intersection will increase the problem of rat running, therefore the installation of traffic calming can be viewed as a proactive response.

·   Buses/Bus Facilities - There were 52 comments made relating to the location of the bus stops as part of this proposal. 29 responses did not support the bus stop moving from Hoon Hay Rd to Cashmere Rd, 6 responses would like Hoon Hay bus stop moved further down Hoon Hay Road, 8 responses would like to leave the bus stop where it is on Hoon Hay Road, the remaining 9 responses related to the bus stop at 170 Cashmere Road.

Following community feedback the concept plan has been amended in relation to the existing bus stop on Hoon Hay Road being relocated to Cashmere Road.  This bus stop is now proposed to be relocated to further down Hoon Hay Road, outside 345 Hoon Hay Road.

This option has also been discussed with the two properties closest to this proposed bus stop location who were not supportive of the bus stop being located due to loss of on street car parking. However, even without the relocation of the bus stop to outside 345 Hoon Hay Road the preferred option still involves the installation of yellow no parking lines at this location.

·   Cyclists/Cycling facilities - There were 39 comments made in relation to cycling. 16 responses supported a separate cycle lane instead of shared/connect into existing Major Cycleway Route; 12 responses would support a separate cycle lane/sharrow; 6 responses generally supported sharrows or cycleways; 2 responses do not support the inclusions of cycle lanes and 6 responses request to widen bridges/roads to accommodate cyclists

A shared lane on Worselys Road is an appropriate form of cycle facility due to the low vehicle flows and the low speeds which will result from the traffic calming. Worselys Road does provide access to a new sub division and the Christchurch Adventure Park, therefore the traffic flows are likely to increase. The future traffic flows are high and would make it difficult to share the road over long distances. However for the short section proposed between Huruni Street and the intersection this will be acceptable, subject to the proposed traffic calming being approved.

Linking the MCRs with the Adventure Park and the new subdivision was considered as part of this project. However this requires work around the Cashmere Road bridge and is outside the scope of this project. There is a future project which will consider connections to and from Major Cycle Routes. It is likely that this connection will be picked up in that project.

·   Parking - There were also concerns raised about the loss of car parking.  With the preferred option now being amended to relocate the bus stop outside 345 Hoon Hay Road, instead of on Cashmere Road near the Cracroft Shopping centre, this will provide a 6 car parks compared to the original proposal of 4 parks for option 1 during the consultation.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       The proposal is consistent with the following policies: The Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan (2012 - 2042) identifies the need to provide safe roads with cycling and walking infrastructure.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – The overall budget for this project is $3.765 million.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Additional maintenance items in the proposed scheme include signals and renewing the green cycle lane paint.

7.9       Funding source – 15 September 2016 Council approved a resolution bringing the scheduled improvements for the Cashmere Rd/ Hoon Hay Rd / Worsleys Rd intersection forward in the Long Term Plan.

Legal Implications

7.10    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions, traffic restrictions and controls by resolution.

7.11    Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations. The list of delegations for the Community Boards included the resolution of parking and stopping restrictions, traffic restrictions and traffic control devices.

7.12    The installation of any signs and/or markings must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

7.13    Resource Consent must be applied for to remove one (number) tree, located on the North of the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection due to the height of the tree.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.14    There are no identified significant risks with this option.

Implementation

7.15    Implementation dependencies - Requires Community Board approval of kerb alignment changes, traffic controls and parking restrictions.

7.16    Requires Council approval of parking restrictions, traffic restrictions, cycle lanes and controls by resolution.

7.17    Resource Consent approval.

7.18    Implementation timeframe - Construction is proposed to commence in mid-2018 and last for approximately four to five months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.19    The advantages of this option include:

·   Signalisation of the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worselys Road intersection

Allows greater control over the traffic movements for current and future traffic flows through the intersection.

Allows for safer control of future traffic flows

Allows improved journey time reliability and safety of passenger transport vehicles.

Traffic calming on local roads to reduce speeds and reduce rat running.

·   Installation of safe cycling facilities on all approaches to the intersection

·   Improved pedestrian safety.

·   Additional traffic calming on local roads, to slow vehicle speeds and discourage rat running.

7.20    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The proposal includes the removal of 33 car parking spaces.

·   Parking on Cashmere Road (east approach) is across the road from the shops requiring pedestrians to cross the road to access the shops.

·   The installation of the traffic signal will likely see an increase in rat running through Mavin Road and Kaiwara Street, with this being a more time efficient route for vehicles travelling north from Cashmere Road western approach. Traffic calming is proposed to ensure lover speeds and discourage rat running.

8.   Option 3 Intersection Improvements (Left turn Cashmere Rd eastbound)

Option Description

8.1       Signalise the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection, allow parking on north side of Cashmere Road east approach, relocate the bus stop to Greta Place, install local traffic calming measures, create east bound left turn slip lane into Hoon Hay Road from Cashmere Road.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is medium significance and is consistent with Section 2 of this report.

8.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects this assessment.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       This option was not consulted on but was developed as a result of feedback. The feedback influencing this option was provided by the local residents group as detailed in Section 5.6.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       The proposal is consistent with the following policies: The Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan (2012 - 2042) identifies the need to provide safe roads with cycling and walking infrastructure.

Financial Implications

8.7       Cost of Implementation – The overall budget for this project is $3.765 million.

8.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Additional maintenance items in the proposed scheme include signals and renewing the green cycle lane paint.

8.9       Funding source – 15 September 2016 Council approved a resolution bringing the scheduled improvements for the Cashmere Rd/ Hoon Hay Rd / Worsleys Rd intersection forward in the Long Term Plan.

Legal Implications

8.10    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions, traffic restrictions and controls by resolution.

8.11    Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations. The list of delegations for the Community Boards included the resolution of parking and stopping restrictions, traffic restrictions and traffic control devices.

8.12    The installation of any signs and/or markings must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

8.13    Resource Consent must be applied for to remove one (number) tree, located on the North of the Cashmere / Hoon Hay / Worsleys Intersection due to the height of the tree.

Risks and Mitigations   

8.14    The creation of an east bound left turn slip lane into Hoon Hay Road from Cashmere Road significantly reduces pedestrian safety. By changing the road alignment to fit the extended left turn lane in it reduces the visibility splay which can be achieved by a pedestrian waiting on the corner of Cashmere Road and Hoon Hay to use the zebra crossing.

Implementation

8.15    Implementation dependencies - Requires Community Board approval of kerb alignment changes, traffic controls and parking restrictions.

8.16    Requires Council approval of parking restrictions, traffic restrictions, cycle lanes and controls by resolution.

8.17    Resource Consent approval.

8.18    Implementation timeframe - Construction is proposed to commence in mid-2018 and last for approximately four to five months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.19    The advantages of this option include:

·   Signalisation of the Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worselys Road intersection

Allows greater control over the traffic movements for current and future traffic flows through the intersection.

Allows for safer control of future traffic flows

Allows improved journey time reliability and safety of passenger transport vehicles.

Traffic calming on local roads to reduce speeds and reduce rat running.

·   Installation of safe cycling facilities on all approaches to the intersection

·   Improved pedestrian safety.

·   Additional traffic calming on local roads, to slow vehicle speeds and discourage rat running.

·   Increased capacity for left turning movement from Cashmere Road into Hoon Hay Road

8.20    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Significant reduction to pedestrian safety, as by changing the road alignment to fit the extended left turn lane in it reduces the visibility splay which can be achieved by a pedestrian waiting on the corner of Cashmere Road and Hoon Hay to use the zebra crossing.

·   A reduction in landscaping due to the removal of the berms

·   Requires the existing power cable to be undergrounded at a significant cost.

·   The proposal includes the removal of 31 car parking spaces.

·   Increased constructions costs of approximately $600,000.

9.   Option 4 (Do nothing)

Option Description

9.1       Do nothing.

Significance

9.2       The level of significance of this option is medium significance and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

9.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

9.4       This option was not consulted on, however there has been ongoing community support for changes to be made at this intersection through media articles and local resident discussions with elected members. It is anticipated that the local community would not be supportive of this option.  There were no comments received during the consultation specifically supporting a ‘do nothing’ option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

9.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

9.6       Not applicable.

Legal Implications

9.7       None.

Risks and Mitigations   

9.8       There is a risk of adverse public reaction and damage to Council’s reputation if the project does not proceed after consulting with the public on options for safety improvements.

9.9       As volumes increase at this intersection there will be a higher risk of conflicts.

Implementation

9.10    There are no changes required.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

9.11    The advantages of this option include:

·   No loss of parking

9.12    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Delays at the intersection will increase as flows increase as it will not be controlled in an effective manner.

·   With the additional traffic there will be a higher risk of collisions at the intersection and decreased journey time reliability and safety for passenger transport due to the increased traffic flows.

·   Rat running on Mavin Road and Kaiwara Street is likely to get worse due to additional delays on Hoon Hay Road, which will have a detrimental impact on the safety of these two roads.

·   Speeds of vehicles in Mavin and Kaiwara Street will not be reduced.

·   No improvement to cycle safety.

·   No improvement to pedestrian safety.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Attachment A - Drawing A

 

b 

Attachment B - Drawing B

 

c 

Attachment C - Consultation leaflet

 

d 

Attachment D - Feedback form

 

e 

Attachment E- Map of all submissions A3

 

f 

Attachment F - Cashmere Road Intersection Improvements map of speed hump submissions

 

g 

Attachment G - Consultation Analysis

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Andy Richards - Project Manager

Tara King - Senior Engagement Advisor

William Homewood - Traffic Engineer - Investigation & Design

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Approved By

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

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Council

07 December 2017

 

 

15.    Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1380610

Contact:

Shupayi Mpunga

shupayi.mpunga@ccc.govt.nz

941 6605

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in November 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held meetings on 6 and 22 November 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved:

·   Parking restrictions in:

·   Marama Crescent, Mt Pleasant

·   Clydesdale Street, Woolston

·   Nayland Street, Sumner

·   Garlands Road, Hillsborough

·   Soleares Avenue, Redcliffs

·   Avonside Drive, outside of Avonside Girls High

·   Lancaster Street, Waltham.

·   Worcester Street Removal of Accessible Parking Space.

·   Richardson Terrace, Proposed Right of Way Naming.

·   Risingholme Hall, Removal of the Rishingholme Hall from the Council’s List 3 Heritage Building List.

·   Funding contributions from the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Discretionary Response Fund for:

·   Avebury House towards the Spring Gala.

·   Heathcote Valley School towards sails for the school.

·   Addington Neighbourhood Association towards the History of Addington Book.

·   Waltham School Recycling Project

·   Sunrise Seats for Edmunds Factory Gardens.

·   Funding contributions from the Woolston Park Amateur Swimming Club Special Fund for Linwood Avenue Community Pool.

·   To apply to the Chairperson of the District Licensing Committee to appear and be heard on behalf of the Christchurch City Council to the Liquor Licensing Application for 375 Ferry Road.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

·        Linwood Village – Proposed Liquor Ban;

·        Linwood/Woolston Aquatic Facility – Best Practice Accessibility Standards;

·        Roads and Rights of Way Naming Policy Review; and

·        Wilson Park – Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Institute of Canterbury Campus.

5.   Significant Community Issues

Ferrymead Heritage Park

5.1       Status

5.1.1   Ferrymead Heritage Park Limited made a presentation to the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board in June 2017.  They outlined their plans for developing the visitor experience, increasing venue hire and social enterprise opportunities, collaborating with key organisations and experimenting with different kinds of events for different demographics.  In July 2017 a number of City Councillors and Community Board members visited the park, took part in a mock wedding and heard a presentation from staff about future social enterprise opportunities that were being explored.

5.1.2   Since then, the Park has continued to innovate in the events it holds, in its promotions and planning for future directions.  Some of the highlights of the last three months include:

·    Toddler Thursday will now be run twice a year, in the first and last terms.  Last time the event was held it attracted 340 adults and 320 pre-schoolers.  The next one is on 2 November.

·    Blast in the Past is a new event aimed at the 50 plus age group, the first one to be held on 30 November.

·    Dogs Day Out, held in collaboration with the Christchurch City Council, as part of The Breeze Walking Festival, attracted 320 people and 185 dogs and was very successful in demonstrating both the need and the feasibility of a dog park being established in the area.

The experiment with reduced admission fees has proved a great success in attracting more people to use the Park. For instance, school holiday attendance in October 2017 was almost double the attendance in October 2016.  There has also been a big increase in the use of family passes resulting in a three-fold increase in the number of families attending the Park.

5.1.3   In the medium term Ferrymead Park Limited is working towards becoming a home for traditional craft skills.  This will involve providing a place for practitioners of traditional crafts to practice their craft, demonstrate their skills to the public, offer items for sale and provide workshops and the like to the public.  To achieve this, the feasibility of converting some of the buildings with passive museum like displays into active work and shop spaces is being investigated.  

5.1.4   Ferrymead Park Limited is becoming more involved in community collaborations and partnerships.  For example, initial discussions have been held with Council’s Heritage Team to explore how the Park might become more actively involved with partnering with the Council on mutual heritage projects or priorities. For example this might include exploring the ways “intangible heritage” might be preserved, promoted and displayed and the development of heritage trails. 

5.2       Action

5.2.1   Ferrymead Park Limited staff and Board members are working with staff from Partnership Approvals, Building Consenting Unit at the Christchurch City Council to investigate what is required to convert buildings with passive displays to active workshop spaces

Heathcote Menz Shed

5.3       Status

5.3.1   The Hagley Ferrymead Community Board has previously supported the development of a Heathcote Community Shed including investigating using the former Heathcote Valley Community Library site in Martindales Road.

5.3.2   The Heathcote Community Shed Trust has indicated that they would like to reactivate moves to establish a Community Shed in Heathcote.

5.3.3   The Trust, with the assistance of the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Governance Team, has recently undertaken a survey to gauge interest in establishing a Community Shed.  Key results include:

·    A total of 61 responses were received, with 59 supporting the establishment of a Community Shed in Heathcote.

·    52 of the 61 respondents said they would use a Community Shed in Heathcote if one were established.

·    A total of 24 respondents indicated that they be interested in being part of establishing a Community Shed.

5.3.4   On 3 July 2017 the Board received a Property Review Process report. The report lists the properties in the Board’s area that are no longer required, or being utilised, for the purpose that they were originally purchased.  The report was provided to initiate the process of making future decisions about the use of the land.

5.3.5   The site at 8 Martindales Road was identifies as a property for review with the comment that any use would need to be compatible with the Reserves Act. 

5.4       Action

5.4.1   All those interested in establishing a Community Shed in Heathcote will meet to discuss next steps in the next few months.

5.4.2   The Heathcote Community Shed Trust requests the assistance of the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board in obtaining the vacant site at 8 Martindales Road as a site for the Community Shed.

Inner City East Revitalisation Plan

5.5       Status

5.5.1   Te Whare Roimata has received $80,000 from the Community Resilience Partnership Fund for each of 2017-18 and 2018-19 for a community-led revitalisation and regeneration project in the Inner City East area.  Funding for the second year will depend on a satisfactory monitoring report after the first year.  A further $10,000 has been allocated to undertake an evaluation of the project.

5.5.2   The project team has met and planned an initial road map to develop the project scope and governance structure.  The first public engagement will be a workshop on 31 October 2017 to establish the themes people would like to see covered in the plan.  Information from a community survey conducted by Te Whare Roimata earlier in the year will form the basis of these discussions.  Further community engagements around possible themes will be undertaken including at the Te Whare Roimata Market Day on 4 November 2017.

5.5.3   The community survey identified issues around safety and crime, poverty, rubbish, loss of shops and housing, a sense of degradation of the area and a lack of outdoor and green spaces.  The survey also identified the need to enhance the positive aspects of the area including the sense of community and connectedness, the location close to the CBD and the availability community facilities and events.

5.5.4   A tiny shops, micro village is proposed for the Linwood Village area. The proposed site is adjacent to the Greening the Rubble temporary park at 108 Stanmore Road.  Five tiny shops will be provided for purposes that will be put forward by the community.  The purpose of the tiny shops project is to stimulate economic activity in centres with a high proportion of vacant sites by providing a space for businesses and services that will serve the local community.  Other initiatives, such as rates incentives, will be used to encourage more permanent developments in the area.  Tiny shops are provided to businesses or organisations at no cost, who will then pay lease costs to the land owner once the establishment period has been met.

5.5.5   The New Zealand Police have expressed renewed concern at some public behaviour in the Doris Lusk Park area and are considering whether either a temporary or permanent liquor ban in the area is the appropriate way forward. 

 

6.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

6.1       Linwood Village Social and Alcohol Issues - During public forum at its meeting on 6 November 2017 the Board heard from 10 individuals, including two constables from New Zealand Police, about the need for an alcohol ban in the Linwood Village area.  The Board heard from the speakers about the issues of public drinking and the effects of this in the Linwood Village area that include:

6.1.1   There is a group of men, some of who are homeless who spend time at Doris Lusk Reserve, a temporary Gapfiller park and the general shopping area, who residents report make them feel unsafe due to their appearance and antisocial behaviour;

6.1.2   Local residents feel intimidated by those who are drinking at Doris Lusk Reserve and the temporary park.  This includes some men who are homeless and who people feel intimidated by;

6.1.3   Business owners feel that the drinking in front of business premises makes local people feel unsafe going into these premises.  The impact has been that businesses suffer loss of potential earnings and makes it difficult for businesses to operate viably;

6.1.4   People feel unsafe at night due to the noise made by the group particularly at night.  There are times when there is fighting witnessed at Doris Lusk Reserve.  This makes residents feel very unsafe; and

6.1.5   Behaviours that suggest drug use and trafficking by some members of the group, begging by a couple of people (not necessarily part of this group), and general antisocial behaviour.

6.1.6   The Board made the follow resolutions at its meeting of 6 November 2017:

That the Board recommend to the Council to implement a temporary alcohol ban from 2017/18 summer while staff investigate the implementing a permanent alcohol ban and for the Council to install close circuit cameras on the Gloucester Street/Stanmore Road intersection.

That the Board write to the District Commander, Canterbury New Zealand Police, with a copy to the Minister of Police, to request increased policing in Linwood Village area to combat excessive antisocial behaviour including public drinking, drug trafficking and drug use.

6.2       Sumner Library Operating Hours - at the Board’s 15 November 2017 meeting the Board requested staff advice regarding operating hours for the reopened Sumner Library, including the current demand and options for increasing weekend opening hours, before the Board needs to consider its submission to the Long Term Plan.  The Board have requested staff to look at an innovative way to increase the opening hours for Saturdays.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Shupayi Mpunga - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 6 November 2017

 

16.    Linwood Village - Proposed Liquor Ban

Reference:

17/1381352

Contact:

Shupayi Mpunga

shupayi.mpunga@ccc.govt.nz

941 6605

 

 

 

1.   Consideration

 

The Board’s Area Report reported to the Board at its 6 November 2017 meeting:

New Zealand Police Community Constables for the Linwood area, has identified the reoccurrence of alcohol issues in the in Linwood Village, Doris Lusk Park area and would like the Community Board to consider the introduction of alcohol restrictions as a response.

Issues identified by the constables include:

Elderly people shopping in the area feel unsafe because of people drinking alcohol on the street front, outside the shops and in the park. A number of local residents no longer use the local shopping facilities because of the issues.

A number of business owners feel unsafe when they are arriving and leaving for work.

A number of business owners feel their business is suffering because of people being scared to be in the area.

Business owners and residents have identified the problem with rubbish, such as bottles, cans and general rubbish, being left in public places throughout the day.

Incidents of public drinking and synthetic drug use are frequently observed in patrols of the area.

Bus stops in the area are being used for sitting and drinking and are sometimes not available for people waiting for the bus.  A number of people have indicated they will not allow their children to use these bus stops because of the drunk and abusive behaviour.

The possibility of imposing alcohol restrictions in the area was considered in 2014 for very similar reasons. At the time staff recommended not to introduce a ban.  Included in the reasons was advice from the New Zealand Police that, at the time, they did not consider the public consumption of alcohol a big enough problem in the area and that “their time and resources were insufficient to enforce a ban”.

The issues of public drinking and drug use and rubbish in the area have been identified as early issues to be addresses as part of the Inner City East Revitalisation Project.

 

After receiving many public forum presentations from residents and business owners from the Linwood Village area and the NZ Police the Board at the Board’s 6 November 2017 meeting the Board agreed to recommend to the Council to investigate a liquor ban for Linwood Village.

 

The Board have also written to the District Commander, Canterbury to requested increased policing within the Linwood Village environs.

 


 

 

2.   Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

That the Council:

1.      Direct staff to install close circuit cameras on the Gloucester Street/Stanmore Road intersection to improve safety of the community in those areas.

2.      Request staff to investigate a permanent alcohol ban in public places in the Linwood Village area including Doris Lusk Reserve.

3.      Request staff to urgently investigate a temporary alcohol ban in public places in the immediate area of the Linwood Village including Doris Lusk Reserve to take effect for the 2017/18 summer onwards.

 

3.   Staff Comment following the Community Board Meeting

 

The Part A recommendation from the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board regarding the installation of closed circuit cameras on the Gloucester Street/Stanmore Road intersection to improve safety on the community in those area does not meet the decision making requirements of the Local Government Act. It is recommended that if the Council wishes to consider this matter that it requests a report from staff to allow proper consideration of the issue prior to making a decision.

Suggested Reccomendations:

That the Council

1.    Request staff report back to the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board on ways to mitigate problems with behaviour in public places in the Linwood Village area and Doris Lusk Reserve, including consideration of measures such as installation of close circuit cameras.

2.    Request staff to investigate a permanent alcohol ban in public places in the Linwood Village area including Doris Lusk Reserve.

3.    Request staff to urgently investigate a temporary alcohol ban in public places in the immediate area of the Linwood Village including Doris Lusk Reserve to take effect for the 2017/18 summer onwards.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 6 November 2017

 

17.    Linwood/Woolston Aquatic Facility - Best Practice Accessibility Standards

Reference:

17/1381560

Contact:

Shupayi Mpunga

shupayi.mpunga@ccc.govt.nz

941 6605

 

 

 

1.   Consideration

 

Representatives from the Barrier Free New Zealand Trust (BFNZT) and the Earthquake Disability Leadership Group (EDLG) made a presentation to the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board on 16 October 2017 on the development of the Accessibility Charter and the need for full accessibility features to be built into the design brief, design and construction of the proposed Linwood Woolston Aquatic facility

The Accessibility Charter will commit all signatories to model best-practice accessibility through all of their work by providing leadership, education, technical knowledge and promoting the link between accessible places and spaces and health and well-being. It is anticipated that the Christchurch City Council will become one of the initial signatories when the Charter is launched in early November 2017

Both BFNZT and EDLG have been involved in significant projects that have included as an objective providing fully accessible facilities, including involvement in the design of the Metro Sports facility.  That experience has lead the two organisations to believe that fully accessible facilities require:

·    Barrier free auditing and reporting to be conducted at all key stages of a project; concept development, design and construction

·    Audits to be done by independent accessibility specialists

·    Consultation with disabled people and their organisations to provide a user perspective.

 

2.    Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

That the Council:

1.      Request staff to design the proposed Linwood Woolston Aquatic Facility to best practice accessibility standards by:

a.         Ensuring barrier free auditing and reporting are conducted at all key stages of the project; concept development, design and construction.

b.         Audits are done by independent accessibility specialists.

c.          Audits include consultation with people with disabilities and their organisations to provide a user perspective.

 


 

 

3.   Staff Comment following the Community Board Meeting

 

Suggested alternative recommendation from staff:

That the Council:

1.              Request staff to design the proposed Linwood Woolston Aquatic Facility to best practice accessibility standards (above minimum code requirements) by:

a.              Ensuring barrier free auditing and reporting are conducted at all key stages of the project; concept development, design and construction.

b.             Audits are done by independent accessibility specialists.

c.              Audits include consultation with people with disabilities and their organisations to provide a user perspective.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 22 November 2017

 

18.    Wilson Park - Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Institute of Canterbury Campus

Reference:

17/1387866

Contact:

Russel Wedge

russel.wedge@ccc.govt.nz

941 8270

 

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Endorse the landscape changes proposed for Wilson Park as part of the Ara Institute of Canterbury Campus High Street entrance upgrade as detailed on the Developed Concept Plan – High Street Entrance (Stage 2) Dated 18.09.2017 by Align Planning and Design (Attachment 1), and

 

2.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Community Board Recommendation to Council

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve the proposed landscape changes to Wilson Park as part of the ARA campus High Street entrance upgrade, as detailed on the Developed Concept Plan – High Street Entrance (Stage 2) Dated 18.09.2017 by Align Planning and Design (Attachment 1).

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Wilson Park - Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Institute of Canterbury Campus

166

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Wilson Park Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Campus

173

 

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

Wilson Park - Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Institute of Canterbury Campus

Reference:

17/1260299

Contact:

Russel Wedge

Russel.wedge@ccc.govt.nz

941-8270

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to endorse and recommend to the Council to approve the proposed landscape changes to Wilson Park by ARA Institute of Canterbury (ARA), Madras Street Campus to improve the safety and accessibility of students, staff and visitors to ARA campus, refer Attachment 1.

1.2       The Delegations Register, section 5(b) states:

The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board does not have delegated authority to determine these matters for the area situation within the Central City Area marked on Plan A (at page 186 of this Delegations Register). Reports on these matters must come directly to the Council.

1.3       Wilson Park is situated within the Central City Area.

Origin of Report

1.4       This report is staff generated originating from a request from ARA Madras Street Campus who are proposing to redevelop the entranceway from Wilson Park to the ARA campus.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision of this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the significance matrix. 

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board:

1.         Endorse the landscape changes proposed for Wilson Park as part of the Ara Institute of Canterbury Campus High Street entrance upgrade as detailed on the Developed Concept Plan – High Street Entrance (Stage 2) Dated 18.09.2017 by Align Planning and Design (Attachment 1), and

2.         Recommend to the Council to approve the proposed landscape changes to Wilson Park as part of the ARA campus High Street entrance upgrade, as detailed on the Developed Concept Plan – High Street Entrance (Stage 2) Dated 18.09.2017 by Align Planning and Design (Attachment 1)

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Neighbourhood Parks

·     Level of Service: 6.0.3 Overall customer satisfaction with neighbourhood parks

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Redesign of Wilson Park Entrance to ARA Campus (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Status Quo – No Redevelopment of Entranceway Through Wilson Park

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·   A safer entranceway is provided for students, staff and visitors entering the campus through Wilson Park from High Street.

·   The new entranceway will comply with Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) for safety standards.

·   The removal of the steps, which are being replaced with a ramp will provide full accessibility for disabled users.

·   The redesign and construction is being fully funded and project managed by ARA.

·   The Council is working in partnership with ARA for the benefit of the community.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·   There will be a temporary disruption to one area of Wilson Park while the new entranceway is being constructed.

 

5.   Background

Background

5.1       The entrance to the ARA campus from High Street is through Wilson Park. Students and visitors to the campus have to walk alongside high plastered concrete walls and up a number of steps to enter the campus grounds.

5.2       The high solid walls with mature trees and shrubs growing behind them create Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) safety issues. There is the potential for people to hide behind the walls and amongst the plants creating safety issues for students and visitors walking into the campus from Wilson Park.

5.3       To enter the campus from Wilson Park there are a number of steps that people are required to navigate. There is no ramp for people to use within close proximity to the steps when entering the campus from Wilson Park.

The Proposal

5.4       ARA are proposing to redesign the area between Wilson Park and ARA campus to improve the safety and accessibility for students and visitors entering the park from High Street.

5.5       The majority of the proposed landscape construction will occur on land owned by the ARA campus. There is a small section of the existing entranceway on Wilson Park between the ‘Passing Time’ sculpture on the corner of High and St. Asaph Street, and the ARA campus that ARA would like to redesign. The re-design includes removing the plastered concrete wall and steps leading into the campus. The mature trees and shrubs on Council land will be retained. There is one small tree that is in poor health on the northern boundary of ARA land, next to the U Block area that has been identified by our arborist to be removed (identified on the plan with a red dotted circle). All of the other trees identified to be removed are on ARA land.

5.6       New timber lighting poles will be installed, funded by ARA along the redesigned entranceway through Wilson Park.

5.7       ARA have agreed to fund the redesign of the construction and landscaping proposed on Wilson Park. ARA believe the redesign will provide a safer access and environment for students, visitors and staff when entering the campus through Wilson Park.

6.   Content

ARA Redevelopment Vision

6.1       Using modern and flexible learning facilities, ARA strive to create a contemporary educational environment that draws upon the traditional ‘classroom’ but is flexible to be carried out in a wide range of facilities on campus, with an increasing emphasis on collaboration.

6.2       The campus grounds will create human scaled spaces, defined by buildings or high quality landscapes to make spaces friendlier and more inviting places.

6.3       ARA will have vitality, comfort and access to technology that will be appealing to students, staff, visitors and those contemplating study at the campus. This will be through producing social spaces offering a welcoming environment to the campus, to encourage people to enjoy, share with others, reflect and have fun.

6.4       Students will be trained in a leading learning environment, producing high quality graduates that will have had the best possible campus experience and skills required to contribute to the revitalisation of Christchurch.

Safety and Accessibility

6.5       The proposal will take into account CPTED requirements. The current landscaping on campus has areas which are felt to be dangerous and unsafe.  The area is designed for safe pathways, such as increasing visibility by utilising low shrub planting and providing sufficient after-hours lighting. With the improvement of pathways and sight lines through the campus, CPTED requirements will be met and safe night navigation achieved.

6.6       The improvement of accessibility around ARA is also a major priority.  To create flush transitions between pedestrian and vehicle access routes on campus, the design aims to reduce the number of kerbs and steps. The use of minimal gradient ramps will give wheel chair access to all raised lawn areas or sunken areas. 

6.7       The design has been developed with the use of different paving materials to make the navigation of the campus easier for students and to provide a defined central pathway running through the entire length of the campus. These also relate to the room and building numbering system and wayfinding principles.

6.8       Accessibility is also achieved through the implementation of key visual markers and consistent repetitive elements. The use of sculptures, and visual cues are an important part of navigation and should support the visually impaired.

Ecology Sustainability

6.9       The softs landscape palette has been chosen to give the campus year round seasonal variety, colour and leaf interest.  Species are all hardy to the Canterbury environment and will be locally sourced. 

6.10    Part of ARA’s values and vision include the utilisation and expression of sustainable techniques around the campus. This means the use of design principles to shape and define the overall campus master plan, at a macro and micro scale.

6.11    Low energy consumption lighting is proposed for the campus with LED lighting being predominant, with this also helping to reduce ongoing maintenance costs.

6.12    The developed design has predominantly been designed with native species with the inclusion of some exotic species to add colour and seasonal variety.  The use of native species will mean less water consumption and lower maintenance costs. By retaining existing tree and shrub planting where possible, budget costs will be kept down and cost savings can be made.  Plants specified should be sourced from local suppliers to ensure that they are hardened to the Canterbury environment.

6.13    High quality durable materials are to be used and will also be of local supply.  All paving and concrete products will be sourced from the Canterbury region. Any timber specified should be sustainably grown in the Canterbury region (Macrocarpa timber).

6.14    The design retains as many existing trees as possible and incorporate both native and exotic species.

Cultural Design Vision

6.15    The ARA campus is a culturally diverse environment. The landscape will look to embrace and showcase the different cultures.  There are a number of cultural symbolisms and artworks in the campus landscaping plan.

6.16    A performance area has been created in the North Green to allow for a variety of uses including multi-cultural displays. The South Green area will recognise other cultures and will include a Chinese Tiled Gate structure using tiles presented to ARA by the Christchurch sister cities association. 

6.17    There has been engagement throughout the design process with Maori stakeholders at Ara with a review of the developed design held with the Ara Kaiarahi. The final detailed design will also be reviewed and developed with this key stakeholder group’s involvement.

6.18    The intention of the High street entry is to connect the city with the Te Puna Wanaka (the main centre in Ara for Māori and Pasifika learning and engagement) landscape already on Campus which looks to embrace Maori and Pasifika culture and to create a series of spaces which allow for waiting, welcoming, gathering and performing.

6.19    The overall landscaping project should embrace different cultures on campus to showcase the valuable layers, stories and meanings they provide to the campus and its inhabitants

6.20    Key areas observed in the design include the memorial plaques that are directly related to specific trees and shrubs.  The linkages of memorial spaces are considered in the design.

 


 

7.   Option 1 – Redesign of Wilson Park Entrance to ARA Campus (preferred)

Option Description

7.1       ARA campus are proposing to redesign and construct the entranceway from Wilson Park into the ARA Campus. The proposed design will increase the safety and accessibility for visitors, students and staff entering the campus from the High Street entrance.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are consistent with the community engagement proposed by ARA Campus, which includes regular updates to the students and staff on Campus.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

7.5       ARA has maintained engagement with the ARA Kaiarahi on the proposed development. ARA states:

The intention of the High street entry is to connect the city with the Te Puna Wanaka (the main centre in Ara for Māori and Pasifika learning and engagement) landscape already on Campus which looks to embrace Maori and Pasifika culture and to create a series of spaces which allow for waiting, welcoming, gathering and performing.

 

Community Views and Preferences

7.6       The ARA campus have undertaken consultation with the students and staff who use the campus and specifically to ensure the campus entrance is catering for a diverse range of people and abilities.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies to provide a safe and accessible city.

Financial Implications Cost of Implementation - <enter text>

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – no significant change to maintenance costs as the area is already being maintained as part of the Council’s park maintenance contracts.

7.9       Funding source – The redesign and construction is being funded by ARA campus. There is no funding requirements from Council.

Legal Implications

7.10    The health and safety requirements will be implemented by ARA campus as part of their overall re-development of the campus.

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    There is a minimal, if any risk to Council as ARA will be responsible for the health and safety requirements for the development of the site. The Council’s reserve land within the area of development occupies a small area of the development site with the majority of the construction area on ARA land.

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies - The implementation of the entrance way on Wilson Park is dependent on the Council, as land owner giving their permission for work on the park.

7.13    Implementation timeframe – ARA are proposing to have the majority of the work completed while students are on Christmas break.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   A safer entranceway is provided for students, staff and visitors entering the campus through Wilson Park from High Street.

·   The new entranceway will comply with CPTED for safety standards.

·   The removal of the steps, which are being replaced with a ramp will provide full accessibility for disabled users.

·   The redesign and construction is being fully funded and project managed by ARA.

·   The Council is working in partnership with ARA for the benefit of the community.

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   There will be a temporary disruption to one area of Wilson Park while the new entranceway is being constructed.

8.   Option 2 – Status Quo – No Redevelopment of Entranceway Through Wilson Park

Option Description

8.1       The Council declines to give permission as landowner for any redesign and construction on Wilson Park.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is high and inconsistent with section 2 of this report.

8.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance would have a direct impact on people using Wilson Park to enter the ARA campus. The current status quo is below the desirable standard for CPTED and is not fully accessible by disabled people entering the ARA campus from Wilson Park.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       The students, staff and visitors using Wilson Park to enter and leave the ARA campus are specifically affected by this option due to the inaccessibility created by the steps.  Their views to create an accessible entrance that also meets CPTED requirements would not be met.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.6.1   Inconsistency – the current entrance is not accessible for disabled people.

8.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - the current entrance is not accessible for disabled people

8.6.3   Amendment necessary – to select Option 1.

Financial Implications

8.7       Cost of Implementation – there are no changes to the current situation.

8.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – status quo remains

8.9       Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

8.10    No legal implications at the moment.

Risks and Mitigations

8.11    There is a risk the Council could be seen by the public as not taking the opportunity to ensure their parks are safe and accessible to everyone.

Implementation

8.12    Implementation dependencies  - not applicable

8.13    Implementation timeframe – not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   There are no advantages to this option

8.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Council is not providing a fully accessible route through Wilson Park to the ARA campus

·   Council is not ensuring the public have a CPTED safe route through Wilson Park to the ARA

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Wilson Park Redevelopment Proposal to ARA Campus

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Russel Wedge - Senior Network Planner Parks

Approved By

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

19.    Appointment of Recess Committee 2017/18

Reference:

17/1357353

Contact:

Jo Daly

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

941 8581

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to resolve to appoint a Recess Committee to consider any issues that require a Council decision from the period of 21 December 2017 to 25 January 2018.  

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Appoint a Recess Committee comprising of the Mayor or Deputy Mayor or [insert name of Councillor] and a minimum of any three Councillors (quorum Mayor or Deputy Mayor or [insert name of Councillor] and three councillors) to be authorised to make any decisions of the Council for the period between 21 December 2017 and 25 January 2018 (both days inclusive).

2.         Note that notice of any meeting of the Recess Committee be publicised and forwarded to all Councillors, all of whom can participate.

3.         Note that any decisions made will be reported to the Council for record purposes.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       There is a period of approximately five weeks between the last ordinary Council meeting of 2017 and the first ordinary Council meeting of 2018.  It is recommended, as is standard practice, that the Council establish a Recess Committee and authorise it to deal with any issues requiring a Council decision that cannot wait until the first ordinary meeting of 2018, on 25 January 2018.

3.2       It is proposed that a Recess Committee appointed comprising [the Mayor or Deputy Mayor or [insert name of Councillor] and a minimum of any three Councillors, with the quorum being the Mayor or Deputy Mayor or [insert name of Councillor] and three Councillors. 

3.3       Notice of any meeting of the Recess Committee will be publicised and forwarded to all Councillors, all of whom can participate.

3.4       Any decisions made by the Recess Committee will be reported to the Council for record purposes.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

20.    Remuneration Authority Local Government Review Consultation Document Part three - Draft Council Comment

Reference:

17/1386827

Contact:

Jo Daly

jo.daly@ccc.govt.nz

941 8581

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       This report is to enable the Council to adopt its comment (Attachment A) to the Remuneration Authority Consultation Document Local Government Review, Part three – Longer Term Proposals.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Adopt the draft comment on the Consultation Document Local Government Review Part three – Longer Term Proposals as attached for submission to the Remuneration Authority.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       The Remuneration Authority (Authority) contacted all Councils in May 2017 with a consultation document on Local Government Review (Attachment B), seeking comment from local government on proposals for immediate changes (Part two) and Longer Term Proposals (Part three).

3.2       Under the Local Government Act 2002 the Remuneration Authority sets the base remuneration for all elected members of local authorities including community boards.  It also sets allowances and expenses.  In undertaking its duties, the Authority is obliged to have regard to the need to minimise potential for behaviour distortion, maintain fair relativity with other levels of remuneration elsewhere, be fair to both elected members and ratepayers, and attract and retain competent persons.  The Remuneration Authority document on Remuneration Setting for Local Authorities is attached (Attachment C). 

3.3       The Remuneration Authority has noted that it is seeking the views of Councils on the proposals, not of individual elected members or staff.

3.4       In June 2017 the Council adopted its comment on Part two – Proposed Immediate Changes (2017 Determination) which was submitted to the Remuneration Authority on 22 June 2017.  The Remuneration Authority’s determination was issued in August 2017.

3.5       Part three – Longer Term Proposals:

·        The Authority is seeking the views of local government on longer term proposals that will affect elected mayors, chairs, councillors and community board members from every council except Auckland.

·        The timeframe for feedback from Councils was extended to 15 December 2017.

3.6       The consultation document was provided to all elected members during the compilation of comment on part two and part three and feedback solicited. 

3.7       This draft comment on the longer term proposals in the consultation document has been compiled from input provided to staff at a Councillor briefing, a Combined Community Board Seminar, discussion with Community Board Chairpersons and feedback provided by elected members. 

3.8       The draft comment was circulated to all elected members in October for feedback and discussed with Councillors in November.

3.9       In October the Remuneration Authority presented to Local Government New Zealand Zone Meetings on the proposals within the consultation document.

3.10    Additionally, the Remuneration Authority held webinars on the consultation document on 13 November 2017, all elected members were invited to attend one of the three webinars held. 

3.11    The Remuneration Authority have indicated that after consultation closes on 15 December 2017 it will consider and make decisions on the proposals in time for any changes to remuneration to be in place for the 2019 local authority elections.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Christchurch City Council Feedback - Remuneration Authority Consultation Document Local Government Review

179

b

Consultation Document - Local Government Review

187

c

Remuneration Setting for Local Authorities

217

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Jo Daly - Council Secretary

Libby Elvidge - Policy Analyst

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

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Council

07 December 2017

 

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Council

07 December 2017

 

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Council

07 December 2017

 

 

21.    2017/18 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund

Reference:

17/1360319

Contact:

Nicola Thompson

nicola.thompson@ccc.govt.nz

941 8937

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to consider an application for funding from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

57269

START Trust

START Trust Operations

$22,500

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from START Inc.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Approves a grant of $13,000 to START Trust towards START Trust Operations for telephone, power and salary of the Manager.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$228,260

$114,610

$113,650

$100,650

 

3.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

3.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2017/18 Metropolitan Discretionary Response Fund Decision Matrix START Trust December 2017

249

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Nicola Thompson - Community Funding Advisor

Mike Pursey - Team Leader Community Funding

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

PDF Creator


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

22.    Linwood/Woolston Pool

Reference:

17/1385089

Contact:

John Filsell

john.filsell@ccc.govt.nz

0274448796

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to consider delegating the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope for the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the Linwood Central Heathcote Community Board (LCH Board), with recommendations reported back to Council.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to fulfil Council resolution CNCL/2017/00311.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by understanding that this decision relates to the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope for the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool by the LCH Board with recommendations reported back to Council.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Council:

1.         Delegate the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the Linwood Central Heathcote Community Board, with recommendations reported back to Council noting that;

a.         Community consultation is based upon the parameters of the project detailed in the 2015/2025 Long Term Plan as amended by the 2017/2018 Annual Plan.

b.         Council’s Engagement Team will be available to advise any statutory or best practice requirements of the consultation.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Recreation and Sports Facilities

·     Level of Service: 7.0.1 Provide residents access to fit-for-purpose recreation and sporting facilities

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Delegate the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the LCH Board, with recommendations reported back to Council. (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do not delegate the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the LCH Board.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The LCH Board are best placed to engage with their local community on a local facility.

·     The rationale underlying the provision of a community pool in Linwood/Woolston reflects the imperative to meet unique local community need and represent the distinct local cultural mix.  The LCH Board are best placed to understand how these can be translated into an initial scope and appropriate location.

·     The LCH Board have done considerable work to date, have a number opportunities for effective community consultation and are best placed to manage an efficient and effective process.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The LCH Board may be unaware of any statutory requirements or generic best-practice principles for community consultation over site and scope.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Council have proposed the development of a swimming pool in Linwood/Woolston in the 2015/2025 Long Term Plan as amended by the 2017/2018 Annual Plan.

5.2       The current phase of the project involves the selection of a site and an indicative scope.

5.3       Initial work has been done by the project team reporting to and seeking feedback from the LCH Board.  There is now a need for community consultation to inform decision making.

5.4       The LCH Board have asked for a delegation from the Council to initiate community consultation on site selection and initial scope.

6.   Option 1 - Delegate the initiation and operation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the LCH Board, with recommendations reported back to Council. (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Delegate the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the LCH Board, with recommendations reported back to Council.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       There are no engagement requirements for this level of significance for this decision as full community consultation on the site and initial scope of the pool will be undertaken.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.  Should this change as a result of community consultation on a site then this will be reported to Council before any further decision making is undertaken.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Community views have not been ascertained.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies as the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool is a level of service in the 2015/2025 Long Term Plan as amended by the 2017/2018 Annual Plan.  Community consultation over a local facility is an established core function of a Community Board.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – costs of community consultation are not significant especially as the LHC Board aim to leverage off a number of existing opportunities.

6.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - none

6.9       Funding source – existing Board funding for community engagement and, where appropriate the use of Council’s engagement team.

Legal Implications

 

6.10    Any legal implications that arise through site selection are likely to manifest when a recommendation from the board is considered by Council

 

Risks and Mitigations

6.11    There is a risk that the LCH Board may be unaware of any statutory requirements or generic best-practice principles for community consultation over site and scope.  This may result in a sub optimal consultation or legal issues for the project down-stream.

6.11.1 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) are implemented will be low.

6.11.2 Planned current treatment(s) include the LCH Board working with Councils Engagement Team where appropriate to inform any statutory or best practice aspects of the process.

6.12    There is a risk that the community will wish to engage with the LCH Board on areas of the project outside of site and scope.

6.12.1 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) are implemented will be low.

6.12.2 Planned current treatment(s) include the Council affirming that the extent of the delegation covers site and scope within the existing parameters of the 2015/2025 Long Term Plan as amended by the 2017/2018 Annual Plan.

Implementation

6.13    Implementation dependencies  - none

6.14    Implementation timeframe – the delegation would be effective immediately.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The LCH Board are best placed to engage with their local community on a local facility.

·   The rationale underlying the provision of a community pool in Linwood/Woolston reflects the imperative to meet unique local community need and represent the distinct local cultural mix.  The LCH Board are best placed to understand how these can be translated into an initial scope and appropriate location.

·   The LCH Board have done considerable work to date, have a number opportunities for effective community consultation and are best placed to manage an efficient and effective process.

6.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The LCH Board may be unaware of any statutory requirements or generic best-practice principles for community consultation over site and scope.

7.   Option 2 - Do not delegate the initiation and operation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the LCH Board.

Option Description

7.1       Do not delegate the initiation of community consultation on a site and initial scope of the proposed Linwood/Woolston pool to the LCH Board.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       There are no engagement requirements for this level of significance for this decision as full community consultation on the site and initial scope of the pool will be undertaken.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.  Should this change as a result of community consultation on a site then this will be reported to Council before any further decision making is undertaken.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Community views have not been ascertained.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

7.6.1   Inconsistency – Council has an expectation that community boards will engage with local communities over the location and scope of local facilities.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation - costs of community consultation are not significant and met from within existing budget noting that any potential leverage from a LCH Board led process will be lost.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - None

7.9       Funding source – existing funding for community engagement.

Legal Implications

7.10    Any legal implications that arise through site selection are likely to manifest when a recommendation from the board is considered by Council

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    There is a risk of a perception that Council doubts the appropriateness of the LCH Board to initiate and operate community consultation caused by the refusal to delegate.

7.11.1 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) is implemented will be high.

7.11.2 Planned treatment(s) include Council explaining the rationale behind its decision.

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies  - none

7.13    Implementation timeframe - none

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   Council have greater scope to focus the consultation on site and scope from a city-wide perspective.

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Council risk disenfranchising the local community and its elected Community Board.

·   The LCH Board are best placed to engage with their local community on a local facility.

·   The rationale underlying the provision of a community pool in Linwood/Woolston reflects the imperative to meet unique local community need and represent the distinct local cultural mix.  The LCH Board are best placed to understand how these can be translated into an initial scope and appropriate location.

·   The LCH Board have done considerable work to date, have a number opportunities for effective community consultation and are best placed to manage an efficient and effective process.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Filsell - Head of Recreation and Sports

Approved By

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

23.    Dudley Creek Flood Remediation

Reference:

17/1286370

Contact:

Martin Smith

martin.smith@ccc.govt.nz

941 8481

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1.  The purpose of this report is to seek approval from Council for an increase in the drawdown from the Land Drainage Recovery Programme for the Dudley Creek Flood Remediation Works aggregating the previously agreed value of $49.072M to $51.272M. This is an overall increase of $2.2M, which includes a contingency allowance. This represents an increase of 4.5% to the project budget.

Origin of Report

1.2.  This report is required to modify the resolution contained in the report to Council dated 13 August 2015 Item 31 (3.2). ‘Approve that the Director, Facilities and Infrastructure Rebuild, be granted Delegated Authority to award ECI and construction contracts based on packages of work up to the estimated cost of $48M.’ (HP Records Manager Number 15/804577).

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.2       The level of significance was determined by the level of community and media interest and definite tangible benefits to the wider community. There is a high amount of reputational risk to Council and an impact on Iwi, as this project involves a body of water.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Council:

1.         Approve an increase in drawdown from the Land Drainage Recovery Programme increasing the project budget from $49.072M to $51.272M

2.         Approve an increase in the delegated authority for the General Manager, City Services to award contracts up to the estimated cost of $51.272M.

a.         To ensure completion of the project

b.         Reduce the flood risk to at least pre-earthquake levels of risk in the Shirley Stream and Edgeware Road area

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025).

4.2       There is only one option to be considered:

·    Preferred Option – Increase the project drawdown by $2.2M to cover the unexpected costs to complete the project and return the Shirley Stream area, downstream of Shirley Road, and the Edgeware Road area to pre-earthquake levels of flood risk (preferred option).

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.4       The advantages of this option include:

·    The project can be completed in full and the flood risk can be returned to pre-earthquake levels of risk.

·    The Council can meet the Land Drainage Six Values in full with benefits for the local community.

·    Meets community expectations for the overall project objective.

·    The additional spend is to be met from savings that have been identified on the Bells Creek Project, LDRP501. The money is currently budgeted for a spend in FY19 and will need to be brought back into FY18.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Current Situation:

5.1       Work has already started on Shirley Stream and St Albans Creek and is well advanced. All the private bridges have been replaced and the culvert in Hills Road has been replaced. Work is underway on Slater Street culvert replacement and creek widening has started in Shirley Stream and St Albans Creek. It would not be cost effective to stop work due to committed spend on materials and work that would require to be completed. Therefore, the only practical option is to complete the works that have already been committed to on site.

5.2       The flood risk in the Flockton Street area has been returned to pre-earthquake levels of risk following creek widening to increase the capacity and construction of the by-pass culvert. This was achieved within the time frame specified by Council in 2015.

5.3       An increase in the capacity of St Albans Creek is partly complete with the replacement of the culverts in Hills Road and Stapletons Road. Work on Slater Street culvert replacement has commenced.

5.4       Creek widening work along St Albans Creek, between Hills Road and Stapletons Road, has started in 2 areas with the construction of new timber retained banks. It is proving to be particularly difficult gaining access due to the high number of private property owners.

5.5       It is expected that work along St Albans Creek will be completed by the end of June 2018.

5.6       The consequences of not approving the additional drawdown would mean that the Shirley Stream area, downstream of Shirley Road, and the Edgeware Road area, downstream of Champion Street, would not be returned to pre-earthquake levels of flood risk. The work that has already started would have to be completed, or stopped, depending on how far the works has progressed and would result in considerable cost due to the commitment already made in purchase of materials and contractual commitments. The Council’s reputation would also be at risk if the works were not completed.

Project Budget:

5.7       The current spend to the end of October is $45M out of the original budget of $49.072M.

5.8       In summary the unexpected cost are:

·    The replacement culvert in Shirley Road was more expensive than originally forecast. This was delivered by SCIRT on behalf of Council but was fully funded by the Dudley Creek project.

·    There has been an unexpectedly large volume of contaminated ground in Stapleton’s Road which has had to be removed as part of the creek widening works. An allowance of $50,000 was in the contract for excavation and disposal of contaminated ground but the final figure is in excess of $600,000.

·    The original estimated cost for increasing the capacity of St Albans Creek has increased from $4.8M to $6.1M. This is partly due to difficult access to private properties, a large number of retained banks to accommodate the creek widening work, and an extended construction period due to restrictions on the length of creek that can be widened at any one time. There are a large number of private property owners that have had to be consulted and the design has had to take into consideration their specific requirements with regards to landscaping, the replacement of private bridges and access during the construction phase of the works. This additional work adds significant resilience to the solution.

5.9       Some savings for works not yet completed have been identified as follows:

·    A Value Engineering exercise was carried out for St Albans Creek and several cost savings were identified which has reduced the overall estimated cost by $400,000. These include a change to the design of the timber retained wall and a reduction in the construction programme by sequencing the works differently.

·    Changing the Contractor’s method of working will reduce the time taken to complete the works and reduces the risk of delays.

·    Other areas that have been looked at to achieve potential savings include reducing the scope of works by not widening St Albans Creek between Hills Road and Slater Street, just replacing the two culverts and a reduction in the ecological and environmental improvements. However, this would not deliver the Council’s undertaking to return the area to pre-earthquake levels of flood risk and would not meet the Council’s Six Values design approach that considers ecological and environmental impacts and enhancements.

·    The current spend is approximately $45M and the project budget has not yet been exceeded. The increase in delegated authority is required to complete contract approvals and allow payments to be made under existing contracts.

 

6.   Preferred Option – Increase in project budget by $2.2M

Option Description

6.1       Increase the project drawdown by $2.2M for the Dudley Creek Flood Remediation Project to allow for the completion of the works in St Albans Creek and Shirley Stream between Shirley Road and the Dudley Creek confluence. This will ensure that the flood risk in these areas are returned to pre-earthquake levels of risk.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The local community in the Edgeware Road area (St Albans Creek catchment) are specifically affected by this option due to an increased flood risk following the earthquakes.  They support the project as it will reduce the flood risk in the area to pre-earthquake levels of risk.

6.6       There was a meeting with the Edgeware Road residents Association in June 2016 and they were supportive of the works in St Albans Creek and asked that the works be completed as quickly as possible due to the increased flood risk to their properties.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies and aligns with the overall LDRP objective to restore the area to pre-earthquake levels of flood risk.

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation - $2.2M

6.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – there will be no change to current Maintenance / Ongoing costs as a result of the additional spend with this option.

6.10    Funding source – the Council’s Land Drainage Recovery Programme Budget. The additional drawdown is to be met from savings that have been identified in FY19 on LDRP 501 Bells Creek. A change request will be submitted to transfer these funds from the Bells Creek project to this project from FY19.

Legal Implications

6.11    None

Risks and Mitigations  

6.12    There is a risk of further delays to the works if access to private property proves to be difficult causing an increase in costs.

6.13    Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) is implemented will be Low.

6.14    Planned and current treatment(s) include early discussions with private property owners and obtaining Access & Restoration Agreements in advance of the works.

Implementation

6.15    Implementation dependencies  - None

6.16    Implementation timeframe – Original programme will be maintained and St Albans Creek widening works will be completed by the end of June 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.17    The advantages of this option include:

·    A reduction in the flood risk to pre-earthquake levels of risk for residents along Shirley Stream, downstream of Shirley Road, and the Edgeware Road area downstream of Champion Street.

·    Meeting the Council’s Six Values for Land Drainage for the length of Shirley Stream, downstream of Shirley Road, and St Albans Creek between Hills road and Stapletons Road. The project can be completed in full and the flood risk can be returned to at least pre-earthquake levels of risk.

·    Meets community expectations for the overall project objective.

·    Provides a long term resilient solution

6.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·    The extra spend will mean the funds cannot be spent on other key priorities.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Martin Smith - Project Manager

Approved By

Keith Davison - Manager Land Drainage

John Moore - Manager Planning and Delivery

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

   

 


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

24.  Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

07 December 2017

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

25

Community member appointments to zone committees

s7(2)(a)

Protection of Privacy of Natural Persons

To give the Council the opportunity to consider the recommended community members for the three zone committees, prior to all applicants being advised of the coutcome of the selection process.

Once the successful nominees have been confirmed by the Council, Environment Canterbury and Selwyn District Council