Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Friday 20 October 2017

Time:                                    8am

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

17 October 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 4

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 4

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 4

B       4.       Public Forum.................................................................................................................... 4

B       5.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 4

B       6.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 4   

STAFF REPORTS

C       7.       Manuka Cottage Amendment To Playground Location............................................ 13

C       8.       Vista Place - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions............................... 23

A       9.       Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing...................................................... 43

C       10.     Discretionary Response Fund Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club.............................. 53

C       11.     Discretionary Response Fund Christchurch South Community Watch Patrol Digital Radio .............................................................................................................................. 57

C       12.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report................................................ 61

B       13.     Elected Members’ Information Exchange.................................................................... 76 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Tuesday, 3 October 2017 be confirmed (refer page 5).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes may be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

It is intended that the public forum session will be held at 8am.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

 

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                     Tuesday 3 October 2017

Time:                                    5pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

3 October 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

An apology for early departure was received and accepted from Tim Scandrett.

 

Lee Sampson/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                      Carried

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00143

Community Board Decision

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Friday, 15 September 2017 be confirmed.

Phil Clearwater/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                               Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

 

4.1       John Heward – Rateable Property

Mr John Heward addressed the Board regarding a flood damaged and derelict property he owns. Mr Heward expressed concern that he is required to pay rates on the property.

The Board agreed to request staff advice on the matter.

The Chairperson thanked Mr Heward for his attendance.

 

4.2       Anne Newman – Christchurch Adventure Park

Ms Anne Newman updated the Board on the progress of the restoration of the Christchurch Adventure Park. Ms Newman advised that it is anticipated that some of the park may be open before Christmas, or at the latest March 2018.

             The Chairperson thanked Ms Newman for her attendance.

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

 

5.1       Barrington Park Playground Renewal (Accessible Standards)

Part B

Kathryn Hammond – Occupational Therapist, and Jo Byrne, Speech Language Therapist of Ferndale School, addressed the Board, regarding the proposed Barrington Park Playground Renewal (accessible standards).  Item 8 refers.

Ms Hammond and Ms Byrne put forward suggestions for change to the plan that they consider would make the playground more accessible.

Following questions from the Board, the Chairperson thanked Ms Hammond and Ms Byrne for their deputation.

Item 8 (Barrington Park Playground Renewal (accessible standards)) of these minutes records the Board’s decision on this matter.

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.    

 

7.   Marleys Hill - Proposed Temporary Right of Way Easement

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolves to:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Section 48(1)(f) of the Reserves Act 1977, the granting of a right of way easement to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a logging road between Cashmere Forest and the Summit Road over the parts of the Marleys Hill scenic reserve as shown on the plan submitted at Attachment A, subject to:

1.1       The Easement being limited to a period of time not exceeding six (6) months from the date of consent, with full reinstatement of the land to be effected upon termination.

1.2       The consent of the Minister of Conservation, exercised by staff delegation, as set out in 2. Below.

1.3       All necessary statutory consents under, yet not limited to, the Resource Management Act, Building Control Act and Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act being obtained.

2.         Recommend that the Chief Executive, using the Council’s delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation, consents to the granting of the easement to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a temporary logging road as outlined in 1. Above.

3.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager, should the easement be granted along with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to finalise documentation to implement the easement.

 

Board Consideration:

The Board considered the proposal and noted that while there is potential for the track to have adverse effects on the reserve and reserve users, use will be temporary and remediation will be required. The Board discussed the need for the easement to include conditions limiting the vehicular use and ensuring that remediation is timely and comprehensive.

The Board further noted staff advice that in addition to approval under the Reserves Act 1977 approval will also be required under other relevant statutory provisions.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00144

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolved:

1.         To approve, pursuant to Section 48(1)(f) of the Reserves Act 1977, the granting of a right of way easement to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a logging road between Cashmere Forest and the Summit Road over the parts of the Marleys Hill Scenic Reserve as shown on the plan submitted at Attachment A, subject to:

1.1       The Easement being limited to a period of time not exceeding six (6) months from the date of consent and subject to the following conditions:

1.1.1         Full reinstatement and active restoration of the land to be effected as soon as practicable after the date of the termination of the easement.  Remediation to be determined according to a photograph dilapidation survey.

1.1.2         That the easement will only be used by vehicles between the hours of 6am to 5pm weekdays.

1.1.3         The speed of vehicles using the right of way to be limited to a maximum of 30 kilometres per hour.

1.2       The consent of the Minister of Conservation, exercised by staff delegation, as set out in 2. Below.

1.3       All necessary statutory consents under, but not limited to, the Resource Management Act, Building Control Act and Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act being obtained.

2.         To recommend that the Chief Executive, exercising on behalf of the Council delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation, consents to the granting of the easement to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a temporary logging road as outlined in 1. Above.

3.         Provided that consent on behalf of the Minister of Conservation is given to authorise the Property Consultancy Manager to finalise documentation to implement the easement.

Tim Scandrett/Helene Mautner                                                                                                Carried unanimously

 

Tim Scandrett left the meeting at 06:24 pm.


 

 

8.   Barrington Park Playground Renewal (accessible standards)

 

Staff Recommendation 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park shown as Version 2 - 3 October 2017 in Attachment A of this report.

 

Board Consideration

The Board noted that staff had worked with the Council’s Disability Advisory Group and Barrier Free New Zealand to develop the design of the playground to make it accessible and noted also that a limited budget was in place.

Members referred staff in attendance to matters raised in the deputation at Item 5.1 and urged them to consider incorporating the suggested features either as part of this renewal project or as part of future projects.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00145

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park shown as Version 2 - 3 October 2017 in Attachment A of this report.

2.         Notes the provision in the Council’s Draft Long Term Plan for new toilets in Barrington Park in Financial Years 2021-2022.

Lee Sampson/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                    Carried unanimously

 

 

The meeting adjourned at 6.47pm and reconvened at 7.55pm.

 

9.   Tree Planting and Pou in Ernle Clark Reserve

 

Board Discussion

 

The Board clarified with staff in attendance that the Kahikatea tree will be planted and the Pou will be located on the site on 21 October 2017.

 

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00146 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea tree in Ernle Clark Reserve

2.         That final foundation plans are submitted to the Parks Asset Engineer for approval prior to installation.

3.         That the exact location for the Pou is to be confirmed on site with the Parks Asset Engineer.

Melanie Coker/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                          Carried

 

 

 

10. Spreydon-Cashmere 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund Applications

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00147 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $3,000 to Spreydon OSCAR Incorporated towards running costs.

Phil Clearwater/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                         Carried

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00148 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $1,759 to the Hoon Hay Community Centre Group towards the Hoon Hay Community Centre equipment costs.

Phil Clearwater/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                Carried

 

11. Discretionary Response Fund - Hillmorton High School Senior A Girls’ Basketball Team

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00149 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $750 to Hillmorton High School towards the Hillmorton High School A Girls' Basketball Team to compete in the Secondary Schools National Basketball tournament in Palmerston North on 1-6 October 2017.

Helene Mautner/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                          Carried

 

12. Discretionary Response Fund - Hillmorton High School Senior A Boys Basketball Team

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00150 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $2,000 to Hillmorton High School towards the Hillmorton High School A Boys’ Basketball Team to compete in the Secondary Schools National Basketball tournament in Palmerston North on 1 to 6 October 2017.

Helene Mautner/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                          Carried

 

 

13. Youth Achievement and Development Fund - Bella Phoebe Gruindelingh

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00151 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Development Fund to Bella Gruindelingh to compete in the New Zealand Aerobics and Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships in Auckland on 6 to 10 October 2017.

Lee Sampson/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                                                Carried

 

14. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00152 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part B

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update.

2.         Adopts the 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan as circulated to members and approves distribution and consultation with the community.

Karolin Potter/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                                Carried

 

15. Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

Board Members exchanged the following information:

·                              The effects of the changes to this year’s funding round were discussed.

·                              It was noted that the Barrington Bowling Club Carpark proposal has been included in the                       draft long Term Plan but that it will be too far away to provide useful accessible parking                       for the playground.

·                              Some concern has been expressed by residents at loss of parking as a result of installation   of the Quarryman’s Trail cycleway.

·                              There has been some resident opposition to the proposal to relocate a bus stop due to the               changes to the Cashmere/Worsleys/Hoon Hay Roads intersection.

 

Meeting concluded at 7.40pm

 

CONFIRMED THIS 20TH DAY OF OCTOBER 2017

Karolin Potter

Chairperson


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

7.        Manuka Cottage Amendment To Playground Location

Reference:

17/1077529

Contact:

Steven Gray

Steven.gray@ccc.govt.nz

9418256

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to approve the amendments made to the existing approved landscape plan LP360602 June 2016, Attachment A, to the new landscape plan LP367903 and LP367901 August 2017, Attachment B.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following changes required to the approved concept plan to help gain Resource Consent approval.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined as the community engagement was undertaken in March 2016 with the Community Board approving the landscape plan.  This report is only looking to make minor amendments to the existing plan

 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Notes its previous approval of the concept plan LP360602, Attachment A, for the location of Manuka Cottage on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve including associated landscaping and car parking.

2.         Approves amended landscape plans LP367903 and LP367901, Attachment B, showing changes made to the playground location, reduction in car park spaces, inclusion of a storm water swale and bike stands.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Community Grants

·     Level of Service: 2.3.4 Effectively manage and administer all other grant funds under management.

·     Level of Service: 6.0.1 Neighbourhood Parks are maintained to specifications so parks are clean, tidy, safe and functional.

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Amendments to Cornelius O’Connor Reserve and Manuka Cottage concept plan (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Status Quo – Stay with existing approved concept plan

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Changes are to help gain Resource Consent approval

·     Moves the playground away from the HAIL site

·     Provides for storm water management and moves the car parking further away from residents

·     Reduces hard surface areas within the park with less parking spaces

·     Inclusion of bike stands

·     Will reduce soil testing cost of the Hail site and possible remediation work

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Less separation between the playground and building as requested in the March 2016 consultation

·     Less parking for Manuka Cottage

 

5.   Context/Background

Capital Endowment Funding

5.1       In December 2012, the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board resolved to apply to the Capital Endowment Fund – Special One-off Scheme to fund the purchase of a community building for Manuka Cottage to be located within the Addington community. The first property considered suitable was sold prior to the funding becoming available. The funding is currently sitting in the Community Facilities Capital Programme.

Steering Committee

5.2       The Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board agreed to put in place a Steering Committee to investigate possible options for either purchasing or building a community facility to house Manuka Cottage. The Steering Committee includes two representatives from the Community Board, members from Manuka Cottage, and council staff from various Units. Options that have been considered and investigated are:

·    Purchasing an existing property in the Addington area

·    Purchasing a re-locatable building to be placed on Council land

·    Purchasing land to build on

·    Building a new facility on Council land

·    Remaining at Church Square and building on that site

Consultation - March 2016

5.3       Community consultation on the New Community Facility (Manuka Cottage) on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve was undertaken from 1 March to 23 March 2016.

5.4       During the course of the engagement, Council received 72 submissions. 61 respondents were in support of the proposed community facility, eight respondents did not support the proposal and three respondents did not state their preference.

 

Existing Community Board Approval

5.5       On 2 August 2016 a report was presented to the Spreydon/ Heathcote Community Board to approve the landscape plan LP360602, Attachment A.

5.6       The resolution was:

5.6.1   Community Board Resolved SHCB/2016/00082

Community Board Decision under Delegation (Original Staff Recommendation Accepted without Change)

That the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board resolved to:

1.    Approve the concept plan (drawing LP360602) for the location of Manuka Cottage on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve including associated landscaping and car parking

2.    Approve the removal of the 30 trees in Cornelius O’Connor Reserve.

3.    Approve the concept design plans for the Manuka Cottage building.

4.    Approve items 1, 2 and 3 to be subject to gaining all required consents and no site work to start prior to consents being gained.

 

Resource Consent Process

5.7       A Resource Consent application was submitted to in February 2017 for the landscape LP360602, Attachment A.

5.8       A number of issues have arisen with responses provided to the consent planner. Below are some of following items that have been highlighted as concerns.

·   Tree heights, loss of trees and new species.

·   Clarification around car park gates and controls.

·   Security fencing and lighting for night time use.

·   Method of attenuation for storm water management and existing storm water network.

·   Area taken up for car parking and other hard surfaces.

·   Playground location over a HAIL site.

5.9       Staff have been working through these items aiming to resolve each concern. Changes made to address these items have resulted in changes to the Community Board approved plan LP360602, Attachment A.

 

5.10   

6.   Option 1 - Amendments to Cornelius O’Connor Reserve and Manuka Cottage (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The following amendments to the approved landscape plan will help with gaining the required resource consent approvals needed for this facility.

6.2       The following are the key items that have been changed:

·   Change the location of the playground position. Path access to the playground will still be provided.

·   Reduce the number of car park spaces from seven to four. One space provided will be fully accessible.

·   Bike stands will be included between the car park and building

·   A shallow storm water swale along the eastern boundary will be provided to manage the water runoff from the building and car park. It is proposed that this swale will be planted in low ground cover plants and small shrubs that tolerate wet ground conditions.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low which is lower than section 2 of this report as the community had already been consulted with for the overall proposal.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       As these are considered minor adjustments to the landscape plan, no further consultation has been undertaken. It is considered that these changes will not have any adverse effects on direct neighbours.

6.6       Community views on this project were sought in March 2016 with several concerns being:

·   To provide separation between the building and playground for park users.

·   To provide more car parking

6.7       Car parking is hard to resolve as more has been requested versus less parking to reduce loss of green space. By retaining seven parking spaces may result in not gaining consent approval.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.8       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.8.1   Inconsistency - Does not meet District Plan rules for Open Space.

6.8.2   Reason for inconsistency - Community buildings on Open Space are a discretionary activity in the District Plan.

6.8.3   Amendment necessary - Requires Resource Consent approval.

Financial Implications

6.9       Cost of Implementation – There is no additional cost to implement these amendments to the plan as the reduction of car park spaces will offset the inclusion of bike stands and the storm water swale.

6.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Manuka Cottage will be leased (to be approved in a later report) with the leasee reasonable for maintenance of their lease area. Changes to the reserve will reduce operational maintenance costs with reduced lawn and fewer trees. The playground relocation will be cost neutral.

6.11    Funding source - LTP project Manuka Cottage Endowment Fund project (22522).

Legal Implications

6.12    Legal implications for these amendments still remain the same as stated in the report dated 2 August 2016 which are noted below.

6.12.1 Requires Resource Consent and Building Consent approvals.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.13    No additional risks are identified with these proposed amendments. The original risks still remain as stated in the 2 August 2016 report, which are noted below.

6.13.1 Key risk – Distract Plan rules for building community facilities on Opens Space which triggers a Resource Consent.

6.13.2 Escalation in building costs since the funding was first approved. Funding was for purchasing an existing property, not to build a new facility.

6.13.3 Mitigation measures

·    Continue to work with the Planners to resolve Resource Consent concerns

·    Continue to work on the best building options available to reduce construction costs

Implementation

6.14    Implementation dependencies  - Community Board, Resource Consent and Building Consent approvals

6.15    Implementation timeframe – This amendments to the landscape plan will help address the resource consent issues. Once these are resolved this will set get the consent notification underway. Construction is still planned in financial year 2017/18.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   Changes are to help gain Resource Consent approval

·   Moves the playground away from the HAIL site

·   Provides for storm water management and moves the car parking further away from residents

·   Reduces hard surface areas within the park with less parking spaces

·   Inclusion of bike stands

·   Will reduce soil testing cost of the Hail site and possible remediation work

6.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Less separation between the playground and building as requested in the March 2016 consultation

·   Less parking for Manuka Cottage users which is against consultation requests for more parking

7.   Option 2 – Status Quo – Stay with existing approved concept plan

Option Description

7.1       To stay with the original approved landscape plan, Attachment A.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low which differs from section 2 of this report due to the landscape plan is already approved and was consulted on in March 2016.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Community engagement was undertaken in March 2016 and their views reported to the Board in August 2016.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies as stated in the 2 August 2016 report due to not meeting District Plan rules

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – To stay with this existing plan will result in additional cost for soil testing in the Hail site. Further costs could occur if soil is required to be removed from site. These costs are unknown at this stage.

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Manuka Cottage will be leased (to be approved in a later report) with the leasee reasonable for maintenance of their lease area. Changes to the reserve will reduce operational maintenance costs with reduced lawn and fewer trees. The playground relocation will be cost neutral.

7.8       Funding source - LTP project Manuka Cottage Endowment Fund project (22522).

Legal Implications

7.9       Legal implications for these amendments still remain the same as stated in the report dated 2 August 2016 which are noted below.

7.9.1   Requires Resource Consent and Building Consent approvals.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.10    Plan not gaining Resource Consent approval in its current state and therefore stopping further progress on this project.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.11    The advantages of this option include:

·   No changes to an existing Community Board approved plan

7.12    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Further costs to undertake soil testing and possible soil removal from the site

·   The project may still not gain the required Resource Consent approval if changes are not made

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Approved Plan August 2016 - Manuka Cottage Final Site Plan

20

b

Amended Landscape Plans for Cornelius O'Connor Reserve for Resource Consent

21

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Steven Gray - Project Manager

Approved By

Brent Smith - Team Leader Asset Planning and Management Parks

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 


 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

8.        Vista Place - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions

Reference:

17/924139

Contact:

John Dore

John.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the approval of prohibited times on roads restrictions on Vista Place and Roystone Way, in accordance with Attachment A.  The proposed restrictions reduce likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing
New Zealand Police a practical tool for enforcement.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to community requests and the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to advise on options available to control the occurrences of anti-social behaviour.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.2       The level of significance was determined by the significance matrix including the relatively small area affected by the proposal in relation to the Christchurch District, the proposal’s ability to be reversed and the limited impact on the Council’s role to carry out its roles and functions.

2.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommend that the Council resolve to:

1.         Approve that pursuant to the Christchurch City Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014, Part 2, Clause 7, motor vehicles weighing less than 3,500 kilograms are prohibited from being operated from 10pm to 5am on the following roads:

a)    Vista Place (entire length)

b)    Roystone Way (entire length)

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install Prohibited Times on Roads restriction

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.2       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Option 1 – Preferred Option)

a)         The advantages of this option include:

·     Reduces likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing NZ Police a practical tool for enforcement.

b)        The disadvantages of this option include:

·     No person may use a motor vehicle weighing less than 3,500kg on Vista Pl or Roystone Way from 10pm to 5am, Monday to Sunday. Unless the vehicle is conveying the owner or occupier of any land having a frontage to Vista Pl and Roystone Way or the owner or occupiers bonafide visitors. Other exceptions are included in the Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Residents on and in the vicinity of Vista Place have been experiencing antisocial behaviour at night, with vehicles often congregating at the Vista Place cul-de-sac head.

5.2       Residents are being woken by loud noise from cars doing burnouts, loud music and partying.

5.3       There are reports of people accessing private property, intimidating behaviour towards residents and littering.

5.4       The Police have been to this area in response to numerous call outs from the public.

5.5       Vista Place and Roystone Way are both local Cul de sac roads in a residential area.

5.6       Council proposes a Prohibited Times on Road restriction. The restriction reduces the likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing NZ Police a practical tool for enforcement.

5.7       Roads subject to ‘Prohibited Times on Roads’ are identified by ‘No Entry’ signs (as shown on Attachment A). The restrictions will apply from 10pm to 5am, seven days a week.

5.8       The Council’s ‘Prohibited Times on Roads’ Bylaw clause enables it to restrict night time access to a street to legitimate users only, such as residents and their visitors. The purpose of the Bylaw clause is to prevent nuisance or antisocial road users from accessing the street and creating problems. Those who infringe risk a $750 penalty.

5.9       The restrictions are planned for the entire length of Vista Place and Roystone Way.

 

6.   Option 1 - Install Prohibited Times on Road Restrictions (preferred)

Option Description

Install a night time access restriction for motor vehicles less than 3,500 kg between the hours of 10pm to 5am, Monday to Sunday for the entire length of the following roads:·     Vista Place (entire length)

·    Roystone Way (entire length)

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       Local residents in the Vista Place area have expressed their concerns regarding the ongoing level of disruption to their daily lives created by anti-social activity in Vista Place.

6.5       A group of residents, representatives from NZ Police, Council Area Traffic Engineer and community board members met to discuss the issues identified and possible options to resolve the problem. These key stakeholders agreed that a proposed restriction as described in Attachment A, would provide a practical tool for Police to enforce anti-social behaviour in the area.

6.6       The NZ Police also noted that enforcement is dependent on available Police resource at the time given other high priority and high risk call outs.

6.7       Consultation on the Prohibited Times on Roads restriction was undertaken from 9 August to 25 August 2017. Council delivered 150 consultation leaflets to residents in and around Vista Place and Roystone Way, Council libraries and service centres. They were also posted and emailed to 48 key stakeholders.

6.8       Of the 62 individuals and organisations that responded, 53 (85 per cent) supported the night-time restrictions, with one not in support.

6.9       Please see Attachment B, C and D for the results, feedback and team responses.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.10    This option is consistent with the Council’s Prohibited Times on Roads Policy.

Financial Implications

6.11    Cost of Implementation – approximately $2000 for the installation of signage.

6.12    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.13    Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget

Legal Implications

6.14    Part 2, Clause 7 (1) of the Christchurch City Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014 provides that “The Council may by resolution specify any road or part of a road and the days and times during which motor vehicles weighing less than 3,500 kilograms are prohibited from being used on that road or part of that road or roads”.

6.15    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides the Council with the authority to install parking, stopping and standing restrictions by resolution.

6.16    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes does not include the installation of light vehicle prohibitions. 

6.17    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.18    Not applicable

Implementation

6.19    Implementation dependencies - Community Board and Council approval

6.20    Implementation timeframe - Approximately four weeks once the area contractor receives the request.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.21    The advantages of this option include:

·   Reduces likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing NZ Police a practical tool for enforcement.

6.22    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   No person may use a motor vehicle weighing less than 3,500kg on Vista Pl or Roystone Way from 10pm to 5am, Monday to Sunday. Unless the vehicle is conveying the owner or occupier of any land having a frontage to Vista Pl and Roystone Way or the owner or occupiers bonafide visitors. Other exceptions are included in the Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014.

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Maintain the status quo in Vista Place and Roystone Way

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with community requests for improvements to the road environment.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Prohibited Times on Roads Policy.  The process set out by the Policy, supports the approval of night time access restrictions as sought under Option 1 of this report.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Costs of repairing damage and cleaning up rubbish.

7.8       Funding source - Not applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Further complaints to staff, New Zealand Police, Community Board and the Council.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No installation cost to the Council.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Likely that antisocial behaviour will continue.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

28

b

Consultation results

29

c

Feedback

30

d

Team responses

40

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Samantha Sharland - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

9.        Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing

Reference:

17/1045385

Contact:

John Dore

John.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to seek approval from council to install a School Patrolled Kea Crossing on Hoon Hay Rd as shown on Attachment A.

1.2       The site is located within the road network as shown on Attachment B. A Kea crossing is a school patrol with swing out stop signs on a crossing point that does not have the zebra markings.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated following discussions with St Peters School.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the project being low cost and affecting a limited group of residents. The decision is easily reversible.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to Council that:

1.         In pursuance of the powers vested in it by Section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule- Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council authorises the head teacher of Spreydon School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Hoon Hay Rd school crossing point as shown on Attachment A, located at a point more or less 132 metres northwest of its intersection with Mathers Road.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users - minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install a school patrol kea crossing for the new Spreydon School site on Hoon Hay Rd as shown on Attachment A.

·     Option 2 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides supervision and priority for children of all school ages, when needing to cross Hoon Hay Rd before and after school.

·     Cost effective solution to providing road safety for school children.

 

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Short delay in traffic flow as vehicles have to stop to allow children to cross the road.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The Ministry of Education (MOE) is relocating the current Spreydon School from Lincoln Road to the former Manning Intermediate site on Hoon Hay Road. The new Spreydon School is expected to open around July 2018.

5.2       Spreydon School has been actively engaged with council school travel plan staff to help work through potential issues at the new Hoon Hay site and are proactively engaging with their school community to help educate and train pupils for the transition. 

5.3       Spreydon school staff approached council and requested a school patrolled kea crossing. A Kea crossing is a school patrol with swing out stop signs on a crossing point that does not have the zebra markings.

5.4       Christchurch City Council can approve the installation of school crossing points (Kea Crossings), provided the crossing comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (the rule).

5.5       The school board of trustees should formally agree to the establishment and operation of a Kea crossing, as the school is responsible for operating the crossing and working with the Police to train children and staff in accordance with the School traffic safety team manual, published by NZTA.

5.6       NZTA traffic note 29 revision 2 provides guidance on how the rule should be applied including the range of vehicle and pedestrian volumes where a kea crossing is effective (Warrants).

5.7       The proposed kea crossing as shown in Attachment A, is compliant with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and meets the required warrant. Council staff and NZ Police are satisfied the site is complementary for a Kea Crossing and can train the children to operate it.

5.8       Since the school is not operational, pedestrian demand at the proposed Kea crossing has been estimated based on data gathered from the Spreydon School Travel Plan Survey recently undertaken with assistance from Council staff, a summary of the findings is tabled in Appendix C.

5.9       The survey was completed in June 2017 and involved 208 children. Similar survey results were reported for walkers and scooters in the afternoon. It is estimated that at least half the surveyed walkers and scooters will cross Hoon Hay Rd outside the school.

5.10    Hoon Hay Road is classified as a minor arterial and is surrounded by residential dwellings around the school site. Spreydon Domain is located behind houses to the east and a pedestrian access links the domain with Hoon Hay Rd near the proposed kea crossing. Hoon Hay Rd has an average weekday traffic volume of approximately 13,000 vehicles per day. 

5.11    There is an operational School Speed Zone already in place on this section of Hoon Hay Rd. 


 

6.   Option 1 – Install Kea Crossing (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install a school patrol kea crossing for Spreydon School on Hoon Hay Rd as shown on Attachment A.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       The Spreydon School Board of Trustees (BOT), have formally agreed to the establishment and operation of a school patrol.

6.5       The NZ Police community constable has been consulted and agrees that a kea crossing can be operated in the proposed location and children/staff be trained to operate.

6.6       No other parties have been consulted, the proposal has no effect on surrounding properties. The proposal is an improvement to the existing crossing location.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation - $12,000

6.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - approved Council Maintenance budget.

6.10    Funding source – Traffic Operations Capital Budget.

Legal Implications

6.11    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations    

6.12    None identified.

Implementation

6.13    Implementation dependencies - dependent on approval by Council to legalise the school patrol operation and training of the school patrollers and staff by the Police Community Education Officer.

6.14    Implementation timeframe –. Plan to complete work in January/February 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.15    The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides supervision and priority for children of all school ages, when needing to cross Hoon Hay Rd before and after school.

·     Cost effective solution to providing road safety for school children.

6.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Short delay in traffic flow as vehicles have to stop to allow children to cross the road.

7.   Option 2 – Do nothing

Option Description

7.1       No changes to existing road.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with the school request.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – $0

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable

7.8       Funding source – No applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.10    Ongoing concern from school about road safety.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable.

7.12    Implementation timeframe – not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No additional cost to Council.

·   No delays in traffic flow as vehicles don’t have to stop to allow children to cross the road.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not respond to the needs of the school community.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

49

b

Location Plan

50

c

Table 1 - Travel Modes to School

51

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

10.    Discretionary Response Fund Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club

Reference:

17/1163769

Contact:

Emma Pavey

Emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

03 941 5107

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from their 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

#57256

Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club

Pacific Series 2017

$16,778

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from the Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $3,000 to the Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club, as fundholder, towards the Pacific Series 2017.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$47,476

$92,704

$89,704

 

4.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

4.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Discretionary Response Fund Aranui Eagles Decision Matrix

55

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

11.    Discretionary Response Fund Christchurch South Community Watch Patrol Digital Radio

Reference:

17/1207013

Contact:

Sol Smith

sol.smith@ccc.govt.nz

941 6634

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from their 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

00057127

Christchurch South Community Watch

Digital Radio for Community Watch Patrol Vehicle

$1725

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from Christchurch South Community Watch.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $1,000.00 to Christchurch South Community Watch towards a Digital Radio for the Community Watch Patrol Vehicle.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$47,476

$92,704

$91,704

 

3.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

3.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Christchurch South Community Watch Digital Radio Discretionary Response Fund - Spreydon-Heathcote 2017

59

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Sol Smith - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

12.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

Reference:

17/1049521

Contact:

Faye Collins

faye.collins @ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to resource the Community Board to promote a pro-active partnership approach to decision-making between the Council and Community Boards working together to achieve the best outcomes for the city with decisions being made with a good understanding of community views.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update.

2.         Agrees that the following items to be reported by the Chairperson in her report to the Council:

·    2017 Funding Round

·    District Plan Zoning provisions

·    Hoon Hay Hoops

·    Edible garden awards

 

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Upcoming Meetings:

·    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Meeting, 7 November 2017, 5pm.

·    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Meeting, 24 November 2017, 8am.

·    Trees and Urban Forest Workshop Invitation, 24 November, 5pm.

·      Joint Spreydon-Cashmere and Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Boards Meeting, 24 November 2017, 10am.

3.2       Community Board Plan update against outcomes

Development of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan has been completed. 

The 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan was adopted by the Board at its meeting on 3 October 2017.

The pilot edible garden awards will be opened for nominations from October 2017- February 2018, with an awards event planned for April 2018.

3.3       Memos/Information reporting back on Community Board matters

3.3.1   Centennial Hall.

At the Board meeting on 4 July 2017 the Board requested information from staff as to any discussions between staff and the Ministry of Education regarding possible re-siting of the Kohunga Reo near to, or on, the site of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori O Te Whanau, or on the land currently occupied by Centennial Hall.

Staff have advised that they have not found any record of any discussions between Council staff and the Ministry of Education regarding this. Staff are currently investigating the future of the hall and should be in position to provide advice on this by December 2017.

 

3.3.2   Tennyson Street – pedestrian refuge islands

Following a presentation from community members at the meeting on 7 July 2017 regarding safety concerns about pedestrian crossing facilities on Tennyson Street the Board requested staff advice on the matter.

The attached memorandum has now been received in response to the Boards request.

It is noted that there are currently four pedestrian refuge islands on Tennyson Street. It is also noted that crossing Tennyson Street is part of a school pedestrian route to the nearby Beckenham School. Visibility issues at the refuge sites have been identified.  Investigation of possible improvements that could be made to bring these crossing points up to current best practice would require funding.

Staff advise that any potential improvements to the existing pedestrian facilities on Tennyson Street need to be prioritised against similar schemes across the city.  The pedestrian count data for all four Tennyson Street pedestrian refuges combined, indicates that 22 pedestrian crossing schemes across the city have a higher priority for improvement. Staff point out, however, that the Traffic Operations priority database criteria is currently being reviewed and this may result in the current ranking for investigation of improvements for Tennyson Street pedestrian refuges being increased, given the noted visibility deficiencies.

Due to its assessment as a low-medium accident risk, staff consider that it is unlikely that Tennyson Street would be seen as a priority for any available funding for minor road safety schemes, although it is possible that improvements to pedestrian refuges could be considered as part of any larger planned capital works.

Staff have considered No Stopping restrictions as an interim measure to improve visibility, but point out that due to the configuration of the street a considerable loss of parking would result.

Staff suggest that in the meantime, Beckenham School could be asked to consider organizing wardens to help children going to and from school.  Staff are willing to assist the school with this process.

 

3.4       The provision of strategic, technical and procedural advice to the Community Board

 

3.4.1   40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit on Selwyn Street (school zone)

At its meeting on 15 September 2017 the Board recommended that the Council approve the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit on Selwyn Street (school zone). The recommendation was considered at the Council meeting on 10 October 2017 and the proposal was approved.

The variable speed limit shall come into force on completion of infrastructure installation.


 

 

3.5       Board area Consultations/Engagement

3.5.1   Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection improvements

Consultation on the proposed Cashmere Road / Hoon Hay Road / Worsleys Road intersection improvements has been undertaken and the results collated and analysed. A staff report on the proposal will come to the Board at the meeting on 7 November 2017   for a recommendation to the Council.

3.6       Submission Opportunities

3.6.1   Nothing to report.

3.7       Annual Plan and Long Term Plan matters

3.7.1   Nothing to report.

3.8       Development of Civil Defence Emergency Plans

3.8.1   On 6 September Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) and Community Governance staff met with representatives from the South Christchurch and Cashmere emergency response teams that are developing local mechanisms of community preparedness and response to environmental disasters. The meeting was interested to learn about the CDEM restructure and resources, as well as to share progress and matters concerning local efforts.

3.9       Requests for information from Board meeting on Newsline

3.9.1   The Board is asked to consider which matters it would like suggest as articles for the Council’s Newsline.

3.10    Significant Board matters of interest to raise at Council

The Board is asked to consider which matters it would like include in its report to Council including:

·    2017 Funding Round

·    District Plan Zoning provisions

·    Hoon Hay Hoops

·    Edible garden awards

4.   Strengthening Communities Funded Projects

4.1       2017/18 Spreydon-Cashmere Strengthening Communities Fund

At its meeting on 5 September the Board established its 2017/18 Strengthening Communities Fund of $275,143 and decided to make grants to 18 organisations totalling this amount. Arrangements for payment of the grants is underway.

4.2       Neighbourhood Week

At its meeting on 15 September the Board approved 36 Neighbourhood Week Applications totalling $2946.00.  All applicants have been advised of the decisions.

4.3       Off the Ground Fund

The annual clean-up of the historic Addington Cemetery by local community groups and residents on 16 September was supported by a Spreydon-Cashmere Off the Ground Fund grant towards barbeque refreshments for the volunteers.  Approximately 25 residents worked alongside Council parks staff to clear more than 270 kilograms of rubbish and recyclable green waste.

 

5.   Significant Community Issues

 

   2017 Funding Round

5.1       Status

The 2017 funding round introduced changes to funding arrangements.  The need to review the allocation of grants funding to Community Boards was due to the change in Board boundaries and differing populations between Boards, and the request by Council in 2016 to review contestable grants processes.

A significant change was the move away from Key Local Project funding.  Key Local Project (KLP) funding was introduced in 2007 following the adoption of the Strengthening Communities Strategy.  It was intended to fill the gap left by the former Social Initiatives Fund which targeted issues of disparity and disadvantage across the city.  KLP funding was distributed at a central level and was seen as taking away the opportunity and responsibility of Community Boards to make decisions about funding and addressing relative needs in their communities.  KLP funding has therefore been discontinued, with what would have been KLP funding now being added into the pool to be distributed to Community Boards for allocation with Boards.  Boards can now decide what proportion of the total funding allocated will be used for Strengthening Communities Fund annual grants and for Discretionary Response Fund grants respectively.

Of the total amount of $7.203 million provided for contestable community grants in the 2017-18 Annual Plan $500,000 was used as a contribution to the Community Resilience Partnerships Fund, $1.2millon was made available to fund major organisations; and $5.1million was made available as contestable grant funding for community organisations through annual Strengthening Communities grants and Discretionary Response Funds, divided between metropolitan and community Board funds.

The mechanism adopted for allocation of funding to Community Boards uses a formula based on 50% population and 50% deprivation that has resulted in changes to the level funding available.

Other changes include:

·    Block allocation of Small Grants funding with annual Strengthening Communities Grants funding and Discretionary Response Funding.

·    Accepting single applications for each applicant organisation

·    Funding an organisation’s running costs as well as projects

·    Three year funding for selected organisations

 

While some of the changes have been well received by applicant organisations there have been concerns expressed. In particular some groups that have this year been turned down on application for metropolitan funding or received considerably less funding than in previous years.  These groups see themselves somewhat as victims of the changes to the funding process.

5.2       Action

The efficacy and the outcomes of the 50/50 allocation formula is to be reviewed for report to Council.

5.3       Timeframe

The review of the current allocation formula is to be undertaken prior to the recommendation of the allocation mechanism for the Strengthening Communities grants funding for 2018-19.

 

 

 

District Plan Zoning provisions

5.4       Status

The Board is aware of ongoing expressions of community concern around new developments and how they fit in terms of the District Plan. Recent development proposals in particular have highlighted that the District Plan provisions and Resource Management Act 1991 processes are not well understood by local residents.  It is considered that it would be beneficial for the Board to host a seminar for residents associations and other interested persons to hear a presentation from staff on the zoning provisions and the consenting process and to have an opportunity to ask questions.

5.5       Action Required

A seminar is to be convened with presentations from appropriate planning staff.

5.6       Timeframe

The date of the seminar is still to be confirmed but will be within the next two months.

Heathcote flood mitigation options

5.7       Status

             The risk of flooding remains a major concern to residents living in the vicinity of the Heathcote River. There has been considerable investigation into the risks to develop options for mitigation measures that can be implemented. Residents are keen to learn the results of the investigations and discuss the options with the Council.

5.8       Action Required

Two community meetings have been arranged to introduce the options that have been developed and to provide an opportunity to discuss these. Invitations have gone out to all properties along the Heathcote River between Princess Margaret Hospital and Ferry Road. In conjunction with these public meetings two consultant reports are to be released one on dredging, and the other on the frequent flooding response.

 

5.9       Timeframe 

The meetings will be held at the Opawa Community Church, on  Tuesday 17 October 10am– 12pm and Wednesday 18 October 6.30pm – 8.30pm.

 

6.   Major Community and/or Infrastructure Projects

6.1       Community Facilities

6.1.1   90 Hoon Hay Road

The former Hoon Hay Children’s Volunteer Library at 90 Hoon Hay Road is now being leased by the Hoon Hay Community Association and run as a bookable community space pending investigation into its future.  At a recent Board workshop to consider the future use of Council owned properties in the area that are no longer being utilised for the public work for which they were acquired 90 Hoon Hay Road was identified as requiring investigation for an alternative public use. Staff will now investigate the property being used as a community centre on a long term basis and put together a recommendation to the Council.

At its meeting on 3 October 2017 the Board approve a grant of $1,759 from its Discretionary Response Fund towards Hoon Hay Community Centre equipment costs to enable the purchase of additional chairs and a whiteboard.

6.1.2   St Martins Volunteer Library

The St Martins Volunteer Library held its AGM for the first time in the new premises on 12 October. The group noted that it has now operated for 90 years since its inception in 1927. The voluntary committee members were all re-elected. Library membership has been re-grown to 131 since the new doors opened in December 2016.

 

6.2       Partnerships with the community and organisations

6.2.1   Ashgrove Reserve

The Lower Cashmere Residents Association is working with local parks staff to become involved in the management and maintenance of Ashgrove Reserve. At a community meeting earlier this month a "Friends of the Ashgrove Reserve" was formed.  The group has held a 'weeding bee' where much of the invasive weeds at the top of the reserve was we removed and bottles/cans were cleared out.  The group wants to nurture the reserve, not just maintain it and plans to arrange smaller, frequent working bees to begin the nurturing process.

“The Friends” have planted some small plants they were given (two Pokaka, three Clematis foetida, one Kahikatea) with awareness of their needs and has found another kauri tree so now there are two.  They are also discussing with the local arborist plans to do some initial work on the canopy.

6.2.2   Hoon Hay Hoops

The second Hoon Hay Hoops will be held on Friday 13 October from 11.30am to 5.30pm at Hoon Hay Park, Mathers Road.  This is being organised by local youth, Cross Over Trust, Spreydon Youth Trust and the Community Recreation Advisor.

6.2.3   Hoon Hay Fiesta

Hoon Hay Fiesta will be held on Thursday 16 November from 4pm to 7pm at Hoon Hay Park, Mathers Road.  This is being organised by Cross Over Trust, Kids Coach, Rowley Resource Centre, Spreydon Youth Trust, local mothers and the Community Recreation Advisor.

 

6.3       Infrastructure projects underway

6.3.1   Major Cycle Routes : Quarryman’s Trail Cycleway 

Construction of the Quarryman’s Trail Cycleway is underway. A number of start work notices have already been distributed. The work will comprise:

·    6,700 square metres of new cycleway 

·    6,100 square metres of new footpath 

·    Installation of six new sets of traffic signals  at:

                             Antigua Street/Disraeli Street intersection 

                             Strickland Street/Roker Street – mid block signalised crossing 

                             Barrington Street/Strauss Place – mid block signalised crossing 

                             Sparks Road/Lyttelton Street intersection 

                             Sparks Road/Hoon Hay Road intersection 

                             Sparks Road outside Hoon Hay Primary School – mid block signalised crossing 

·    Drainage  

·    Landscaping 

·    Lighting upgrades 

 

6.4       Events Report Back

6.4.1      Pacific Walk

                The sixth Breeze Walking Festival will be held from 30 September to 15 October 2017.        There are over 50 walks for all ages and levels of fitness.  Omai ke O Hui' is a Pacific                        Walk was held on the 30th September 2017 from 11am to 2pm at Hoon Hay Park.  The               event included a walk, have a go activities and a sausage sizzle.  It was a lovely day and               the walk was enjoyed by all attendees.

7.   Parks, Sports and Recreation Update (bi-monthly)

7.1       Local Parks Update

Ernle Clark Reserve Damage

Delta staff met Alice Shanks from Friends of Ernle Clark RMC in the reserve last week. Delta has paid for replacement plants for those wiped out by maintenance activities in the reserve in the last twelve months. Delta has offered assurance to the RMC that there are measures in place to ensure that the reserve is as safe as practically possible from unwarranted maintenance activities.

Ranger Activities

The local park ranger has been involved in the following volunteer activities in the last two months. Working bees included: Rubbish pickups and weeding at Farnley Reserve, Addington Cemetery and King George V Reserve.  Cherry’s Preschool  did a rubbish pick up along the donkey track in September and also planted more native plants in their adopted patch of the Heathcote riverbank last week.

 

7.2       Sports Parks Update

October is a very busy month for our parks maintenance contractors as they work to continue controlling the spring flush. With a change of code from winter to summer, all summer field markings have now been set out. They will be remarked twice this month.

Sports fields have been renovated with aeration and seeding activities. Cricket blocks have been upgraded.

          Scheduled Parks Maintenance Programme for October:

         

Activity

Frequency per month

Ornamental mowing

4

Amenity mowing

4

Summer cricket outfield mowing

8

Summer sport field mowing

4

Summer sport line marking

2

Chemical weed control

1

Ornamental garden maintenance

2

 

 

Performance:

Delta’s audited quality performance for September was 86%; breakdown below:

 

 

Delta’s current quality performance for October is 93%; breakdown below:

 

 

7.3       Capital Works Projects

The mulching and planting programme continues across the city this month. 20,000 plants have been assigned to priority parks across the city. Planting commenced mid-September and the project will be completed by end of October.

 

8.   Community Board funding budget overview and clarification

8.1       Funding update attached.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Tennyson Street Pedestrian facilities

71

b

Funding Update 20  October 2017

75

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Sol Smith - Community Development Advisor

Jay Sepie - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

PDF Creator

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

20 October 2017

 

 

13.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.