Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Tuesday 3 October 2017

Time:                                    5pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

28 September 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 4

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 4

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 4

B       4.       Public Forum.................................................................................................................... 4

B       5.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 4

B       6.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 4   

STAFF REPORTS

c       7.       Marleys Hill - Proposed Temporary Right of Way Easement..................................... 13

C       8.       Barrington Park Playground Renewal (accessible standards)................................... 25

C       9.       Tree Planting and Pou in Ernle Clark Reserve............................................................. 85

C       10.     Spreydon-Cashmere 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund Applications .............. 91

C       11.     Discretionary Response Fund - Hillmorton High School Senior A Girl's Basketball Team......................................................................................................................................... 95

C       12.     Discretionary Response Fund - Hillmorton High School Senior A Boys Basketball Team......................................................................................................................................... 99

C       13.     Youth Achievement and Development Fund - Bella Phoebe Gruindelingh........... 103

C       14.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report.............................................. 105

B       15.     Elected Members’ Information Exchange.................................................................. 109 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Friday 15 September 2017, be confirmed (refer page 5).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes may be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process. It is intended that the public forum session will be held at 5pm.

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson. There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

 

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                     Friday 15 September 2017

Time:                                    8am

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

13 September 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

There were no apologies.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Tim Scandrett declared an interest in Item 13 regarding V-Base and took no part in the Board’s discussion and decision on this matter.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00132

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Tuesday, 5 September 2017, be confirmed.

Tim Scandrett/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                                               Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

4.1          Angus Hamilton – Recipient of a Youth Development and Achievement Scheme grant

 

                Angus Hamilton spoke to the Board about his attendance at the Beach Handball Youth World Cup held in Mauritius as part of the New Zealand under 17 team and thanked the Board for its grant to assist him in representing New Zealand.

 

4.2          Greg Spence – Origin Sport

 

                            Mr Spence spoke to the Board in regard to Origin Sport initiative that encourages children’s participation in sport.  The programmes offered by Origin Sport have recently been extended to   include coach mentoring.

4.3       Tim Walsh - Parklands Drive

 

                Mr Walsh, consultant, spoke on behalf of his clients who reside in Parklands Drive. The residents are seeking a contribution  from the Council for the maintenance of the formed access way to properties at 17-25 Parklands Drive.  Mr Walsh advised that the access way is situated largely within the road reserve and is regularly used by pedestrians as there is no other formed footpath.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00133

Part B

         The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Agreed to request staff advice on the maintenance responsibility for the access way adjacent to the properties at 17 to 25 Parklands Drive.

 

Tim Scandrett/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                                               Carried

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.    

7.   Selwyn Street, Centaurus Road, Sylvan Street and Colombo Street - Proposed No Stopping Restrictions

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00134 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolved:

Selwyn Street

1.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Selwyn Street commencing at its intersection with Rosebery Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

2.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Selwyn Street commencing at its intersection with Rosebery Street and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 18 metres.

Selwyn Street

3.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Selwyn Street commencing at its intersection with Dobson Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 20 metres.

4.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Selwyn Street commencing at its intersection with Dobson Street and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 18 metres.

Sylvan Street

5.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south west side of Sylvan Street commencing at its intersection with Lincoln Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 21 metres.

Centaurus Road

6.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the north side of Centaurus Road commencing at a point 184 metres south east of its intersection with Armstrong Avenue and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 32 metres. As shown on Attachment D of the staff report.

Colombo Street

7.         To revoke the parking restrictions on the east side of Colombo Street, commencing at a point 14 metres south of its intersection with Strickland Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of three metres.

8.         To approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the east side of Colombo Street, commencing at a point 14 metres south of its intersection with Strickland Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of three metres.

Tim Scandrett/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                            Carried

 

 

8.   Selwyn Street – 40 Kilometre per Hour Variable Speed Limit

 

Community Board Decided SCCB/2017/00135 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approves the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit on Selwyn Street (school zone), as it meets the requirements of Section 7.1 of the Land Transport Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2003, and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approves that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed zone) apply on:

             Selwyn Street, commencing at a point 22 metres north of its intersection with Milton Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 365 metres.

3.         Approves that the above mentioned variable speed limit come into force on completion of infrastructure installation.

Lee Sampson/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                             Carried

 

 

9.   Safety Improvements: Pedestrian/ Cycle Safety Fences - Dyers Pass Route

 

Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommended to Council that:

1.    The project scope description CPMS ID 17211 be changed from “Safety Improvements: Pedestrian/ Cycle Safety Fences - Dyers Pass route” to “Pedestrian/ Cycle Safety Improvements – Dyers Pass route”.

 

 

 

Community Board Decided SCCB/2017/00136

Part A

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to Council that:

1.      The scope of the project identified in the Long Term Plan as item CPMS ID 17211 be changed from “Safety Improvements: Pedestrian/ Cycle Safety Fences - Dyers Pass route” to “Pedestrian/ Cycle Safety Improvements – Dyers Pass route” to reflect that the cycle safety fences not be installed but general Cycle Safety improvement be made as set out in Option 1 in the report.

Melanie Coker/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

10. Spreydon-Cashmere 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme - Grant Application Aiyana Mason-King

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00137 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolved to:

1.         Approve a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Fund to Aiyana Mason-King towards attending the New Zealand Secondary Schools Brass Band Course in Napier, from 2 to 8 October 2017.

Melanie Coker/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

12. Spreydon-Cashmere 2017/18 Youth Development and Achievement Scheme - Grant Applications

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00138  (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolved to:

1.         Approve a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Fund to St Thomas' of Canterbury towards participation in The Aims Games in Tauranga in Tauranga from 10 to 15 September 2017.

2.         Approve a grant of $100 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Fund to Ferrymead Bays towards participation in the Jack McKnight South Island Under 10's Festival in Nelson in Nelson from 1 to 3 October 2017.

3.         Approve a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Fund to Maia O'Connor towards participation in the New Zealand Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships in Auckland in Auckland on 5 to 10 October 2017.

4.         Approve a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Fund to Henry Copeland towards participation in the Football South Island Tournament in Nelson 1 to 3 October 2017.

Tim Scandrett/Helene Mautner                                                                                                                            Carried

 

 

11. Spreydon-Cashmere 2017 Neighbourhood Week Applications for Consideration

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00139 (Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolved to:

1.         Allocate its 2017 Neighbourhood Week funding of $2,946 as set out below:

 

Applicant

Activity

No. Attending

Recommendation

1

Apse

Mara

BBQ & games

50 - 60

$110.00

2

Beadle

Kathryn

BBQ

85

$120.00

3

Burrows

Christine

BBQ

36

$72.00

4

Coulter

Robyn

BBQ

48

$92.00

5

Cowie

Katrina

BBQ

35

$70.00

6

Dale

Catherine

BBQ

25 - 30

$60.00

7

Davey

Aimee

BBQ

52

$98.00

8

de Jongh

Jaimita

BBQ

20 - 30

$60.00

9

Dudson

Wendy

BBQ

50 - 100

$100.00

10

Erkkila

Karen

BBQ

38

$76.00

11

Grace

Catherine

BBQ

50

$95.00

12

Keen

Sharon

BBQ

30 - 40

$60.00

13

Lassen

Julie

Meet, greet & games

80 - 100

$100.00

14

Loveday

Karen

BBQ

26

$52.00

15

Maze

Anna

BBQ

80

$100.00

16

Mills

Keith

BBQ

50 - 60

$110.00

17

Monsef

Noeline

Christmas lunch

25 - 30

$60.00

18

O'Brien

Richard

Afternoon tea

18

$36.00

19

Peterson

Robyn

BBQ

30

$60.00

20

Reid

Pauline

Afternoon tea

25

$50.00

21

Sloan

Dennis

BBQ morning tea

40

$50.00

22

Stewart-Ward

Callum

Open mic party

100

$80.00

23

Suckling

Sarah

BBQ

50

$95.00

24

Tobbell

Julie

Sale Day & BBQ

60

$80.00

25

Van Tongeren

Louise

BBQ

30

$60.00

26

Wenmoth

Bev

BBQ

40

$80.00

27

Whearty

Angela

BBQ

30

$60.00

28

Wilson

Andrew

Street party

50

$95.00

29

Bailey

David

Christmas BBQ

50 - 70

$125.00

30

Cook

Graeme

BBQ

30 - 40

$80.00

31

Coulbeck

Lynette

Picnic & BBQ

100

$100.00

32

Drayton

David

Coffee & Cake

100+

$100.00

33

Hudson

Allan

BBQ & games

60 - 70

$110.00

34

McAleer

Donna

BBQ

50

$50.00

35

Miller

Greg

Christmas BBQ & Carols

100 - 150

$100.00

36

Tobbell

Julie

Sausage sizzle

80

$100.00

37

Brodie

Steven

Sausage sizzle

60 - 70

$0.00

38

Le Heux

William

Outdoor Movie/BBQ

90 - 120

$0.00

39

Barker

Catherine

Christmas Party

150 - 200

$0.00

40

Bowie

Sjaan

West Spreydon Community and School Pool Opening

500

$0.00

41

de Senna

Christine

Monster Car Boot Sale

200

$0.00

42

Smit

Amy

Disco

100

$0.00

 

Phil Clearwater/Lee Sampson                                                                                                                                Carried

 

 

13. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

 

Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receive the Area Update.

2.         Agrees the items to be reported by the Chairperson in her report to the Council:

3.         Adopts the 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan as circulated to members and approves distribution and consultation with the community. 

 

Community Board consideration:

The Board noted staff advice that the development referred to at 3.3.1 of the report is at
23 Studholme Street not 23 Athelstan Street.

 

Community Board decided SCCB/2017/00140

Part B

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolved:

1.         To receive the Area Report

2.         That the items to be reported by the Chairperson in her report to the Council be identified by the Chairperson and Deputy Chair in consultation with other Board members.

3.         That the Board Chairperson, Community Governance Manager and Community Board Adviser be delegated power to consider the Proposed Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017,   Proposed General Bylaw 2017, and Proposed Stock on Roads Bylaw 2017 and if appropriate, to lodge submissions on these on behalf of the Board.

Phil Clearwater/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                               Carried

 

 

Tim Scandrett left the meeting at 10.03am

 

 

Community Board consideration:

The Board discussed the proposal by Vbase for a permanent alcohol ban in Addington and noted that Section 147A Local Government Act 2002 allows for such bylaws only where they are justified as a reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms.  After considering the information provided the Board decided that the proposal failed to meet this threshold.

 

 

 

 

                                                                           

 

Community Board decided SCCB/2017/00141

Part B

The Board decided not to recommend to Council that a permanent Alcohol Ban in Addington be put in place. 

 

Note: Tim Scandrett left the room during the discussion of this item and took no part in the discussion thereon.

Helene Mautner/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                          Carried

 

 

Tim Scandrett returned to the meeting at 10.27am

 

 

14. Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

4.1     Lee Sampson – Social Enterprise World Forum

          Lee Sampson requested approval to attend the Social Enterprise World Forum, as the Board’s representative, at a cost of $500.

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2017/00142

The Board decided to delegate to the Board Chair and Deputy Chair power decide on attendance at the Social Enterprise World Forum by Lee Sampson.

Helene Mautner/Tim Scandrett                                                                                                                            Carried

 

 

 

   

Meeting concluded at 10.32am.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 3RD DAY OF OCTOBER 2017

 

 

Karolin Potter

Chairperson

   


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

7.        Marleys Hill - Proposed Temporary Right of Way Easement

Reference:

17/889748

Contact:

Derek Roozen

derek.roozen@ccc.govt.nz

941-8798

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider approving the granting of a temporary right of way easement to McVicar Holdings Limited (McVicars) over part of the Marleys Hill scenic reserve (refer Attachment A).

1.2       The Board is also requested, should it approve the granting of the easement, to recommend to the Chief Executive that she exercise her authority as delegate of the Minister of Conservation to consent to the easement.  The Minister of Conservation has delegated her authority to the Council, which has subsequently sub-delegated that authority to the Chief Executive.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated and is being submitted to the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board in response to a request from McVicars for short term access through Marleys Hill by way of development and operation of a temporary logging road to extract milled timber from its neighbouring land (Cashmere Forest) out to the Summit Road.  This is to enable the part of Cashmere Forest occupied by the Christchurch Adventure Park (Adventure Park) to be repaired to the point it can reopen later this year, which would be jeopardised if logs were instead transported elsewhere through the Adventure Park.  The proposed temporary road access through Marleys Hill will ensure separation of the logging and recreational mountain-biking activities in the Adventure Park area so both may co-exist without additional safety risks until logging is completed.

1.4       Marleys Hill is a Regional Park located alongside the north-western side of the Summit Road on the Christchurch Port Hills.  It is a scenic reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.  The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board has the delegated authority as the administering body to make a decision on the granting of the proposed easement.

1.5       Under the Reserves Act, the administering body’s consent is subject to the consent of the Minister of Conservation.  The Minister has delegated this power to the Council.  The delegation from the Minister raised an expectation that the roles of the administering body will be kept separate from the role as the Minister’s delegate.  The Council has addressed this by way of making the Community Board the administering body and the Chief Executive the Minister’s delegate.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low to medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by a significance and engagement assessment worksheet.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflects the assessment in addition to the statutory requirement.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolves to:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Section 48(1)(f) of the Reserves Act 1977, the granting of a right of way easement to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a logging road between Cashmere Forest and the Summit Road over the parts of the Marleys Hill scenic reserve as shown on the plan submitted at Attachment A, subject to:

a.         The Easement being limited to a period of time not exceeding six (6) months from the date of consent, with full reinstatement of the land to be effected upon termination.

b.         The consent of the Minister of Conservation, exercised by staff delegation, as set out in 2. below.

c.         All necessary statutory consents under, yet not limited to, the Resource Management Act, Building Control Act and Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act being obtained.

2.         Recommend that the Chief Executive, using the Council’s delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation, consents to the granting of the easement to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a temporary logging road as outlined in 1. above.

3.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager, should the easement be granted along with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to finalise documentation to implement the easement.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Regional Parks

·     Level of Service: 6.3.5 Provide, develop and maintain facilities to the satisfaction of park users

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Grant the easement (preferred option).

·     Option 2 – Decline to grant the easement.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Complies with the appropriate statutory and legal process to authorise the temporary activity.

·     Logs are able to be removed from Cashmere Forest without impacting on the Adventure Park being able to reopen to the public this year.

·     The proposed temporary road will mostly utilise the alignment of an existing vehicle track, which limits new ground being affected.

·     Able to manage potential impacts and provide for full site reinstatement to its present state and condition through easement conditions.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Potential physical impact on the reserve (road earthworks), restriction of reserve use (crossing recreational tracks) and heavy vehicle traffic on the Summit Road, although these can be mitigated by the proposed activity being temporary and manageable.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The proposed activity to be covered by the right of way easement is the development and operation of an unsealed logging road on Marleys Hill (regional park) connecting with a logging road in the pine plantation area on adjoining private land to the north-west (known as Cashmere Forest) owned by McVicar Holdings Limited (McVicars).  This will allow operations to commence over the coming summer to extract timber from Cashmere Forest (the Forest).  An issue with developing and using any possible alternative extraction routes, such as to, and then up or down, Worsleys Road, is, in addition to involving increased distance and works including on legal road, likely to impact on the reopening of the Christchurch Adventure Park (Adventure Park) that occupies the Forest area and which the mountain biking community has a strong interest in.  Logging out the proposed way via Marleys Hill will enable the Adventure Park to repair damaged tracks and attempt to get the chair lift, some MTB tracks and the zip line open this year, and to be fully open this season (2017/18 summer).  The proposed route will shorten the logging time across the Adventure Park assets and, without this, the ability of the Adventure Park to reopen (if at all) will be severely compromised.  It will also allow separation of the two activities in the Forest (logging and recreational mountain-biking) so both may co-exist until logging is completed.

5.2       The proposed road will follow the alignment of an existing vehicle track in the regional park but will require this to be upgraded in terms of width, level and surface.  It will cut across the popular and well used Marleys Hill / Flying Nun Mountain Biking Trail as well as the Crater Rim Walkway running alongside the Summit Road.

5.3       The proposed road will be constructed to New Zealand Forest Road Engineering Manual guidelines for ‘Spur’ roads; that is, in this case it will be designed:

·     for traffic that is less than 20 heavy vehicles per day; and

·     traveling at a maximum speed of 40 km/hr; and

·     will be to a metalled maximum width of 4.3 metres; and

·     length of approximately 340 metres; and

·     have a maximum grade of 18-20%.

5.4       Subgrade and top course material will be quarried within the Forest area where possible.  Better quality top course, however, may be brought in from other sources (not the park) if rock quarried in the Forest is not suitable.

5.5       The existing vehicle track mentioned above is used by Orion New Zealand Limited (Orion) to access its power line running alongside.  McVicars, through its agent, will liaise directly with Orion over the development and use of this road alignment before proceeding with any construction, including with respect to the anticipated moving or bracing of up to four existing power poles.

5.6       Council officers, at this time, note that there appears to be no easement currently in place for this existing vehicle track and power line across Marleys Hill.

5.7       It is expected that the road, if approved, will be required for the purpose of a logging road for a period of time not likely to exceed six months.  The applicant has estimated a period of time the proposed road access would be used by logging trucks to be three months.  However, Council officers believe the greater term for the easement is warranted to cover road construction time and any potential disruption to the logging production, such as the consequence of bad weather.  At the end of that time the site will be fully reinstated to its present state and condition.  

5.8       Any easement granted will need to be negotiated to reflect the proposed temporary occupation and activity, and will include appropriate terms and conditions for managing impacts, including those on the recreational tracks, and reinstatement of the site.

5.9       Use of the proposed access for log cartage will be on weekdays from 6 am until 5 pm.  No trucking movements will be permitted on weekends.  Mountain bikers using the Marleys Hill / Flying Nun Mountain Biking Trail, and walkers using the Crater Rim Walkway, will be informed through prominent signage, as a minimum, of the proposed activity, and their use of these tracks will be accommodated as much as possible during the activity in a way that provides for the safe crossing of the proposed logging road.  Council officers recommend that the foot and cycling traffic can be managed by having gated crossing points for both tracks across the access road, with signage erected both before and at the gates to warn cyclists and walkers to give way to harvesting traffic at the gated crossing points.

Marleys Hill

5.10    The proposed easement will run through reserve land that is held in title CB48C/718.   The legal description is Lot 1 DP 83864.  The land parcel area is 19.7628 ha.  The land parcel is held in fee simple title by the Council and is vested in the Council as a Scenic Reserve subject to Section 19 of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.11    In addition, the proposed easement will cross the part of the reserve land that is deemed Protected Land under the Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act 2001.  The implications of this are summarised in 5.22 to 5.26 of this report below.

5.12    The proposed easement does not impact on any other registered rights over the Council’s title.

5.13    Marleys Hill is categorised as a Regional Park by the Council, such parks being part of a network of parks of regional significance, including the Port Hill reserves of which Marleys Hill is one, and may include natural areas, visitor information centres and recreation facilities such as walking tracks and bike trails.  This category of parks contributes to the range of distinct recreation experiences and settings across Christchurch’s network of parks.  The regional parks provide services such as information, volunteer events, track networks and biodiversity support.

5.14    The park is largely a modified one in terms of vegetation present; however it is identified as an area for native species regeneration.

5.15    There is no management plan covering Marleys Hill.

Easement

5.16    Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act) provides for the administering body of a reserve vested in it, with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to grant easements for rights of way and other easements over any part of the reserve.  In this case, Section 48(1)(f) covers “providing or facilitating access … to … any other land not forming part of the reserve or for any other purpose connected with any such land”.

5.17    Section 48(2) of the Act requires that there be public notification of any intention to grant an easement under Section 48(1).  However, Section 48(3) provides for an exemption from this where the reserve is unlikely to be materially altered or permanently damaged, and the rights of the public in respect of the reserve are unlikely to be permanently affected.  In this instance, public notification is not required because:

·   the proposed road follows the line of an existing vehicle track;

·   it will be a temporary use;

·   the installation and operation will be undertaken in as disruption-free manner as possible;

·   there will be full reinstatement of the area so affected to its present state and condition; and

·   mountain bikers using the Marleys Hill / Flying Nun Mountain Biking Trail, and walkers using the Crater Rim Walkway, will be informed through signage, as a minimum, of the proposed activity, and their use of these tracks will be accommodated as much as possible during the activity in a way that provides for their safe crossing of the proposed logging road.

5.18    Attachment A shows the easement area required.  This comprises Area A shown marked in red:

·   A is a five metre wide easement for the proposed logging road, covering a length of approximately 340 metres, and equating to an area of approximately 1,700 square metres.

5.19    It is anticipated that the proposed easement is granted contractually by way of deed or agreement without the need to have a survey plan prepared or to have an easement instrument registered against the land title – thus, costs of meeting these are not incurred.  Consequently, and in order  to support measures taken to assist the timely reopening of the Adventure Park, the normal one-off compensation fee is proposed to be waived.

Consent of the Minister of Conservation

5.20    In exercising the consent of the Minister of Conservation, the Council should be satisfied that due procedure has been followed, and in this respect the Council should have regard to the following matters:

5.20.1       The land affected by the application is a reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.20.2       The easement being applied for falls within the purposes specified in Section 48(1) of the Reserves Act.

5.20.3       The provisions of Section 48(2) (public notification) have been complied with or a waiver can be given to this requirement under Section 48(3), the second of which has been recommended by Council officers.

5.20.4       Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 (that this Act shall be interpreted and administered as to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi), meaning that, in consenting to transactions under the Reserves Act, consideration is given to the requirement or otherwise to consult with iwi.

5.21    Specific consultation with iwi is not considered necessary in this case as the site affected does not feature in the City Plan as having any significance to tangata whenua, and the proposal development and use is believed to not be inconsistent with the framework of the Mahaanui Iwi Management Plan (MIMP) as it will take place over an already relatively modified site, be temporary and involve the site being fully reinstated to its present state and condition at the end of the use for logging trucks.

Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act 2001

5.22    The land making up most of the park, in particular that adjoining and parallel to the Summit Road, is Protected Land as defined in Section 4, described in Schedule 2 and shown on the plans set out in Schedule 3 of the Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act 2001.  Attachment B shows the extent of the Protected Land in relation to Marleys Hill.

5.23    The purposes of the Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act are to provide for the:

(a)   preservation and protection of the scenic amenity associated with the Summit Road and other roads, walkways, paths, and public open spaces within the protected land;

(b)   preservation and protection of natural amenities associated with land within the protected area; and

(c)    the improvement of facilities for the public enjoyment of the scenic amenity and the natural amenities.

5.24    The Summit Road Protection Authority administers the Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act and has the function to work to preserve the scenic amenity of the Summit Road. 

5.25    McVicars needs to apply to the Summit Road Protection Authority for consent in writing to use the Protected Land specified in the Summit Road (Canterbury) Protection Act.  Advice was received by Council officers on 12 September 2017 that a submission was being made to the Authority.

5.26    The Authority may require notification of the proposal (inviting submissions over 20 working days).

District Plan

5.27    Marleys Hill sits in the Open Space Natural zone (ON) of the Christchurch District Plan.  This zone encompasses extensive natural, ecological, scenic and outdoor recreation areas, which enable:

·   conservation and protection of areas of significant biodiversity, landscape, cultural and historic heritage values;

·   people to experience the natural open space environment through a range of compatible recreation and tourist activities; and

·   compatible rural activities and buildings appropriate to the location and proposed use.

5.28    The proposed logging road activity is potentially a Discretionary activity for the zone due to it, arguably, being an intrinsic part of the Plantation forestry (D3) discretionary activity for the ON zone (use of land and buildings for planting, maintenance and harvesting of timber tree species for commercial wood production); however, as the actual commercial wood production, other than some of the transport of that timber, will be wholly happening on the adjacent private land, it is more likely be considered to be a Non-complying activity, in which case resource consent is required.

5.29    McVicars will need to confirm the requirement with a District Planner and make the according application.


 

6.   Option 1 – Grant the easement (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Adopt the staff recommendation (to grant the right of way easement on the conditions stipulated).

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low to medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Mountain bikers are specifically potentially affected by this option due to the proposed road crossing their trail.  However, there is already an existing vehicle track crossing at around the same point the proposed road will cross the trail, the proposed road and activity will be temporary, and any potential adverse effects when it is active should be able to be managed appropriately.  Also, the site will be fully reinstated to its present state and condition upon cessation of the proposed activity.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – negligible, staff time.

6.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - responsibility of McVicar Holdings Limited.

6.9       Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

6.10    Section 48(1)(f) of the Reserves Act 1977 enables the Council to grant rights of way and other easements over any part of a reserve for providing or facilitating access to any other land or for any other purpose connected with any such land, in this case for transport of timber milled on that land.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.11    The proposal is either a Discretionary or Non-complying activity under the Christchurch District Plan rules, requiring a resource consent to be applied for if it is considered the latter.

6.12    There is a risk the easement is not able to be utilised due to the resource consent not being granted.  This will result in a potential delay in the re-opening of the Christchurch Adventure Park, with the proposed logging road needing to be re-routed.

6.12.1 Treatment: Resource consent application is prepared so that it appropriately and effectively addresses measures to minimise or remove all adverse effects; thereby increasing the likelihood it is granted.

6.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is High.

Implementation

6.13    Implementation dependencies - consent of the Summit Road Protection Authority to use the Protected Land, and potentially resource consent needing to be granted.

6.14    Implementation timeframe – up to 6 months. The formation of the proposed road is proposed to commence in October 2017, subject to easement document preparation / signing and regulatory approval.  The logging activity is likely to be completed well within the 6 months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Complies with the appropriate statutory and legal process to authorise such a temporary activity.

·   Logs are able to be removed from Cashmere Forest without impacting on the Christchurch Adventure Park being able to reopen to the public, at least in part, later this year.

·   Able to manage potential impacts and provide for the site to be fully reinstated to its present state and condition through easement conditions.

6.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Potential impact on the reserve (road earthworks), restriction of reserve use (crossing of recreational tracks) and heavy vehicles traffic on the Summit Road, although these can be mitigated by the proposed activity being temporary and manageable.

7.   Option 2 – Decline to grant the easement

Option Description

7.1       Decline the application – that is, do not approve the granting of a right of way easement as requested.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low, which differs slightly from section 2 of this report due to the status quo applying - that is, no development generating impacts occurring that will raise the degree of significance.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are appropriate (that is, none).

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Clients of the Christchurch Adventure Park are potentially indirectly affected by this option due to the logging route not able to be diverted from the Adventure Park area to allow it to be repaired for re-opening later this year.  This option may be supported by the users of the Marleys Hill / Flying Nun Mountain Biking Trail, in that it will not be affected by any logging road development and use.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.  Although not a favourable outcome in terms of the granting of an easement, the proposal is appropriately evaluated in accordance with due process – it is just that grounds for an unfavourable decision is weighted on the public benefits / impacts in relation to Marleys Hill and not those relating to the activities in the privately owned Cashmere Forest / Christchurch Adventure Park area.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – not applicable.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – no change for Marleys Hill.

7.9       Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.10    Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.11    There are no risks to the values, or users, of Marleys Hill if the easement is not approved.

7.12    However, there is arguably a wider risk to the public benefit derived from both public and private outdoor recreational space provision if the Christchurch Adventure Park is not able to reopen in a timely fashion.

7.12.1 Treatment: Alternative strategies employed by McVicars on its own land to address both the logging of Cashmere Forest and the reopening of the Christchurch Adventure Park.

7.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk for Marleys Hill is low.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Complies with the appropriate due process to adequately and properly assess the effects of the proposed activity on the Council administered regional park.

·   There will not be earthworks within (to develop the proposed logging road) nor temporary restrictions to public access to part of Marleys Hill for recreation.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Logs are not able to be removed from Cashmere Forest via a route that permits safe co-existence of the logging and recreational mountain-biking activities in the forest, thereby potentially impacting on the Christchurch Adventure Park being able to reopen to the public this coming summer season.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Marleys Hill - McVicars Easement Plan

23

b

Marleys Hill and Protected Land

24

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Derek Roozen - Senior Network Planner Parks

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

8.        Barrington Park Playground Renewal (accessible standards)

Reference:

17/557171

Contact:

Marcy McCallum

marcy.mccallum@ccc.govt.nz

941 6283

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to approve landscape plan for the renewal of Barrington Park Playground.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following a seminar with the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board on 6 June 2017.

1.3       The report presents a landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park prepared in consultation with the community and affected stakeholders.

1.4       Barrington Park Playground Renewal is funded through Christchurch City Council’s Long Term Plan 2015 – 2025.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined on the suggested thresholds for assessing criteria, which had a medium level of possible risk to the Council of carrying out the decision and whether the impact of a decision can be easily reversed, medium-low number of people affected, level of community interest and possible social impact and low for the other criteria.  

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park shown as Version 2 - 3 October 2017 in Attachment A of this report.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Sports Parks

·     Level of Service: 7.1.2 Deliver a high level of customer satisfaction with the range and quality of sports parks

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Approve the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do not approve the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park and request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Removal of play equipment which is near the end of its lifespan thereby removing a potential safety risk to playground users.

·     Provision of new playground equipment that meets the current New Zealand Playground Standards.

·     Providing a community playground that provides accessible and inclusive play opportunities for a variety of ages and abilities

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Closure of the playground during the construction period.  However the other playground near the Bowling Club will be unaffected during the construction period for this playground.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Barrington Park is a Sports Park located at 266 Barrington Street, Barrington.

5.2       There are currently two playgrounds within the park, one alongside the carpark at Barrington Mall and one beside the Bowling Club at the north-western end of the park. This project is to renew the playground beside the carpark of Barrington Mall and bring it up to accessibility standards. The section of the modular structure that was replaced following a fire in 2015 will be retained. The project does not consider the playground beside the Bowling Club as this has approximately 10 years lifespan left.

5.3       The Parks Unit work on a 25 year renewal programme for play equipment to keep up with safety standards and compliance with the New Zealand Playground Standards NZS 5828:2016. This ensures playgrounds are safe and maintain an acceptable level of service.

5.4       Capital Funding for the construction of this playground has been approved in the Long Term Plan 2015 – 2025 for Financial Year 2017/2018.

5.5       A Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Report (refer to Attachment B) was completed in October 2016 and provided the following recommendations which have been incorporated into the design:

·   The Playground be extended to sit in close proximity to the Library

·   Provision of some seating options within the boundary of the Playground, to clearly signal that they are intended for Playground users. Removal of most or all of the present seating options around the Playground, and placement of seating elsewhere within the Park

·   Fencing of the west boundary to separate the rear of the Library’s loading bay driveway from the Playground – we will feed this back to the Parks and Library units for future planning purposes.

5.6       Staff met with members of Christchurch City Council’s Disability Advisory Group on Tuesday 20 September 2016 to discuss the Barrington Park Playground Renewal Project. This group advised that an important aspect to the design would be to obtain an audit of the concept design through Barrier Free New Zealand. 

5.7       Barrier Free New Zealand completed an audit of the concept plan in May 2017 prior to consultation (refer to Attachment C) a summary of the changes made to the plan following the audit are attached (refer to Attachment D).

5.8       Staff went back to the Disability Advisory Group with the concept plan that had been reviewed by Barrier Free New Zealand on Tuesday 16 May 2017. They gave the plan their highest endorsement.

5.9       An email was sent out on Monday 1 May 2017 to those that contributed to the playground following the fire damage in 2015, to let them know that the playground was due for renewal and whether they had any specific feedback around the project. Staff received feedback from one stakeholder and this was incorporated where appropriate into the concept plan prior to consultation.

5.10    We met with the Kiwiable Recreation Network on 8 September 2016 prior to starting work on this project; the purpose of the meeting was to get input from the members and give them advanced notice of our intentions for the playground. We received suggestions for organisations to assist up with our design work including the recommendation to have the plan peer reviewed by Barrier Free NZ. Due to timing issues, we weren’t able to meet with Kiwiable to go through the concept plan, however, the chair of Kiwiable is a member of the Disability Advisory Group and was present when we presented the concept plan to this group.

5.11    Tree Review – Council arborists have assessed the current condition of the trees around the playground, provisions have been made in the design to minimise the impact on the trees. A Resource Consent will be required for working within 5m of a tree in a park.

5.12    Staff attended a Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Seminar on 6 June 2017 to share the concept plan prior to heading out for Community Consultation.

6.   Option 1 – Approve the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       To install new playground equipment as shown in Attachment A. The proposed equipment will consist of the following items:

6.1.1   Ramped Climbing structure – The ramps are at a suitable gradient and have two areas included where wheel chair users can turn around. The section of the structure that was replaced after it was damaged by fire will be retained. This structure contains a range of play panels and activities for varying levels of abilities.

6.1.2   Sand Play Area – the sand play area includes a crane, conveyor belt, stencil, scale and transported as well as a table to sit and stand at.

6.1.3   Talk tube / fun phone – These will be located at a height that can be used by a range of people and will enable interaction across the playground.

6.1.4   Climbing boulder with tunnel – There will be two heights on the boulder. A Tunnel through it will provide a quiet place as well as enabling interaction with the equipment for those unable to climb.

6.1.5   Inclusive Carousel – The carousel is suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs as well as those who wish to stand or sit on it.

6.1.6   Swing Set – It will include two standard swings, one basket swing and two infant swings, one with a higher back for extra support.

6.1.7   Babel Drum – This creates a fairly soft sound and is played with the hands.

6.1.8   Net see-saw – This can be used by people with a range of abilities. People can lie on it, climb it, rock on it and multiple people can use it at one time.

6.1.9   Jumping jacks – These can be used sitting or standing with or without the assistance of a guardian.

6.1.10 Furniture – Picnic table with central leg, park benches and a platform seat.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance included a letterbox drop, circulation to local schools, pre-schools, early childhood groups, on-site signage, community drop-in, Have Your Say website and social media.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The local community and disability groups are specifically affected by this option due to the close proximity to this playground and the inclusion of accessible pieces of equipment.  Their views are outlined below.

6.6       Community consultation on the Barrington Park playground renewal was undertaken from Monday 10 July to Friday 4 August 2017.

6.7       A total of 240 leaflets were hand delivered to properties on Athelstan Street and Sugden Street and sections of Barrington Street, Coronation Street, Milton Street and Simeon Street.

6.8       The leaflet was also sent to 160 key stakeholders and 73 absentee owners.

6.9       Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, South Library, Spreydon Library, Pioneer Recreation and Sport Centre and the Barrington Park playground.

6.10    The project team attended the Kidsfest storytime held at Spreydon Library on 14 July 2017 to talk to attendees about the project.

6.11    During the course of the engagement, Council received 62 submissions. Of the 62 submissions, 33 submitters were in support, 28 were in support but had some concerns and one did not support the proposal.

6.12    The following summarises feedback received in support of the proposal:

Enthusiasm for the project

·        …”think this is a wonderful plan”…

·        “How lovely to have our favourite playground revamped. So grateful to be living in this beautiful city. Thank you City Council!!!”

·        “Fantastic to see local playground getting some improvements. Our family will support this all the way.”

·        “Love the variety of different activities.  Particularly their accessibility for babies and toddlers which has always been great about this park. Love that it's not just the same old stuff. “

·        “This is amazing!  Love it!! We will miss the walking beams ... but the sandpit will be worth it.”

·        …” Can't wait to use the updated playground.”

·        …” I go to music in Barrington Mall every Wednesday so I look forward to playing on the new playground!”

·        …” The proposed plan looks good and it is needed as it serves quite a big area in the neighbourhood.”

Concerns

·        Concern there is not convenient mobility parking nearby

·        The sandpit may be shaded in winter

·        Replace bark with a softer surface

Suggestions

·        Tar sealed path

·        Include a drinking fountain

·        Include balance beams

·        Skate Park for youth

·        Adult workout stations

·        Better fencing

·        More seating

·        Water play feature by boulders

·        More rubbish bins

 

6.13    The following summarises feedback received in support of the proposal but had some concerns:

Concerns

·        Concern that the ramped structures would not be replaced

·        Concern about bark being used as soft fall as wheel chair users find it difficult to navigate and it is a potential choking hazard for babies

·        Concern about the open area at the top of the slides

·        Concern the existing slides create static electricity

·        Concern whether there are accessible toilets available at the park

·        Concerns about people drinking in the park at night

·        Concern about how the sand pit will be protected from animal excrement

Suggestions

·        Additional fencing to close off from the mall carpark

·        Shade sails

·        Recycling bin and more rubbish bins

·        Water fountain

·        Adult gym area

·        Solar power charging table

·        Chess set

·        Design considerations e.g. high water table, access for maintenance/rubbish collection

·        Do not include the sandpit as rain will make it unusable in winter

·        Convert the western playground into a parking area for the bowling, croquet and tennis clubs

·        Keep the bars and beams

·        Include a water feature

·        Keep the flying fox

·        Include augmentative and alternative communication boards, or include braille signage

·        Include a wheel chair swing

·        Warning signs for the mall carpark

 

6.14    The following summarises feedback received from the one submitter who did not support the proposal:

·        Concern that the plan did not include the see saws and swings at the other end of the park.

 

6.15    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Board meeting and how they can request speaking rights. Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback summary with project team responses.

 

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.16    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.16.1 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

6.16.2 Children’s Policy 1998

6.16.3 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

Financial Implications

6.17    Cost of Implementation – the cost of implementing the current landscape plan is approximately $347,000 (refer to breakdown in 6.19 below)

6.18    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The playground is currently under a maintenance contract and schedule which undertakes inspections of the equipment for compliance and a condition assessment. These inspections are undertaken regardless of the age of the equipment. However, with the equipment’s current condition the maintenance cost will be higher as opposed to new equipment and safety surface which is designed and built to meet the compliance standards. There will be a small increase in operational costs to implement this renewal project due to the sand play area. However, the sand play area will be contained to reduce the spread of sand into other areas.

6.19    Funding source

$310,337 – CPMS 2331 – Barrington Park Playground Renewal (Accessibility standard)

$17,000 - CPMS 37487 – FY18 Delivery Package – Parks Furniture (New)

$20,000 – CPMS 965 – FY19 Parks – Play and Recreation Facilities (New) – Climbing boulder

Legal Implications

6.20    The New Zealand Playground Standards NZS5828:2016 are not a compulsory Standard. However, the Standards have been put in place to provide a form of safety for users and administrators.

6.21    No building consents are required as playgrounds are exempt.

6.22    A resource consent will be required as construction will take place within 5m of a tree. This will be applied for as part of the Detailed Design phase.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.23    Risk of increase in costs of play equipment caused through time delay from estimates at the concept plan stage until gaining approval and placing orders.

6.23.1 Treatment: Confirming the estimate and obtaining a final quote. If cost is higher than expected, other suppliers will be researched for better pricing.

6.23.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.24    Implementation dependencies - Gaining Community Board approval to proceed with construction.

6.25    Implementation timeframe –

·   Board Approval – 3 October 2017

·   Detailed design, obtaining consent (Resource Consent) and tendering – November 2017 to February 2018

·   Construction completed – June 2017

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.26    The advantages of this option include:

·   Removal of non-compliant equipment thereby removing potential safety risks to playground users

·   Provision of new playground equipment that meets the current New Zealand Playground Standards

·   Play equipment will be much more accessible to a wider range of users

·   The amount and types of equipment will increase providing more options to users

·   Provision of safety surfacing in accordance with the New Zealand Playground Standards

·   Provision of a new accessible path connecting the playground spaces

6.27    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Closure of the playground space during the construction period

·   Does not meet all of the submission requests received through the consultation. Discussed in section 6.11 Community Views and Preferences.

7.   Option 2 – Do not approve the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park and request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

Option Description

7.1       The landscape plan (attachment A) for the playground renewal at Barrington Park is not approved and the Community Board request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       The local community and disability groups are specifically affected by this option due to the close proximity to this playground and the inclusion of accessible pieces of equipment.

7.5       No feedback supported this option and this option would not deliver the required asset renewal requirement.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.6.1   Inconsistency – not meeting Levels of Service

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – Not complying with the New Zealand Playground Standards

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – additional cost to re-design and engage with the community again plus the cost of renewing the playground. It is likely that one or more pieces of equipment would need to be removed or the size of the playground reduced to fit within the available budget (or additional budget allocated).

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – higher maintenance costs would continue while the design is changed and the community engaged with. 

7.9       Funding source - 

$310,337 – CPMS 2331 – Barrington Park Playground Renewal (Accessibility standard)

$17,000 - CPMS 37487 – FY18 Delivery Package – Parks Furniture (New)

$20,000 – CPMS 965 – FY19 Parks – Play and Recreation Facilities (New) – Climbing boulder

Legal Implications

7.10    The New Zealand Playground Standards NZS5828:2016 are not a compulsory Standard. However, the Standards have been put in place to provide a form of safety for users and administrators.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.11    Not removing or replacing equipment runs a risk of injury to users.

7.12    Risk of injury caused by faulty play equipment. This may result in an enquiry (depending on the severity of the injury or death) looking at safety records and audits undertaken, condition assessment reporting and the Council’s response to mitigate these issues.

7.12.1 Treatment: remove playground equipment that has been assessed as posing a potential risk to users (and not replace). Increase the frequency of safety assessments.

7.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies  - gaining Community Board Approval of a revised Landscape Plan

7.14    Implementation timeframe:

·   Redesign playground – October 2017

·   Community Board Seminar –  November 2017

·   Community Engagement –  November/December 2017

·   Community Board Approval – January/February 2018

·   Detailed design, obtaining Resource Consent, tendering, placing orders for equipment – March to June 2018

·   Construction completed – September 2018

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The community has the opportunity to consider and alternative playground design.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Delays in providing safe playground space and meeting Levels of Service

·   Potential for the cost of play equipment to increase

·   Increased design fees may result in less budget being available for play equipment/furniture/landscaping (or alternatively, more budget may be required to complete the project)

·   Medium to high risk of injury to users

·   Construction will potentially be over the winter months

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Barrington Park Playground - Landscape Plan for Community Board Approval - Version 2 - 3 October 2017

35

b

Barrington Park Playground - CPTED advice - 31 October 2016

37

c

Barrington Park Playground - Barrier Free NZ Accessibility Audit

41

d

Barrington Park Playground - Summary of changes following Barrier Free NZ Audit

81

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Marcy McCallum - Project Manager

Megan Carpenter - Recreation Planner, Greenspace

Lori Rankin - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Rod Whearty - Team Leader Project Management Parks

Liam Nolan - Head of Vertical Capital Delivery and Professional Services

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

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03 October 2017

 


 


 


 


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03 October 2017

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

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03 October 2017

 

 

9.        Tree Planting and Pou in Ernle Clark Reserve

Reference:

17/1039746

Contact:

Maria Adamski

Maria.adamski@ccc.govt.nz

941 5103

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to approve the location and construction of a Pou and the location of the planting of a Kahikatea in Ernle Clark Reserve which is an addition to the Ernle Clark Reserve Implementation Plan March 2012 .

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to fulfil Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board resolution SCCB/2017/00095 on 7 July 2017.

4.1          The Board decided to request staff advice on the proposal to plant a Kahikatea tree and place a carved Pou in Ernle Clark Reserve to commemorate the birth of Bahá’u’llah.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined on the suggested thresholds for assessing criteria which had a medium level of resulting benefit and additional opportunity and assessed as low for all of the other criteria

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea in Ernle Clark Reserve

2.         That final foundation plans are submitted to the Parks Asset Engineer for approval prior to installation.

3.         That the exact location for the Pou is confirmed on site with the Parks Asset Engineer.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report does not support the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025).

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea in Ernle Clark Reserve (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do not approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea in Earnle Clark Reserve

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Meets the request of the community group

·     Enhances the Ernle Clark Reserve

·     The Council receives a landmark and cultural piece at no cost

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     None

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The Spreydon-Cashmere Community board received a deputation from Maghan McMahon from the local Bahá’i Community and Somerfield Junior Youth Group on the 4 July 2017 regarding a wish to plant a kahikatea and place a carved Pou in Ernle Clarke Reserve as a gift to the community.  The gift was proposed as part of the bicentenary celebration of the Birth of Bahá’u’lláh during Labour weekend 21 and 22 October 2017.

5.2       Staff were asked for advice on the proposal.

5.3       The Community Board approved a landscape plan for Ernle Clarke Reserve on the 17 August 2010.  The plan provides for the development of the Reserve maintaining a mix of native and exotic plantings, tracks, seating and rubbish bins.

5.4       In periods of high rainfall the Heathcote River (Ōpāwaho) is prone to flooding.  The location of the Pou has taken this into consideration along with the tree placement.

5.5       The delegation of a gift valued under $10,000 is assigned to a named officer with financial sub-delegation up to $10,000 and this has been approved.

5.6       The construction and installation will be undertaken by the Bahá’i community.

5.7       The Pou is carved by Karl Ward a highly experienced Māori carver.

5.8       The ongoing maintenance and care of the Pou is undertaken by the local Bahá’i and Somerfield Junior Youth Group.

5.9       The Pou was designed by three Somerfield youth who have been involved in the Junior Youth Programme and aims to reflect conservation of indigenous trees and wildlife, Tikanga Māori and to celebrate the unity of humanity.

5.10    The Somerfield Junior Youth Group have connections to Ernle Clark Reserve by assisting in working bees watering, weeding and pruning since 2013.

5.11    A dedication plaque will be attached to the lower portion of the Pou.

5.12    The Pou is proposed to be installed with a dawn karakia as the Pou leaves the carvers and again once it is installed on the site. The Pou will be covered until the unveiling on the 21st October.

5.13    The tree planting will be celebrated by the youth and their families along with the volunteers of Friends of Ernle Clark Reserve.

5.14    The relocation of the Copper Beech will be undertaken and funded from the Parks Tree Budget.

5.15    The area of planting in the Ernle Clark Reserve Implementation Plan allows for mixed plantings.

5.16    No consents are required


 

6.   Option 1 – To approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea in Ernle Clark Reserve (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       To approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea in Ernle Clark Reserve as per the attached plan.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not required.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The Friends of Ernle Clark Reserve are specifically affected by this option due to their involvement in the Reserve.  Their views have been consulted and are supportive of the proposal.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – none

6.8       The approximately $1,500 cost to transplant the Copper Beech will be covered under the operational Tree budget.

6.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - none

6.10    Funding source – none required

Legal Implications

6.11    There are no legal implications

Risks and Mitigations   

6.12    There is a risk of the Pou being affected by flooding, this has been minimised by placing it away from the river and flooding .

6.13    Risk of failure of the pou caused by continual wetting and drying as a result of flooding or dampness.  This will result in short life of the Pou

6.13.1 Treatment: locate the Pou away from any wet or flood prone areas of the Reserve

6.13.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low

Implementation

6.14    Implementation dependencies  - Acceptance of location

6.15    Implementation timeframe – the Pou is proposed to be installed on the morning of the
19 December and unveiled on the Saturday 21 September 2017, the tree will be planted on the day of the celebrations.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   Enhancement of the Reserve

·   Engagement and sense of Community

·   The Council receives a landmark and cultural piece at no cost

6.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   none

7.   Option 2 - To not approve the location of the Pou and the Kahikatea in Ernle Clark Reserve

Option Description

7.1       Decline the location of the Pou and Kahikatea.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are non-existent.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Bahá’i community and Junior Youth Group are specifically affected by this option due to the time and effort they have put into the design and the connections they have made with the Reserve and Friends of Ernle Clark Reserve.  Their views are they would like to install the Pou.

7.6       The Friends of Ernle Clark Reserve will be involved in the planting.  Their views are, understood to be, in support of this project.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

7.8       Cost of Implementation – no cost

7.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – no cost

7.10    Funding source – not required

Legal Implications

7.11    There are no legal implications.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.12    There are no risks

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies  - none

7.14    Implementation timeframe - none

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   none

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   A landmark feature will not be provided to enhance the reserve and visitor experience

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 Tree planting and Pou Ernle Clark Reserve

90

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Maria Adamski - Asset Engineer, Greenspace Buildings and Heritage

Approved By

Brent Smith - Team Leader Asset Planning and Management Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

10.    Spreydon-Cashmere 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund Applications

Reference:

17/999267

Contact:

Jay Sepie

jay.sepie@ccc.govt.nz

5102

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from their 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisations listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

57033

 

57101

Spreydon Oscar Inc.

 

Hoon Hay Community Centre

Running Costs

 

Centre Equipment

$15,000

 

$1,759

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider two applications for funding from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $3,000 to Spreydon OSCAR towards running costs.

2.         Approves a grant of $1,759 to Hoon Hay Community Centre towards equipment costs.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140.180

$47.476

$92,704

$87,945

 

4.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the applications listed above are eligible for funding.

4.3       The attached Decision Matrices provide detailed information for the applications.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and staff assessments.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

57033 - Spreydon-Cashmere DRF Matrix Spreydon OSCAR

93

b

57101 - Spreydon-Cashmere DRF Matrix - Hoon Hay Community Centre

94

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Jay Sepie - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

11.    Discretionary Response Fund - Hillmorton High School Senior A Girl's Basketball Team

Reference:

17/1050972

Contact:

Emma Pavey

Emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

941 5107

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from their 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

#57239

Hillmorton High School

Hillmorton High School A Girls' Basketball Team

$2,250

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from Hillmorton High School.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $750 to Hillmorton High School towards the Hillmorton High School A Girls' Basketball Team.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$47,476

$92,704

$91,954

 

4.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

4.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Decision Matrix Hillmorton A Girls Basketball Team National Championships

97

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

12.    Discretionary Response Fund - Hillmorton High School Senior A Boys Basketball Team

Reference:

17/1051454

Contact:

 Enter contact

Enter email address

Enter phone.

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider an application for funding from their 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

#57237

Hillmorton High School

Hillmorton High School A Boys Basketball Team

$3,000

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from Hillmorton High School.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $2,000 to Hillmorton High School towards the Hillmorton High School A Boys Basketball Team.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2017/18

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendation adopted

$140,180

$47,476

$92,704

$90,704

 

4.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the application listed above is eligible for funding.

4.3       The attached Decision Matrix provides detailed information for the application.  This includes organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Decision Matrix Hillmorton A Boys Basketball Team National Championships

101

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

13.    Youth Achievement and Development Fund - Bella Phoebe Gruindelingh

Reference:

17/1064477

Contact:

Emma Pavey

emma.pavey@ccc.govt.nz

941 5107

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to consider
Bella Gruindelingh's application received for the Board's 2017/18 Youth Development Fund.

1.2       There is currently $3,650 remaining in this fund.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from
Bella Gruindelingh.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Development Fund to Bella Gruindelingh towards the 2017 New Zealand Aerobics and Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships.

 

 

4.   Applicant 1 – Bella Gruindelingh

4.1       Bella Gruindelingh is 13 years of age and lives with her mum and younger brother in Spreydon.  Bella is in her first year at Hagley Community College.  Bella has been selected to compete in the New Zealand Aerobics and Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships in Auckland on 6 to 10 October 2017.

4.2       Bella has been competing in rhythmic gymnastics for the past six years and is currently at level 6.  She trains for 12 hours a week and has competed at numerous competitions around New Zealand to qualify for the New Zealand Aerobics and Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships as well as the Nationals where she came top in her level.  Bella has a keen interest in coaching gymnastics and has been attending courses to help further her skills to enable her to teach others.

4.3       Bella enjoys all sports and has come top of her class for cross country.  She also enjoys fashion and design and performing arts.

4.4       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Bella Gruindelingh:

 

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Flights

$229

Competition Entry

$140

Accommodation

$207

Food, Transport, Expenses

$768

 

 

                                                                                                 Total

$1,344

 

1.1.  This is the first time the applicant has applied for funding.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Emma Pavey - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

14.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

Reference:

17/1062639

Contact:

Faye Collins

faye.collins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5108

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to resource the Community Board to promote a pro-active partnership approach to decision-making between the Council and Community Boards working together to achieve the best outcomes for the city with decisions being made with a good understanding of community views.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update.

2.         Adopts the 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan as circulated to members and approves distribution and consultation with the community.

 

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Community Board Plan update against outcomes

Development of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan has been completed. 

The final draft of the Community Board Plan has been circulated to members.  The Board is recommended to consider adoption of the 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan and approves distribution and consultation with the community.   

3.2       Submission Opportunities

At the last meeting on 15 September 2017 the Board decided to delegate power to consider the Proposed Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, Proposed General Bylaw 2017, and Proposed Stock on Roads Bylaw 2017 and if appropriate, to lodge submissions on these on behalf of the Board to  Board Chairperson, Community Governance Manager and Community Board Adviser. Following consideration of the proposed bylaws it was decided to lodge a submission on the Proposed Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 only. A copy of the submission is attached.

4.   Infrastructure Projects

 

 

Major Cycle Routes – Quarryman’s Trail

Construction of the Quarryman’s Trail is about to get underway. Start work notices have been sent out and the work is planned to start early October 2017 and be completed by June 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Submission to the Parking Bylaw Review

107

 

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

03 October 2017

 

 

15.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.