Coastal-Burwood Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Coastal-Burwood Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Monday 7 August 2017

Time:                                    4.30pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Corner Beresford and Union Streets,
New Brighton

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Kim Money

Tim Sintes

Tim Baker

David East

Glenn Livingstone

Linda Stewart

 

 

1 August 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Jo Wells

Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

941 6451

jo.wells@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 4

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 4

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 4

B       4.       Public Forum.................................................................................................................... 4

B       5.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 4

B       6.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 4 

C       7.       Correspondence - Ministry of Education, Queen Elizabeth Park Fitness Trail......... 11

C       8.       Staff Briefings - Streetscape Enhancement Project.................................................... 13

STAFF REPORTS

C       9.       Prestons Subdivision - Provision of Bus Stops............................................................ 15

C       10.     Horseshoe Lake Reserve Earthquake Repairs.............................................................. 55

C       11.     Burwood Park south - Proposed outdoor fitness trail............................................... 83

C       12.     Coastal-Burwood Community Board Area Report..................................................... 93

B       13.     Elected Members’ Information Exchange.................................................................. 111 

 

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Coastal-Burwood Community Board meeting held on Monday, 17 July 2017 be confirmed (refer page 5).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes may be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

It is intended that the public forum session will be held at 5.30 p.m.

 

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

5.1

Prestons Subdivision Bus Stops

Claire Nicholls, Operations Administrator will speak on behalf the Public Transport Team at Environment Canterbury Regional Council, in support of the report Prestons Subdivision - Provision of Bus Stops being item nine of the agenda.

 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

 

Coastal-Burwood Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                     Monday 17 July 2017

Time:                                    4.30pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Corner Beresford and Union Streets,
New Brighton

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Kim Money

Tim Sintes

Tim Baker

David East

Glenn Livingstone

Linda Stewart

 

 

17 July 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Jo Wells

Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

941 6451

jo.wells@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

There were no apologies.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

 

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved CBCB/2017/00121

Community Board Decision

That the minutes of the Coastal-Burwood Community Board meeting held on Monday, 3 July 2017 be confirmed.

Linda Stewart/Tim Sintes                                                                                                                                         Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

There were no public forum presentations.

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.    

7.   Coastal-Burwood Community Board Youth Development Fund 2017/18 - J Scott, M Placid, T McCaughan

 

Community Board Resolved CBCB/2017/00122 Staff Recommendation accepted without change

Part C

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to Joshua Scott towards the 2017 UC1 World Track Junior Championships in Italy from the 23 July to the 27 August 2017.

2.         Approves a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to Mana Placid towards the USA High Performance Championship Tournament in Florida from the 14 to 25 July 2017.

3.         Approves a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to Taylor Caughlan towards the Gymsports New Zealand team to compete in Phoenix America at the International Sports Aerobics Competition from the 29 July to 2 August 2017.

Tim Baker/Glenn Livingstone                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

8.   Right to Drain Water Easement over Wainoni Park

 

Community Board Resolved CBCB/2017/00123 Staff Recommendation accepted without change

Part C

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board, acting in the capacity of the administering body, resolve to:

1.         Recommend that the Chief Executive acting as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate, consents to the granting of the easement to Christchurch City Council for the right to drain water as outlined in this report.

2.         Subject to the consent of the Minister of Conservation, approve the grant of the easement pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 to:

a.         Christchurch City Council - for the right to drain water over part of 31 Hampshire Street (Certificate of Title reference CB25K/366) shown on the plan at attachment A.

3.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager, should the easement be granted with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to finalise documentation to implement the easement.

Glenn Livingstone/Linda Stewart                                                                                                                         Carried

 

 

9.   Coastal-Burwood Community Board Area Report

 

Board Comment

9.1         The Board agreed to nominate David East for Chairperson and Linda Stewart as a member of the Styx Catchment Working Party, noting that any member could attend these working party meetings to observe.

It was requested that at the first meeting of the working party, an overview of the background and process to date be provided.”

9.2         The Board requested staff to arrange a workshop with Development Christchurch Limited for the purposes of receiving an update on projects.

9.3         Discussions have taken place with the New Brighton Returned and Services Association (RSA) on the protective panels around the cenotaph and also on possible improvements to the walls and landscaping for the area immediately surrounding the cenotaph.

The Board agreed this warranted a workshop with the RSA,  Development Christchurch Limited and heritage staff and that any necessary landscape improvement funding could be requested in the next Long Term Plan.

9.4          To be included in the report to Council:

·    The Board is working with staff around the planning of transport at QEII Park including the two schools.

·    The positive community response to the South Brighton boardwalk reconstruction.

 

Community Board Resolved CBCB/2017/00124 Staff Recommendation accepted without change

Part B

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.       Receive the Area Update.

Kim Money/David East                                                                                                      Carried

 

 

10.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

10.1     Noted that the Ministry of Education has responded to the Board’s recent request for clarity around the QEII Park fitness trail and this will be tabled at the Board’s 7 August 2017 meeting.

10.2     It was agreed to have a site visit to Dogwatch Sanctuary Trust in Dyers Road for the purposes of understanding the Trust’s work. Also that the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board be invited to attend.

10.3     Kim Money had received a request for information regarding the possibility of earmarking exotic mature trees in the Residential Red Zone with a view to eventual transplanting elsewhere. 

10.4     At the request of the Board staff undertook to research the feasibility of residents being informed in advance of when their street was about to be swept. This would enable cars to be shifted on the day if necessary.

10.5     At the request of the Board staff undertook to establish the status of the New Brighton Police Station in terms of public access.

10.6     At the request of the Board staff undertook to establish a planned use of the New Brighton fire station in Hawke Street when they relocate to a new station.

10.7     The Board discussed an idea suggested at a Council meeting, to explore opportunities to promote the unique scenery, recreation opportunities and lifestyle the ward offers.

10.8     Staff undertook to provide clarity around the geographic area covered by the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016.

10.9     The Board agreed to consider options for the use of the Council property at 122 Pages Road and forward these to staff for collation in advance of a workshop on the topic.

10.10   Staff agreed to research the viability of relocating a house slated for demolition through the Knights Drain project, onto Council owned property by the Pump Station at 478 Pages Road.

10.11   Staff undertook to follow up on when an itemised response could be expected to the Boards Annual Plan submission.

 

 

 

   

Meeting concluded at 5.50pm.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 7 DAY OF AUGUST 2017

 

Kim Money

Chairperson

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

7.        Correspondence - Ministry of Education, Queen Elizabeth Park Fitness Trail

Reference:

17/782482

Contact:

Peter Croucher

peter.croucher@ccc.govt.nz

941 5305

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

Correspondence has been received from:

Name

Subject

Ministry of Education

Queen Elizabeth Park Fitness Trail

-     Response from the Ministry of Education to the Board's Request of 28 June 2017 for the fitness trail to be reinstated.

 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the correspondence report dated 07 August 2017

2.         Notes the information provided in the Coastal-Burwood Community Board Area Report Area Report at Item 3.2.7, page 97.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Inwards Correspondence - Ministry of Eductation on QEII Park fitness trail

12

 

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

PDF Creator

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

8.        Staff Briefings - Streetscape Enhancement Project

Reference:

17/738664

Contact:

Peter Croucher

peter.croucher@ccc.govt.nz

941 5305

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The Board will be briefed on the following:

Subject

Presenter(s)

Unit/Organisation

Streetscape Enhancements Project

Louis Collingwood

Transport

 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.         Notes the information supplied during the Staff Briefings.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

  


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

9.        Prestons Subdivision - Provision of Bus Stops

Reference:

17/700395

Contact:

Brenda O’Donoghue

brenda.odonoghue@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Coastal-Burwood Community Board to approve new bus stops located within Prestons subdivision.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated.  The provision of bus stops in Prestons subdivision is linked to the approved bus service that has been planned as part of the 2014 Metro Bus Service Review by Environment Canterbury.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessing the impact of the project against the 10 criteria set out in the Significance and Engagement assessment.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.         Approve five new bus stops within the Preston subdivision, in accordance with the preferred option as shown on Attachment A.  The associated parking and stopping restrictions for each bus stop is indicated below.

Bus Stop 1 - adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street, Attachment B

2.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 82.5 metres south of its intersection with Korowai Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 30 metres, be revoked.

3.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 82.5 metres south of its intersection with Korowai Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 9.5 metres.

4.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 92 metres south of its intersection with Korowai Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 14 metres.

5.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 106 metres south of its intersection with Korowai Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 6.5 metres. 

Bus Stop 2 - Adjacent to 2 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street), Attachment C

6.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 5 metres north of its intersection with David Palmer Street and extending in a northbound direction for a distance of 14 metres, be revoked.

7.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the west side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 5 metres north of its intersection with David Palmer Street and extending in a northbound direction for a distance of 14 metres.

Bus Stop 3 - Opposite to 1 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street), Attachment C

8.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 12.7 metres south of its intersection with David Palmer Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 14 metres, be revoked.

9.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 12.7 metres south of its intersection with David Palmer Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 14 metres.

Bus Stop 4 - Te Korari Street adjacent to a wetland reserve, westside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street, Attachment D

10.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 72.6 metres south of its intersection with Weruweru Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 33 metres, be revoked.

11.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 72.6 metres south of its intersection with Weruweru Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 7 metres.

12.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the west side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 79.6 metres south of its intersection with Weruweru Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 14 metres.

13.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 93.6 metres south of its intersection with Weruweru Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 12 metres. 

Bus Stop 5 - Te Korari Street adjacent to a wetland reserve, eastside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street, Attachment E

14.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 47 metres south of its intersection with Weruweru Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 14 metres, be revoked.

15.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Te Korari Street commencing at a point 47 metres south of its intersection with Weruweru Street and extending in a southbound direction for a distance of 14 metres.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Public Transport Infrastructure

·     Level of Service: 10.4.1 Contribute to increase number of trips made by public transport

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Preferred bus stop locations – Option 1.  The preferred bus stop locations are shown in Attachment A.

·     Option 2 – Mixture of preferred and second preference bus stop locations – Option 2

·     Option 3 – Mixture of preferred and second preference bus stop locations – Option 3

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The location of the bus stops has been chosen to maximise passenger accessibility and to balance the impact the proposed bus stops will have on residents who live beside the bus stop.

·     Three of the five bus stops are located adjacent to a wetland reserve, and not adjacent to a residential property.

·     Seats will be installed at the inbound (towards Shirley) bus stops, where the passenger boarding numbers are likely to be greatest, and provide those passengers with a basic level of comfort while they wait for the bus.

·     The least loss of on-street car parking in comparison to Option 2 and Option 3 of this report.  There is a total loss of eight on-street parking spaces in the preferred option, as opposed to the loss of 14 on-street parking spaces in Option 2, or the loss of 22 on-street parking spaces in Option 3.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The loss of eight on-street parking spaces, four of which are located adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street, where there is greater potential demand for on-street parking, given the proximity to Marshland School.  The loss of on-street parking near 30 Te Korari Street can be absorbed by the remaining provision of on-street parking near to the bus stop, and the carpark provided by Marshland School for parents to use when picking up or dropping off school children.  The removal of the remaining four on-street parking spaces occur at a location where there are no houses nearby, resulting in a very low demand for these parking spaces   

·     A bus stop is located across the driveway of 2 David Palmer Street.  Buses are legally permitted to stop over driveways for picking up and dropping off passengers at a bus stop.  The limited frequency of the bus service mitigates the impact of the of temporary access restriction.

·     Most of the proposed bus stops are located adjacent to the wetland reserves.  However, some of the proposed bus stops are near an adjacent property that does not have a front fence.  This can be viewed as intrusive by the adjacent resident.  This disadvantage is mitigated by the limited frequency of the bus service, and locating the bus stop adjacent to the garage of the property. 

·     The spacing of about 500 metres between the bus stops on Te Korari Street may be perceived as creating a long walk to get to the bus stop, and hence a disadvantage to some residents.  However, analysis of the residential walking catchment of the three bus stop location options indicates only a small increase in residential catchment if the spacing was lower, such as in Option 3.

·     The use of semi in-lane bus stops will be monitored if the bus service frequency increases, significant number of passengers are boarding/alighting at the in-lane bus stops that would result in longer bus stop dwell time, or traffic volumes increase such that operation of the in-lane bus stop configuration needs to be reviewed for road safety reasons.

 

5.   Context/Background

Access to public transport

5.1       The Prestons subdivision is in the Burwood ward, in the northeast of Christchurch, as indicated in Figure 1.

Figure 1:  Location of Prestons subdivision

5.2       The 150-bus service is a metro suburban link.  The service currently operates between Shirley (The Palms) and Spencerville via Marshland Road, as indicated in Figure 2.  The service operates from around 8:00am to around 5:00pm, Monday to Friday.  On a weekday, there is about one bus service per hour between 8:00am and 10:00am, and one bus per hour between 2:00pm and 5:00pm, in both directions.  The service currently does not operate during the weekend. 

Figure 2:  Route of the existing 150 bus service

5.3       A bus service to Prestons was consulted on and subsequently approved during the 2014 Metro Bus Service Review.  The 150 bus service has been planned to travel from Prestons to The Palms, with extension services to Spencerville during the peak hours.  It is possible that from the end of August 2017 the bus service will start operating via Prestons, however this is to be confirmed by Environment Canterbury.

5.4       The provision of a public transport service along Te Korari Street was identified in the subdivisions Outline Development Plan.

5.5       To begin with the 150-bus service will continue to extend to Spencerville for all services, and will operate to a very similar schedule as the existing service.  Overtime the freqency of the bus service may improve to an hourly service or better, with extensions to Spencerville during the peak hours.

5.6       The route alteration of the 150-bus service will see the bus travel from Marshland Road via Prestons Road and along Te Korari Street, to re-join the existing route on Lower Styx Road, as indicated in Figure 3.  Along Te Korari Street, the bus service connects to Marshland School, the under-development commercial area, as well as the many residential homes in the area.

Figure 3:  Route alteration of the 150 bus service through Prestons

Bus stop location planning

5.7       Bus stops provide key access connection points to allow personal mobility, by means of public transport.  It can be a challenge in an urban-residential environment to achieve a balance in bus stop planning criteria, because of the need to work with the space available on-street, and to be considerate to those who live near the bus stop.

5.8       There are multiple considerations in the location planning of bus stops, however the key topics to consider include:

·   Catchment areas and proximity to surrounding services and amenities,

·   Operational suitability,

·   Accessibility,

·   Capacity, and

·   Information gathered from site visits and feedback from stakeholders (Environment Canterbury and residents).

5.9       As indicated in Section 5.4, the provision of a public transport service along Te Korari Street was identified in the subdivisions Outline Development Plan. 

5.10    The location of Te Korari Street and the locations of interest that concern the planning of bus stop are shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4:  Bus stop location planning - Prestons

Bus Stop Consultation

5.11    In total, 14 submissions were received over two consecutive consultation periods.  The second round of consultation was undertaken to find alternatives to resolve the issues raised by some of the submitters during the first round of consultation, whilst still meeting the objective of providing the Prestons community with suitable access to public transport.  One respondent was in general support, and 13 respondents did not generally support the proposal.

5.12    Two consecutive rounds of consultation occurred because of objections received to the first collection of bus stops consulted on.  The bus stop locations were re-evaluated, and a second round of consultation followed with the residents impacted by the new set of bus stops proposed.  The first round of consultation covered the period 13 April 2017 to 4 May 2017.  The second round of consultation covered the period 22 May 2017 to 6 June 2017.

5.13    The bus stop plan associated with the first round of consultation has two sets of bus stops located between the bus stops at Marshland School and the bus stops north of Te Rito Street, as indicated in Figure 5 of Section 6.  The bus stop plan associated with the second round of consultation has one set of bus stops located between the bus stops at Marshland School and the bus stops north of Te Rito Street, as indicated in Figure 7 of Section 6. 

5.14    The bus stop consultation process, feedback and outcome is described in Section 6.8 to Section 6.28.

6.   Option 1 – Preferred bus stop location – Option 1

Option Description

6.1       The bus stops proposed as part of Option 1 are a mixture of the proposed bus stops that were initially consulted on, and alternative sites that have come about because of the second round of bus stops consultation on.

6.2       The planning of bus stop locations has been based on the bus stop planning criteria, as indicated in Sections 5.7 to 5.10.

6.3       For the most part, the proposed bus stops adhere to the recommended provisions as set out in the Christchurch Bus Stop Guidelines (2009), this includes the provision of hardstands and tactile ground surface indicators.  The area in which the proposed bus stop differ to the Bus Stop Guidelines, is the kerb height.  The kerb height along Te Korari Street is approximately 30mm, which is lower than the minimum kerb height of 130mm.  Accessibility concerns associated with the lower kerb height will be monitored through feedback raised by the public.

6.4       The removal of two temporary bus stops on Lower Styx Road is consistent with Option 1 and 2 of this report.  The approved bus service will no longer travel via western end of Lower Styx Road, when the bus service diverts through Prestons.  This means the bus stops located on Lower Styx Road to the east of Marshland Road are no longer necessary.  The Lower Styx Road bus stops were installed in late 2014, with temporary authorisation by the then Burwood-Pegasus Community Board.  As these bus stops have only temporary authorisation, there is no authorised parking or stopping restrictions which need to be revoked.  The agenda relating to the temporary authorisation of the Lower Styx Road bus stops by the then Burwood-Pegasus Community Board, during the Community Board meeting of 17 November 2014 can be found on this webpage http://christchurch.infocouncil.biz/.

6.5       The preferred bus stop locations are indicated in Section 6.29 to Section 6.31, and in Figure 7.

Significance

6.6       The level of significance of this option is low, consistent with Section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance include consultation with adjacent property owners and occupiers, and engagement with Environment Canterbury as the relevant bus operator.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.7       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngai Tahu, their culture and traditions. 

Community Views and Preferences – First Round of Consultation

6.8       The properties listed in Table 1 are those specifically affected by this option due to the proximity of the property to the proposed bus stops.  A consultation notice and feedback form was hand delivered to each property listed in the table, and the consultation information posted by mail to absentee owners.  The consultation occurred from 13 April 2017 to 4 May 2017.  Also indicated in Table 1 is if Council staff received a submission in objection to the proposed bus stop during the consultation period.

Bus stop location

Consultation notice and feedback

Submitter objection (yes/no)

Property adjacent to the bus stop

Property opposite the bus stop

30 Te Korari Street

28, 30 & 32 Te Korari Street

11 Te Korari Street: Ministry of Education (Marshland School)

Yes

47 Te Korari Street

45, 47 & 49 Te Korari Street

62 & 64 (EduKids preschool) Te Korari Street

Yes

62 Te Korari Street

60, 62 & 64 Te Korari Street

43, 45 & 47 Te Korari Street

Yes

Opposite 75 Te Korari Street (and adjacent to a reserve)

CCC Parks Team - Eastern, 35 & 37 Te Whenu Crescent

75 & 77 Te Korari Street

No

81 Te Korari Street

79, 81 & 83 Te Korari Street

39 & 41 Te Whenu Crescent

Yes

Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, westside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street

Kahu Kiwi 1 Drainage Reserve, CCC Parks Team - Eastern

Kahu Kiwi Parks Team - Eastern 2 Drainage Reserve, CCC Parks Team - Eastern

No

Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, eastside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street

Kahu Kiwi 2 Drainage Reserve, CCC Parks Team - Eastern

Kahu Kiwi 1 Drainage Reserve, CCC Parks Team - Eastern

No

Table 1:  Bus stop locations and properties impacted – consultation round 1

6.9       The locations of the bus stops referred to in Table 1 are shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5:  Bus stop locations – consultation round 1

6.10    As indicated in Table 1, apart from the three bus stops located adjacent to a park reserve, all bus stops were objected to. 

6.11    In total, 11 submissions were received during the first round of consultation. One respondent was in general support, and 10 respondents did not generally support the proposal.

6.12    There are common reasons on why the bus stops have been objected to.  These general reasons for objection, along with a response, are indicated in Table 2.  The individual comments provided as feedback by all submitters, and staff responses is provided Attachment F.

Objection Category

Response

Loss of parking

On-street parking spaces are a public space, and the CCC parking strategy prioritises bus stops over all other types of parking.

While there is some parking loss in the immediate vicinity of the bus stop, there is sufficient on-street parking capacity in the general area to mitigate the introduction of the bus stops.

Hazard to motorists when pulling in or out of the residential driveway

When pulling in or out of driveway, drivers must give way to all traffic on the road, including buses.  

Certain sight lines for movements to and from the driveway will be restricted while the bus is stopped.  This is a temporary obstruction, lasting for a matter of seconds when the bus is stopped to allow passengers to board or alight the bus, which is why such configurations are common practice locally and nationally.

Hazard to pedestrian safety (for example children playing near the bus stop or pedestrians walking along the footpath)

Buses are part of the traffic composition.  Traffic is a potential hazard on all streets, irrespective of the location of stops. 

At all bus stops the footpath that coincides with the front and rear door of the bus will be extended to the kerb.  This improves passenger accessibility to board and alight the bus, and provides additional space for pedestrians to move around obstacles such as a bus stop seat.

The existing traffic operation of Te Korari Street, particularly around the commercial centre and Marshland School.

A bus service on Te Korari Street was included as part of the Prestons Outline Development Plan, and has been approved to operate.  Te Korari Street is sufficiently wide for the bus service, which passes the Marshland School and the developing commercial centre on Te Korari Street.

Table 2:  Bus stop consultation round 1 – common reasons for objection

6.13    Where an objection was received to a bus stop in the ‘Round 1’ of consultation, Council staff reviewed the resident’s reason(s) for the objection.  Where possible, staff have sought an alternative location, whilst still meeting the objectives of providing the Prestons community with suitable access to public transport.

6.14    Alternative bus stop locations for 47 Te Korari Street, 62 Te Korari Street, and 81 Te Korari Street have been re-evaluated.  Because of the re-evaluation an alternative bus stop plan was established which requires one set of mid-point bus stops.  The mid-point bus stops are located beside 2 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street) and opposite 1 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street).  These are the bus stops that have been consulted on during the second round of consultation.

6.15    An alternative site was sought for the 30 Te Korari Street, which is located opposite Marshland School.  After re-evaluation, the preferred bus stop location remains at 30 Te Korari Street.  The advantages of placing the bus stop adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street include:

·   The bus stop is near Marshland School and the existing bus stop located adjacent to the school, which is a key consideration in the site identification of this bus stop. 

·   The bus stop is near a new kea crossing, but not so close that it would be a potential hazard for the safe operation of the crossing.  The new kea crossing will be of assistance to children who use the bus, and then need to cross the road safely.

·   Due to the geometric and physical constraints posed by the tree planting kerb extensions which break-up the on-street parking along Te Korari Street into smaller sections of parking, the length of the bus stop must be longer than that of a standard bus stop.  The length of the bus stop in such instances should be closer to recommended length of a half-indented bus bay, which is about 33 metres.  At 30 Te Korari Street, there is a 30 metre distance between the tree planting kerb extensions either side of the driveway to 30 Te Korari Street, which should be sufficient for the bus to manoeuvre into, stop parallel to the footpath, and manoeuvre back onto Te Korari Street. 

·   The boarding and alighting area of the bus stop is located adjacent to garage of 30 Te Korari Street.

·   The 14 metre bus box stop marking would extend by about 1.0m across the driveway to 30 Te Korari Street.  Whilst the bus stop parking restrictions resolution for the bus stop reflect the ‘true’ distance, in this instance the bus box marking will stop short of the driveway.  It is always possible the largest type of vehicle in the bus fleet (13.5 metres) could operate on this service, however the most likely length of bus will be 12.6 metres or less.  This means that a stopped bus is unlikely to block access to the property during the brief period of collecting or dropping off a passenger.

6.16    The following locations were evaluated as alternatives to 30 Te Korari Street, but were ruled out for the following reasons: 

·   Adjacent 38 Te Korari Street: 

·     The uninterrupted section of kerb between Korowai Street and 38 Te Korari Street is too close to the intersection of Te Korari Street with Korowai Street, and hence unsafe.

·     The distance between the driveway of 38 Te Korari Street and the tree planting kerb extension is too short for a bus stop.

·   Adjacent 36 Te Korari Street:

·     The distance of 22.8 metres between the tree planting kerb extensions either side of the driveway of 36 Te Korari Street is too short for a bus stop.

·   Adjacent 32 and 34 Te Korari Street:

·     The distance of 26 metres between the tree planting kerb extensions either side of the driveway to 36 Te Korari Street is likely to be too short.

·     There are two driveways located between the tree planting kerb extensions.  This would result in the bus stop being marked across two driveways.  It would also result in the front and rear door of the bus coinciding with a driveway, which is not a recommended practice.

·     The placement of the bus stop would result in greater crossover between the bus stop and the living areas of the adjacent house that is located closest to the bus stop.

·   Adjacent 26 and 28 Te Korari Street:

·     The available space for the bus stop is 30 metres, the same as the preferred location adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street.  However, the bus stop would be fully marked across the driveway of 26 Te Korari Street.  Whilst the front door of the bus would not open over a driveway, the rear door of the bus would.

·     The placement of the bus stop would result in greater crossover between the bus stop and the living areas of the adjacent house that is located closest to the bus stop.

·     A kea crossing has been approved as part of a school speed zone around Marshland School.  The kea crossing will be installed near the property boundary of 26 and 24 Te Korari Street.  Whilst the frequency of the bus service is limited, the presence of a stopped bus on the approach to the pedestrian crossing is not recommended.  Given that the pedestrian crossing is specifically associated with the safe movement of students to and from Marshland School, it is not recommended that a bus stop be installed adjacent to 26 and 28 Te Korari Street.

·   Adjacent 22 and 24 Te Korari Street:

·     The bus stop would be located semi in-lane near the northern driveway of Marshland School, which coincides with the intersection of Te Korari Street/Te Aika Street.  Due to the number of turning movements and pedestrian activity in this area, this site is not considered appropriate for a bus stop.

·   Between Te Aika Street and Te Kereme Street:

·     The traffic and cycle lanes for north and southbound travel along this section of Te Korari Street are divided by a raised median.  Installing a bus stop along this section of road would block through traffic, as there is insufficient room for a vehicle to manoeuvre around a stopped bus.  As such, the site is not considered appropriate for a bus stop.

·   Between Te Kereme Street and Prestons Road

·     The traffic and cycle lanes for north and southbound travel along this section of Te Korari Street are divided by a raised median.  Installing a bus stop along this section of road would block through traffic, as there is insufficient room for a vehicle to manoeuvre around a stopped bus.

·     Installing a bus stop on Te Korari Street, near the signalised intersection of Te Korari Street with Prestons Road is not considered appropriate, which is due to network operational reasons associated with the signalised intersection, and for buses to manoeuvre from the bus stop to the left turn bay at the intersection when travelling in the direction of Shirley.

Community Views and Preferences – Second Round of Consultation

6.17    An alternative bus stop plan was established which requires one set of mid-point bus stops.  The mid-point bus stops are located at 2 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street) and opposite 1 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street). 

6.18    The bus stops that are proposed either side of David Palmer Street are both semi in-lane bus stops.  The location of the semi in-lane bus stops has been discussed with the Area Traffic Engineer and Team Leader of Traffic Operations, who consider that the proposed configuration is suitable for the situation, given the limited frequency of the bus service.

6.19    The proposed bus stop configurations eliminate the need for the bus stop to occupy on-street parking, as such no on-street parking spaces are removed.

6.20    The bus stop adjacent to 2 David Palmer Street, utilises the long section of kerb extension that is associated with the intersection of Te Korari Street/David Palmer Street.  Utilising this space means the bus stop is marked over the driveway of 2 David Palmer Street.  The front door of the bus would open over the extended footpath, but the rear door of the bus would open over the driveway.  Buses are legally permitted to stop over driveways for picking up and dropping off passengers at a bus stop.

6.21    The bus stop opposite 1 David Palmer Street, is located between the intersections of Te Korari Street/David Palmer Street and the intersection of Te Korari Street/Raranga Street.  The bus stop is located adjacent to a wetland reserve. 

6.22    The following locations were evaluated as alternative locations to the proposed bus stop opposite 1 David Palmer Street, but were ruled out for the following reasons:

·   A bus stop cannot be located adjacent to the kerb extension immediately to the south of Raranga Street, as there is insufficient space between the intersection of Te Korari Street/Raranga Street and the new driveway associated commercial centre.

·   A bus stop adjacent to the preschool has been considered, and has been discussed with the preschool centre manager.  The centre manager would have significant concerns with a bus stop located adjacent to the preschool.  The Centre Managers concerns relate to the safety of very young “unpredictable” children.  From a parking demand perspective, the infrequency of the bus service would mean the bus stop space would be unoccupied and unavailable for other vehicles to park for nearly 60 minutes of every hour when the bus service is operational, and the space will be completely empty when it is not running.  To install the bus stop beside the preschool would be an inefficient use of space that could otherwise be available for on-street parking, especially given that demand for on-street parking is greatest adjacent to the preschool.

6.23    The limited bus service frequency and the infrequency of which buses stop at suburban locations significantly reduces the instances of restricted driver sight lines between drivers on the main road (Te Korari Street) and the side Roads (David Palmer Street and Raranga Street).  When such instances do occur, the bus is likely to be stopped for no more than a couple of seconds.  During this time, it is the driver’s responsibility when exiting the side road to do so safely.  If this cannot be achieved it is the driver’s responsibility to wait a few seconds until the bus has departed.

Figure 6:  Bus stop locations by David Palmer Street – consultation round 2

6.24    The properties listed in Table 3 are those specifically affected by this option due to the proximity of the property to the proposed bus stops.  A consultation notice and feedback form was hand delivered to each property listed in the table, and the consultation information posted by mail to absentee owners.  The consultation occurred from 22 May 2017 to 6 June 2017.  Also indicated in Table 3 is if Council staff received a submission in objection to the proposed bus stop.

Bus stop location

Consultation notice and feedback

Submitter objection (yes/no)

Property adjacent to the bus stop

Property opposite the bus stop

2 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street)

2 David Palmer Street, 61 & 63 Te Korari Street

40R Raranga, drainage reserve, CCC Parks Team - Eastern

Yes

Opposite 1 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street)

40R Raranga, drainage reserve, CCC Parks Team - Eastern

1 David Palmer Street, 55 Te Korari Street

Yes

Table 3:  Bus stop locations and properties impacted – consultation round 2

6.25    The locations of the bus stops referred to in Table 3 are shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7:  Bus stop locations – consultation round 2 (bus stops by David Palmer Street only)

6.26    As indicated in Table 3 all bus stops were objected to.  In total, three submissions were received during the second round of consultation.

6.27    The reason for objection were generally consistent with the first round of consultation.  The individual comments provided as feedback by all submitters, and staff responses is provided Attachment F.

6.28    The main difference in the feedback by submitters in the second round of consultation was associated with the placement of the bus stops near the side arm roads of David Palmer Street and Rararanga Street.  The limited bus service frequency and the infrequency of which buses stop at suburban locations significantly reduces the instances of restricted driver sight lines between drivers on the main road (Te Korari Street) and the side Roads (David Palmer Street and Raranga Street).  When such instances do occur, the bus is likely to be stopped for no more than a couple of seconds.  During this time, it is the driver’s responsibility when exiting the side road to do so safely.  If this cannot be achieved it is the driver’s responsibility to wait a few seconds until the bus has departed.

Recommended bus stop locations

6.29    Because of the bus stop planning and consultation process, the following are the preferred bus stops that are recommended for approval as part of Option 1 of this report.  For each location, a brief description of the items of interest has been included.  The locations of these bus stops are indicated in Figure 7 above.

6.29.1 Adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street, inbound bus stop, refer to Attachment B. 

·     As it is an inbound bus stop, a seat will be installed.  To the rear of the seat is the garage of 30 Te Korari Street.

·     The grassed berm will be paved (asphalt) to connect the boarding and alighting areas of the bus stop to the footpath.

6.29.2 Adjacent to 2 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street), outbound bus stop, refer to Attachment C. 

·     Refer to Section 6.18 to Section 6.20 for information about this bus stop.

·     The grassed berm will be paved (asphalt) to connect the boarding and alighting areas of the bus stop to the footpath.

6.29.3 Opposite 1 David Palmer Street (bus stop on Te Korari Street), inbound bus stop, refer to Attachment C. 

·     Refer to Section 6.18 to Section 6.19, and Section 6.21 for information about this bus stop.

·     As it is an inbound bus stop, a seat will be installed.  However following feedback relating to this bus stop, the seat will be repositioned from what is shown in Attachment C, to take into consideration privacy concerns that have been raised by residents who live opposite the bus stop.  There is ample space at this location, as the bus stop is located adjacent to a wetland reserve.  The seat can be moved closer to the Raranga Street, and can be installed facing the wetland reserve.  The new position of the seat will not restrict the passenger’s sightline to an approaching bus, and may well provide a nicer view while the passenger waits for the bus.

·     The grassed berm will be paved (asphalt) to connect the boarding and alighting areas of the bus stop to the footpath.

6.29.4 Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, westside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street, inbound bus stop, refer to Attachment D. 

·     Environment Canterbury have indicated there is potential for the bus service frequency to increase over time.  If this is the case not all bus service will continue onto Spencerville, and will instead finish the bus service in Prestons.  To accommodate this the final outbound (towards Spencerville) bus stop has been strategically placed in the first parking bay to the north of Te Rito Street.  This will allow the bus to layover, which is the wait time between the end of an existing service and the start of a new one, in a space outside the traffic lane, and not near to houses.

·     The available space for the bus stop is 28 metres.  It is possible that this will work fine in conjunction to the bus driver manoeuvring into the bus stop at a slow speed.  However, given the potential future significance of this bus stop becoming a bus layover, the recommended parking resolution reflects the recommended dimensions of a half-indented bus bay (33 metres).  If over time it is found that the additional space is required by the bus operators, the bus stop can be extended.  However, in the first instance the bus stop will operate with the space that is available.

·     The grassed berm will be paved (asphalt) to connect the boarding and alighting areas of the bus stop to the footpath.

6.29.5 Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, eastside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street, inbound bus stop, refer to Attachment E. 

·     The semi in-lane bus stop is located downsteam of a pedestrian crossing, and is near to the outbound bus stop on the other side of the road.  The location of the bus stop will allow good visibility for drivers travelling southbound to observe vehicles travelling in the opposite direction on Te Korari Street, and to decide if it is safe to move around the bus, or wait until it is safe to do so.  The bus stop is for picking up and dropping off passenger only. 

·     As it is an inbound bus stop, a seat will be installed.  The grassed berm will be paved (asphalt) to connect the boarding and alighting areas of the bus stop to the footpath.  In the newly paved section, there is sufficient space to install a seat, rather than along the wetland reserve edge of the footpath (as shown in Attachment E).

6.30    The 400 metre walkable catchment area for each bus stop pair is shown in Figure 8.  The coloured lines show where a person could walk to within a 400 metres of the bus stop, hence how many households are within that catchment area.  The line colours that differ from the main colours used for the circles, indicate areas were some households are within the 400 metres walking catchment of more than one pair of bus stops.

6.31    As indicated in Figure 8, spacing between the bus stop pairs is about 500 metres.  The spacing of about 500 metres may be perceived as creating a long walk to get to the bus stop, and hence a disadvantage to some residents.  However, analysis of the residential walking catchment of the three bus stop location options indicates only a small increase in residential catchment if the spacing was lower, such as in Option 3.

Figure 8:  Preferred option - bus stop locations – 400m walkability catchment

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.32    This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.33    Cost of Implementation - The estimated cost of this proposal is about $10,000.  Note the cost associated with raising the height of the boarding/alighting platform of the bus stop, or the length of the bus layover have not been included as they will not form part of the immediate implementation of this project. 

6.34    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Transport and City Streets, Operations Expenditure budget, includes maintenance of bus stop infrastructure, as and when it is needed.

6.35    Funding source - Traffic Operations, Capital Expenditure budget for bus stop installation.

Legal Implications

6.36    The Christchurch City Council’s Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008, provides the Council with the authority to install stopping and parking restrictions by resolution.  The Council has delegated this authority for this part of the city, to the relevant community board.

6.37    The installation of any traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.  These markings will comply.

6.38    For the most part, the proposed bus stops adhere to the recommended provisions as set out in the Christchurch Bus Stop Guidelines (2009), this includes the provision of hardstands and tactile pavers.  The area in which the proposed bus stop differ to the Bus Stop Guidelines, is the kerb height.  The kerb height along Te Korari Street is approximately 30mm, which is lower than the minimum kerb height of 130mm.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.39    Road safety implications of the semi in-lane bus stops will be monitored if the bus service frequency increases, significant number of passengers are boarding/alighting at the bus stops that would result in longer bus stop dwell time, or traffic volumes increase such that operation of the in-lane bus stop configuration needs to be reviewed for road safety reasons.

6.40    Road users park in the marked bus stop box and on the 'No Stopping' lines.  The risk is mitigated by vehicle users obeying the road rules, or by parking enforcement if deemed necessary.

Implementation

6.41    Implementation dependencies - The implementation is dependent on the Coastal-Burwood Community Board approving some or all-of the recommendations as described in Section 3

6.42    Implementation timeframe - The timeframe for implementation is dependent on the contractor’s workloads, as well as the bus service becoming operational.  It is possible that from the end of August 2017 the bus service will start operating via Prestons, however this is to be confirmed by Environment Canterbury.  As such, the implementation could occur within one to three months of the proposed parking restriction resolutions being approved.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.43    The advantages of this option include:

·   The location of the bus stops has been chosen to maximise passenger accessibility and to balance the impact the proposed bus stops will have on residents who live beside the bus stop.

·   Three of the five bus stops are located adjacent to a wetland reserve, and not adjacent to a residential property.

·   Seats will be installed at the inbound (towards Shirley) bus stops, where the passenger boarding numbers are likely to be greatest, and provide those passengers with a basic level of comfort while they wait for the bus.

·   The least loss of on-street car parking in comparison to Option 2 and Option 3 of this report.  There is a total loss of eight on-street parking spaces in the preferred option, as opposed to the loss of 14 on-street parking spaces in Option 2, or the loss of 22 on-street parking spaces in Option 3.

6.44    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The loss of eight on-street parking spaces, four of which are located adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street, where there is a greater potential demand for on-street parking, given the proximity to Marshland School.  The loss of on-street parking near 30 Te Korari Street can be absorbed by the remaining provision of on-street parking near to the bus stop, and the carpark provided by Marshland School for parents to use when picking up or dropping off school children.  The removal of the remaining four on-street parking spaces occur at a location where there are no houses nearby, resulting in a very low demand for these parking spaces  

·   A bus stop is located across the driveway of 2 David Palmer Street.  Buses are legally permitted to stop over driveways for picking up and dropping off passengers at a bus stop.  The limited frequency of the bus service mitigates the impact of the of temporary access restriction.

·   Most of the proposed bus stops are located adjacent to the wetland reserves.  However, some of the proposed bus stops are near an adjacent property that does not have a front fence.  This can be viewed as intrusive by the adjacent resident.  This disadvantage is mitigated by the limited frequency of the bus service, and locating the bus stop adjacent to the garage of the property. 

·   The spacing of about 500 metres between the bus stops on Te Korari Street may be perceived as creating a long walk to get to the bus stop, and hence a disadvantage to some residents.  However, analysis of the residential walking catchment of the three bus stop location options indicates only a small increase in residential catchment if the spacing was lower, such as in Option 3.

·   The use of semi in-lane bus stops will be monitored if the bus service frequency increases, significant number of passengers are boarding/alighting at the in-lane bus stops that would result in longer bus stop dwell time, or traffic volumes increase such that operation of the in-lane bus stop configuration needs to be reviewed for road safety reasons.

7.   Option 2 – Mixture of preferred and second preference bus stops – Option 2

Option Description

7.1       Option 2 is consistent with Option 1 concerning the following bus stops:

7.1.1   Adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street,

7.1.2   Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, westside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street,

7.1.3   Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, eastside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street, and the

7.1.4   Removal of two temporary bus stops on Lower Styx Road to the east of Marshland Road.

7.2       The bus stops that were not identified as the preferred site in Option 1, but now from the preferred bus stop location for Option 2 are:

7.2.1   Adjacent to 47 Te Korari Street, refer to Attachment G.

·     The bus stop would be located between the driveways of 47 and 49 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop would result in the loss of three on-street parking spaces.

7.2.2   Adjacent to 62 Te Korari Street, refer to Attachment G.

·     The bus stop is located over the driveway of 62 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop is located to the left-hand side of the preschool exit only driveway.  This ensures a stopped bus does not restrict the sightlines of drivers exiting the preschool of a vehicle approaching from the north. 

·     As it is an inbound bus stop, a seat will be installed.  To the rear of the seat is the garage of 62 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop would result in the loss of three on-street parking spaces.

7.3       The 400 metre walkable catchment area is indicated in Figure 9, which is similar to the 400 metre walkable catchment of Option 1.

Figure 9:  Option 2 – bus stop locations – 400m walkability catchment

Significance

7.4       Refer to Section 6.6.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.5       Refer to Section 6.7.

Community Views and Preferences

7.6       Refer to Section 6.8 to Section 6.28.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       Refer to Section 6.32.

Financial Implications

7.8       Cost of Implementation – The estimated cost of this proposal is about $10,000.  Note the cost associated with raising the height of the boarding/alighting platform of the bus stop, or the length of the bus layover have not been included as they will not form part of the immediate implementation of this project. 

7.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Transport and City Streets, Operations Expenditure Budget, includes maintenance of bus stop infrastructure, as and when it is needed.

7.10    Funding source – Traffic Operations, Capital Expenditure budget for bus stop installation.

Legal Implications

7.11    Refer to Section 6.36 to Section 6.38.

Risks and Mitigations

7.12    Refer to Section 6.39 to Section 6.40.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - The implementation is dependent on the Coastal-Burwood Community Board.  If the preference by the Coastal-Burwood Community Board is Option 2, this will mean another report will be presented to the Board to resolve the parking/stopping restrictions for the bus stops that are specific to Option 2.  Bus stops that are common to both options can be approved as part of Option 1 of this report.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – Approval of bus stops that are common to Option 1 of this report follow the same implementation timeframe as indicated in Section 6.42.  The implementation timeframe for bus stops specific to Option 2 is dependent on the approval process. Following approval of bus stops specific to Option 2, it is estimated that they will be implemented within three months of being approved.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The location of the bus stops has been chosen to maximise passenger accessibility to public transport.

·   Two of the five bus stops are located adjacent to a wetland reserve, and not adjacent to a residential property.

·   Seats will be installed at the inbound bus stops, where the passenger boarding numbers are likely to be greatest, and provide those passengers with a basic level of comfort while they wait for the bus.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The loss of 14 on-street parking spaces, which is the sum of four on-street parking spaces adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street, three on-street parking spaces adjacent to 47 Te Korari Street, three on-street parking spaces adjacent to 62 Te Korari Street, and four spaces adjacent to the wetland reserve on Te Korari Street north of Te Rito Street.  

·   A bus stop is located across the driveway of 62 Te Korari Street.  Buses are legally permitted to stop over driveways for picking up and dropping off passengers at a bus stop.  The limited frequency of the bus service mitigates the impact of the of temporary access restriction.

·   Some of the proposed bus stops are near the adjacent property that does not have a front fence.  This can be viewed as intrusive by the adjacent resident.  This disadvantage is mitigated by the limited frequency of the bus service, and locating the bus stop adjacent to the garage and the entrance space of the property. 

·   The spacing of up to 600 metres between the bus stops on Te Korari Street may be perceived as creating a long walk to get to the bus stop, and hence a disadvantage to some residents.  However, analysis of the residential walking catchment of the three bus stop location options indicates only a small increase in residential catchment if the spacing was lower, such as in Option 3.

8.   Option 3 – Mixture of preferred and second preference bus stops – Option 3

Option Description

8.1       Option 3 is consistent with Option 1 concerning the following bus stops:

8.1.1   Adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street,

8.1.2   Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, westside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street,

8.1.3   Te Korari Street adjacent to the wetland, eastside of the road between Te Rito Street and Weruweru Street, and the

8.1.4   Removal of two temporary bus stops on Lower Styx Road to the east of Marshland Road.

8.2       The bus stops that were not identified as the preferred site in Option 1, but now from the preferred bus stop location for Option 3 are:

8.2.1   Adjacent to 47 Te Korari Street, refer to Attachment G.

·     The bus stop would be located between the driveways of 47 and 49 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop would result in the loss of three on-street parking spaces.

8.2.2   Adjacent to 62 Te Korari Street, refer to Attachment G.

·     The bus stop is located over the driveway of 62 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop is located to the left-hand side of the preschool exit only driveway.  This ensures a stopped bus does not restrict the sightlines of drivers exiting the preschool of a vehicle approaching from the north. 

·     As it is an inbound bus stop, a seat would be installed.  To the rear of the seat is the garage of 62 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop would result in the loss of three on-street parking spaces.

8.2.3   Adjacent to 81 Te Korari Street, refer to Attachment H.

·     The bus stop is located over the driveway of 81 Te Korari Street.

·     The bus stop would result in the loss of four on-street parking spaces.

8.2.4   Opposite 75 Te Korari Street, refer to Attachment I.

·     The bus stop is located adjacent to a park reserve.

·     As it is an inbound bus stop, a seat would be installed.  The exact location of the seat would need to be determined to take account of any privacy concerns the adjacent property owners may have.

·     The bus stop would result in the loss of four on-street parking spaces.

8.3       The 400 metre walkable catchment area is indicated in Figure 10.  Option 3 provides the greatest number of bus stops, which consequently means it has the most households located within 400 metres of a bus stop.  However due to the design of pedestrian access throughout the subdivision the catchment area does not vary significantly to the walkability catchment of Option 1 and Option 2.

Figure 10:  Option 3 – bus stop locations - 400m walkability catchment

Significance

8.4       Refer to Section 6.6.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.5       Refer to Section 6.7.

Community Views and Preferences

8.6       Refer to Section 6.8 to Section 6.28.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.7       Refer to Section 6.32.

Financial Implications

8.8       Cost of Implementation – The estimated cost of this proposal is about $13,000.  Note the cost associated with raising the height of the boarding/alighting platform of the bus stop, or the length of the bus layover have not been included as they will not form part of the immediate implementation of this project. 

8.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Transport and City Streets, Operations Expenditure Budget, includes maintenance of bus stop infrastructure, as and when it is needed.

8.10    Funding source – Traffic Operations, Capital Expenditure budget for bus stop installation.

Legal Implications

8.11    Refer to Section 6.36 to Section 6.38.

Risks and Mitigations

8.12    Refer to Section 6.39 to Section 6.40.

Implementation

8.13    Implementation dependencies - The implementation is dependent on the Coastal-Burwood Community Board.  If the preference by the Coastal-Burwood Community Board is Option 3, this will mean another report will be presented to the Board to resolve the parking/stopping restrictions for the bus stops that are specific to Option 3.  Bus stops that are common to both options can be approved as part of Option 1 of this report.

8.14    Implementation timeframe – Approval of bus stops that are common to Option 1 of this report follow the same implementation timeframe as indicated in Section 6.42.  The implementation timeframe for bus stops specific to Option 3 is dependent on the approval process.  Following approval of bus stops specific to Option 3, it is estimated that they will be implemented within three months of being approved.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The location of the bus stops has been chosen to maximise passenger accessibility to public transport.  In the case of Option 3, analysis of the residential walking catchment indicates this option has the most households located within 400 metres of a bus stop.  However due to the design of pedestrian access throughout the subdivision the catchment area does not vary significantly to the walkability catchment of Option 1 and Option 2.

·   Three of the seven bus stops are located adjacent to a wetland reserve, and not adjacent to a residential property.

·   Seats will be installed at the inbound bus stops, where the passenger boarding numbers are likely to be greatest, and provide those passengers with a basic level of comfort while they wait for the bus.

8.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The loss of 22 on-street parking spaces, which is the sum of four on-street parking spaces adjacent to 30 Te Korari Street, three on-street parking spaces adjacent to 47 Te Korari Street, three on-street parking spaces adjacent to 62 Te Korari Street, four on-street parking spaces opposite to 75 Te Korari Street, four spaces adjacent to 81 Te Korari Street, and four spaces adjacent to the wetland reserve on Te Korari Street north of Te Rito Street.  

·   A bus stop is located across the driveway of 62 Te Korari Street and 81 Te Korari Street.  Buses are legally permitted to stop over driveways for picking up and dropping off passengers at a bus stop.  The limited frequency of the bus service mitigates the impact of the of temporary access restriction.

·   Some of the proposed bus stops are near the adjacent property that does not have a front fence.  This can be viewed as intrusive by the adjacent resident.  This disadvantage is mitigated by the limited frequency of the bus service, and locating the bus stop adjacent to the garage, entrance or living spaces of the property. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bus stop plan for Coastal-Burwood Community Board approval - Location of all bus stops in accordance with the preferred Option

41

b

Bus stop plan for Coastal-Burwood Community Board approval - 30 Te Korari Street

42

c

Bus stop plan for Coastal-Burwood Community Board approval - bus stops by David Palmer Street

43

d

Bus stop plan for Coastal-Burwood Community Board approval - bus stop south of Weruweru Street, westside of road

44

e

Bus stop plan for Coastal-Burwood Community Board approval - bus stop south of Weruweru Street, eastside of road

45

f

Summary of all submissions received and staff responses

46

g

Bus stop plan for information only - 47 and 62 Te Korari Street

51

h

Bus stop plan for information only - 81 Te Korari Street

52

i

Bus stop plan for information only - opposite 75 Te Korari Street

53

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Brenda  O'Donoghue - Passenger Transport Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

Peter Langbein - Finance Business Partner

  


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

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Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

10.    Horseshoe Lake Reserve Earthquake Repairs

Reference:

17/758363

Contact:

Steven Gray

steven.gray@ccc.govt.nz

941 8256

 

 

1.   Secretarial Note:

1.1       The Board previously considered this report at its 20 March 2017 meeting.  While the concept plan for the location of the new car park was approved, the Board lay on the table the matter of the concept landscape plan for the footbridge removal and path realignment. This was to enable staff to consult nearby residents and users on option one and two in relation to the footbridge and to bring the outcome to the Board for a decision.  A memorandum is attached with staff advice on this matter (Attachment A).

2.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

2.1       The purpose of this report is for the Coastal-Burwood Community Board to note its prior approval of the location of a new car park at Horseshoe Lake Reserve; and to approve the landscape concept plans for the bridge removal, path realignment and new car park at Horseshoe Lake Reserve.

Origin of Report

2.2       This report is staff generated following an information seminar with the Burwood/Pegasus Board in September 2016 regarding earthquake repair options.

2.3       Significance

2.4       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.4.1   The level of significance was determined by the project being low cost and affecting a limited number of direct residents however the decision will benefit city wide users.

·     Provides environmental improvements through the removal of damaged assets next to a water body

·     Reinstates levels of service the community have not benefited from in the last six years

2.4.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.         Notes its previous approval of the concept landscape plan, attachment B, for the location of new car park near the corner of Horseshoe Lake Road and Lake Terrace Road at Horseshoe Lake Reserve.

2.         Approve the concept landscape plan, attachment A for the footbridge removal and path realignment at Horseshoe Lake Reserve.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report does support the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025).

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Bridge Removal, New Tack and Car Park Relocation (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Bridge Replacement and New Car Park

·     Option 3 – Remove Bridge and Car Park and Not Replace

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

·    The advantages of this option include:

·    Remove the damaged bridge and salvage the existing handrails for reuse

·    Close the existing car park and remove the hard stand surface and base

·    Replant the old car park space with appropriate native plants

·    Realign the path to cross over the culvert and connect to the toilet block

·    Better stable ground conditions which is less likely to move in future earthquake events

·    Extend the barriers around the culvert by reusing the existing handrail and barriers from the bridge

·     New planting where required along the new path and old bridge location

·     Construct 28 new car parking spaces on better stable ground

·     The car park proposal allows for future expansion if required

·     The car park will provide a good walkway connection to the public toilets and existing track network

·     Proposal is in keeping with the 2002 Horseshoe Lake Master Plan

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Shrub vegetation will be removed for this path realignment

·     Not having a car park on the lake front, however to other lake front car parks exist further along the reserve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

5.   Context/Background

Earthquake Damage to the Reserve

5.1       Following the 2011 and 2012 earthquake’s, there was significant damage caused to parts of the Reserve with one of these areas being near the intersection of Lake Terrace Road and Horseshoe Lake Road.

5.2       The damaged caused was to the pedestrian footbridge over the Old No 2 Drain and to the small car park next to the lake.

5.3       Land damage occurred on both sides of the bridge and in the car park and suffered significant lateral and vertical land deformation and low lying land skirting the lake.

5.4       Other earthquake damaged has occurred within the reserve with some of these areas already repaired. This other repair work has occurred only in areas on the north and east side of the lake which borders ‘Green Zoned’ land and didn’t involve any changes to the park assets.

5.5       The location for this proposed work is shown below in figure 1.

Figure 1: Horseshoe Lake Reserve – bridge / car park location

 

5.6       Eliot Sinclair engineers have been commissioned to investigate the damage and provide options for these asset renewals.

5.7       In the Eliot Sinclair Options Report, attachment C, consideration is given to replacing the bridge with a “Floating Deck” and stone piling to help stabilise the bank or to realign the pedestrian route onto more stable ground. These options are cover in more depth further in this report.

 

 

5.8       Existing Footbridge

·   The bridge structure is composed of Dycore panels with a timber handrail fixed to the bridge deck

·   It is 9 metres long by 2.4 metres wide

·   It was supported on six (three at each end) 7 metres deep piles with concrete abutments

·   The earthquakes have caused the bridge to move off its piles and has twisted and snapped the top deck

                     Figure 2: Damaged Foot Bridge

                          2012_1017-JohnB0043

5.9       Existing Carpark

·    The car park has 7 parking spaces, with timber wheel stops and bollards to separate the pedestrian walkway

·    The chip seal has broken with the base moving and splitting open

·    The bollards and wheel stops have all moved with some breaking

·    The land has suffered severe liquefaction-induced settlement and lateral spread towards the lake as shown in figure 3

         Figure 3: Damaged Car Parks

   

6.   Option 1 – Bridge Removal, New Tack and Car Park Relocation (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Following the Eliot Sinclair Options Report, attachment C, Elliot Sinclair was commissioned to provide conceptual designs for the realignment of the foot path, bridge removal, and relocation and layout for a new car park based on the report supporting this as the most viable option.

6.2       The Parks Manager supports this proposal as being the most viable and economical approach.

6.3       Bridge Removal and Path Realignment:

6.3.1   Remove the damaged bridge and salvage the existing handrails for reuse.

6.3.2   Realign the path to cross over the culvert which is 26 metres upstream from the damaged bridge and provide a new connection to the toilet block

6.3.3   Extend the barriers around the culvert by reusing the existing handrail and barriers from the bridge

6.3.4   A small amount of shrub vegetation will be removed to allow for the path realignment

6.3.5   A “rock hop” crossing is proposed in the old bridge location. This will be finalised in the detail design and confirmed on site in the construction phase if deemed suitable and safe.

6.3.6   New planting will be included where required along the new path and old bridge location

6.4       The photos in figure 4 show the path realignment location as viewed from Lake Terrace Road above the culvert.

Figure 4: Path alignment over the culvert

 

 

6.5       Car Park Relocation:

6.5.1   Close the existing car park and remove the hard stand surface and base.

6.5.2   Replant the old car park space with appropriate native plants

6.5.3   Relocate the car park to the flat land off Horseshoe Lake Road. This site is consistent with the 2002 Master Plan for Horseshoe Lake Reserve. Refer attachment D and the snippet from this master plan show in figure 5 below.

6.5.4   The new car park layout has been designed to allow for expansion if required in the future depending on reserve development. A maximum of 84 parking spaces is shown but it is proposed to develop these in stages as required.

6.5.5   The first stage allows for 28 parking spaces which includes two disabled spaces and comprises of two separate bays with 14 parking spaces per bay.

6.5.6   This layout allows for pedestrian access from a central point linking with the Horseshoe Lake track network.

6.5.7   One entry / exit point is shown into the car park from the road which will allow easier management of the car park.

6.5.8   Storm water from the car park will be managed through a number of shallow planted swales.

Figure 5: Horseshoe Lake Master Plan 2002

 

Significance

6.6       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.7       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are noted under Community Views and Preferences.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.8       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.9       Through the seminar meeting with the Community Board, the level of consultation was discussed and the influence consultation would provide in the decision making.

6.10    It was considered that although this is a well-used reserve by the public and due to the economic options it was felt that there would be no advantage in public consultation based on the following reasons:

6.10.1 This option was returning back a level of service that hadn’t been available for six years

6.10.2 The path realignment would provide the same level of service as the bridge

6.10.3 The cost to replace the bridge did not make it a feasible option when an alternative was available at a lower cost

6.11    The Community Board did request that contact was made with the Christchurch Golf Club and Regenerate Christchurch.

6.12    Both of this organisations have responded, Christchurch Golf Club 21 November 2016 and Regenerate Christchurch 4 November 2016, and neither have any concerns with the proposed car park plans and path realignment.

6.13    These replies are recorded in Trim 16/1296178 and 16/1357960.

6.14    The proposed car park location was part of the 2002 consultation and Master Plan.

6.15    Although this Master Plan was 15 years ago, there is no direct impact of residents or park users.

6.16    The car park area is an old hard fill site therefore provided very limited options for this space, hence the original car park proposal.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.17    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.17.1 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

6.17.2 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

Financial Implications

6.18    Cost of Implementation - The current cost estimates to implement this work will be managed within the existing Capital budget.

6.19    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs:

6.19.1 The maintenance of the new track will be offset by the cost from carry our annual structural inspections, so no increase in maintenance cost.

6.19.2 The operational cost on car parks generally is low and as this is a new asset it is expected that there would be none to very low maintenance costs for the first 5 years.

6.20    Funding source - Projects listed in the current Capital Programme:

6.20.1 Horseshoe Lake Reserve EQ Repairs (8234)

6.20.2 Horseshoe Lake Reserve Footbridge repairs (11384)

Legal Implications

6.21    Resource Consent will be required for the new car park due to being on an old hard fill land fill site.

6.22    Work to remove the damaged bridge and realign the track may require a resource consent but are likely to be covered under the Councils global consent for this activity. If a new consent is required this will be applied for in the normal manner.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.23    New Track: There is very low risk in this option as no deep foundations are required for the track realignment.

6.24    Car Park: This is on an old hard fill land fill site with a risk of ground settlement or land cracking in future earthquake events. However this site only had minor damage with small cracking in the surface 2012 events.

6.25    Risk: Uncertainty caused by old hard fill land fill site.  This may result in higher construction cost depending on the chosen method for treating this.

6.25.1 Treatment: Auger and penetrometer tests have been carried out in the proposed car park location. There are several methods to approaching construction which will be investigated further in the detail design stage.

·     Dig out the land fill material and replace with good compacted base course. This material would need to be tested and disposed of correctly

·     Or limit the depth of excavation to not disturb the land fill material. Some future settlement may occur causing some surface crack in the car park. This is not considered an issue as the hard fill land fill is decades old and only had minor cracking in the 2012 events

·     The most appropriate method will be used based on construction cost and any potently operational cost

6.25.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

6.26    Implementation dependencies - Gaining Community Board approval to proceed to construction.

6.27    Implementation timeframe -

·   Board approval  -20 March 2017

·   Detail design, obtaining consents (where required) and tendering – April / May 2017

·   Construction completed –

·     Bridge removal and new track June / July 2017

·     Car park October 2017

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.28    The advantages of this option include:

·   Remove the damaged bridge and salvage the existing handrails for reuse

·   Close the existing car park and remove the hard stand surface and base

·   Replant the old car park space with appropriate native plants

·   Realign the path to cross over the culvert and connect to the toilet block

·   Better stable ground conditions which is less likely to move in future earthquake events

·   Extend the barriers around the culvert by reusing the existing handrail and barriers from the bridge

·   New planting where required along the new path and old bridge location

·   Construct 28 new car parking spaces on better stable ground

·   The car park proposal allows for future expansion if required

·   The car park will provide a good walkway connection to the public toilets and existing track network

·   Proposal is in keeping with the 2002 Horseshoe Lake Master Plan

6.29    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Shrub vegetation will be removed for this path realignment

·   Not having a car park on the lake front, however two other lake front car parks exist further along the reserve

7.   Option 2 – Bridge Replacement and New Car Parks

Option Description

7.1       The car parking option is the same as reported in Option one in this report with the relocation of the car park

7.2       The existing bridge is damaged to the point it cannot be repaired.

7.3       It is possible to build a new bridge with an alternative design (timber) with the following elements:

7.3.1   Foundations that are able to spread, settle and distort without damaging the deck

7.3.2   The timber deck would be connected using a foundation – deck connection to act as a ‘fuse’. This would allow the foundations to move independently of the deck

7.3.3   The timber deck would need to be able to withstand land and foundation movement and be moveable to allow for foundation remediation in a future event

7.4       The cost of a timber bridge would be in the order of $50,000 which does not include the foundation costs or engineering design of the bridge.

7.5       The foundation would require specific engineering based on an in-depth Geotech investigation and could include stone columns or piles

7.6       The investigations to date shows this land to of poor bearing

Significance

7.7       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.8       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are noted under Community Views and Preferences.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.9       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.10    Refer comments in Options 1 of this report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.11    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.11.1 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

7.11.2 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

Financial Implications

7.12    Cost of Implementation - The current cost estimates to implement this work will be managed within the existing Capital budget however this option is more expensive that option 1.

7.13    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs:

7.13.1 Annual structural inspections are required on Park structure

7.13.2 To maximise the life of a timber structure, ongoing treatment of the timber would be required through either staining or painting. The cost of this is unknown until a final design is completed. This would involve Parks Unit operational input so there is a clear understanding of this maintenance requirement.

7.13.3 The operational cost on car parks generally is low and as this is a new asset it is expected that there would be none to very low maintenance costs for the first 5 years.

7.14    Funding source - Projects listed in the current Capital Programme:

7.14.1 Horseshoe Lake Reserve EQ Repairs (8234)

7.14.2 Horseshoe Lake Reserve Footbridge repairs (11384)

Legal Implications

7.15    Resource Consent will be required for the new car park due to being on an old hard fill land fill site.

7.16    Work to construct a new bridge will require a Resource and Building Consent.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.17    Ground conditions for bridge foundations

7.18    Risk:

7.18.1 Uncertainty caused by insufficient data on ground stability.  This could result in high capital costs with further investigation work and piling treatment

7.18.2 Not gaining a Resource or Building Consent

7.18.3 Treatment: Undertake in-depth Geotech investigation work to develop a suitable foundation design

7.18.4 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is Very high

Implementation

7.19    Implementation dependencies:

7.19.1 Gaining Community Board approval to proceed to construction.

7.19.2 Gaining all required consents

7.20    Implementation timeframe -

·   Board approval  -20 March 2017

·   Detail design, obtaining consents and tendering – April to July 2017

·   Construction completed:

·     Bridge removal and construction of a new bridge August to September 2017

·     Car park October 2017

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.21    The advantages of this option include:

·   Replaces a bridge with a bridge

·   Same advantages as Options 1 for the car park relocation

7.22    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Higher design and construction costs for the bridge

·   Investing in an asset in earthquake prone land with poor soil bearing conditions

·   The bridge will be more vulnerable to future damaging events when there is a robust alternative as stated in Option 1

8.   Option 3 - Remove Bridge and Car Park and Not Replace

Option Description

8.1       This option would be to remove the damaged bridge and ca park and not replace / rebuild these assets.

8.2       Reinstatement of the sites would be required which would involve planting the car park area as stated in Option 1.

8.3       There would be no walking track connection across or around the Old No2 Drain apart from using the road.

8.4       This Option is not considered suitable as it changes the level of service and does not provide a safe alternative walk route for park users.

Significance

8.5       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.6       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are noted under Community Views and Preferences but this was not discussed with the Board to not replace these assets.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.7       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.8       Refer 5.9 of Option 1 in this report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.9       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.9.1   Inconsistency – Reduces the exist Level of Service

8.9.2   Reason for inconsistency – By not replacing existing assets

8.9.3   Amendment necessary - <enter text>

Financial Implications

8.10    Cost of Implementation – The cost to remove the assets would be covered under the Capital project budget

8.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – This would be reduced with no car park or bridge to maintain

8.12    Funding source - Projects listed in the current Capital Programme:

8.12.1 Horseshoe Lake Reserve EQ Repairs (8234)

8.12.2 Horseshoe Lake Reserve Footbridge repairs (11384)

Legal Implications

8.13    No legal requirements for this option.

Risks and Mitigations  

8.14    The main risk would be with not meeting a Level of Service and concerns from the public.

8.15    Risk Uncertainty caused by no community engagement on the removal of these assets. 

8.15.1 Treatment: Undertake a separate round of community consultation to determine the community’s views on not replacing these assets.

8.15.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is High.

Implementation

8.16    Implementation dependencies  - Community Board approval

8.17    Implementation timeframe – Removal work would be completed this financial year.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   Less assets to maintain

8.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Unhappy residents with loss of a walkway connection

·   Public safety with people likely to use the road margin to get around the waterway

·   Reduced Level of Service

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Horseshoe Lake Reserve Concept Plan Path Realignment and Bridge Removal

68

b

Horseshoe Lake Reserve New Car Park Location

69

c

Horseshoe Lake Reserve 2002 Master Plan

70

d

Horseshoe Lake Reserve - Memorandum

71

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Steven Gray - Project Manager

Approved By

Liam Nolan - Head of Vertical Capital Delivery and Professional Services

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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07 August 2017

 

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11.    Burwood Park south - Proposed outdoor fitness trail

Reference:

17/373959

Contact:

Sarah Blows

Sarah.Blows@ccc.govt.nz

941 8714

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Coastal-Burwood Community Board to approve the landscape concept plan for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south, Burwood.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following a seminar with the Coastal-Burwood Community Board on 6 March 2017. The report presents a landscape concept plan for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south prepared in consultation with the community and affected stakeholders.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the criteria noted in the Significance and Engagement Policy 2014.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

a.         Approve a fitness trail at Burwood Park south.

b.         Approve the landscape concept plan for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south, refer Attachment A.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Sports Parks

·     Level of Service: 7.1.2 Deliver a high level of customer satisfaction with the range and quality of sports parks

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Approve the landscape concept plan for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south (preferred option).

·     Option 2 – Do not approve the landscape concept plan for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The installation of a fitness trail will provide the opportunity for local residents to be physically active, contributing to their health and wellbeing.

·     The installation of a fitness trail at Burwood Park south will serve a wide variety of users, contributing to improved social cohesion and reduced social isolation.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Council has limited funding for this project, therefore Council need to be clear around the expectation of the community contribution for this proposal.

4.4       Community Feedback

4.4.1   Community consultation on the Burwood Park (south), Burwood - Proposed fitness trail was undertaken from Friday 31 March to Friday 21 April 2017.

4.4.2   A total of 1250 leaflets were hand delivered to properties on Horseshoe Lake Road, Broomfield Terrace, Strathmore Gardens, Tompkins Lane, Te Puna Ora Place, New Brighton Road, Golflinks Road, Netherby Lane, Ajax Street, Rowe Place, Bampton Street, Cheam Street, Wrey Jury Lane, Moran Lane, Banks Avenue, Achilles Street, Barclay Place, Achilles Street, Coopers Road, Strathfield Avenue, Belfield Street, Bramwell Street McBratneys Road, Halberg Street, Lovelock Street, Landy Street, Bideford Place, Claydon Place, Moyna Avenue, Birchfield Avenue, Sutton Place, Gayhurst Road, Katie Lane, Mundys Road, Cresswell Avenue and Dallington Terrace.  The leaflet was also sent to 172 key stakeholders and 318 absentee owners.

·     Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, Shirley Service Centre, Parklands Community Library, Pioneer Recreation and Sport Centre, Jellie Park Recreation and Sport Centre and Graham Condon Recreation and Sport Centre.

4.4.3   During the course of the engagement, Council received 133 submissions (two of which were anonymous so they were not treated as formal submissions). Of the 131 submissions, 106 submitters were in support, 21 were in support but had some concerns, one did not support the proposal and three did not state their preference.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Burwood Park south is classified as a Recreation Reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. The park is located in the suburb of Burwood and is bordered by New Brighton Road and Cresswell Avenue.

5.2       The Dallington Community Cottage Trust approached Christchurch City Council in October 2015 offering to contribute $35,000 towards equipment for a fitness trail in Burwood Park south. It was agreed that the project had merit and subject to available budgets, Council would partner in the project covering the cost of: design, consultation, installation, and ongoing maintenance.

5.3       The Dallington Community Cottage Trust began as a partnership involving the community, Christchurch City Council and Anglican Care 17 years ago. They aim to give the Dallington community a focal point, foster a sense of community and belonging, provide opportunities for fellowship and friendship by offering group activities, and a venue for crafts.

5.4       A landscape concept plan was presented to the Coastal-Burwood Community Board at a seminar on Monday 6 March 2017 prior to heading out for consultation.

5.5       There have been several changes to the landscape concept plan through consultation:

5.5.1   The Dallington Community Cottage Trust offered to contribute funding towards purchasing a seventh piece of fitness equipment. The seventh piece of fitness equipment has been included into the landscape concept plan.

5.5.2   The inclusion of a mobility parking bay. The Traffic Operations Team believe there is merit in installing a mobility park on Cresswell Avenue and are investigating its feasibility. The installation of a mobility parking bay will be subject to public consultation and Community Board approval.

5.5.3   The inclusion of a drinking fountain and cycle stands. Due to budget constraints for this project, additional funding for these assets has been set aside in 2019. The assets have been included in the landscape concept plan however the location of these assets is indicative only. The location of the drinking fountain will be dependent on available water connections.

5.5.4   For greater accessibility the static pieces of equipment (refer Attachment A, pieces 1, 2, and 3) have been grouped into one box with the appropriate safety surfacing. The box will be dug into the ground with the excess soil mounded around the edges to provide a ramp into the area. 

6.   Option 1 – Approve the landscape concept plan for a fitness tail at Burwood Park south (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The Burwood Park south proposed fitness trail landscape concept plan, refer Attachment A, has been prepared in consultation with the Community and affected stakeholders. The fitness equipment images are indicative only and represent type of activity/equipment. Changes to activity/equipment may occur when selecting a suitable equipment supplier. Decisions will be made in conjunction with the Dallington Community Cottage Trust.

6.2       This option involves the installation of seven pieces of fitness equipment.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low, consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance included a letterbox drop, mail out to key stakeholders and absentee owners, on-site signage and social media.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Staff attended a Disability Advisory Group meeting on 18 April 2017. It was suggested that the landscape concept plan needs to take into consideration appropriate access into the park, mobility car parking, and suitable space around the equipment.

6.7       Mobility parking was also suggested through the consultation process. The Traffic Operations Team believe there is merit in installing a mobility park on Cresswell Avenue and are investigating its feasibility. The installation of a mobility parking bay will be subject to consultation and Community Board approval.

6.8       Community consultation on the Burwood Park (south), Burwood - Proposed fitness trail was undertaken from Friday 31 March to Friday 21 April 2017.

6.9       A total of 1250 leaflets were hand delivered to properties on Horseshoe Lake Road, Broomfield Terrace, Strathmore Gardens, Tompkins Lane, Te Puna Ora Place, New Brighton Road, Golflinks Road, Netherby Lane, Ajax Street, Rowe Place, Bampton Street, Cheam Street, Wrey Jury Lane, Moran Lane, Banks Avenue, Achilles Street, Barclay Place, Achilles Street, Coopers Road, Strathfield Avenue, Belfield Street, Bramwell Street McBratneys Road, Halberg Street, Lovelock Street, Landy Street, Bideford Place, Claydon Place, Moyna Avenue, Birchfield Avenue, Sutton Place, Gayhurst Road, Katie Lane, Mundys Road, Cresswell Avenue and Dallington Terrace.  The leaflet was also sent to 172 key stakeholders and 318 absentee owners.

·    Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, Shirley Service Centre, Parklands Community Library, Pioneer Recreation and Sport Centre, Jellie Park Recreation and Sport Centre and Graham Condon Recreation and Sport Centre.

6.10    During the course of the engagement, Council received 133 submissions, (two of which were anonymous so they were not treated as formal submissions).  Of the 131 submissions, 106 submitters were in support, 21 were in support but had some concerns, one did not support the proposal and three did not state their preference.

6.11    The following summarises feedback received in support of the proposal:

Enthusiasm for the project

·    …“This is a positive step and a great idea”…

·    “Looks like a good idea.”

·    “We think this is wonderful…. Simply wonderful.”

·    “Fantastic idea. I believe it will be a great asset to the area”…

·    …” wholeheartedly support this plan”….

·    “I am very pleased that a fitness trail will be installed at Burwood Park and will make a point of using it”...

·    “Good community & Council initiative - promoting use of park and fitness”.

·    “Great idea”.

·    “Excellent idea - just what is needed to encourage fitness and use of the park”.

·    “Do it. Good for the community and low cost”.

·    “I think it sounds great!”

·    “Although we may not use the fitness trail we think it is a great idea for the community and we fully support it”.

·    “We think this is a great idea and a real asset to Burwood Park”…

·    …“Let’s get Dallington "moving again.”

·    “Fabulous idea - the more things for children and families to do in the local area the better.”

·    “I think this is a great idea.  Something new and positive for our area. Promoting health and fitness is important.”

·    …”This is a great location for a fitness trail. Excellent to see community partnerships working so well with Council to deliver such a great resource for the community.”

·    …”encourages more people to keep fit and achieve health goals”…

·    …”it is a great way to encourage younger generations and the whole community to be more active…”

 

Concerns

·    Close proximity to the children’s playground could create a safety issue.  

·    Potential theft of the equipment.

·    Vandalism.

·    Sports team would monopolise the equipment.

 

Suggestions

·    Drinking fountains. 

·    Nearby seating.

·    It would be good to see more static pieces as they require less maintenance.

·    A walking track around the park.

·    Add another fitness station.

·    Level or ramp access and a path to all areas of the fitness trail.

·    At least one mobility park nearby.

·    Installation of bike stands.

·    Bigger rubbish bins.

·    Suggestion for additional equipment to be added in future.

·    Car parking on the wide grass berm on Cresswell Avenue.

·    Erection of a wall or fence to stop stray balls getting onto the road.

 

6.12    The following summarises feedback received in support of the proposal but had some concerns:

 

Enthusiasm for the project

·    “Totally support the well thought through plans….will be well used by the seniors…”

·    …“It is exciting to see more available at this already busy park”…

·    “Great idea!”…

·    “I think that the idea of the fitness trail is great. Thank you to the council and the Dallington Community Cottage Trust for the funding and the concept”…

 

Concerns

·    Concern that equipment pieces 4, 5 & 6 were not a good choice and would not be maintained.

·    The cost and ongoing maintenance of the movement machines is higher than static equipment and less people can use them, would prefer more static pieces.

·    Concern the equipment would be vandalised.

·    Concern it’s not money well spent.

·    Concern that Cresswell Avenue might need a pedestrian crossing.

·    Concern about parking and speeding around the park.

·    Concern sports groups would monopolise the equipment.

 

Suggestions

·    Upgrade the toilets. 

·    Put in a full sized basketball court with two hoops.

·    Install a sail over some seating.

·    Running track around the park.

·    Upgrade the playground.

·    Install more rubbish bins.

·    Turn the roadside berm on Cresswell Avenue into parking.

·    The chin up bars or parallel bars need to be replaced with a fitness station for core strength.

·    Request to include more equipment.

 

6.13    Of the three submitters who did not state their preference, only one commented:

·    “Looks really good, should bring more people to the area”

6.14    The following summarises feedback received from the one submitter who did not support the proposal:

·    Concern with the way the funds were distributed to an organisation that has very little contact with the community.

6.15    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Board meeting and how they can request speaking rights. Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback summary with project team responses.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.16    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.16.1 Physical Recreation and Sport Policy 2002.

6.16.2 Public Open Space Strategy 2010.

6.16.3 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002.

Financial Implications

6.17    Cost of Implementation – The total Burwood Park south fitness trail estimate is $71, 935. This price estimate is based on February 2017 rates with no allowance for inflation or price increases. The Dallington Community Cottage Trust are increasing their contribution to $45,000 towards the project to purchase equipment. The remaining balance of $26,935 for installation will be covered by Council, from CPMS 37517 Sports Parks – Structures (New).

6.18    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The Urban Parks Team have confirmed that they will take on the maintenance costs for this proposal. The total maintenance is approximately $503 per annum.

Legal Implications

6.19    There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.20    This option has low risk for delivery, however the project is dependent on Community funding. There is a risk to the completion of the project if this funding contribution is withdrawn.

Implementation

6.21    Implementation dependencies - Council have limited funding for this project and is dependent on the Dallington Community Cottage Trust to contribute the majority of funds for this project.

6.22    Implementation timeframe – It is proposed that the fitness trail is completed by late 2017.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.23    The advantages of this option include:

·   The installation of a fitness trail will provide the opportunity for local residents to be physically active, contributing to their health and wellbeing.

·   The installation of a fitness trail at Burwood Park south will serve a wide variety of users, contributing to improved social cohesion and reduced social isolation.

6.24    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Council have limited funding for this project, therefore Council need to be clear around the expectation of the community contribution for this proposal.

7.   Option 2 – Do not approve the landscape concept plan for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south.

Option Description

7.1       A fitness trail will not be installed at Burwood Park south and the park will remain as it is currently.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low, consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       The local community are specifically affected by this option due to their desire for a fitness trail. 

7.4.1   No feedback supported this option.

7.4.2   This option would not deliver positive health benefits to the local community.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.4.3   Nil.

Financial Implications

7.5       Cost of Implementation – Nil.

7.6       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Nil.

7.7       Funding source – Nil.

Legal Implications

7.8       There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option.

Risks and Mitigations

7.9       Nil.

Implementation

7.10    Implementation dependencies – Nil.

7.11    Implementation timeframe – Nil.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.12    The advantages of this option include:

·   There is no financial impact upon Christchurch City Council.

7.13    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   This is not the preferred option as demand from the community exists for a fitness trail at Burwood Park south.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Burwood Park south - outdoor fitness trail

91

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Blows - Student Monitoring & Research

Megan Carpenter - Recreation Planner, Greenspace

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

PDF Creator


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

12.    Coastal-Burwood Community Board Area Report

Reference:

17/724046

Contact:

Jo Wells

jo.wells@ccc.govt.nz

941 6451

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to resource the Community Board to promote a pro-active partnership approach to decision-making between the Council and Community Boards working together to achieve the best outcomes for the city with decisions being made with a good understanding of community views.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.             Receive the Area Update.

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Community Board Plan update against outcomes

It is anticipated that the Community Board Plan for the next two years will be developed and come into effect during August 2017.  

The Community Board Plan sets the framework that will guide the Boards decision making and actions for the next two years.  It informs the Board’s decisions on local activities and enables the Board to make decisions on funding and Long Term Plan priorities. 

 

Our communities have told us their views on many issues over the past years as part of the development of a wide range of council plans. This information, as well as information received through specific engagements will be used in developing this Plan.    

 

3.2       Memos/Information reporting back on Community Board matters

3.2.1      Pages Road Footpath

At the 3 July 2017 meeting, the Board noted that with the recently completed Pages Road footpath by the bridge, the berm areas where old driveways were located had soil which was not contained. Staff undertook to follow this up.   Grass has been seeded so once this grows, the soil will stabilise and it is not expected any will migrate.

 

        The soil will stabilise when the newly-seeded grass establishes  

 

 

3.2.2   Southshore Flood Protection Workshop

 

On 15 June 2017 the Board requested staff to organise a workshop with Regenerate Christchurch, OCEL consultants, Council Staff and Southshore Residents Association to discuss Southshore flood protection.

 

However, this has now been superseded by the Council’s Annual Plan decision of 20 June 2017:

 

That the Council:

a.                 Direct the Chief Executive to report back to Council by 30 August 2017 with an initial evaluation of the feasibility of the OCEL Consultants Ltd's proposal for the Estuary Edge Protection at Southshore, and whether there are any other alternative options for short-term measures to address concerns raised by the community. The report back from the Chief Executive should include what statutory, planning or consenting mechanisms may be required to allow estuary edge protections (of any form) to be  legally constructed; and should also include any assessment of the OCEL proposal undertaken by Regenerate Christchurch.

 

b.                Request Regenerate Christchurch to review their proposed timeframes for regeneration planning for Southshore, with the view to bringing these forward.

 

c.           Direct the Chief Executive to report back to Council by 30 August 2017 on a proposed approach for the Council to lead and expedite the regeneration planning for earthquake related damage to the area of South New Brighton.

 

On 27 July 2017 the Council agreed that it will lead and expedite the regeneration planning for earthquake-related land damage to the area of South New Brighton.  It will also work with Regenerate Christchurch to review their proposed timeframes for regeneration planning for Southshore, with the view to bringing these forward.

 

Regenerate Christchurch is in the process of initiating a project for development of a regeneration strategy for Southshore and South New Brighton, incorporating the Southshore Residential Red Zone.

 

The area includes all of South New Brighton and Southshore, essentially picking up where the Otakaro Avon River Corridor Regeneration Plan ends (at Withells reserve), including the estuary edge.

 

The Council will also write to the Minister for the Environment requesting that given recent serious flooding events in Christchurch and the South Island that the guidance to local government on sea level rise and the National Policy Statement on Natural Hazards be progressed with urgency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2.3   QEII Recreation & Sports Centre 

With ground remediation work completed in mid-March, using stone columns driven into the ground, contractors are now laying the concrete block walls of the central area of the building.

 

The structural steel frames for the main pool hall have gone up, and the "dry" parts of the facility – the entrance foyer, fitness/weights/cardio studio, group fitness studio, spin room, meeting rooms and staff offices – have had their foundations poured.

 

New entrance roads at Bower Avenue and Travis Road have been excavated and filling is currently underway.  Completion of the 4573 square metre facility is well on track for completion in mid-2018.

 

3.2.4   Removal of South Brighton Estuary Dead Trees

On 3 July the Southshore Residents Association and the South Brighton Residents Association requested the removal of four dead trees located by the Bridge Street bridge.   This request was made because:

·    The two trees identified on Rat Island mar the fact that the area is the visual gateway to South Brighton and Southshore

·    The two trees on the east Estuary side are seen as unsightly and present a danger of falling.

 

The Board requested that the four dead trees be removed.

 

Staff have assessed the possible ornithological and ecological values of the trees and it has been determined that there should be no ill effects of the removal.  As the trees are located in sensitive saltmarsh areas they need to be removed outside of the breeding season (when other birds are nesting in rushes close by). Therefore the removal will take place in mid-August.

 

3.2.5   Knight Drain – proposed wetland and landscape plan

The Knights Drain project is part of the wider Land Drainage Recovery Programme (LDRP) which seeks to restore the flooding risk in Christchurch to 'pre-earthquake' levels. Consultation has now closed and a report was submitted to the Council on 27 July 2017.

 

Approval was given for new storage and treatment ponds to be built next to the new Knights Drain pump station to reduce the risk of flooding problems in the Aranui and Bexley areas and to improve the quality of water discharges to the Avon River. Up to 13 properties may need to be purchased to allow the work to go ahead.

 

Council staff have budgeted up to $3.5 million for the property purchases and $4.5 million for the pond design and construction. The work will be delivered as part of the Land Drainage Recovery Programme.

 

          The proposed location of the Knights Drain ponds

 

The Board has enquired whether there is a possibility of one of the newer houses in the Knights Drain area being relocated onto council owned property next to the pump station in Pages Road.

 

Staff advice on that suggestion is as follows:

 

·   The Council is the owner of the land next to the pump station – however responsibility will rest with a specific unit within Council.

·   It would be likely that if a demolition company was contracted to clear the properties, they may wish to recover this house.

·   The foundation requirements of the site next to the pump station are unknown as this is dependent on the quality of the land. A site specific investigation would be required establish the possible foundation costs.

 

Therefore if the Board wishes to pursue this, they are invited to consider requesting that appropriate investigations be carried out to establish the feasibility or otherwise of this proposal.

  

 

3.2.6   Stopbank extension – south of Bridge Street

The Land Drainage Recovery Programme is extending its stopbank upgrade work in the South Brighton area and building a stopbank south of Bridge Street. This stopbank will reduce the impact of tidal flooding from the estuary, and offer increased flood protection to more than 500 properties in the area, including provision for sea level rise.

 

The stopbank has been designed, and final construction plans are being finalised. Construction will begin later in the year and is expected to take a month. 

 

This is a high-level design of the proposed stopbank noting that this includes two options for re-routing the walkway. It has been established that the stopbank will not interfere with the proposed Godwits Sculptures location.

 

 

3.2.7   QEII Park Fitness Trail

Item 7 on the agenda is the Ministry of Education’s response to the Board’s letter asking for reinstatement of the fitness/walking trail on QEII Park. The Ministry has indicated agreements are in place for this trail to run outside the boundary of the schools to the north and west.

Council's Recreation and Sports Unit confirm they are comfortable with this location and will work with the Ministry to coordinate timing of the construction of the track for both the part that falls on Council land and for the more northern part that falls within Ministry land. Already there is cooperation between the two organisations to ensure path widths and construction are consistent with each other.

 

In addition the Ministry has advised that the parts marked "internal pedestrian routes" shown in the image below will be available for the public to cross over at any time, except in the case of emergency or special school events

 

Map of pedestrian routes and publically accessible pedestrian fitness track in relation to the two Schools (Avonside Girls’ High School and Shirley Bous’ High School) on QEII Park

 

 

3.2.8   On 17 July 2017 the Board made the following requests:

3.2.7.1      It was agreed to visit the Dogwatch Sanctuary Trust in Dyers Road for the purposes of understanding the Trust’s work and that the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board also be invited to attend. Staff have made contact with the Trust who would be very happy to meet on-site to discuss the work they do in the wider community. Staff are determining a date that suits both Boards.

 

3.2.7.2      At the request of the Board staff undertook to research the feasibility of residents being informed in advance of when their street was about to be swept. This would enable cars to be shifted on the day if necessary particularly for non-deep dish gutter streets.

 

   Channel sweeping, rubbish and litter collection to agreed standards is carried out street by street on a six-weekly basis. There are factors that can affect a rigid schedule, such as flooding, roadworks etc.  Council is considering a system similar to the wheelie bin collection data, of having this information available on-line to enable residents to look-up when their street is next due for sweeping. Given resources and funding, the staff view is that advance notice by letter drop is not feasible.

 

3.2.7.4      At the request of the Board staff undertook to establish the status of the New Brighton Police Station in terms of public access. We can advise that the New Brighton Police Station is normally open to the public 9am4pm Monday to Friday (not public holidays). The exception is if all officers are out on duty, in which case the doors are locked and a contact information placard displayed.

 

3.2.7.5      At the request of the Board staff undertook to establish a planned use of the New Brighton fire station in Hawke Street when they relocate to a new station. At this stage there has not been a decision about the future of the existing New Brighton Fire Station but it is likely that in time Fire and Emergency New Zealand will want to dispose of the land and buildings. The new Anzac Fire Station is due for completion late March 2018 and at that stage a clearer picture is expected on the New Brighton site.

 

3.2.7.6      Staff undertook to provide clarity around the geographic area covered by the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016.  The geographical application of the legislation is the greater Christchurch area as shown in the map below.

 

  

Regenerate Christchurch may perform and exercise its functions and powers in relation to the area of Christchurch district that falls within greater Christchurch – this map is from the act and shows the area of greater Christchurch

 

3.2.7.8      Staff undertook to follow up on when an itemised response could be expected to the Boards Annual Plan submission. Responses to each Community Board are being compiled and will be sent to the Community Board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2.9   Outwards Correspondence

·    Team Leader, Road Amenity and Asset Protection – Thank you for New Brighton beautification work (Attachment A).

·    Southshore and South Brighton Residents Associations – Bridge Street Bridge Landscaping and other matters (Attachment B).

 

3.3       The provision of strategic technical and procedural advice to the Community Board

Nil to report.

 

3.5       Board area Consultations/Engagement

Current Consultations in the Coastal-Burwood Board Area:

Nil to report.

 

3.4       Submission Opportunities

Nil to report.

3.5       Annual Plan and Long Term Plan matters

Nil to report.

3.6       Development of Civil Defence Emergency Plans

A workshop will be arranged. 

3.7       Requests for information from Board meeting on Newsline

Members are invited to consider items for inclusion in Newsline.

3.8       Significant Board matters of interest to raise at Council

Board members are requested to highlight significant matters from the meeting to be raised by the Chair at the next Council Meeting (Community Board reports) on Thursday 10 August.

4     Key Local Projects (KLPs) and Strengthening Communities Funded Projects

 

4.2       Strengthening Communities Fund

 

The Strengthening Communities Fund opened on Monday 8 May and closed at midnight Tuesday 6 June.  A Community Board workshop to discuss the funding application is scheduled for the end of July.

 

5     Significant Community Issues

5.1       Coastal Burwood Community Facilities Research

Local Community Governance staff have engaged the services of social researcher Sarah Wylie to undertake a community facility needs snapshot for the Coastal and Burwood ward areas. Sarah will interview key stakeholders including the Community Board, Residents Associations and other organisations to find out what the needs of the communities they are involved in are and across the wards. This will help to inform the development of a plan or identify where support may be needed for facilities from the Community Board and Council staff to enable us to better meet community needs in the area.

 

6     Major Community and/or Infrastructure Projects

6.2          Community Facilities

No updates to report.

6.3          Partnerships with the community and organisations

6.3.1   Aranui Community Trust

A draft memorandum of understanding has been developed between Christchurch City Council and the Aranui Community Trust acknowledging the relationship and history we have with them when it comes to working with and in the Aranui Community. This memorandum will come to the Community Board in the next couple of months for information and we will look to have a signing event to mark the occasion. In keeping with the intention of this partnership Council facilities are currently negotiating an interim document with the Aranui Community Trust to hand some of the management responsibilities over to the organisation for the Aranui Wainoni Community Centre. Once a template has been developed across the city for this type of management agreement it is expected that full management of the facility will go to the community group to increase community participation and use of the facility.

 

6.3.2   Burwood Park Fitness Trail

The Burwood Park Fitness Trail is set to move closer to being a reality when a report for the approval of the concept design comes to the Community Board on August 7th. The project came from an approach by the Dallington Community Cottage Trust to Council staff as an idea that came from two staunch long term Dallington residents Bill Allot and Anton Korunic. With so much loss in the Dallington area after the earthquakes the idea of an outdoor gym and fitness trail as a place for the community to “run into” each other and look to keep body and mind well seemed like a great starting place towards rebuilding community connections. It is a great community partnership project with Council with ideas and funding coming from both and is hoped that the project will be completed around November/December of 2017 ready for community use over the summer months.

 

6.4          Infrastructure projects underway

6.4.3   South Brighton Jetty

The Jetty should be complete in the coming 3 weeks and the car park works will start after that. The car park works will include shore erosion control from the area to the North of the new car park, between the jetty and the new boat ramp and between the new boat ramp and the Yacht Club ramp.   There will be upgrading of the rock protection directly in front of the Boardwalk.

6.5          Events Report Back

6.4.1   Matariki in the Zone

On Sunday the 25th June people gathered in the red zone at Corserland Street for Matariki in the Zone 2017, an event which included the dedication of the ‘Poppies over Gallipoli’ ANZAC Garden.

The ‘Poppies over Gallipoli’ sculpture was unveiled on 11 November 2003 and moved to its present position in 2015, due to land damage from the earthquakes.  As part of this project there was an agreement between Avon-Otakaro Network and the Council to create an ANZAC memorial garden to compliment the sculpture. The garden would include shingle brought to New Zealand by the Turkish Embassy from the Cannukale Gallipoli Peninsula.

The Community Board made a grant of $4,168 towards landscaping materials and equipment for the construction of the garden. It also include money for plants and a celebratory event. Many people turned up despite the bitterly cold weather, enjoying the activities and planting over 200 trees. Coffee, free hot soup and excellent music helped keep everyone warm and entertained, and the hangi was enjoyed by everyone who braved the elements till the end.

      Matariki in the Zone was held on Sunday the 25th June

 

6.4.2   Pukeko Centre – Community Board Site Visit

The Pūkeko Centre is an exciting new community-led development in the heart of Parklands. The multi-use sports and recreation hub on the site of the Parklands Bowling Club will provide indoor and outdoor facilities for a range of local clubs, groups and organisations.  Stage 1 of the development is due to be completed in late 2017.  The Board visited building site on 19 July 2017 to hear about the progress and future plans of the Centre.  

 

7     Parks, Sports and Recreation Update (bi-monthly)

7.1          Local Parks Update

June is one of the quietest months in the Local and Neighbourhood, Sports Parks Maintenance Contract. We decrease the frequency of all mowing activities, increase the sports field inspections, continue the annual parks clean-up, hedge pruning, play surface cleaning, & irrigation checks.

7.1.1         Contract key performance – Completion Rate (of all jobs)

Recreational Services – Parks Eastern        June 2017     90.5%

7.1.2         Mowing and spraying programme – June ‘17

Activity

Frequency per month

Ornamental mowing

1

Amenity Mowing

1

Informal Mowing

0

Sports Field Mowing

2

Weed Spraying

1

 

7.1.3         Field surface activities

The Parks Maintenance contractors (Recreational Services) are monitoring the sports field conditions a weekly.

7.1.4         Sports Parks Update

All winter sports start on the 1 April with sports fields transitioning from summer to winter codes from the 27 March.

Sports Turf Renovation Programme will be undertaken in the spring.

7.1.5         Local & Neighbourhood Parks Update

Response Jobs/Tasks

·    Burwood Park – Old Bowling Clubrooms site will have the slumping areas levelled and seeded in the spring.

·    Richmond Park Playground – new bases being installed, re-opening TBC.

·    Horseshoe Lake – Grey willow saplings removed from garden beds along Lake Terrace Road & stream bank.

·    Avon Riverbank (& other Riverbank Reserves) – Woody/Noxious weed removal & mowing.

·    Porritt Park – New pedestrian bridges installed and repaired carparks (completed just before Christmas – CAPEX Funding).

·    Delamare Park – Self-seeded willows removed.

·    Bexley Park – Mowing of new dog exercise area (PM by Steve Grey), have made contact with SCRIT Supervisor to have gravel and piping removed from the park frontage, new boom gate installed to prevent illegal dumping and vehicles.

·    Bridge Reserve – Woody and Noxious weed control, releasing native plants, repairing post and rail fence, trimming shrubs along park/footpath, mowing.

·    Withells Island Reserve – Trimming of shrubs off the buildings (for repair work), removal of dumped rubbish, pressure cleaned boat ramp/slipway, repaired bollards.

·    New Brighton Mall Playground – Replacing spinner and Roctopus (PM Steve Grey).

·    New Brighton Beach Developed – Painted handrails, retaining walls & parts of the playground. Repaired, sanded & painted decking around Macrocarpa (Next to Salt on the Pier). Painted bollards and replaced chains (between mall & park), mulch and infill planting, shrub trimming, weed removal, road sweeping all hard surfaces (incl. carparks). Repaired and painted picnic tables, replaced burnt seagull proof bin. Irrigation and turf repair.

·    Thompson Park – Repair & clearing the drainage of the skating facilitates.

·    Broad Park – New large slide installed and small slide to be replaced (PM Steve Grey).

·    Brooker Reserve – dangerous footbridge isolated from public use.

·    Wilmington Reserve – Trimming shrubs overhanging neighbouring property boundaries.

·    Queenspark Reserve - Trimming shrubs overhanging neighbouring property boundaries.

·    Titirangi Reserve – Removal of woody and noxious weeds from swales and drains.

·    Putake/Tamara Reserve - Removal of woody and noxious weeds from swales and drains, & releasing natives

·    Bluestone Drainage Reserve - Removal of woody and noxious weeds from swales and drains, & releasing natives, mulching.

·    Alpine View Drainage Reserve - Removal of woody and noxious weeds from swales and drains, & releasing natives, mulching.

·    Snellings Waterway Reserve - Removal of woody and noxious weeds from swales and drains, & releasing natives, mulching.

·    Limes Reserve – Trimming flaxes and shrubs, removing dead plants, replanting garden beds, mulching.

·    Korowai Reserve 1 – Mowing, mulching, weed control, infill planting.

7.1.6         Capital Works Projects

Sports Park Turf Renewal Update – Wainoni Park

·    Work programmed – Remediation work around soil storage area, continue grow-in programme of turf

·    Site fencing will remain in place across both fields until nearer the time of Rugby League World Cup.

 

FY16-17 Parks Furniture Delivery Package (PM Marcy McCullum)

Local & Neighbourhood Parks Furniture Renewal

·    Carisbrook Reserve – Two new park bench seats (replacing existing)

·    Ironwood Reserve - One new park bench seat (replacing existing)

·    Titirangi Reserve - One new park bench seat (replacing existing)

 

          Sports Parks Furniture Renewal

·    Burwood Park – Two new rubbish bins (replacing existing)

·    Parklands Reserve - One new rubbish bin (replacing existing)

·    Thompson Park   -      Install two new park bench seats (replacing existing)

-      Install new park bench

8    Community Board funding budget overview and clarification

8.1  The budget information for the Board’s 2017/18 Discretionary Response and Youth Development fund is not available at this time.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Outwards Correspondence - Road Amenity & Asset Protection ~ thanks for New Brighton Beautification

106

b

Outwards Correspondence - Southshore & South Brighton Residents Association - Bridge Street Bridge landscaping and other matters

107

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Katie MacDonald - Community Support Officer

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Natalie Dally - Community Development Advisor

Heather Davies - Community Development Advisor

Jacqui Miller - Community Recreation Advisor

Peter Croucher - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

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Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

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Coastal-Burwood Community Board

07 August 2017

 

 

13.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.