Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Tuesday 13 June 2017

Time:                                    4.30pm

Venue:                                 Community Room, Upper Riccarton Library,
71 Main South Road, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mike Mora

Helen Broughton

Natalie Bryden

Vicki Buck

Jimmy Chen

Catherine  Chu

Anne Galloway

Ross McFarlane

Debbie  Mora

 

 

7 June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Watson

Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

941 8258

gary.watson@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 4

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 4

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 4

B       4.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 4

B       5.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 4 

B       6.       Correspondence............................................................................................................. 17  

STAFF REPORTS

C       7.       Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - Standing Orders............................ 21

C       8.       Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - Code of Conduct........................... 89

A       9.       Yaldhurst Village Subdivision - Dedication of Road - Sir John McKenzie Avenue 121

C       10.     Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Wards - Proposed Road Names - Quarry View........... 129

C       11.     299 Main South Road - Proposed P10, P30 and P120 Parking Restrictions........... 133

C       12.     Sockburn Recreaton Centre - Proposed Lease and Sub-Lease Agreements........... 139

C       13.     Licence for Gravel Extraction - 35 Miners Road........................................................ 151

C       14.     Picton Reserve - New Swing and Slide...................................................................... 159

C       15.     Halswell Skate and Recreation Parks - Landscape Concept Plans........................... 165

C       16.     Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Youth Development Fund - 2016/17 - Application - Casper Howell....................................................................................... 221

C       17.     Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2016/17 - Applications- Catholic Parish of Hornby and Darfield, University of Canterbury Foundation and Anglican Parish of Upper Riccarton-Yaldhurst............................. 223

B       18.     Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Area Report - June 2017............... 229

B       19.     Elected Members Information Exchange................................................................... 239

B       20.     Questions Under Standing Orders............................................................................. 239

C       21.     Resolution to Exclude the Public............................................................................... 240  

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board meeting held on Tuesday 23 May 2017, be confirmed (refer page 5).

4.   Deputations by Appointment

4.1

BIBIANA STREET AND AIDANFIELD DRIVE

Allan Goulstone, Secretary, Anthony Wilding Retirement Village, has been granted speaking rights to request that the Board consider (a) extending the existing no stopping restriction on the west side of Bibiana Street and, (b) for a bus shelter to be provided on the north side of Aidanfield Drive opposite the complex.

 

4.2

BOAT SAFETY AT NAVAL POINT, LYTTELTON PROJECT

James Ensor has been granted speaking rights to address the Board regarding the Boat Safety at Naval Point, Lyttelton Project

 

4.3

HALSWELL DOMAIN ACTION GROUP

Geoff Feasey and Anya Besley, on behalf of the Halswell Domain Action Group, have been granted speaking rights to address the Board regarding the Halswell Skate and Recreation Parks – Landscape Concept Plans report (Item 15 refers).

 

5.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

 

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                     Tuesday 23 May 2017

Time:                                    4.30pm

Venue:                                 Community Room, Upper Riccarton Library,
71 Main South Road, Christchurch

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Members

Mike Mora

Natalie Bryden

Jimmy Chen

Catherine  Chu

Anne Galloway

Ross McFarlane

 

 

23 May 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Watson

Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

941 8258

gary.watson@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00139

That the apologies from Helen Broughton, Vicki Buck and Debbie Mora for absence, be accepted.

Natalie Bryden/Catherine  Chu                                                                                                                             Carried

 

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00140

That the minutes of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board meeting held on
Tuesday 9 May 2017, be confirmed.

Anne Galloway/Catherine  Chu                                                                                                                             Carried

4.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

4.1       John Yin and Claire Nicholls, staff from Environment Canterbury, addressed the Board  detailing the background and context for the route extension of the Orange Line bus service from Longhurst into the Knights Stream subdivision in 2016. 

             After questions from members, the Chairperson thanked John Yin and Claire Nicholls for their presentation.

             Item 8 of these minutes records decisions made by the Board to approve bus stops to support this part of the service route.

 

4.2       The following local residents addressed the Board regarding the proposed bus stops in the Longhurst/Knights Stream subdivisions:

 

1.   Ben Blower

2.   Brad and Jess Gearry

3.   Alidad (Ali) Shafahi

4.   Bing (Tommy) Bai and Min (Sophia) Su

 

After questions from members, the Chairperson thanked each of the presenters for their deputations.

 

Item 8 of these minutes, records the decisions made by the Board on this matter.

 

 

Catherine Chu left the meeting temporarily at 5.57pm until 6.02pm.

 

The meeting adjourned at 6.44pm until 6.53pm.

8.   Longhurst/Knights Stream - Provision of Bus Stops to Access Public Transport

 

Staff in attendance spoke to the accompanying report.

The Board also took into consideration the deputations made in, Item 4.2 of these minutes.

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolves to:

Murphys Road 1 (adjacent to 18 McDermotts Place, Attachment A)

1.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 45 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

2.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 45 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

3.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 49 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

4.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 63 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of eight metres. 

Murphys Road 2 (opposite 4 Murphys Road, Attachment A)

5.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 75 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

6.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 75 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

7.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 83 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

8.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 97 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Caulfield Avenue 1 (opposite 42 to 46 Caulfield Avenue, Attachment B)

9.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 275 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 27 metres, be revoked.

10.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 275 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

11.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 283 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

12.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 297 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of five metres.

Caulfield Avenue 2 (opposite 53 Caulfield Avenue, Attachment C)

13.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 33 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

14.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 33 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

15.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 37 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

16.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 51 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

Caulfield Avenue 3 (adjacent to 87 Caulfield Avenue, Attachment D)

17.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 28 metres, be revoked.

18.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 10 metres.

19.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 16 metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

20.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 30 metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Caulfield Avenue 4 (opposite 79 to 81 Caulfield Avenue, Attachment E)

21.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 33 metres, be revoked.

22.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

23.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 21 metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

24.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 35 metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Richmond Avenue 1 (adjacent to 19 Richmond Avenue, Attachment F)

25.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 23 metres north west of its intersection with Kruger Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

26.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 23 metres north west of its intersection with Kruger Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

27.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 31 metres north west of its intersection with Kruger Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

28.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 45 metres north west of its intersection with Kruger Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Richmond Avenue 2 (adjacent to 18 Richmond Avenue, Attachment F)

29.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 34 metres south east of its intersection with Monsanto Street and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

30.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north east side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 34 metres south east of its intersection with Monsanto Street and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of eight metres.

31.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the north east side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 42 metres south east of its intersection with Monsanto Street and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

32.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north east side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 56 metres south east of its intersection with Monsanto Street and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of four metres.

Richmond Avenue 3 (adjacent to 1 Killarney Avenue, Attachment G)

33.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 47 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 51 metres, be revoked.

34.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 47 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of four metres.

35.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 51 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 32 metres.

36.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 83 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

Revoke redundant Caulfield Avenue layover bus stop (Attachment H)

37.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions, including the bus stop, on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 166 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 41 metres, be revoked.

Revoke redundant Hamill Road bus stops (Attachment I)

38.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions, including the bus stop, on the north side of Hamill Road commencing at a point 97 metres east of its intersection with John Annan Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 22 metres, be revoked.

39.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions, including the bus stop, on the south side of Hamill Road commencing at a point 57 metres east of its intersection with Graycliffe Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 20 metres, be revoked.

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00141

Part C

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

Murphys Road 1 (adjacent to 18 McDermotts Place)

1.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 41 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

2.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 41 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

3.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 45 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

4.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north west side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 59 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of eight metres. 

Mike Mora/Anne Galloway                                                                                                                                    Carried

Note:         The figures shown in bold above, are the measurement changes adopted by the Board.    

Natalie Bryden requested that her vote be recorded against the above decisions.

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00142

Murphys Road 2 (opposite 4 Murphys Road)

5.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 75 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

6.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 75 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

7.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 83 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

8.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south east side of Murphys Road commencing at a point 97 metres southwest of its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and extending in an south westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Mike Mora/Anne Galloway                                                                                                                                    Carried

Ross McFarlane and Natalie Bryden requested that their votes be recorded against the above decisions.

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00143

Caulfield Avenue 1 (opposite 42 to 46 Caulfield Avenue)

9.         Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 275 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 27 metres, be revoked.

10.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 275 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

11.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 283 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

12.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 297 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of five metres.

Anne Galloway/Jimmy Chen                                                                                                                                  Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00144

Caulfield Avenue 2 (opposite 53 Caulfield Avenue)

13.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 33 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 26 metres, be revoked.

14.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 33 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of four metres.

15.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 37 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

16.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the north east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 51 metres north west of its intersection with Hamill Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of eight metres.

Anne Galloway/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                           Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00145

Caulfield Avenue 3 (adjacent to 87 Caulfield Avenue)

17.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 28 metres, be revoked.

18.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 10 metres.

19.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 16 metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

20.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 30 metres north of its intersection with Piper Street and extending in a northerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Anne Galloway/Jimmy Chen                                                                                                                                  Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00146

Caulfield Avenue 4 (opposite 79 to 81 Caulfield Avenue)

21.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 33 metres, be revoked.

22.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point six metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

23.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 21 metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of 14 metres.

24.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the east side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 35 metres south of the prolongation of the southern kerb line of Piper Street and extending in a southerly direction for a distance of four metres.

Anne Galloway/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                           Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00147

Richmond Avenue 1 (adjacent to 19 Richmond Avenue) and Richmond Avenue 2 (adjacent to 18 Richmond Avenue)

25.       That decisions on clauses 25 to 32 of the staff recommendation (Richmond Avenue 1 and 2) lie on the table pending further advice from staff on alternative locations closer to Knights Stream Park. 

Ross McFarlane/Mike Mora                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00148

Richmond Avenue 3 (adjacent to 1 Killarney Avenue)

26.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 47 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 51 metres, be revoked.

27.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 47 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of four metres.

28.       Approve that a marked bus stop be installed on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 51 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 32 metres.

29.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at all times on the south west side of Richmond Avenue commencing at a point 83 metres south east of its intersection with Killarney Avenue and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 15 metres.

Ross McFarlane/Catherine  Chu                                                                                                                            Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00149

Revoke redundant Caulfield Avenue layover bus stop

30.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions, including the bus stop, on the south west side of Caulfield Avenue commencing at a point 166 metres north west of its intersection with Murphys Road and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 41 metres, be revoked.

Revoke redundant Hamill Road bus stops

31.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions, including the bus stop, on the north side of Hamill Road commencing at a point 97 metres east of its intersection with John Annan Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 22 metres, be revoked.

32.       Approve that all parking and stopping restrictions, including the bus stop, on the south side of Hamill Road commencing at a point 57 metres east of its intersection with Graycliffe Street and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 20 metres, be revoked.

Jimmy Chen/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

5.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.    

6.   Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Submissions Committee Minutes - 31 March 2017

 

Community Board Decided HHRB/2017/00150

Part B

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decided to receive the Minutes of its Submissions Committee meeting of 31 March 2017.

Ross McFarlane/Mike Mora                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

7.   Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Submissions Committee Minutes - 12 April 2017

 

Community Board Decided HHRB/2017/00151

Part B

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decided to receive the Minutes of its Submissions Committee meeting of 12 April 2017.

Mike Mora/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

9.   Yaldhurst Memorial Hall

 

Staff Recommendations 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend to the Council:

1.         That the Yaldhurst Memorial Hall be demolished as the building is damaged, earthquake prone, the community interest in the building is low, and it is not economically feasible to repair and strengthen the facility.

2.         That the memorial plaques be removed from the building and taken to secure storage until the community and the Council deliver a future plan for their preservation and display, as the community is committed to devising a plan to preserve the memorial plaques.

 

Community Board Decided HHRB/2017/00152

Part A

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend to the Council:

1.         That the Yaldhurst Memorial Hall be demolished as the building is damaged, earthquake prone, the community interest in the building is low, and it is not economically feasible to repair and strengthen the facility.

2.         That the memorial plaques be removed from the building and taken to secure storage until the community and the Council deliver a future plan for their preservation and display, as the community is committed to devising a plan to preserve the memorial plaques.

3.         That following demolition of the building, and any subsequent decision made by the Council regarding the land, including disposal, the Board requests that the proceeds from any land sale, be retained for use in the Yaldhurst rural community as the Council’s contribution towards a local facility, including reinstatement of the memorial features.

Mike Mora/Ross McFarlane                                                                                                                                   Carried

 

10. Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2016-17 - Applications - Gilberthorpe School, Hornby Croquet Club

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolves to:

1.         Approve the making of a grant of $2,000 to the Gilberthorpe School towards the purchase and installation of a basketball hoop.

2.         Approve the making of a grant of $3,500 to the Hornby Croquet Club towards establishing an annual maintenance programme to upgrade its lawn at Hornby Domain.

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00153

Part C

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

1.         Approve the making of a grant of $2,700 to the Gilberthorpe School towards the purchase and installation of a basketball hoop.

Natalie Bryden/Mike Mora                                                                                                                                     Carried

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00154

2.         Approve the making of a grant of $3,500 to the Hornby Croquet Club towards establishing an annual maintenance programme to upgrade its lawn at Hornby Domain.

Mike Mora/Jimmy Chen                                                                                                                                          Carried

 

11. Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Youth Development Fund 2016/17 - Applications - Anahera Nikora-Chalmers, Amelia Morgan, Hamilton Martin and Matthew Mesman

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00155 (Original Staff Recommendation Accepted without Change)

Part C

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

1.         Transfer $3,000 from the 2016/17 Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund to the 2016/17 Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Youth Development Fund.

2.         Approve the making of a grant of $500 from its 2016/17 Youth Development Fund to Anahera Nikora-Chalmers towards an educational trip to Europe in September 2017.

3.         Approve the making of a grant of $500 from its 2016/17 Youth Development Fund to Amelia Morgan towards attending the Volunteers Leaders Academy in Kazan, Russia, from 2 to 8 July 2017.

4.         Approve the making of a grant of $500 from its 2016/17 Youth Development Fund to Hamilton Martin towards attendance at the International Future Problem Solving Competition in Wisconsin, USA, in June 2017.

5.         Approve the making of a grant of $500 from its 2016/17 Youth Development Fund to Matthew Mesman towards competing in the Men's Double Scull at the World Under 23 Rowing Championships in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, from 19 to 23 July 2017.

Mike Mora/Natalie Bryden                                                                                                                                     Carried

 

12. Elected Members Information Exchange

Part B

Board members exchanged information on matters of current interest.

13. Questions Under Standing Orders

Part B

There were no questions under Standing Orders at this meeting.

 


 

 

14  Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

Community Board Resolved HHRB/2017/00156

Part C

That at 7.19pm the resolution to exclude the public as set out on pages 89 to 90 of the agenda, be adopted.

Mike Mora/Anne Galloway                                                                                                                                       Carried

 

The public were re-admitted to the meeting at 7.29pm

   

Meeting concluded at 7.30pm

 

CONFIRMED THIS 13TH DAY OF JUNE 2017

 

Mike Mora

Chairperson

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

6.        Correspondence

Reference:

17/576225

Contact:

Peter Dow

peter.dow@ccc.govt.nz

941 6501

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

Correspondence has been received from:

Name

Subject

Halswell Residents’ Association

Local Planning Matters

 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decide to:

1.         Receive the correspondence from the Halswell Residents’ Association regarding local planning matters.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Halswell Residents' Association - Local Planning Matters

18

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

7.        Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - Standing Orders

Reference:

17/521310

Contact:

Ian Thomson

ian.thomson@ccc.govt.nz

941 6469

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       To recommend to the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board that it replaces its current set of Standing Orders with the new set accompanying this report.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Receive the information in the report.

2.         Adopt the set of Standing Orders attached to the report, replacing the Board’s current Standing Orders.

3.         Resolve whether or not the Chairperson of the Board is to have a casting vote.

4.         Authorise the Chief Executive to approve any non-material changes that may be required before the new Standing Orders are published.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       All local authorities must adopt a set of Standing Orders for the conduct of its meetings and those of its committees (clause 27(1), Schedule 7 Local Government Act 2002).

3.2       This requirement also applies to Community Boards (section 54(2).

3.3       The Council’s current Standing Orders are based on a New Zealand Standards model, last revised in 2003.

3.4       In 2015, Local Government New Zealand set up a working party to review the model and to develop its own template.  This was made available to local authorities in September 2016.

3.5       Council staff reviewed the template and made a number of changes they believed would best suit the Council’s needs.  Their draft, and an explanatory note, were distributed to all elected members (the governing body and Community Boards) in November 2016.

3.6       Since then a number of comments have been received and, where appropriate, reflected in the draft.  The Council adopted its new Standing Orders on 6 April 2017.

3.7       The Council also requested that each Community Board replace its current set of Standing Orders with the Standing Orders adopted by the Council.  These are attached to this report.

3.8       Each Community Board has the opportunity to decide whether or not a Chairperson is to have a casting vote (cl. 24, schedule 7 LGA 2002).  Unless Standing Orders provide otherwise, matters are decided by majority vote and, in the case of a tie, there is no casting vote for the Chairperson.

3.9       The Standing Orders adopted by the Council on 6 April 2017 provide that a Council and Committee Chairperson does not have a casting vote but that this is a matter for each Community Board to decide on.

3.10    It is recommended that the Board adopts the Standing Orders attached to this report, and resolves whether or not, the Chairperson is to have a casting vote.

3.11    The adoption of a new set of Standing Orders requires a vote of not less than 75 per cent of members present.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Christchurch City Council Standing Orders 6 April 2017

23

 

 

Signatories

Author

Ian  Thomson - Senior Legal Advisor, Governance

Approved By

Rob Goldsbury - Head of Legal Services

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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13 June 2017

 

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13 June 2017

 

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13 June 2017

 

 

8.        Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board - Code of Conduct

Reference:

17/520916

Contact:

Ian Thomson

ian.thomson@ccc.govt.nz

941 6469

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       To recommend to the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board that it adopts the Code of Conduct accompanying this report, replacing its current Code of Conduct.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Receive the information in the report.

2.         Adopt the Code of Conduct attached to the staff report, replacing the Board’s current Code of Conduct.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       Clause 15, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act (LGA) 2002 requires the Council to adopt a Code of Conduct.

3.2       This must set out:

3.2.1   understandings and expectations about the manner in which members may conduct themselves while acting in their capacity as members, including:

·     their behaviour towards one another, staff, and the public; and

·     the disclosure of information, including documents provided to elected members in their capacity as elected members, and which relate to how the Council gives effect to any provision of the LGA 2002.

3.3       The Code must also contain a general explanation of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and any other enactment or rule of law applicable to members.

3.4       The Mayor and Councillors must comply with the Council’s Code of Conduct, although a breach of the Code does not constitute an offence under the Act (cl. 15, schedule 7 LGA 2002).

3.5       The Council adopted a new Code of Conduct on 4 May 2017.

3.6       At the same time, the Council requested that each Community Board replace its current Code of Conduct with the Code of Conduct adopted by the Council.

3.7       The previous Code had been due for an overhaul, particularly with regard to the process for dealing with an alleged breach. In October 2016, Local Government New Zealand distributed to all local authorities a template for a new Code.  Staff reviewed the template and made a number of changes they believed best suited the Council’s needs.  Their draft, and an explanatory note, were provided to all elected members (the governing body and Community Boards) in November 2016.

3.8       As a result of that, a number of comments were received (including from Community Boards) and, where appropriate, reflected in the document adopted by the Council.

3.9       The LGA requirement to adopt a Code of Conduct does not apply to Community Boards (s. 54(2).  However, the Community Boards in the Christchurch City Council district all adopted the Council’s previous Code of Conduct.

3.10    This is important for consistency across the organisation.  For example, some Council staff, as part of their employment by the Council, have regular contact with Community Board members.  Comments made about staff by those members may create the same issues as comments made by Council members, and should be treated the same.

3.11    Also, the positive aspects of having a Code of Conduct apply as much to a Community Board as they do to the Council, particularly with regard to the community’s interest in the Boards’ governance practices.

3.12    It is recommended therefore that the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board adopts the Code of Conduct attached to this report, replacing the Board’s current Code of Conduct.

3.13    Adopting a new Code of Conduct for the Council requires a vote of at least 75 per cent of members present (cl. 15(7), schedule 7 LGA 2002).  It is recommended this should apply to the Board’s vote as well.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Code of Conduct - Community Board Draft - May 2017

91

 

 

Signatories

Author

Ian  Thomson - Senior Legal Advisor, Governance

Approved By

Rob Goldsbury - Head of Legal Services

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

9.        Yaldhurst Village Subdivision - Dedication of Road - Sir John McKenzie Avenue

Reference:

17/34580

Contact:

Richard Holland

richard.holland@ccc.govt.nz

941 8690

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider and recommend to the Council, the dedication of the collector road Sir John McKenzie Drive and other side roads in the Yaldhurst Village subdivision, shown as Lot 601 (serving the residential area) and Lot 613 ( servicing the commercial area) on LT 448725 (lots 601 and 613) under Section 349 of the Local Government Act 1974, rather than the normal vesting following acceptance of the infrastructure, and the issue of a Section 224 Certificate under the Resource Management Act 1991 (“RMA”).

1.2       Lots 601 and 613 cannot vest as a road due to a covenant registered on the land. This is stopping the subdivision from proceeding. Dedication of Lots 601(residential) and 613 (commercial) as road can occur with the covenant in place and will allow the plan to deposit. Although Lots 601 and 613 will remain subject to the covenant after dedication, the covenant themselves will be of no effect as the covenant provisions provide that the covenant lapse on subdivision. Dedication will allow the subdivision to proceed subject to the safety measures being built and approved before a Section 224(c) approval is issued.

1.3       At the Council Meeting of 10 April 2014, the Council resolved that all safety issues will need to be addressed through Variations to the existing RMA consent and all plans altered and approved. No acceptance of the Lots 601 and 613 can occur until the physical safety works on Lots 601 and 613 have been built and comply with all the safety audit requirements.

Origin of Report

1.4       This report is being provided following a request from the new developer of Yaldhurst Village, Infinity Yaldhurst Limited, (the “Developer”) for the Council to dedicate Lots 601 and 613 as road so that the subdivision can proceed. The covenant does not restrict the use of Lots 601 and 613 as road, and is a normal standard covenant relating to controls on vertical building standards quality, maintaining trees and hedges, and not running certain farming activities. However, a road cannot vest under the RMA if there are registered interests such as the covenant on the title even where, as here, those covenant do not restrict the use of the land as road. The developer has not been able to obtain the co-operation of some of the landowners required to surrender the covenant. As a consequence, the developer has made the dedication request.

1.5       The dedication of Lots 601 and 613 will allow Stage 1 (residential) of the Yaldhurst Village development to proceed. The dedication of Lots 601 and 613 as road, does not remove the covenant in itself but the covenant will become redundant on the subdivision plan depositing as the covenant provides that it lapses and is of no further effect on the subdivision of the land.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of a low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by considering that the subdivision and safety requirements and the standards which still apply.

2.1.2   This is about process to allow the vesting of the subdivision and affected land owners adjoined to the subdivision are few.

3.   Staff Recommendations: 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend to the Council:

1.         That Lots 601 (residential) and 613 (commercial) on LT 448725 will be dedicated under Section 349 of the Local Government Act 1974 as a road, in order for the road to vest.

2.         Note that a Deed of Indemnity will be executed by Infinity Yaldhurst Limited which will indemnify and keep indemnified the Council from all actions, proceedings and claims made by any land owner in relation to the Council accepting the dedication of Lots 601 and 613 on LT 448725, as road.

3.         Also note that the Council shall not be required to issue a Section 224(c) Certificate under the Resource Management Act 1991 in respect to Lots 601 and 613 on LT 448725 until all the safety audit requirements as specified by the Council, and included in the Variations of the subdivision consent, have been physically built to the Council’s satisfaction.

4.         That the General Manager City Services be delegated authority to negotiate and enter into on behalf of the Council, such documentation required to implement the dedication.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Resource Consenting

·     Level of Service: 9.2.6 Ensure resource consent decision-making is robust and legally defendable

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – For the Council to approve the dedication of the road in conjunction with the Developer continuing the process to remove the covenant from the Developer’s land,   (including Lots 601 and 613) pursuant to an application to the Court under the Property Law Act.

·     Option 2 – For the Council to take no action and allow the Developer to continue with its application to the Court pursuant to the Property Law Act for the removal of the covenant instrument from Lots 601 and 613 through the Court.

 

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option- Option 1)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     A faster process than through the Court.

·     As part of the Variations, the Developer would agree to the commercial and residential safety audit works being designed and approved.

·     The Council would not dedicate the road until all the safety works are carried out to comply fully prior to a Section 224 (c) Certificate being issued for that stage of the subdivision.

·     A  Deed of Indemnity will protect the Council from all actions proceedings and claims in relation to the Council accepting the dedication of Lots 601 and 613 as road.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The Council would be required to rely on the indemnity from the Developer in respect of any consequences of the redundant land covenant remaining or any other legal challenges.

·     The Council takes the initiative rather than the Developer through the Court to remove the covenant from the underlying land through the Property Law Act.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Existing Council safety audit requirements

5.1       Following the challenge from a land owner over the safety of the collector road Sir John McKenzie Avenue, the Council passed a resolution on 10 April 2014, and confirmed in the Council Minutes of 24 April 2014, that officers will not accept roads for vesting in the Council until:

·   The applicant has been granted a Variation of the existing resource consent.

·   Has changed the engineering plans for the residential area and the scheme plans for the commercial area in the manner agreed by the three traffic experts to ensure that the issues in the road safety audit are addressed and rectified.

·   The applicant has completed the physical works for the residential area.

·   Directs that before the roads in the commercial area vest in the Council, there must be a variation of the commercial area consent that provides that there can be no commercial development until the agreed road design changes are built.

·   A Variation has been received by the Council and the road plans are being altered to comply with all the safety audit requirements.

5.2       Variation applications have been received and the road design scheme plans for the commercial area have been amended to meet the safety audit requirements. The residential section engineering plans have also been amended to meet the safety audit requirements. These plans have been approved by Council officers as part of the Variations.

5.3       The Variations to the subdivision itself, will be approved at the time of reporting.

Application for dedication

5.4       The request from the Developer would allow Stage 1 of the development to proceed, while still fulfilling the obligations under the development consents and Council resolutions.

·   Dedication of Lots 601 and 613 is proposed for the Council’s consideration as the underlying land covenant instrument registered against Lots 601 and 613 means that the road cannot vest under the RMA, and the Developer has not been able to obtain the required surrender from some of the landowners, which would allow the vesting.

·   The covenant on Lots 601 and Lot 613 on LT 448725 is also on the balance of the Developer’s land and precludes dwellings that are not private residential, temporary dwellings and caravans, and building materials such as polite and fibrolite. There are also building design controls and any building work to be completed in twelve months. Also, the Covenantor must keep all trees trimmed and must not use their land for certain farming activities such as pig farming. The covenant does not restrict the use of the land as road.

·   Under Section 349 of the Local Government Act 1974, the Council may declare by way of dedication, a private road (intended for use by the public) or right-of-way to be a public road. Although Lots 601 and 613 are not currently open for public use, the view of our legal advisor is that the roadway fits squarely within the definition of private road in that it is intended by the Developer that Lots 601 and 613 be utilised by the public.

·   If the Council accepts the dedication process, the dedication would be approved but not enacted until all the road safety features had been physically built and approved.

·   The Developer and a suitable guarantor, will enter into a Deed of Indemnity with the Council and in a form provided by the Council’s solicitors, indemnifying the Council in respect of any consequences of the redundant land covenant remaining on Lots 601 and 613, and protecting the Council from all actions, proceedings and claims.

·   The Developer would still proceed under the Property Law Act and through the Court to remove the redundant covenants from the underlying land (including Lots 601 and 613). This could take some time.


 

6.   Option 1 – Dedication of Road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       That the Council agree to allow the dedication of Lots 601 and 613 under Section 349 of the Local Government Act 1974 in conjunction with the developer proceeding with an application to the Court under the Property Law Act to remove the redundant covenant.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not required apart from the Developer notifying the other landowners with an interest of the process to remove the covenant from the road and the Developer’s adjoining land by an application under the Property Law Act. The other landowners also have the covenant on their lots but not all have agreed to remove the covenant from Lots 601 and 613.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Mainly the landowners who have an interest are specifically affected by this option due to similar covenant.  Their views have been canvased by the Developer.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

6.6.1   Urban Development Strategy

6.6.2   Resource Management Act 1991

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – internal staff time and external lawyer time

6.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Not applicable

6.9       Funding source – internal operations

Legal Implications

6.10    As described under the Local Government Act 1974 and Land Transfer Act 1952.

Risks and Mitigations   

A Deed of Indemnity will be put in place to protect the Council in a form provided by Council’s solicitors, indemnifying the Council in respect of any consequences of the redundant land covenant remaining on the title and protecting the Council from all actions, proceedings and claims.

6.11    The risk to the Council is from opposition of the other lot owners with an interest in the land.  This may result in complaints as to the process chosen.

6.11.1 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low

Implementation

6.12    Implementation dependencies are related to the legal process.

6.13    Implementation timeframe is based on this Council approval or the matter being resolved before the Court.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   Delivering a result for the Developer faster than the Court process to allow the subdivision to proceed.

6.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The perception by the other landowners who have an interest in the land that the Council is using an unusual step to dedicate the road.

7.   Option 2 – Removal of Covenant by the Developer through the Court

Option Description

7.1       That the Council not agree to a dedication process and inform the Developer to pursue the matter through the Courts under the Property Law Act to remove the covenant from the land.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements would be nil.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Only the views of the other landowners is applicable.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – no cost to the Council.

7.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – normal for any new subdivision.

7.9       Funding source – no cost to the Council.

Legal Implications

7.10    The Developer accepts all the legal responsibility for the removal of the covenant.

Risks and Mitigations  

7.11    The full risk is borne by the Developer to place the matter before the Court.

7.12    Risks to the Developer are that the Court does not remove the covenant from Lots 601 and 613.

7.12.1 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies, once the Court approved the removal of the covenant then the process would be the same as option 1 or the standard RMA vesting process would be followed.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – dependent on the Court.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   The Council not being involved in removing the covenant under the Property Law Act.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   There are no other disadvantages provided the Developer still proceeds with the Variation and relating safety improvements.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Yaldhurst Village Lots 601,613 Plan

128

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Richard Holland - Team Leader Asset Planning

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

10.    Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Wards - Proposed Road Names - Quarry View

Reference:

17/529064

Contact:

Paul Lowe

paul.lowe@ccc.govt.nz

941 6481

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to approve the proposed road names for the Quarry View subdivision in Halswell.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated resulting from naming requests from the subdivision developer.

1.3       This report relates to the following subdivision: Quarry View, 25 Provincial Road.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to approve the following road and right-of-way names:

1.         Quarry View, 25 Provincial Road, Halswell (RMA/2016/3488)

·    Prospect Place

·    Foden Lane

·    Dennis Lane

 

 

4.   Background

4.1       Introduction

4.1.1   Road naming requests have been submitted by the developer of the following subdivision: Quarry View (RMA/2016/3488).

4.1.2   The recommended road and right-of-way names have been checked against existing road  names in Christchurch and bordering districts, for duplication, alternative spellings, or other similarities in spelling or pronunciation to avoid the potential for confusion. The recommended names are considered sufficiently different to existing road names.

4.1.3   The recommended road and/or right-of-way names have been checked against the Roads and Right-of-Way Naming Policy dated 2 November 1993. The recommended names are considered to be consistent with this Policy.

4.1.4   The recommended road and right-of-way names and types have been checked against Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4819:2011 Rural and urban addressing. The recommended names are considered to be consistent with this Standard.

4.1.5   Under the Roads and Right-of-Way Naming Policy the names considered must be requested by the developer. There is not an ability to consider alternative names without first checking whether there are any duplications or similarities with other road and right-of-way names.

4.1.6   Consultation has been undertaken with Land Information New Zealand who have raised no concerns with the proposed road names.

4.1.7   The request has been accompanied by an explanation of the background to the names which are summarised below.

4.2       Quarry View (RMA/2016/3488)

4.2.1   An application for road and right-of-way names have been requested by GW West Melton for road(s) at Quarry View in Halswell which is within a greenfield area bounded by Provincial Road, Kennedys Bush Road, Sparks Road and Sutherlands Road.

4.2.2   This is the second application put forward by the applicant after the first application was declined at the Community Board meeting on 9 May 2017. It is understood that the applicant has since consulted with Mr Ross McFarlane, Community Board member, on the background to the proposed names.

4.2.3   The original street names were taken from the area and the theme is to continue through the balance of the subdivision.

4.2.4   The names in order of preference for each road, are:

Road Names for Lot 30

·        Prospect Place – reference to the mining/quarrying industry

·        Leyland Place – model of truck used in the Quarry

Right-of-Way Names for Access Lot 28

·        Foden Lane – Steam truck used at the Quarry

·        Crusher Lane – First line of processing

Right-of-Way Names for Access Lot 29

·        Dennis Lane – model of truck used in the Quarry

4.2.5   It is noted that an alternative name for Dennis Lane has not been included because of a conflict. The applicant has confirmed that any of the other alternatives for the other road and rights-of-ways could be utilised if Dennis Lane was not approved.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RMA/2016/3488 - Quarry View - Plan

132

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Laura Braddick - Planning Technician

Paul Lowe - Principal Advisor Resource Consents

Approved By

John Higgins - Head of Resource Consents

Leonie Rae - General Manager Consenting and Compliance

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

11.    299 Main South Road - Proposed P10, P30 and P120 Parking Restrictions

Reference:

17/102370

Contact:

Edwin Tiong

edwin.tiong@ccc.govt.nz

941 8188

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to approve the installation of P10, P30 and P120 parking restrictions at 299 Main South Road, in accordance with Attachment A.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to a request from the owner of 299 Main South Road to have improved access to short term parking for customers and deliveries.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the issue and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the southern side of the Main South Road commencing at a point 11 metres east of its intersection with Garvins Road and extending in an easterly direction for a distance of 29 metres.

2.         Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 10 minutes on the southern side of the Main South Road commencing at a point 11 metres east of its intersection with Garvins Road and extending in a easterly direction for a distance of 17 metres.

3.         Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes on the southern side of the Main South Road commencing at a point 28 metres east of its intersection with Garvins Road and extending in a easterly direction for a distance of 12 metres.

4.         Revoke all existing parking restrictions on the north eastern side of Garvins Road commencing at a point 14 metres southeast of its intersection with the Main South Road and extending in an south easterly direction for a distance of 11 metres.

5.         Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes on the north eastern side of Garvins Road commencing at a point 14 metres southeast of its intersection with the Main South Road and extending in a south easterly direction for a distance of 11 metres.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Parking

·     Level of Service: 10.3.8 Optimise operational performance  

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       The Council has been contacted by the owner of 299 Main South Road seeking short term on street parking to service this business property.

5.2       It is sought that three unrestricted parking spaces fronting the property on Main South Road be amended to P10 spaces, two unrestricted parking spaces be amended to P30 spaces, and two unrestricted parking spaces fronting the property on Garvins Road be amended to P120 spaces to support customers and to support deliveries to the property.

5.3       There is a medium to high demand for commuter parking in the area on weekdays.


 

6.   Option 1 – Install P10, P30 and P120 Parking Spaces at 299 Main South Road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Replace three unrestricted parking spaces with three P10 parking spaces on the frontage of 299 Main South Road.

6.2       Replace two unrestricted parking spaces with two P30 parking spaces on the frontage of 299 Main South Road.

6.3       Replace two unrestricted parking spaces with two P120 parking spaces on the frontage of Garvins Road.

Significance

6.4       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       The proposed changes are limited to the frontage of 299 Main South Road and Garvins Road.

6.7       Affected business owners were advised of the proposal. They have requested the installation of the P10, P30 and P120 parking restrictions.

6.8       There has been no opposition received.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.9       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.10    Cost of Implementation - $1000 for the installation of marking, signage and poles.

6.11    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Covered under the area maintenance contract and the effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.12    Funding source – Traffic Operations budget

Legal Implications

6.13    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides the Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

6.14    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations. The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

6.15    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.16    Not applicable

Implementation

6.17    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval

6.18    Implementation timeframe – Approximately four weeks once the area contractor receives the request.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.19    The advantages of this option include:

·   Supports the adjacent business

6.20    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   None identified

7.   Option 2 – Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing unrestricted parking spaces at 299 Main South Road.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with the community request for short stay parking to support business activity.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - $0

7.8       Funding source – Not applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Not applicable

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe – Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   None identified

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not support the adjacent businesses.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

299 Main South Road Proposed P10 P30 P120 Parking Restrictions Layout Plan TG130396

138

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Edwin Tiong - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

12.    Sockburn Recreaton Centre - Proposed Lease and Sub-Lease Agreements

Reference:

17/493578

Contact:

Nick Jenkins

nick.jenkins@ccc.govt.nz

941 5060

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to:

1.1.1   Approve the granting of a lease agreement to Squash Canterbury Incorporated over the Sockburn Recreation Centre, being part of 134 Main South Road, Sockburn Park.

1.1.2   Approve the granting of sub-lease agreements to Christchurch City Weightlifting Incorporated, and to Zone Fitness, over part of the Sockburn Recreation Centre, being part of 134 Main South Road, Sockburn Park.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated at the request of the existing lessee, Squash Canterbury Incorporated.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by applying the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, taking into consideration (amongst other things) the number of people affected and/or with an interest, the level of community interest already apparent for the issue, possible environmental, social and cultural impacts, possible costs or risks to the Council, ratepayers and wider community of carrying out the decision, and whether the impact of the decision can be reversed. 

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board, acting in the capacity of the administering body resolve to:

1.         Enter into a lease agreement with Squash Canterbury Incorporated pursuant to section 54 of The Reserves Act 1977, for a period of up to nine years, over that part of 134 Main South Road, Sockburn, described as being Sockburn Recreation Centre, having a footprint of approximately 900 square metres of land as depicted in Attachment A, subject to:

a.         Public notification under the Reserves Act 1977 being completed and no sustainable objections being received.

2.         Approve an application from Squash Canterbury Incorporated to sub-lease approximately 49 square metres of the Sockburn Recreation Centre, to Christchurch City Weightlifting Incorporated, having a footprint of approximately 49 square metres for a period of up to nine years less one day, as depicted more or less in Attachment B.

3.         Approve an application from Squash Canterbury Incorporated to sub-lease approximately 14 square metres of the Sockburn Recreation Centre, to Zone Fitness, having a footprint of approximately 14 square metres for a period of up to nine  years less one day, as depicted more or less in Attachment B.

4.         Recommends that the Chief Executive acting as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate, consent to the granting of the lease and sub-leases, as outlined in this report.

5.         In the event that there are objections through the notification process under section 119 of the Reserves Act 1977 that cannot be resolved and need to be determined through a hearing, then staff are delegated the authority to appoint a Hearings Panel that has the power to receive, consider, and determine any objections by rejecting or upholding them.

6.         Authorise the Property Consultancy Manager, should the lease and sub-leases be granted with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, to manage and conclude all issues and processes associated with the above resolutions, including any determinations from a Hearings Panel.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Recreation and Sports Facilities

·     Level of Service: 7.0.3 Support community based organisations and networks to develop, promote and deliver recreation and sport in Christchurch

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Approve the lessee’s application for a new lease agreement and sub-lease agreements (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Decline the lessee’s application for a new lease agreement and sub-lease agreements

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Helps to support the provision of squash in the Canterbury region.

·     Enhances the use of Sockburn Recreation Reserve for recreation purposes.

·     Encourages community networks to develop, promote and deliver recreation in Christchurch.

·     The proposed lease and sub-lease agreements closely aligns with objective (i) of the Sockburn Park Management Plan dated 6 August 1985, namely, “To manage Sockburn Park as a recreational area for the benefit, use and enjoyment of the community.”

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Restricts the Council’s ability to use the Sockburn Recreation Centre for an alternative purpose for the duration of the lease (albeit for a positive purpose).

·     The decision is difficult to reverse.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The Council is the administering body of a parcel of land at 134 Main South Road, Sockburn which is commonly referred to as Sockburn Park. The parcel of land comprises of approximately 17.9 hectares more or less and is legally described as being Lot 8 DP 39452 and Lot 1 DP 39808 held within Certificates of Title CB18F/231 and C18A/1035.  It is classified as a Recreation Reserve and is administered by the Council under the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.2       The site is treated as a sports park, and is predominately held for the purposes of open space outdoor recreation.

5.3       In 2008, the Council granted Squash Canterbury Incorporated a lease agreement over part of Sockburn Park. The lease comprised the footprint of the Sockburn Recreation Centre. The lease agreement recently expired on 31 March 2017 and has since been rolling over on a month to month basis.

5.4       Post-earthquakes, Squash Canterbury have faced a number of challenges. In particular, its ability to retain existing membership numbers with the closure of two (2) earthquake damaged squash facilities in Canterbury, and a number of other Canterbury facilities sustaining significant damage.

5.5       The table below illustrates Squash Canterbury’s affiliate membership numbers over the past 5 years.

Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Membership  base

1643

1464

1378

1388

1412

 

5.6       Membership numbers are notably down on pre-earthquake levels, but are beginning to show signs of a resurgence with affiliated membership numbers expected to exceed 2000 by the end of 2017.

5.7       Squash Canterbury have made a formal application to the Council requesting a new lease term of nine (9) years over the Sockburn Recreation Centre, and landlords consent to formalise two (2) existing sub-lease arrangements.

5.8       Details of the proposed lease and sub-lease agreements are outlined below.

Community Board Considerations – Approval of Lease

5.9       The Community Board has the delegated authority, on behalf of the Council, to approve the granting of leases and licences over land administered by the Council as recreation reserve pursuant to section 54 of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.10    The proposed lease agreement is intended for the purpose of permitting Squash Canterbury Incorporated to continue providing opportunities for the community to participate in the playing of squash in the Canterbury region. The premises also doubles as Squash Canterbury’s headquarters.

5.11    The lease area will comprise approximately 900 square metres of land, being the footprint of the Sockburn Recreation Centre, as depicted more or less in Attachment A.

5.12    The lease agreement will be granted for a maximum period of nine (9) years. The agreement will comprise an initial term of three (3) years, with two (2) rights of renewal, each for three (3) years.

5.13    A commercial market rental assessment was undertaken for this building and indicated an annual rental of $65,000 plus GST per annum.  Officers propose that the annual rental remain at the current level of $7,500 plus GST to assist Squash Canterbury in rebuilding their sport.

5.14    The rights of renewal will be subject to Squash Canterbury demonstrating that there is a sufficient need for the recreational activity specified in their lease, and the Council’s satisfaction that the public interest in some other sport, game or recreational activity should not take priority.

5.15    Whilst dealing unilaterally with the club departs from the Council’s normal practice of publically advertising land and buildings available for lease, in this instance it is deemed to be the best use of the Sockburn Recreation Centre given that the facility has a purposed fit-out for playing squash and has a limited potential for alternative recreational uses.

5.16    Council staff from the Recreation and Sports Unit are supportive of the proposed granting of a new lease agreement to Squash Canterbury and have identified no alternative community uses for the site which should take priority.

Community Board Considerations – Approval of Sub-Lease

5.17    Subject to a lease agreement being approved, Squash Canterbury wish to seek the Council’s approval, as lessor, to enter into sub-lease agreements with two (2) separate recreation entities that currently occupy parts of the Sockburn Recreation Centre.

5.18    Details of the proposed sub-lease agreements are provided in paragraphs 5.19 to 5.28 below.

Proposed Sub-Lease #1 (Christchurch City Weightlifting)

5.19    Christchurch City Weightlifting Incorporated have occupied part of the Sockburn Recreation Centre for the past nine years.

5.20    The sub-leased premises has been used as a weight training room, and has been fitted out with floor mats and the necessary weight training equipment. The organisation offers participation opportunities ranging from entry level through to competitive weightlifting for athletes that wish to complete on a national and an international stage.

5.21    Christchurch City Weightlifting pay a rental of $4,500 including GST per annum to Squash Canterbury, with the funds contributing to the overall management and running costs of the facility.

5.22    The sub-leased area measures approximately 49 square metres, as shaded green on Attachment B. There are no changes proposed to the sub-leased area.

Proposed Sub-Lease #2 (Zone Fitness)

5.23    Zone Fitness have occupied part of the Sockburn Recreation Centre for the past eight months.

5.24    Zone Fitness offer a personalised health and fitness training service, with fitness programmes built around the individual needs of each patron. Zone Fitness specialise in weight loss, postural correction and sports fitness.

5.25    Zone Fitness pay a rental/hire fee of $4,680 including GST per annum to Squash Canterbury, such funds contributing to the overall management and running costs of the facility.

5.26    Whilst the organisation operates as a sole trader, for a profit, their activities are complimentary to the facility. The scale of their activities are considered appropriate for the premises, and are in keeping with the surrounding residential character of the neighbourhood.

5.27    The sub-leased area measures approximately 14 square metres, as shaded blue on the attached plan. In addition to this area, Zone Fitness also have a non-exclusive use of the room labelled ‘Exercise’ on a for hire basis for running its fitness programme. There are no changes proposed to the sub-leased area.

5.28    Both of the proposed sub-lease agreements strongly align with the recreation classification of the land, and the activities appear to comply with the zoning rules applicable to the site Open Space 3 (Metropolitan Facilities). As such, Council staff support the granting of landlords consent to the proposed sub-leases.

Council Considerations - Approval of Lease (as a delegate of the Minister of Conservation)

5.29    On 12 June 2013, the Minister of Conservation delegated to all territorial authorities his powers, functions and duties where the territorial authority is the administering body of the relevant reserve. The Chief Executive holds the delegation to exercise all of the Ministerial powers that have been delegated to the Council under the Reserves Act 1977.

5.30    In exercising the Minister’s delegation, the administering body (i.e. the Chief Executive) must give consideration to those matters previously applied by the Minister, for example ensuring that:

·     The land has been correctly identified;

·     The necessary statutory processes have been followed;

·     The functions and purposes of the Reserves Act have been taken into account in respect to the classification and purpose of the reserve as required under section 40 of the Act;

·     The administering body has considered submissions and objections from affected parties and that, on the basis of the evidence, the decision is a reasonable one;

·     Pursuant to the requirements of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987, the administering body has consulted with and considered the views of tangata whenua or has in some other way been able to make an informed decision.

5.31    Council officers have publically notified the Council's intentions to consider granting Squash Canterbury Incorporated a lease agreement for a period of up to nine years, for the continued operation of a squash facility.

5.32    The notice also outlined the Council intentions to consider approving an application to sub-lease an area of approximately 49 square meters to Christchurch City Weightlifting, and approximately 14 square metres to Zone Fitness.

5.33    The public notice was placed in The Press on Wednesday 3 May 2017, with the notification period due to close at 5pm on Monday 5June 2017.

5.34    If submissions are received, on or before the 5 June 2017 deadline, and submitters wish to be heard in support of their submission, it will be necessary to convene a Reserves Hearing Panel to hear submitters’ views prior to the panel making a recommendation back to the Council.

5.35    Council Officers are satisfied that the proposed lease and sub-lease agreements comply with the Minister’s requirements.

 


 

6.   Option 1 - Approve the lessee’s application for a new lease agreement and sub-lease agreements (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Enter into a new lease agreement with Squash Canterbury Incorporated, for a period of up to nine years, over the footprint of the Sockburn Recreation Centre, and concurrently approve a sub-lease to Christchurch City Weightlifting Incorporated, and Zone Fitness, over approximately 49 square metres and 14 square metres respectively.

6.2       The proposed lease and sub-lease agreements will support the continued provision of recreational activities, from the Council owned Sockburn Recreation Centre, for the wider benefit of the community.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance require the Council to publically notify its intentions to grant a new lease, and approve the proposed sub-lease agreements, and consider any written submissions or objections received in accordance with section 119 and 120 of The Reserves Act 1977.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Squash Canterbury Incorporated and the wider the squash playing community are specifically affected by this option due to the long established use of Sockburn Recreation Centre as a squash facility. 

6.7       The two proposed sub-lessees, Christchurch City Weightlifting Incorporated and Zone Fitness, are both specifically effected by this option. Both organisations have an established membership/client base which use the Sockburn Recreation Centre for their activities.

6.8       Their views support this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.9       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

6.9.1   Inconsistency – Not applicable

6.9.2   Reason for inconsistency – Not applicable

6.9.3   Amendment necessary – Not applicable

Financial Implications

6.10    Cost of Implementation - There is no financial cost to the Council.

6.11    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - The lessee will be responsible for the cost of preparing the new lease agreement, and any costs associated with the ongoing maintenance and upkeep of the interior of the premises. The Council will continue to maintain the roof and exterior of the premises.

6.12    Funding source - The exterior maintenance costs will continue to be met through existing Recreation and Sports Unit budgets.

Legal Implications

6.13    There are no legal implications to the Council associated with this option.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.14    There is a positive risk to the Community Board in approving the proposed lease agreement.

6.15    Risk - Reputation/Image caused by the Community Board approving the proposed lease. This may result in positive media coverage for the Community Board and the wider city.

6.15.1 Treatment: The Community Board can take on the positive effects of this risk. i.e. community support and publicity surrounding the decision to retain the Sockburn Recreation Centre as a squash facility.

6.15.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.16    Implementation dependencies - The granting of a new lease agreement will be dependent upon the feedback received during public consultation. If any sustainable objections are received and are unable to be satisfied, Council staff will prepare a further report for the Community Board’s consideration. If no sustainable objections are received, or the objections can be satisfied, a new lease will be issued.

6.17    Implementation timeframe - The proposed lease agreement and sub-lease agreements have been notified. The public notification period is due to close at 5pm on Monday 5June 2017.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   Helps to support the provision of Squash in the Canterbury region.

·   Enhances the use of Sockburn Recreation Centre for recreation purposes.

·   Encourages community networks to develop, promote and deliver recreation in Christchurch.

·   The proposed lease and sub-lease agreements closely aligns with objective (i) of the Sockburn Park Management Plan dated 6 August 1985, namely, “To manage Sockburn Park as a recreational area for the benefit, use and enjoyment of the community.”

6.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Restricts the Council’s ability to use the Sockburn Recreation Centre for an alternative purpose for the duration of the lease (albeit for a positive purpose).

·   The decision is difficult to reverse.

7.   Option 2 - Decline the lessee’s application for a new lease agreement and sub-lease agreements

Option Description

7.1       Do not enter into a new lease agreement with Squash Canterbury Incorporated. Do not approve the two proposed sub-lease agreements. Advise Squash Canterbury to remove any existing lessee improvements in accordance with the provisions of the existing lease.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance would require the Council to notify Squash Canterbury to vacate the premises. Future options for the site would then need to be considered.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Squash Canterbury Incorporated and the wider the squash playing community are specifically affected by this option due to the long established use of Sockburn Recreation Centre as a squash facility. 

7.6       The two proposed sub-lessees, Christchurch City Weightlifting Incorporated and Zone Fitness, are both specifically effected by this option. Both organisations have an established membership / client base which use the Sockburn Recreation Centre for their activities.

7.7       Their views are not supportive of this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.8       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

7.8.1   Inconsistency - Does not support the Council’s Long Term Plan (2015 – 2025)

7.8.2   Reason for inconsistency - This option does not align with the levels of service provided for in the long term plan, including; “6.3.5 Provide, develop and maintain facilities to the satisfaction of park users” and “7.0.1 Provide residents access to fit-for-purpose recreation and sporting facilities”.

7.8.3   Amendment necessary - Not applicable

Financial Implications

7.9       Cost of Implementation - There is no financial cost to the Council.

7.10    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - The Council will be responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of the Sockburn Recreation Centre.

7.11    Funding source - The maintenance costs will continue to be met through existing Recreation and Sports Unit budgets.

Legal Implications

7.12    There are no legal implications to the Council associated with this option.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.13    There is a negative risk to the Community Board in declining the proposed lease and sub-lease agreements.

7.14    Risk Reputation/Image caused by the Community Board declining the proposed lease and sub-lease agreements.  This may result in negative media coverage for the Community Board and the Council unless there is good reason not to support the application.

7.14.1 Treatment: The Community Board and the Council would need to take on the negative effects of this risk, namely, loss of community support and engagement surrounding the decision to close the Sockburn Recreation Centre.

7.14.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

7.15    Implementation dependencies - There are no implementation dependencies associated with this option.

7.16    Implementation timeframe – If the Council resolves to decline Squash Canterbury’s application for a new lease one (1) calendar months written notice will need to be provided in accordance with the existing lease.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   The Council retains ultimate control over the running and use of the premises

·   Declining the application would see three (3) clubs displaced which would impact negatively on the delivery and breadth of sport and recreation opportunities in eastern Christchurch.

7.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The facility will cost substantially more to manage under Council control.

·   Discourages community networks to develop, promote and deliver recreation in Christchurch.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sockburn Recreation Centre - Proposed Squash Canterbury Lease Plan

148

b

Sockburn Recreation Centre - Proposed Sub Lease Areas

149

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Nick Jenkins - Leasing Consultant

Approved By

Kathy Jarden - Team Leader Leasing Consultancy

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Bruce Rendall - Head of Facilities, Property and Planning

John Filsell - Head of Recreation and Sports

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

PDF Creator


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

PDF Creator


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

13.    Licence for Gravel Extraction - 35 Miners Road

Reference:

17/432367

Contact:

Jeff Woodham

jeff.woodham@ccc.govt.nz

941 8771

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to approve the granting of an Access Agreement Licence for Gravel Extraction from Reserve 2529 Canterbury, also known as 35 Miners Road, Yaldhurst, Christchurch.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by staff assessment.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve an Access Agreement Licence for Gravel Extraction to Fulton Hogan Limited for a term of five (5) years with an annual licence fee based on royalties from the extraction of gravel from Reserve 2529 Canterbury at 35 Miners Road, Yaldhurst, Christchurch.

2.         Authorise the Manager Property Consultancy to conclude the Access Agreement Licence with Fulton Hogan Limited.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report does not support the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025).

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Grant a New Access Agreement Licence (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Terminate Current Access Agreement and Make Good

 

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Helps to fulfil Fulton Hogan’s commitments to the rebuild of Christchurch and Canterbury.

·     Revenue to the Council through royalty payments.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Limited amount of material available for extraction – once it is removed, there is no more available.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Land Status

5.1       Reserve 2529 (the Reserve) is a parcel of land located at 35 Miners Road, Yaldhurst, vested in the Christchurch City Council and classified for the purpose of a Gravel Pit in New Zealand Gazette Notice 1881 page 1484.

5.2       The use of the Reserve for the extraction of gravel is consistent with the intended purpose.  The Gazette Notice also states that the land may be used for pastoral purposes, namely grazing.

5.3       An aerial image of the Reserve is outlined in red below.

 

Licence History

5.4       Grazing Licence - A grazing licence was issued in March 2006 with the Licensee given notice in August 2011.

5.5       Gravel Pit Extraction Access Agreement – Fulton Hogan Limited entered into an agreement with the Council for the purposes of Quarrying Operations commencing on 3 August 2011.  The Agreement was for a term of five (5) years and has been rolling over on a monthly basis.

5.6       Fulton Hogan also held an Access Agreement for a parcel of land at 226 Hasketts Road.  The quarrying operation ceased in January 2015 and Fulton Hogan have reinstated the land.

5.7       The Agreement provides for royalty payments based on all pit-run materials extracted from the Reserve.  The royalties are based on current market values assessed by an independent registered valuer.

5.8       Fulton Hogan has approached the Council expressing a desire to enter into a new Agreement.

Demand for Aggregate

5.9       Fulton Hogan currently operate a gravel extraction operation across the road from the Reserve (as seen in the image above).

5.10    Following the recent earthquake events, the demand for aggregate has remained high.  In the short term, it is understood that there is a projected shortfall of aggregate resources in close proximity to Christchurch.

5.11    Fulton Hogan has expressed a desire to continue to extract the remaining gravel from the Reserve.  At the cessation of extraction, Fulton Hogan will be required to undertake obligations to rehabilitate the site.

Extraction Plan

5.12    Fulton Hogan have extracted gravel from the Reserve for the last five (5) years.

5.13    Environment Canterbury resource consent conditions limit the amount of gravel that can be extracted.  Resource Consent CRC072440 expires on 3 May 2042. 

5.14    Staff  have checked with both Environment Canterbury and the Council’s Compliance Team.  There are no non-compliance issues with Fulton Hogan’s activities at this site.

5.15    Current extraction has occurred to five (5) metres below ground level and is permitted to a depth of eight (8) metres below ground level.

5.16    The site measures approximately 200 metres by 180 metres which should yield approximately 108,000m3 cubic metres of remaining material.  The expected timeframe for this extraction is approximately three and one-half (3½) years.

5.17    Over the last five years, gravel extraction has averaged out at 35,000m3 per year.

Rehabilitation of the Reserve

5.18    Any new Access Agreement will continue to have provision for rehabilitation of the site.  This includes provisions for repairing any damage caused to the land as well as fulfilling the requirements of the Land Use Consent, Water Discharge Permit, shaping the land, reinstating fences, tracks and any other improvements existing prior to and removed or destroyed as a result of the quarrying operations.  These obligations apply for as long as Fulton Hogan holds the access rights.

Dealing Unilaterally with Fulton Hogan

5.19    Fulton Hogan is established on site with their main activities on adjacent land.

5.20    The Council could choose to go to the open market and offer the site for tender for gravel extraction in accordance with the guidelines set out in the “Lease Policy for the Creation of New Leases and Extensions Requests Prior to Expiry – Property” approved on 10 December 2015.

5.21    While this above Policy does not contemplate gravel extraction as an example for dealing unilaterally when creating a new lease, recognition should be given to the costs incurred by Fulton Hogan in establishing the gravel pit operation.

5.22    To publically tender a new opportunity in the open market could provide extensive cost saving benefits to any other party expressing interest in that activity.   As there is only sufficient gravel extraction for an estimated 3½ years, it is more beneficial to deal with Fulton Hogan who already have an established relationship with the Council in relation to the Access Agreement and their previous Agreement held for Hasketts Road.

5.23    In accordance with the Public Bodies Leases Act 1969, the Agreement will not be for a term greater than five (5) years.

Delegations

5.24    The Council, as administering body, has the authority to grant new leases on reserves pursuant to section 61 of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.25    The Council has delegated to Community Boards, the authority for the granting of leases or licences on reserves pursuant to section 61 of the Reserves Act 1977.  The proposed Access Agreement will be granted under the provisions of section 61 (2) of that Act.


 

6.   Option 1 – Grant New Access Agreement Licence (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Grant new Access Agreement Licence to Fulton Hogan Limited for a term of five (5) years with provision for site remediation at the end of the term.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low, consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not required.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The residents and ratepayers of Christchurch are indirectly affected by this proposal.  Fulton Hogan are specifically affected by this option due to the need for gravel and the cost savings in extracting material from nearby supplies.  Their views are supportive of this proposal.  Consultation with the community has not been undertaken.  The requirement to publically advertise this proposal is not required as the activities comply with the Reserves Act 1977.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies:

6.6.1   Inconsistency – silent in the Annual Plan

6.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – as above

6.6.3   Amendment necessary – gravel extraction activity inclusion in Annual Plan

Financial Implications

6.7       Cost of Implementation – document preparation costs to be met by Fulton Hogan

6.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – no costs to the Council for the duration of term

6.9       Funding source – not applicable

Legal Implications

6.10    The Access Licence Agreement will be prepared by the Council’s Legal Services staff.

6.11    As the Agreement is not being publicly tendered, it cannot be granted for a term greater than five (5) years to adhere to the Public Bodies Leases Act 1969.

Risks and Mitigations    

6.12    There is a risk that Fulton Hogan will not rehabilitate the site.

6.13    Risk – contractual obligations not met caused by Fulton Hogan not fulfilling the contract.  This will result in the Council rehabilitating the site and recovering reasonable costs and expenses in doing so.

6.13.1 Treatment: Granting a new Access Agreement with continued provision for rehabilitation of the site at the end of the term and confirmation and agreeance of an action plan to the satisfaction of the Operations Manager for Regional Parks.

6.13.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.14    Implementation dependencies  - Community Board resolution and preparation of a new Agreement

6.15    Implementation timeframe – Two months

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   Helps fulfil Fulton Hogan’s commitments to the rebuild of Christchurch and Canterbury.

·   Revenue to the Council through royalty payments.

6.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Limited amount of material available for extraction – once it is removed there is no more available.

7.   Option 2 – Terminate Current Access Agreement and Make Good

Option Description

7.1       Give notice to Fulton Hogan to cease extraction activities and make good the site as per the obligations in the current Access Agreement.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not required.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       The residents and ratepayers of Christchurch are indirectly affected by this proposal.  Fulton Hogan are specifically affected by this option due to the need for gravel and the cost savings in extracting material from nearby supplies.  Their views would not support this proposal.  Consultation with the community has not been undertaken. 

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies

7.6.1   Inconsistency – silent in the Annual Plan

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – as above

7.6.3   Amendment necessary – not required

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – No direct cost to the Council

7.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Ongoing maintenance of the Reserve once the site has been cleared and rehabilitated.

7.9       Funding source – Regional Parks operational budgets for ongoing maintenance.

Legal Implications

7.10    The current Access Agreement sets out the provisions for rehabilitation of the site. 

Risks and Mitigations    

7.11    There is a risk that Fulton Hogan will not rehabilitate the site if they no longer hold access rights.

7.12    Risk – contractual obligations not met caused by Fulton Hogan not fulfilling contract.  This will result in the Council rehabilitating the site and recovering reasonable costs and expenses in doing so.

7.12.1 Treatment: Granting a new Access Agreement with continued provision for rehabilitation of the site at the end of the term and confirmation and agreeance of an action plan to the satisfaction of the Operations Manager for Regional Parks.

7.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - Community Board resolution and notification to Fulton Hogan.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – approximately 6 to 12 months to rehabilitate the site.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Reserve is returned to a natural state.

·   Small quantity of gravel remains underground for future generations to use.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Loss of revenue to the Council.

·   Increased costs to local authorities, contractors, developers and residents due to the costs in sourcing gravel from other regions.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Jeff Woodham - Leasing Consultant

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Anne Columbus - General Manager Corporate Services

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

14.    Picton Reserve - New Swing and Slide

Reference:

17/421229

Contact:

Megan Carpenter

megan.carpenter@ccc.govt.nz

941 6761

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to be updated around its resolution for a swing and slide suitable for younger children to be installed at Picton Reserve.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to fulfil the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolution HHRB/2017/00089 from 14 March 2017.

1.2.1   That a swing and a slide be provided for younger children at the Picton Reserve subject to funding availability and further that Council staff be requested to work with the Central Riccarton Residents’ Association to determine and appropriate location.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board:

1.         Receive this information.

2.         Consider using the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund for a new swing and slide at Picton Reserve.

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       Picton Reserve is a neighbourhood park located on the corner of Picton Avenue and Dilworth Street in Riccarton (63 Picton Avenue, Riccarton).

3.2       There is funding available in CPMS 965 Neighbourhood Parks – Play and Recreation Facilities (New). Funding would be available in financial year 2021 (2020–2021), depending on approval of Annual Plans and Long Term Plans.

3.3       Staff will work with representatives of the Central Riccarton Residents’ Association to discuss possible locations for the equipment. Consultation with the community may be required to confirm that residents are happy with the proposal to install a swing set and a slide in this reserve. If required, it would be envisaged that this would take place soon after July 2020 when funding is approved through the Annual Plan process.

 

4.   Context/Background

Background

4.1       On 13 December 2016, the Central Riccarton Residents’ Association presented a deputation to the Community Board requesting a swing and slide at Picton Reserve suitable for younger children under the age of 10.

4.2       Staff presented a memorandum back to the Community Board on 14 March 2017 including the following key points:

·   The land for Picton Reserve was purchased by the Council in 1999/2000 to be developed into a local park and a new water service site for a water supply pumping station and wells.

·   The landscape concept plan was consulted on in 2000/2001. The plan was approved on 13 February 2001

·   The playground was installed in 2003 and has a potential life span of 25 years, therefore the Council will not be renewing the playground in the near future. The Council needs to balance the demand for play facilities across the city and only upgrade play facilities when they are due for renewal. Renewal is determined through completing a condition assessment of the play equipment.

·   The existing equipment in this reserve includes a super nova (age group five to 12 years). This is a modern form of a roundabout, springer (age group two to five years, spica (age group five to 12 years) and a modular structure (age group five to 12 years). There is an opportunity for children to use the open space in the reserve, as well as experiencing nature play with the established gardens e.g. balancing and climbing on the boulders.

4.3       On 14 March 2017, the Board resolved that a swing and a slide be provided for younger children at the Picton Reserve subject to funding availability and further that Council staff be requested to work with the Central Riccarton Residents’ Association to determine and appropriate location.

4.4       There is funding available in CPMS 965 Neighbourhood Parks – Play and Recreation Facilities (New). Funding would be available in financial year 2021 (2020–2021), depending on approval of Annual Plans and Long Term Plans. If the Community Board wanted this project to be completed earlier, then they could consider funding the project.

4.5       Staff will work with representatives of the Central Riccarton Residents’ Association to discuss possible locations for the equipment. Consultation with the community may be required to confirm that residents are happy with the proposal to install a swing set and a slide in this reserve. If required, it would be envisaged that this would take place soon after July 2020 when funding is approved through the Annual Plan process.

4.6       If consultation is required, a report will be presented back to the Community Board following consultation in 2020 to approve the location and installation of a new swing set and slide.

Swing Set and Slide Information

4.7       Freestanding slide (image below) – approximate cost including soft fall and install - $6,400

4.8       One bay swing (image below) – approximate cost including soft fall and install - $5,200

4.9       Total cost estimate is $11,600. Some additional landscaping and moving of garden beds maybe required which would be a cost on top of this estimate.

 

 

4.10    The space required (soft fall requirements) for the freestanding slide is 4039mm x 6942mm and the space required for the one bay swing set is 3520mm x 8000mm. An indication of the required space and location has been shown on the map below. Landscaping or moving of garden beds may be required.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Play Equipment Images

163

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Megan Carpenter - Recreation Planner, Greenspace

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

15.    Halswell Skate and Recreation Parks - Landscape Concept Plans

Reference:

17/253795

Contact:

Steven Gray

steven.gray@ccc.govt.nz

941 8256

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to approve the landscape concept plans for the layout of Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park and the Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to fulfil the following Riccarton/Wigram Community Board resolutions from 27 July 2016:

Part C - RWCB/2016/108

1.          Approves the development of a skate and recreation park in Halswell Domain.

Part C - RWCB/2016/109

 

2.          That the location be the site adjoining the playground on Halswell Domain as outlined in the staff report.

 

Note: Funding for this option is to be from the Council’s budgeted allocation in its Long Term Plan 2015/25.

Part A - RWCB/2016/110

3.          That the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board recommend to the Council that it proceed with a skate park at Knights Stream potentially funded from Development Contributions.

1.3       This report is being provided to fulfil the following Council resolution from 8 September 2016:

 CNCL/2016/00378

That the Council proceed with a skate park at Knights Stream potentially funded from Development Contributions.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by using the engagement significance matrix. Staff have considered the significance of the decision to be made by the Community Board. Their assessment is that the matter is of medium significance for the following reasons:

2.1.2   There is already a high level of community interest in this project.  There has been regular media interest in this project, while there is also strong local support for this project there are also a number of residents near Halswell Domain who are not supportive of this project.

2.1.3   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve the landscape concept plan for a skate and recreation park at Halswell Domain as referred to in Attachment C of the staff report.

2.         Approve the landscape concept plan for a skate and recreation park at Knights Stream Park as referred to in Attachment F of the staff report.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Sports Parks

·     Level of Service: 7.1.2 Deliver a high level of customer satisfaction with the range and quality of sports parks

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Approve the landscape concept plans for Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park and Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park (preferred option).

·     Option 2 – Not approve both designs and request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·    The skate and recreation parks are providing opportunities for residents to be physically active in the community. There is a growing body of evidence that links physical activity to mental health benefits.

Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park

·     Meeting user needs by providing a small skate bowl with in-built ½ pipe, street skate elements and pump track.

·     Providing additional sun shelter and seating.

·     Inclusion of adult fitness equipment to increase overall use of this space.

·     Mounding on the east side of the skate facility to provide visual screening of the facility without hindering surveillance sightlines.

·     Additional landscape planting to soften the effects of hard surfaces.

·     Coloured concrete inserts to soften the scale of the overall facility.

·     Increased path access into the skate and playground space.

·     Re-arrangement of the existing ‘boulder hop’ rocks to provide better connectivity between the playground and skate area as well as opening up a lawn area for picnic space.

Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park

·     Meeting user needs by providing a larger skate flow bowl with two in-built ½ pipes, street skate elements and large flat transition area.

·     This site will provide some challenge for users but still meets the needs for learner to intermediate level.

·     Providing sun shelter and seating.

·     Additional landscape planting to soften the effects of hard surfaces.

·     Coloured concrete inserts to soften the scale of the overall facility.

·     Connecting paths to other park facilities – car park, basketball, learn to ride, and sports pavilion which includes accessible toilets.

·     Facility is large enough to allow for population growth but also room to expand in the future, if required.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park

·     The storm water basin may require some re work to meet capacity requirements.

·     Allows no room for expansion if required in the future.

·     Nearby residents are concerned with potential noise and anti-social behaviour.

·     Not meeting all submitter’s requests.

Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park

·     This is a new park with no established trees or landscaping to soften the effects of hard surfaces.

·     Not meeting all submitter’s requests.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Christchurch City Council’s (CCC) Skateboarding, Inline Skating and Freestyle BMX Cycling Strategy 2004 has the following listed under Section Three, Future Direction and Geographic gaps:

5.1.1   "Gaps in provision are noted in the Halswell and Sumner area. Halswell area required further investigation to identify the youth priority needs."

5.2       The closest CCC skate park to Halswell can be found at Hoon Hay Park, Mathers Road, Hoon Hay. There is also a skate park located nearby in Selwyn District Council at the Prebbleton Community Park, Stationmasters Way, Prebbleton.

5.3       A report to the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board discussed the need for a skateboarding area in Halswell in December 2008. This was in response to a deputation to the Community Board from a local resident requesting a skate park. The resident had completed a survey of children from the local schools around sporting interests and participation; provision for skate in Halswell was a common theme. The Board requested staff to identify suitable sites within Halswell for a skateboard area.

5.4       There was funding earmarked in the Council’s Long Term Plan (2009 – 2019), however the funding was held over due to the Canterbury Earthquakes.

5.5       Site selection for a skate park in the Halswell area was further considered in an information memorandum to the Board on 16 April 2013. Three sites were considered possible, however it was recommended by staff that site selection be reassessed when capital funding became available through Long Term Planning processes.

5.6       A Youth Voice event was held in Halswell on Friday 11 July 2014 with 34 people in attendance, the ages of people ranged from 11 to 23 year olds with a fairly even split of 11 to13 year olds and 15 to 23 year olds. 17 votes were received from this group in support of a skate/BMX track. The group listed Halswell Skate in their top three projects for Halswell.

5.7       On 14 October 2014, the Halswell Residents’ Association along with a number of local youth representatives addressed the Community Board on the matter of facilities for youth in Halswell such as a skate park. The Board decided to convene a meeting with the Halswell Residents’ Association and appropriate Council staff.

5.8       The Council included funding in its Long Term Plan (2015 – 2025) for a Halswell Skate and Recreation Park. Staff held a seminar with the Community Board on 6 October 2015 around this available funding, which discussed the background of the project, the project brief, what is considered in site selection, the process for Halswell and proposed four sites to take to the community for consultation. These sites were Halswell Domain – beside playground, proposed Knights Stream Sports Park, Scott Park – beside playground and half basketball court and Westlake Reserve – beside playground.

·   Staff held a meeting with the Halswell Residents’ Association on Thursday 10 December 2015 as per the request from the Community Board on 14 October 2014.

5.9       Community Consultation on the four proposed locations (Halswell Domain, Knights Stream Park, Scott Park and Westlake Reserve) was undertaken from 26 February to 18 March 2016. A drop in session was held at the Halswell Community Market on Sunday 28 February 2016. At the close of consultation 280 submissions were received with 164 (59 per cent) in support of Halswell Domain, 71 (25 per cent) in support of Knights Stream Park, 35 (12 per cent) in support of Westlake Reserve and 10 (4 per cent) in support of Scott Park.

5.10    A community workshop was held on Tuesday 7 June 2016 to gain more information from the community about each proposed site. 60 people attended this workshop.

5.11    A petition was received on behalf of the Halswell Domain Action Group regarding the Proposed Halswell Skate Facility on 14 June 2016. The Prayer of the 570 signatory read: “We are totally opposed to the establishment of a Skate Park in Halswell Domain in the position that has been proposed. We feel that it has the potential to devalue properties in the locality, could introduce an element of “anti-social behaviour” and will destroy the peaceful aspect of living close to the tranquil domain that we all enjoy.”

5.12    A petition was received from a local resident regarding the proposed skate facility in Halswell on 19 July 2016. The Prayer of the 204 signatory read: “We, the undersigned, are concerned residents who urge the Christchurch City Council to remove Westlake Reserve from consideration for the Halswell Skate and Recreation Park project.”

5.13    A petition was received from a local resident regarding the proposed Halswell Skate Facility on 19 July 2016. The Prayer of the 948 signatory read: “We the undersigned, believe there should be a skate and recreation park in Halswell.”

5.14    An Extraordinary Meeting was held by the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board on 27 July 2016. 13 deputations were received from the community. The Community Board resolved to approve Halswell Domain beside the playground as a suitable location for a skate and recreation park, and recommended to the Council to approve Knights Stream Park as a suitable location for a skate and recreation park.

5.15    At the Council meeting on 8 September 2016, the Council approved that it proceed with and skate and recreation park at Knights Stream Park.

Pre-design Consultation

5.16    The Council ‘Your Voice’ page provided an opportunity for the public to submit ideas or ask the project team a question. A Halswell Skate and Recreation Park e-newsletter was emailed to those who had requested to be added to the subscription list on 26 August 2016 with details including the proposed community drop-in session.

5.17    Signage advertising the drop-in session was placed at the Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park, as well as being displayed electronically at Te Hapua: Halswell Centre. There was also social media coverage of the pre-engagement on Facebook and Twitter.

5.18    A community drop-in session was held at Halswell Domain on 11 September 2016 where the community was able to discuss both projects with the skate park designer and the project team, and provide ideas on what they would or would not like to see included in the design.

5.19    On 12 September 2016, the project team along with the skate park designer met with students from Halswell School and Seven Oaks School (currently in Waltham, relocating to Halswell) to collect their ideas on what they would like to see included in the skate park concept designs for Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park.  These sessions involved students providing their own drawings, models and placing coloured dots on existing images of skate park facilities to indicate which features they liked best.  Photos of these are available on the Council ‘Your Voice’ page at https://yourvoice.ccc.govt.nz/halswellskate under the photo section.

 

5.20    Students from the University of Canterbury’s CHCH101 class (Strengthening Communities through Social Innovation) collected feedback from Oaklands School and Discovery School as part of their course requirements in September 2016. At Discovery School, the session involved 12 students from a range of age groups and genders placing dots on existing images of skate facilities to indicate which feature they liked best. At Oaklands School 12 year 7-8 students were selected, each student got five stickers each to put on their favourite design or design aspect of images of skate facilities to indicate which feature they like best.

5.21    The skate park designer used the information provided from the school visits and community drop-in session to develop concept plans for community consultation. Issues and opportunities raised through the site selection consultation was also considered.

Community Consultation

5.22    Consultation on the concept designs for Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park was undertaken from 20 January 2017 to 20 February 2017.  The submission form asked submitters to indicate whether yes, they generally support the concept plans for each location or no, they generally do not support the concept plans.  There was also an opportunity to add any additional comments about the plans.

5.23    Prior to the consultation commencing in January 2017, the project team met with members of the Halswell Residents’ Association, the Canterbury Society of Model Engineers (CSMEE) and the Halswell Domain Action Group (HDAG).  This was in order to show them the concept plans and discuss what was included in the designs and to encourage them to participate in the consultation.

5.24    Approximately 852 consultation leaflets (refer Attachments A and B) were hand delivered to properties surrounding Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park, including 162 absentee land owners.  These leaflets were sent out to 228 key stakeholders.  The project was also posted on the Council’s ‘Have Your Say’ website and on the Council’s ‘Your Voice’ page. https://yourvoice.ccc.govt.nz/halswellskate

5.25    The project team was available to discuss the project at two public drop-in sessions at the Halswell Community Market on 22 January 2017 and at the Halswell Skate Jam held at Halswell Domain on 27 January 2017.  There were approximately 30 people (at both events in total) that spoke with the project team, and a number of those who attended also dropped off completed feedback forms.

5.26    A Halswell Skate and Recreation Park e-newsletter was emailed to those who had requested to be added to the subscription list on 18 January 2017 to advise that consultation was to commence on 20 January 2017.

5.27    Temporary signage was installed at both Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park, to advertise the consultation and the drop-in sessions that were being offered.

Photo of temporary signage at Halswell Domain (left) and Knights Stream Park (right)

5.28    At the close of the consultation, 147 submissions were received with 108 (73 per cent) generally supporting the concept plan for Halswell Domain and 104 (71 per cent) generally supporting the concept plan for Knights Stream Park.

Concept plan

Yes – generally support

No – do not support

Not indicated

Total

Halswell Domain

108 (73%)

29 (20%)

10 (7%)

147

Knights Stream

104 (71%)

21 (14%)

22 (15%)

147

 

5.29    All submissions with names and addresses have been provided to the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board members. All submissions without name and address details are available publicly online at file://ccofs01/KingT$/Downloads/Halswell_Skate_and_recreation_park_submissions_24_March_2017.pdf

6.   Option 1 - Approve the landscape concept plans for Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park and Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park (preferred)

Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park

6.1       The Halswell Skate and Recreation Park Landscape Plan, refer Attachment C, has been prepared in consultation with the community and affected stakeholders.

Image of proposed skate facility for Halswell Domain

6.2       The key features included in the design are:

·   Upgraded access footpaths leading into the playground and skate facility.

·   A small 800-1100mm deep bowl with raised quarter pipe lip.

·   Street skate path which includes a pyramid hip, small learner’s ledge, a round rail, 300mm high ledge, and a 1.35 metres high quarter pipe with rollover.

·   A pump track with berms and rollovers, these elements are all below a metre in height.

·   Sections of coloured concrete are included to provide interest and break up the hard surface.

·   Higher mounding with landscape planting and feature rocks will be included between the skate area and the storm water basin. These mounds will be blended into the existing landscape and provide screening of the hard surface from residential properties.

·   The mounds are designed 300mm higher than the skate surface but will still allow good sightlines and views of the users.

·   Provide a second shelter with picnic table.

·   Provide two pieces of adult fitness equipment which include a recumbent cycle, pull down bars, cross trainer and shoulder wheel.

·   A new seat positioned between the skate area and playground. Note: The final position of this seat will be determined during construction to maximise this open space and provide the best sightlines from the seat.

·   Realignment of the existing ‘boulder hop’ rocks to form a smaller ‘boulder hop’ with the remaining boulders reused as landscape features.

·   This rearrangement of the boulders provides a larger open lawn area for picnics and better connectivity between spaces. The line of the existing ‘boulder hop’ was acting more of a barrier edge to the playground and the storm water basin.

6.3       The skate park complements the existing family orientated community space and is aimed at riders of a beginner to intermediate level. Associated activities at Halswell Domain include a playground and sports fields. The Quarryman’s Major Cycleway is proposed to run through Halswell Domain near the proposed skate park. Te Hapua: The Halswell Centre and the Halswell Pool are located on the opposite side of the Domain.

6.4       Some remodelling of the storm water basin may be required to maintain the water capacity of the basin. This has been discussed with the Land Drainage Team and will be confirmed in the detailed design stage.

6.5       Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Principles have been taken into account throughout the design process. The most recent report has been completed on the concept design, refer Attachment D.

6.6       Noise mitigation has been considered, a preliminary noise assessment was completed by Marshall Day Acoustic on the concept plan used for consultation (refer Attachment E). It was recommended a detailed noise model be completed to ensure noise does not exceed any District Plan requirements. 

Significance

6.7       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.8       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.9       At the close of the consultation, 147 submissions were received with 108 (73 per cent) generally supporting the concept plan for Halswell Domain and 104 (71 per cent) generally supporting the concept plan for Knights Stream Park.

6.10    For those who indicated that they generally supported the concept plan for Halswell Domain, the most common comments were about:

Type of comment

Number of comments

Liked the concept plans as they are

55

Design change

23

Requests for lighting

7

Requests for more seating or shade

6

Requests for drinking fountain

4

Request for the park to be built faster

2

Request for rubbish bins

2

 

Themes from those who do generally support the Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park Concept Plan

6.11    The common themes around supporting the concept plan for Halswell Domain relate to supporting the existing plan, requesting more items, requesting lighting, requesting more seating or shade, landscape or greenspace comments, request for a drinking fountain, requests for the park to be built faster and requests for more rubbish bins.  The project team comments in relation to these are as follows (where relevant). 

6.12    Support for existing concept plans

There were 55 comments relating to submitters being happy with the concept plan as it currently is “They look amazing, Halswell kids have wanted something like this for so long it’s fantastic”.

6.13    Requests for the design to be changed

There were 23 comments relating to requests for additional items or changes to the concept plan.  Some of those requests included half pipes, mini ramps, more fitness equipment, different sized ramps, bowl cave, ghost ramp, safety barriers, make the bowl and half pipe bigger, flat grind rail, underground tunnels, dome and make it more advanced.  “…underground tunnel:  it goes underground and has ramps inside it…”

The concept plan for Halswell Domain has been amended and the platform with the small quarter pipe has been replaced with a larger quarter pipe and rollover, as shown below.

  Original platform with small quarter pipe                          Amended platform with quarter pipe and rollover


 

The bowl design already contains a section of half pipe within it.  Making other items larger would be outside the project brief for a beginner to intermediate skate and recreation park. Washington Way Reserve in central Christchurch caters to all abilities and provides for an advanced level of skating.  Other items such as the underground tunnel with ramps and a dome would be outside of the budget for this project and would not meet CPTED guidelines for good visibility into the park.

6.14    Requests for lighting

There were seven comments requesting lighting at Halswell Domain.  “..First of all I think there should be some lights because I think it would attract more people...”

As per CPTED guidelines, lighting of parks is discouraged unless it is an essential designated route.  Lighting is not being proposed as Council do not want to promote night time use of the space. The car parks Resource Consent conditions does not allow for lighting of the car park.  Therefore as no additional lighting will be provided, it is not envisaged that this asset will attract use after dark.

6.15    Requests for more seating or shade

There were six comments requesting the installation of additional seating or shade.  “Shaded seating areas for families with picnic tables etc. should be included to encourage supervision of children and make it easier to attend with a range of children’s ages”.

In response to these requests the concept plan has now been amended at Halswell Domain and it now includes one additional shelter and one additional picnic table. 

6.16    Requests for a drinking fountain

There were four comments requesting a drinking fountain in the concept plan.  “A drinking fountain or two in case you get dehydrated”.

There is already an existing drinking fountain near the toilets, beside the playground at Halswell Domain.  This fountain also includes a bottle filler.

6.17    Requests for the park to be built faster.

There were two comments requesting that the park is built faster.  “My kids can’t wait for it to be built!  I do want it in my backyard.  Can it be built sooner?”

Both parks are due to be completed by December 2017.  Council is unable to complete the parks any quicker than this due to the timeframe for gaining Community Board approval, completing detail design, obtaining consents (if required) and tendering.  

6.18    Requests for rubbish bins

There were two comments requesting rubbish bins to be included in the concept plan.  “…at present there are only seven rubbish bins in the domain, all of which are in one corner of the park in the vicinity of the sports field”.

There will be a rubbish bin included in the concept plan.  This will either be a new rubbish bin or will be relocated from elsewhere within the domain.

6.19    For those who indicated that they generally did not support the concept plan for Halswell Domain, the most common comments were about:

Type of comment

Number of comments

Design changes

10

Concept design size

7

Location of the skate and recreation park

5

Anti-social behaviour

4

Noise

4

Amount of concrete

3

Maintenance

2

Lighting

2

 

Themes from those who do not generally support the Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park Concept Plan

6.20    The common themes from those who generally do not support the concept plan for Halswell Domain relate to the concept design size, the location, antisocial behaviour, noise, design changes, the amount of concrete, maintenance and lighting.  The project team comments in relation to these are as follows (where relevant).

6.21    Design changes

There were ten comments requesting a change to the concept design to include security cameras, graffiti protection on surfaces, flipping the design so the bowl is at the opposite end of the park and further away from houses, including coloured concrete and adding more elements such as bigger ramps, tunnels and a bike track.  “Need to ensure there are security cameras to catch/reduce anti-social behaviour.  Any surfaces should have a protective coating that makes graffiti easy to remove”.

There needs to be exceptional circumstances for Council to install CCTV cameras into parks.  For the best solution to support safety and discourage anti-social behaviour it is important to have a CPTED assessment during the concept design of the of the skate and recreation park.  Anti-graffiti coating is only able to be applied to non-skating surfaces for example vertical walls with no skate value, otherwise if it is applied to skate surfaces it becomes too slippery.  If the design was flipped the other way, it would involve more earthworks as the current design works with the existing slope of the site.  More coloured concrete will be considered as part of the detailed design process if the budget allows. Other design elements such as tunnels would be outside of the project budget and would not meet CPTED guidelines for good visibility into the park.  A dirt BMX track is outside of the scope of this project, however this request has been noted.  There is an existing BMX track located in Kyle Park in Hornby.

6.22    Concept design size

There were seven comments relating to the size of the skate and recreation park.  Of these 6 comments noted the park was too big and one comment related to it being too small. “Too big, needs to be much smaller” and “Too small”.

During the previous round of site selection consultation, the size and scale of the facility was compared to Sheldon Park and Prebbleton Community Park.  The skate area at Halswell Domain is 410m2 and the pump track is 72m2.  This is larger than Prebbleton but smaller than Sheldon.  This is a very small amount of additional hard surface in overall comparison to the entire domain.  The size of the facility is dictated by the budget for the project and the available useable space. 

6.23    Location of the skate and recreation park

There were five comments relating to the location of the skate and recreation park at Halswell Domain.  These comments related to alternative sites next to the cemetery, keeping it smaller and next to the toilet blocks, or another alternative site within the domain.  There was also comment around there not being sufficient picnic space remaining in this portion of the domain due to this location.  “I personally believe that the skate park should be next to the cemetery, where I originally asked for it to be, but got ignored”.

The location of the skate and recreation park was approved by the Community Board on 27 July 2016.  This recent consultation was focussed on the concept designs for both Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park skate and recreation parks.  The alternative sites referred to were deemed unsuitable after CPTED assessments, due to distance from Halswell Road which limits opportunity for natural surveillance, and due to the setback from neighbours boundary’s once applying a minimum 40m noise setback.  The land beside the church and cemetery is privately owned, and therefore was not considered. 

6.24    Anti-social behaviour

There were four comments around antisocial behaviour in relation to the construction of the skate and recreation park at Halswell Domain.  “Skate parks attract the wrong type of people for the domain and park.  All skate parks I have seen are littered in graffiti with young teens.  They also attract rowdy behaviour after dark…”

There is no evidence to suggest that antisocial behaviour arises from skate parks.  Skate and Recreation parks provide a sense of place for the community.  Evidence indicates that ‘the lack of things for young people to do’ is more likely to lead to undesirable behaviour (Wood, Lisa (2011) Why consider skating and skateparks as a public health issue; a review of evidence. University of Western Australia).  The Council discourages anti-social behaviour in public spaces it is responsible for, through CPTED.

6.25    Noise

There were four comments relating to noise associated with the skate and recreation park.  There was concern that a higher ability park would create greater noise, that the ramp will make it noisy, that the recent ‘Halswell Skate Jam’ created a lot of noise and that no noise assessment has been completed yet.  “I could hear unpleasant grating noise from the Skate Jam and shudder to think what the noise will be like when the Halswell Domain skate park is built”.

The concept design for Halswell Domain has been amended and the platform and small quarter pipe have been replaced with a rollover and quarter pipe instead, refer images point 6.9.  This will not be able to be used in the same way as submitters were concerned about with creating excessive noise.  The skate park is required to meet the day and night time noise standards in the Christchurch District Plan, therefore Marshall Day Acoustics have been involved in the site selection and design process.  Previous acoustic assessments have suggested a suitable separation between skate parks and residential dwellings of at least 40 m.

6.26    Amount of concrete

There were three comments relating to the amount of concrete and hard surface the concept design for Halswell Domain.  “Too much visual concrete area to be visually acceptable”.

The size and scale of the skate area has been designed to provide a usable facility which is similar in scale to other existing skate facilities.  More coloured concrete will be considered as part of the detailed design process if the budget allows.

The skate area has been designed to complement the existing environment and the mounds have been increased in height by an additional 300mm higher than the concrete height.

6.27    Maintenance

There were two comments made in relation to the site being visited on a regular basis to remove graffiti and there being a previous issue with the maintenance in Halswell Domain in relation to the grass areas not being maintained.  “The site should be visited weekly by a contractor to remove any graffiti”.

Council parks contractors are on site regularly mowing lawns, emptying litter bins and checking play equipment etc.  Council does not specifically require the parks maintenance contractors to check for graffiti, and encourage residents to use the ‘snap, send, solve’ app to report graffiti as with any issue that may occur within a park.

6.28    Lighting

There were two comments in relation to lighting and there being a risk of light spill from the toilet block and the cycle trail once that is constructed through the domain as that will be lit.  “Whilst you say this facility will not be used at night we note the skate park is now close to the existing toilet lights at the domain will provide sufficient lighting now and when the bike path which is to run down the side of the skate path is built the lighting from this will enable evening and night usage which will severely impact on local residents”.

Staff are working alongside the design team for the Quarryman’s Major Cycleway Trail.  The design team are aware of the requirements to ensure that any light installed will be shrouded to avoid any spill over into this area.  A CPTED report was completed on the concept designs for the skate park. The report recommended that the external lights of the public toilet are fitted with lower output lamps and that pedestrian scale lighting is installed along the cycleway (refer attachment D).

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.29    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.29.1 Skateboarding, Inline Skating and Freestyle BMX Cycling Strategy 2004

6.29.2 Children’s Policy 1998

6.29.3 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

6.29.4 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

6.29.5 CCC Long Term Plan 2015 – 2025

6.29.6 Youth Policy 1998

6.29.7 Council’s Delegation Register 31 March 2017 - all Community Boards have the delegation to approve the location of, and construction of, or alteration or addition to, any structure or area, and the design of landscape plans for the same, on reserves, parks and road, provided the design is with the policy and budge set by the Council.

Financial Implications

6.30    Cost of Implementation:

6.30.1 $324,605 is allocated in the Long Term Plan, Financial Year 2018 CPMS 17928 Halswell Skate Park  for the skate facility

6.30.2 $20,000 is allocated in the Long Term Plan, Financial Year 2018 CPMS 37517 Sports Parks Structure (New)

6.30.3 These two budgets are sufficient funding to complete this project

6.31    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs:

6.31.1 The additional annual operational costs are:

6.31.1.1            Garden Amenity Maintenance $104

6.31.1.2            Play and Fitness Equipment maintenance $136

6.31.1.3            Play surface cleaning $59

6.31.1.4            Total additional operational cost per annum is $299

6.32    Funding source: From the current LTP project Halswell Skate Park (17928)

Legal Implications

6.33    There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option. There has been an appropriate consultation process for the level of significance.

6.34    Required consents will be obtained before construction of the project begins.

Risks and Mitigations    

6.35    Risk of increase in construction costs through time delay from initial estimates at the conceptual stage until gaining approval and tendering.

6.35.1 Treatment: Firming up the estimate at detail design stage prior to tendering. If cost is higher than expected then considering options;

·     Changes in construction methods to reduce cost

·     Change in construction timeframe i.e. pushing the construction period out several months may take pressure off contractors and therefore reduce cost.

6.35.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium based on current market rates.

6.36    Risk of delay in construction timeframe due to contractor availability or tenders flagging an alternative start date:

6.36.1 Treatment: Contact contractors prior to tendering to gauge delivery times

6.36.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium based on current workloads and the demand for this type of specialised work

Implementation

6.37    Implementation dependencies - Gaining Community Board approval to proceed to construction.

6.38    Implementation timeframe:

·   Board approval -13 June 2017.

·   Detail design, obtaining consents (where required) and tendering - June to mid-September 2017.

·   Tender August / September 2017.

·   Construction of skate facility completed – late December 17 / early Jan 2018.

·   Landscape works completed April / May 2018.

Note: completion timeframe is subject to gaining all required consents and contractor availability as this is specialised work

 

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.39    The advantages of this option include:

·   The skate and recreation parks are providing opportunities for residents to be physically active in the community. There is a growing body of evidence that links physical activity to mental health benefits.

·   Meeting user needs with providing a small skate bowl with in built ½ pipe, street skate elements and pump track.

·   Providing additional sun shelter and seating.

·   Inclusion of adult fitness equipment to increase overall use of this space.

·   Mounding on the east side of the skate facility to provide visual screening of the facility without hindering surveillance sightlines.

·   Additional landscape planting to soften the effects of hard surfaces.

·   Coloured concrete inserts to soften the scale of the overall facility.

·   Increased path access into the skate and playground space.

·   Re-arrangement of the existing ‘boulder hop’ rocks to provide better connectivity between the playground and skate as well as opening up a lawn area for picnic space.

6.40    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The storm water basin may require some rework to meet capacity requirements.

·   Allows no room for expansion if required in the future.

·   Nearby residents are concerned with potential noise and anti-social behaviour.

·   Not meeting all submitter request.

Knight Stream Park Skate and Recreation Option

6.41    The Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park Landscape Plan, refer attachment F, has been developed in consultation with the community and effected stakeholders.

Image of proposed skate facility for Knights Stream Park

6.42    The key features included in the design are:

·   A 1.2m to 1.8m deep flow bowl with a chill area and slappy kerb.

·   Street skate area that includes a bank, hubba and stair setup with a china bank, a pump bump, a quarter pipe ledge pyramid with banked ledge A frame round rail.

·   A flat open space area which include a perfect ledge and manual setup, pole jam, flat skinny rail and a bank and kerb.

·   Seating is provided around this open space.

·   A sun shelter with full covered roof is provide next to the bowl and includes seating. There are two other shelter provides near the basketball court.

·   Feature landscape poles are included to pick up on the theme within the rest of the park and subdivision.

·   Two paths are shown to provide connections with the existing carpark and paths to the pavilion and toilets.

·   Specimen trees will be planted along the carpark frontage as part of the subdivision works. Additional trees and landscaping will be included on the north and east side of the skate facility.

6.43    The skate park complements the existing family orientated community space and is aimed at riders of a beginner to intermediate level. The bowl is deeper than the bowl at Halswell Domain and will provide more challenge for users. Associated activities at Knights Stream Park include a learn to ride bike course, ½ basketball court and sports fields. A playground is located directly across the road at Neil Graham Park.

6.44    Two rubbish bins will be provided, one beside the sports pavilion and one near the shelters beside the basketball court. Accessible toilets will be provided as part of the sports pavilion.

6.45    CPTED Principles have been taken into account throughout the design process. The most recent report has been completed on the concept design – refer attachment D.

6.46    Noise mitigation has been considered, a preliminary noise assessment was completed by Marshall Day Acoustic on the concept plan used for consultation (refer attachment G). The report considered any potential noise effects associated with the proposed activity to be acceptable according to District Plan noise requirements.

Significance

6.47    The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.48    This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.49    At the close of the consultation, 147 submissions were received with 108 (73 percent) who generally supported the concept plan for Halswell Domain and 104 (71 percent) who generally supported the concept plan for Knights Stream Park.

6.50    For those who indicated that they generally supported the concept plan for Knights Stream Park, the most common comments were about:

Type of comment

Number of comments

Liked the concept plans as they are

74

Design change

16

Requests for more seating or shade

3

Requests for drinking fountain

2

Request for security cameras

2

 

Themes from those who do generally support the Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park Concept Plan

6.51    The common themes around supporting the concept plan for Knights Stream Park relate to supporting the existing plan, requesting more items, requesting more seating or shade, request for a drinking fountain and requests for security cameras.  The project team comments in relation to these are as follows (where relevant). 

6.52    Support for existing concept plans

There were 74 comments relating to submitters being happy with the concept plan as it currently is “I love the plans and I will have a lovely time in the Knights Stream Park and at the skate park”.

6.53    Requests for the design to be changed

There were three comments relating to requests for additional items or changes to the concept plan.  Some of those requests included half pipes, mini ramps, different sized ramps, bowl cave, ghost ramp, safety barriers, make the bowl and half pipe bigger, flat grind rail, underground tunnels, dome, more coloured concrete and make it more advanced and one comment for adding fitness equipment.  “We would like to have some tunnels included in the plan and design.  And a bit of colour would look great”.

The concept plan for Knights Stream Park includes an existing bowl which contains two sections of half pipe within the bowl.  Making other larger items would be outside the project brief for a beginner to intermediate skate and recreation park, however this bowl is deeper than the Halswell Domain bowl and will provide more challenge for some skaters.

The Knights Stream Park design has been created this way in order to ensure there isn’t overcrowding and sufficient space for skaters to circulate.  Washington Way Reserve in central Christchurch caters to all abilities and provides for an advanced level of skating.  Other items such as the underground tunnel with ramps and a dome would be outside of the budget for this project and would not meet CPTED guidelines for good visibility into the park.  More coloured concrete will be considered if the budget allows.

6.54    Requests for more seating or shade

There were three comments requesting the installation of additional seating or shade.  “I would like to see more seating in shady places for both parks…”

In response to these requests the Knights Stream Park plan has been amended to include a solid roof shelter to ensure sufficient sun protection.

6.55    Requests for a drinking fountain

There were two comments requesting a drinking fountain in the concept plan.  “How about a good drinking water dispenser which can be designed in an attractive way for our kids.”

At Knights Stream Park a drinking fountain will be installed beside the proposed sports pavilion, which will include a bottle filler.

6.56    Requests for security cameras

There were two comments requesting the installation of a security camera at the park.  “If possible have a security camera, could eliminate or minimize a lot of unwanted issues around the park”.

There needs to be exceptional circumstances for Council to install CCTV cameras into parks.  For the best solution to support safety and discourage antisocial behaviour it is important to have a CPTED assessment during the concept design of the skate and recreation park.  CPTED assessments have occurred during the site selection phase, as well as prior to concept design.  A further CPTED assessment will be completed on the concept designs.

6.57    For those who indicated that they generally did not support the concept plan for Knights Stream Park, the most common comments were about:

Type of comment

Number of comments

Design changes

9

Anti-social behaviour

3

Concept design size

2

Location of the skate and recreation park

2

 

Themes from those who do not generally support the Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park Concept Plan

6.58    The common themes from those who generally do not support the concept plan for Knights Stream relate to design changes, concept design size, the location and antisocial behaviour.

6.59    Anti-social behaviour

There were two comments in relation to anti-social behaviour at the skate and recreation park at Knights Stream Park.  “Need to ensure there are security cameras to catch/reduce anti-social behaviour”.

There is no evidence to suggest that antisocial behaviour arises from skate parks.  Skate and Recreation parks provide a sense of place for the community.  Evidence indicates that ‘the lack of things for young people to do’ is more likely to lead to undesirable behaviour (Wood, Lisa (2011) Why consider skating and skateparks as a public health issue; a review of evidence. University of Western Australia).  The Council discourages anti-social behaviour in public spaces it is responsible for, through CPTED.

6.60    Design changes

There were nine comments requesting a change to the concept design to include security cameras, graffiti protection on surfaces and adding more elements such as bigger ramps, tunnels and a bike track.  “Make the bowl bigger and the halfpipe bigger please”.

There needs to be exceptional circumstances for Council to install CCTV cameras into parks.  For the best solution to support safety and discourage anti-social behaviour it is important to have a CPTED assessment during the concept design of the of the skate and recreation park. 

Anti-graffiti coating is only able to be applied to non-skating surfaces for example vertical walls with no skate value, otherwise if it is applied to skate surfaces it becomes too slippery. 

More coloured concrete will be considered as part of the detailed design process if the budget allows. Other design elements such as tunnels would be outside of the project budget and would not meet CPTED guidelines for good visibility into the park. 

A dirt BMX track is outside of the scope of this project, however this request has been noted.  There is an existing BMX track located in Kyle Park in Hornby.

6.61    Concept design size

There were two comments relating to the size of the skate and recreation park.  These comments noted the park was too small. “I generally don’t like the Knight Streams park idea it is not my favourite and too small”.

The size of the facility is dictated by the budget for the project and the available useable space. 

6.62    Location of the skate and recreation park

There were two comments relating to the location of the skate and recreation park at Knights Stream Park.  These comments related to the location within the park not being appropriate “...the proposed location is a high wind zone and the plans do not include appropriate wind shelter, either between the skate park and the houses on Richmond Avenue, or behind the skate park.

The location of the skate and recreation park was approved by the Community Board on 27 July 2016.  This recent consultation was focussed on the concept designs for both Halswell Domain and Knights Stream Park skate and recreation parks.  The design needs to be careful to not limit visibility into the park by including formal wind breaks to meet CPTED guidelines for natural surveillance, and are not something Council would normally install in a park.  As the trees become more established they may assist with natural wind shelter.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.63    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies:

6.63.1 Skateboarding, Inline Skating and Freestyle BMX Cycling Strategy 2004

6.63.2 Children’s Policy 1998

6.63.3 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

6.63.4 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

6.63.5 CCC Long Term Plan 2015 – 2025

6.63.6 Youth Policy 1998

6.63.7 Council’s Delegation Register 31 March 2017 - all Community Boards have the delegation to approve the location of, and construction of, or alteration or addition to, any structure or area, and the design of landscape plans for the same, on reserves, parks and road, provided the design is with the policy and budge set by the Council.

Financial Implications

6.64    Cost of Implementation

6.64.1 The construct budget for this project is from the Development Contributions from Knights Stream subdivision and agreed to be used on this project. The budget is $350,000 for construction works which is held in a Trust account with Buddle Findlay

6.65    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The Park is not currently vested to Council and therefore has no operational cost.  Once bested the expected costs are shown below:

6.65.1 The annual operational costs are:

6.65.1.1 Garden Amenity Maintenance $24

6.65.1.2 Chemical Weed Control and Loose Litter $1,038

6.65.1.3 Turf Amenity Maintenance Mowing $91

6.65.1.4 Total additional operational cost per annum is $1,153

6.66    Funding source – From Development Contributions (DC’s) for the Knights Stream Park subdivision. All costs including design, consenting and construction will be paid directly from the developer with the finished skate facility vested to Council.

Legal Implications

6.67    There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option. There has been an appropriate consultation process for the level of significance.

6.68    Required consents will be obtained before construction of the project begins.

Risks and Mitigations   

6.69    Risk of increase in construction costs through time delay from initial estimates at the conceptual stage until gaining approval and tendering.

6.69.1 Treatment: Firming up the estimate at detail design stage prior to tendering. If cost is higher than expected then considering options in construction methods to reduce cost.

·     Changes in construction methods to reduce cost.

·     Change in construction timeframe i.e. pushing the construction period out several months may take pressure off contractors and therefore reduce cost.

6.69.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium based on current market rates.

6.70    Risk of delay in construction timeframe due to contractor availability or tenders flagging an alternative start date.

6.70.1 Treatment: Contact contractors prior to tendering to gauge delivery times.

6.70.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium based on current workloads and the demand for this type of specialised work.

Implementation

6.71    Implementation dependencies - Gaining Community Board approval to proceed to construction.

6.72    Implementation timeframe:

·   Board approval -13 June 2017.

·   Detail design, obtaining consents (where required) and tendering - June to mid-September 2017.

·   Tender August / September 2017.

·   Construction of skate facility completed – late December 17 / early January 2018.

·   Landscape works completed April / May 2018.

Note: completion timeframe is subject to gaining all required consents and contractor availability as this is specialised work.

 

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.73    The advantages of this option include:

·   The skate and recreation parks are providing opportunities for residents to be physically active in the community. There is a growing body of evidence that links physical activity to mental health benefits.

·   Meeting user needs with providing a larger skate flow bowl with two in built ½ pipes, street skate elements and large flat transition area.

·   This site will provide some challenge for users but still meets the needs for learner to intermediate level.

·   Providing sun shelter and seating.

·   Additional landscape planting to soften the effects of hard surfaces.

·   Coloured concrete inserts to soften the scale of the overall facility.

·   Connecting paths to other park facilities – car park, basketball, learn to ride, and Sports Pavilion which includes accessible toilets.

·   Facility is large enough to allow for population growth but also room to expand in the future if required in the future.

6.74    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   This is a new park with no established trees or landscaping to soften the effects of hard surfaces.

·   Not meeting all submitter’s requests.

 

7.   Option 2 – Not approve both designs and request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

Option Description

7.1       The location of the Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park and the Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park were approved by the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board on 27 July 2016 and by Council on 8 September 2016. Therefore the Community Board have given staff permission to consult with the community around suitable design for both skate parks. If the Community Board consider that the plans do not represent the views of the community, this options provides them with an opportunity to instruct staff to consider alternative landscape concept plans and to re-consult with the community around suitable designs.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is medium consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Community views were not sought on this option. If the Community Board considered that the plans do not meet the needs of the community, then staff would need to re-consider the consultation approach and alternative concept plans suitable for consultation.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Delegation Register 31 March 2017 as all Community Boards have the delegation to approve the location of, and construction of, or alteration or addition to, any structure or area, and the design of landscape plans for the same, on reserves, parks and road, provided the design is with the policy and budge set by the Council.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – The cost of designing alternative skate and recreation parks would cost as estimated $37,000 for both sites. This covers design, consultation, advertising, printing and delivery and staff fees for report and management. These additional costs would be funded from the existing Capital budget, reducing the remaining funding for construction. This would impact on the size of the skate facility.

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – This will need to be confirmed once new designs are completed.

7.8       Funding source – Any further re-design work and consultation would be from the current Capital budget, Halswell Skate Park (17928).

Legal Implications

7.9       There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option.

7.10    Required consents will be obtained before construction.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.11    Risk of not fulfilling the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board resolutions from 27 July 2016 for the development of a skate and recreational facility at these sites.

7.11.1 Treatment: Having to re-design and consult on new options.

7.11.2 Residual risk rating: The rating of the risk is medium.

7.12    Risk of not meeting all of the community’s wishes who submitted through the consultation process.

7.12.1 Treatment;

7.12.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies;

7.13.1 The Community Board approving this option at the 13 June meeting.

7.13.2 Follow up meeting with the project team to confirm the Boards requirements as part of a re-design and the process for consultation.

7.13.3 Availability of the designer for and redesign work.

7.14    Implementation timeframe;

7.14.1 Follow up meeting with the Board June 2017.

7.14.2 Under take community engagement and re-design – July to October 2017.

7.14.3 Re-consult with amended designs – November to December 2017.

7.14.4 Board approval – early 2018.

7.14.5 Detail design, consenting, tendering and constriction mid to late 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Meeting the views of the minority of the submitters.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Delay in providing the community with new skate facilities.

·   Not meeting the majority of the submitters preferred option.

·   Community losing faith in the process and that they may not get a skate facility built.

·   Additional cost to redesign.

·   Reduced budget to undertake construction work.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Halswell Skate and Recreation Parks Concept Design - Public Information Leaflet

189

b

Halswell Skate and Recreation Parks Concept Design Feedback Form

195

c

Halswell Domain Skate and Recreational Park Landscape Concept Plan May 2017

197

d

Halswell Skate Parks CPTED review of Plans for Consultation 2017.03.31

201

e

Halswell Domain Skate and Recreation Park - Design Advice Noise Assessment - February 2017

208

f

Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park Landscape Concept Plan May 2017

211

g

Knights Stream Park Skate and Recreation Park - Design Advice Noise Assessments - February 2017

217

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Steven Gray - Project Manager

Tara King - Senior Engagement Advisor

Megan Carpenter - Recreation Planner, Greenspace

Approved By

Liam Nolan - Head of Vertical Capital Delivery and Professional Services

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


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13 June 2017

 

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13 June 2017

 

 

16.    Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Youth Development Fund - 2016/17 - Application - Casper Howell

Reference:

17/527469

Contact:

Karla Gunby

karla.gunby@ccc.govt.nz

941 6705

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton to consider an application received for funding from the Board's 2016/17 Youth Development Fund.

1.2       There is currently $1,658 remaining in this fund.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider an application for funding from Casper Howell.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to :

1.         Approve the making of a grant of $500 from its 2016/17 Youth Development Fund to Casper Howell towards attending the Under 17 Australian Cadet Championship in Sabre Fencing in Perth, Australia, in July 2017.

 

 

4.   Applicant 1 – Casper Howell

4.1       Casper Howell is a 15 year old living in Westmorland.  He has been selected to represent New Zealand at the Australian Cadet (under 17) Championship in Sabre Fencing for the individual and New Zealand Team Sabre event.  The event is being held in Perth from 4 to 9 July 2017.  Casper is the only person to represent New Zealand solely in this apparatus. 

4.2       The event will expose Casper to a higher grade of competition and new fencing styles that will improve his skills and competitiveness.  He will be able to bring back knowledge and skills gained and pass them on to the fencing community.  Casper has been asked to hold a sabre clinic'on his return so that the Cashmere High School team will be able to be more competitive at the national secondary schools competition later this year.

4.3       Casper has been fencing for nearly six years and trains three times a week with his coaches.  He is taking part in 15 competitions this year during the fencing season which is March to November.  This will include travel to the North Island and Dunedin.   

4.4       Casper is currently the Mid South Champion, Under 17 silver medallist and has represented New Zealand at the Oceania Under 20's championships.  His goal is to place at the Australian Under 17s in Perth and the national competitions in 2017 and 2018. 

4.5       Casper is in year 11 at Cashmere High School.  He is an Air Cadet, enjoys snowboarding and volunteers for the Labour Party.  To fundraise, he will be holding a bake sale at his father’s work, sell old toys and games on Trade Me and raise money from chores. 

4.6       The following table provides a breakdown of the costs for Casper:

EXPENSES

Cost ($)

Airfares

$1,028

Travel insurance

$33

Food, accommodation, transport

$1,400

Registration

$150

                                                                                                 Total

$2,611

 

 

 

4.7      This is the first time the applicant has applied for funding.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Gary Watson - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

17.    Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2016/17 - Applications- Catholic Parish of Hornby and Darfield, University of Canterbury Foundation and Anglican Parish of Upper Riccarton-Yaldhurst

Reference:

17/528338

Contact:

Karla Gunby

karla.gunby@ccc.govt.nz

941 6705

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider applications for funding received from its 2016/17 Discretionary Response Fund from the organisation(s) listed below.

Funding Request Number

Organisation

Project Name

Amount Requested

00056274

Catholic Parish of Hornby and Darfield

Uniforms for St Bernadette's Youth Group

$2,970

00056339

University of Canterbury Foundation

Young Community Builders Programme

$9,000

00056340

Anglican Parish of Upper Riccarton-Yaldhurst

Restoration of St Peter's Church, Church Corner

$30,000

 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is to assist the Community Board to consider three applications for funding received from the Catholic Parish of Hornby and Darfield, the University of Canterbury Foundation and the Anglican Parish of Upper Riccarton-Yaldhurst.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people affected and/or with an interest.

2.1.2   Due to the assessment of low significance, no further community engagement and consultation is required.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

1.         Approve the making of a grant of $2,970 from its 2016-17 Discretionary Response Fund to the Catholic Parish of Hornby and Darfield towards the purchase of uniforms for the St Bernadette's Samoan Youth Group.

2.         Approve the making of a grant of $5,000 from its 2016-17 Discretionary Response Fund to the University of Canterbury Foundation towards Young Community Builders project implementation costs.

3.         Approve the making of a grant of $15,000 from its 2016-17 Discretionary Response Fund to the Anglican Parish of Upper Riccarton-Yaldhurst as a contribution to the compliance costs for the renovation of St Peter’s Church.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       At the time of writing, the balance of the 2016-17 Discretionary Response Fund is as detailed below.

Total Budget 2016/17

Granted To Date

Available for allocation

Balance If Staff Recommendations adopted

$129,913

$95,698

$34,215

$11,315

 

4.2       Based on the current Discretionary Response Fund criteria, the applications listed above are eligible for funding.

4.3       The attached Decision Matrices provide' detailed information about the applications, including organisational details, project details, financial information and a staff assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2016/17 - Decision Matrix - Catholic Parish of Hornby and Darfield

225

b

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2016-17 - Decision Matrix - University of Canterbury Foundation

226

c

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Discretionary Response Fund 2016-17 - Decision Matrix - Anglican Parish of Upper Riccarton-Yaldhurst

227

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Approved By

Gary Watson - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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18.    Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Area Report - June 2017

Reference:

17/476910

Contact:

Gary Watson

gary.watson@ccc.govt.nz

941 8258

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to resource the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to promote a pro-active partnership approach to decision-making between the Council and Community Boards.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board decide to:

1.         Receive the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Area Report for June 2017.

2.         Receive the information provided in the staff memorandum regarding Gallaghan Close, and note the intention to carry out consultation locally on proposed parking restrictions for reporting back to the Board for a decision in due course. 

 

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Community Board Plan update against outcomes

3.2       The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board has yet to develop its 2017-19 Community Board Plan however planning will start soon to align with Annual Plan and Long Term Plan aspirations.

3.3       Memos/Information reporting back on Community Board matters

3.3.1   Gallaghan Close - Parking Update

The attached memorandum from staff refers.

3.4       The provision of strategic, technical and procedural advice to the Community Board

3.4.1   The Board is continuing to receive strategic, technical and procedural advice mainly through an ongoing programme of Board seminars held at the conclusion of the Board’s twice monthly ordinary meetings.

3.5       Annual Plan and Long Term Plan matters

3.5.1   Draft Annual Plan 2017-18

The Board’s submission on the Draft Annual Plan was heard by the Council on 16 May 2017.

The Council’s adoption of its Annual Plan for 2017-18 will occur in late June 2017.

3.6       Significant Board matters of interest to raise at Council

3.6.1   Issues regarding the Yaldhurst Village subdivision and ongoing discussions around the removal of covenants.

3.6.2   Approval of the Riccarton Racecourse related subdivision by Central Government.

3.6.3   Halswell residents have decided not to appeal to the Environment Court regarding the decision made to grant a resource consent to Lamb and Hayward Limited to establish a funeral facility on the corner of Halswell Junction Road and Wigram Road.

4.   Key Local Projects (KLPs) and Strengthening Communities Funded Projects

4.1       During June 2017, the Aidanfield Memorial will be constructed on the McMahon Reserve, corner McMahon Drive and Aidanfield Drive, using materials saved from the old farm buildings that previously adjoined the reserve.  Staff are planning a low key opening in July 2017 to celebrate the completion of the project which will involve the local community and the Board.

4.2       Staff are working with the Halswell Community Project to assist them and supporting groups to move into the former Halswell Library at 381 Halswell Road. Over 100 chairs and some other furniture has been transferred to the property from the former Riccarton Community Centre to assist with the furnishing of the building.   

4.3       Leadership Day – the Community Board allocated $4,000 towards the running of its second Leadership Day covering the three local wards.  Leadership Day was started in 2016 as an initiative arising from the Riccarton/Wigram research findings which identified the development of community leaders as a priority area.  Leadership Day 2017 was held on 16 May 2017 at the Crockfords Bridge Club with 50 attendees present.  Key speakers were Sooze Harris from the Heathcote Valley Community Association, Oak Development Trust’s Carol Renouf and Chrys Horn from the Halswell Community Project. Attendees came from a diverse range of community groups including residents' groups, recreation groups, community organisations and even the Hub Hornby management.

                

                

 

4.4       Consultation on the proposed Hornby Library and Service Centre; and South West Leisure Facility closed on 9 June 2017.  All planned public engagements were completed. Additional promotional and drop-in sessions were also held locally to encourage different users to submit.      

4.5       The Harvard Lounge noticeboard has been upgraded as part of the ward enhancement programme.  Members of the public can now put notices up themselves after receiving details via contacting the Council’s Customer Call Centre.

   


 

 

Before

After

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.6       “Summer with your Neighbours”, formerly known as Neighbourhood Week, is back again in 2017-18 and will be held from Friday 27 October 2017 to the end of March 2018 coinciding with Neighbours Day Aotearoa. This change has come about from feedback from a number of previous applicants who were unable to hold events during the week due to the weather and neighbours being busy in the lead up period to Christmas. Neighbourhood Week has been rebranded to “Summer with your Neighbours” to reflect funding being available for the whole summer. Applications will still be invited in July with a closing date of late August/early September, followed by reporting to the Boards for funding allocation decisions in late September/early October.

5.   Significant Community Issues

Recovery planting in the Halswell Quarry        

5.1.1   Status

5.1.2   Halswell Quarry was used as the main operations base for firefighting for over three weeks during the fires and as a result sustained damage from heavy vehicle use and aerial dipping in the park conservation wetlands.

5.1.3   In 2016 the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board allocated $1,000 towards plants for the ward.  This has gone towards 380 natives, which will be planted by Year 9 students from Hilmorton High School as part of the overall recovery effort after the Port Hills Fires. The plants are regenerating an area valued as a plant and wildlife restoration area.

5.2       Action Required

5.2.1   This is part of the on-going recovery.

5.3       Timeframe

5.3.1   On-going 

6.   Major Community and/or Infrastructure Projects

6.1       Major Cycle Route Projects - Update

6.1.1   Quarryman’s Trail - Tender documents for the construction of the section of the route between Moorhouse Avenue and Victors Road were issued in the week of 23 May 2017. Construction is expected to start in late July/early August with completion by the end of March 2018. The remaining length is being funded in 2018-2019 so will be tendered and built then.

6.1.2   Nor’West Arc - Currently the consultation feedback is being analysed and the scheme plan refined to take account of the issues raised. Elected members will be briefed prior to seeking Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee (ITE) approval on 26 July 2017 to procced to detailed design and construction. A briefing to the Board members in late June will enable feedback to be given to the ITE Committee, if desired.

6.1.3   South Express – Staff are currently working on the scheme design for the Gilberthorpe to Templeton section of the route. This work follows on from the previous scheme option for that section of the route from Hagley Park to Gilberthorpe. Staff will brief the Board prior to the commencement of consultation. This is envisaged as being at a future point still to be determined.

6.1.4   Uni Cycle - Construction is progressing well with completion and project opening planned for August 2017.

6.2       Riccarton Road - Bus Priority and Infrastructure Upgrade

 

6.2.1   Following the update given to the Board on 26 April 2017, project staff presented to the ITE Committee on 10 May 2017 and are currently considering the delivery options that could be used. Arising from this assessment, a joint Board/ITE Workshop will be arranged to discuss available options to then be followed by a report for consideration in due course.

 

7.   Community Board funding budget overview and clarification

7.1       Attached for information, is the monthly status update on the Board’s 2016-17 funding.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Gallaghan Close - Parking Update

234

b

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board 2016/17 Funding Update - June 2017

236

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Peter Dow - Community Board Advisor

Gary Watson - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Noela Letufuga - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

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19.  Elected Members Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.

 

 

 

20.  Questions Under Standing Orders

 

Any member of the local authority may at any meeting of the local authority at the appointed time, put a question to the Chairperson, or through the Chairperson of the local authority to the Chairperson of any standing or special committee, or to any officer of the local authority concerning any matter relevant to the role or functions of the local authority concerning any matter that does not appear on the agenda, nor arises from any committee report or recommendation submitted to that meeting.

 

Wherever applicable, such questions shall be in writing and handed to the Chairperson prior to the commencement of the meeting at which they are to be asked.

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

21.  Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

13 June 2017

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

22

Public Excluded Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Minutes - 23 May 2017

 

 

Refer to the previous public excluded reason in the agendas for these meetings.