Social and Community Development Committee

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Social and Community Development Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Wednesday 1 March 2017

Time:                                    1pm

Venue:                                 Council Chamber, Level 2, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Tim Scandrett

 

 

24 February 2017

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Mary Richardson

General Manager Customer & Community

Tel: 941 8999

 

Liz Ryley

Committee Advisor

941 8153

liz.ryley@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meeting-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

Social and Community Development Committee - Terms of Reference

 

Chair

Councillor Clearwater

Membership

Councillor Livingstone (Deputy Chair), Councillor Chen, Councillor Galloway, Councillor Keown, Councillor Johanson, Councillor Scandrett

Quorum

Half of the members if the number of members (including vacancies) is even, or a majority of members if the number of members (including vacancies) is odd.

Meeting Cycle

Monthly

Reports To

Council

 

Responsibilities

The focus of the Social and Community Development Committee is matters relating to social and community wellbeing.

 

The Committee:

·      Promotes active citizenship, community participation and community partnerships

·      Seeks to address cultural, social and economic disadvantage and  promote equity for all citizens

·      Works in partnerships with key agencies, organisations and communities of place, identity and interest

·      Is innovative and creative in the ways it contributes to social and community wellbeing

 

The Social and Community Development Committte considers and reports to Council on issues and activites relating to:

·      Arts  and culture including the Art Gallery

·      Heritage protection

·      Libraries (including community volunteer libraries)

·      Museums

·      Sports, recreation and leisure services and facilities

·      Parks (sports, local, metropolitan and regional), gardens, cemeteries, open spaces and the public realm

·      Community facilities and assets

·      Community housing, including- social housing, affordable housing (including rental), housing policy, tenancy service, homelessness and unresolved earthquake housing matters

·      Public Health and health in all policies

·      Community safety and crime prevention, including family violence

·      Civil defence and rural fire management including disaster planning and local community resilience plans

·      Community events, programmes and activities

·      Community development and  support, including grants and sponsorships

·      Citizen services

·      Community engagement and participation

·      Civic and International Relations

·      Communities of place, identity and interest.

 

Delegations

 

The Committee delegates to the following subcommittees/taskforce the responsibility to consider and report back to the Committee:

·      Safer Communities Council for matters relating to Safety and Crime Prevention, including Family Violence 

·      Community Housing to the Housing Taskforce for matters relating to Community housing, including- social housing, affordable housing (including rental), housing policy, tenancy service, homelessness and unresolved earthquake housing matters

·      Multicultural Subcommittee for matters relating to the multicultural strategy

·      International Relations Working Group on matters relating to international relations

 


Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 5

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 5

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 5

B       4.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 5

B       5.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 5

STAFF REPORTS

A       6.       Heritage Incentive Grant and Covenant Consent Approval for 37 Valley Road, Cashmere.......................................................................................................................... 7

C       7.       Multicultural Subcommittee Terms of Reference...................................................... 19

C       8.       Botanic Gardens Spatial Plan....................................................................................... 21   

 

 


Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

4.   Deputations by Appointment

4.1

Martin Witt will speak on behalf of the Cancer Society regarding progress of Smokefree Canterbury’s Voluntary Smokefree Outdoor Dining Trial, where it began, initial response to the project and how it fits in with the Christchurch City Council’s support for Smokefree 2025

 

4.2

Claudia Reid will speak to the Committee on issues relating to the Botanic Gardens.

 

5.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  

   


Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

 

6.        Heritage Incentive Grant and Covenant Consent Approval for 37 Valley Road, Cashmere

Reference:

17/96991

Contact:

Fiona Wykes

Fiona.wykes@ccc.govt.nz

941 8052

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Social and Community Development Committee to recommend Council approve a Heritage Incentive Grant and give a Covenant Consent for Ngaio Marsh House at 37 Valley Road, Cashmere.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to an application for a Heritage Incentive Grant.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the heritage classification of the dwelling and the amount of funding requested being less than $500, 000.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Social and Community Development Committee recommend to Council to:

1.         Approve a Heritage Incentive Grant of up to $39,889 for conservation, strengthening and repair work to the protected heritage building located at 37 Valley Road, Cashmere.

2.         Note that the property is the subject of a conservation covenant and this report seeks covenant consent from Council for the works outlined below which are the subject of this grant application.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Heritage Protection

·     Level of Service: 1.4.2 All grants meet Heritage Incentives Grants policy and guidelines

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·    Option 1 – Fifty per cent grant support of eligible items (preferred option)

·    Option 2 – Thirty per cent grant support of eligible items

4.3       Options Summary – Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

             4.3.1 The advantages of this option include:

·    The work will help to ensure the future protection and ongoing use of this significant heritage building as a house museum. The application meets all the criteria for a grant as provided in the Heritage Incentives Grants Policy – Operational Guidelines.

·    A building associated with one of New Zealand’s leading 20th century literary and theatrical figures, Ngaio Marsh, who was a world-renowned crime writer and theatre director, will be retained as a museum dedicated to her memory.

·    The building will continue to have a compatible use which will enable it to be maintained and protected, and allow public access.

·    With the completion of the works outlined, the buildings will be repaired and upgraded, and the owner is committed to the continuing use and maintenance of the buildings.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·    This is a relatively large grant for a single building, however the sum is not a significant proportion of the total grant funds for the 2016/2017 year.

 

5.   Context/Background

Building Status

5.1       Ngaio Marsh House is scheduled as a Highly Significant (Group 1) Building in the Christchurch District Plan. The building is listed Category I by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (HNZPT). The building is of high historical, social, and cultural significance as a New Zealand style bungalow, which reflects the lifestyle of a particular period in time and has an intimate relationship with Dame Ngaio Marsh, world-renowned crime writer and theatre director, and one of New Zealand’s leading 20th century literary and theatrical figures. The dwelling has high architectural and aesthetic significance as predominantly the work of noted Christchurch architect Samuel Hurst Seager. There is craftsmanship significance in the Arts and Crafts detailing, and the building technology of the time. The building is maintained as a museum dedicated to the memory of Dame Ngaio. It remains much as she left it, with her household effects in-situ. Please refer to Attachment A, “Statement of Significance” for further information.

5.2       The current owners of the building, and the applicants for the grant, are the charitable trust, The Ngaio Marsh House and Heritage Incorporated. The total costs for the current repair of the building (including heritage and non-heritage related costs) is estimated at $79,777.50, excluding GST. There is no insurance associated with these works as the proposed works are not improvements and are not eligible for an insurance claim. The Trust also have to undertake work (based on a previous resource consent) to remove some trees, at a cost of $15,179.46. These works are not eligible for grant funding, in spite of the gardens being scheduled as Highly Significant in the Christchurch District Plan. The building has had a grant in the past, to assist with the construction of two sections of retaining wall along the south side of the dwelling, and a replacement timber crib wall to link the new sections of retaining wall. There is a full conservation covenant on the property that was put in place in June 2000.

5.3       The Trust maintain the building as a house museum. The proposed works have been suggested as a result of a roof condition and maintenance report from Conservation Architect Tony Ussher, along with outstanding and urgent matters that require attention on fire protection, security and the replacement of the heating system. The latter ensures the interior atmosphere of the building can be maintained at a level that will be conducive to the preservation of the contents and fabric of the building, as is necessary for its ongoing retention as a museum.

Covenant consent

5.4       The proposed works outlined in detail in Section 6 below, will not have an adverse effect on the heritage building and hence Council heritage staff support the granting of a conservation covenant consent. The proposed new heating system will reuse the existing heating ducting and grilles in the building, and will only create one very small hole in the heritage fabric of the building – that is, the outside wall. The fire protection and security measures help to prevent the loss of the building to fire and the loss of significant heritage fabric through damage or theft. The roof is to be returned to its original form and fabric with the reinstatement of the metal roofing system. Overall the proposals assist with protecting this important heritage fabric and retaining it for future generations. All the works are being overseen by a registered heritage professional to ensure they are of a high standard and that the key consideration of the works is the protection of the building’s heritage significance, both in the fabric of the building itself and the valuable contents.

 

 

Photograph Ngaio Marsh House, 37 Valley Road, January 2015, B Smyth

6.   Option 1 – Fifty per cent grant support of eligible items (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Ngaio Marsh House was originally a four room bungalow designed by Hurst Seager. The house was modified in 1948 by the firm Helmore and Cotterill, who extended a bedroom, transforming it into what became known as the ‘Long Room’ and became Dame Ngaio’s living room. In the mid to late 1950s the front bedroom was extended. In 1976 the rear flat was constructed, replacing the previously converted washhouse, and in 1980 a new studio was built below the front bedroom to cater for Dame Ngaio’s failing health. At the same time a lift was installed. This extension was designed by Don Donnithorne Architects.

6.2       After Dame Ngaio’s death in 1982 the house was left to a relative. In 1992 the house was put up for sale and bought by a trust. Today it is run as a museum in memory of Dame Ngaio and contains much of her furniture and objects, as well as retaining the interior decoration schemes that she put in place. As a house museum the former residence illustrates the three main aspects of her life; her writing, her involvement with the theatre and her work as a painter. In 1993 a Conservation Plan was prepared by Jim Espie and this is the basis for all works carried out to the property.

6.3       Repair works have been carried out following the earthquakes. However, there are ongoing problems with the roof, prompting an inspection and report by Conservation Architect, Tony Ussher in 2016. Most of the roofing on the house is now ‘Decramastic’ tiles, dating from c. 1976, fixed directly over the earlier painted corrugated iron roofing. These tiles are made of metal sheet coated with materials so as to resemble more solid tiles. These are in poor condition and need replacing. The metal roofing beneath is also in poor condition as the ‘Decramastic’ tiles have been fixed to it with battens, resulting in a lot of perforations where the battens were nailed on. These areas of roofing require replacement and it is intended to reinstate corrugated metal roofing. There is also some flat metal roofing and existing corrugated metal roofing, which also need repair. The rainwater goods also require some repair and maintenance work. It is important that this work is undertaken to preserve the interiors and collections of the building.

6.4       In addition to this work it is intended to update the existing oil burning heating system, with a new inverter ducted system with integrated temperature sensor to better control and maintain the temperature inside the house for the better preservation of the interiors and collections. The new system will re-use the existing ducting and grilles that are already in the house.

6.5       The fire alarms and security system are also being updated to provide better coverage for the building. All these matters assist with conserving and repairing the heritage building.

6.6       All relevant costs of the heritage related works have been summarised in the table below:

 

Particulars

Costs

 (GST exclusive)

Roofing works – including rainwater goods and any timber repairs

$70,518.00

Fire and security upgrade

$2,570.00

Heating upgrade

$6,689.50

Total of conservation and restoration related work requiring

assistance

$79,777.50

 

6.7       The Operational Guidelines for the Heritage Incentive Grants Policy provide for a grant of up to fifty percent of the total heritage related costs. The building has high historical, social and cultural significance to Canterbury, as well as architectural, aesthetic and technological significance. Its ongoing repair and retention as a museum is worthy of support. A grant of fifty percent would be appropriate for this project.

 

Proposed Heritage Incentive Grant (fifty per cent of cost of itemised works requiring assistance)

$39,889.00

 

Significance

6.8       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.  There are no engagement requirements in the Operational Guidelines or Policy for this grant scheme.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.9       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.10    The Heritage Incentive Grants Scheme is aligned to the Community Outcomes ‘The city’s heritage and taonga are conserved for future generations’ and ‘The central city has a distinctive character and identity’. Heritage Incentive Grants contribute towards the number of protected heritage buildings, sites and objects, which is a measure for these outcomes.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

 

6.11    The recommendations of this report align with the relevant strategies, plans and policies as listed below:

·           Christchurch Recovery Strategy

·           The Replacement Christchurch District Plan

·           Heritage Conservation Policy

·           Greater Christchurch Urban Development Strategy

·           New Zealand Urban Design Protocol

·           International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) New Zealand Charter 1993

 

Financial Implications

             Cost of implementation:

 

Annual Budget for the Heritage Incentive Grant (HIG) fund                           

$740,800.00

Approved grant to 34 St David’s Street, Lyttelton

$13,462.00

Approved grant to 13 Oxford Street, Lyttelton

$29,250.00

Approved grant to 39 Kahu Road, Christchurch (War Memorial)

$3,312.00

Approved grant to 75 St David’s Street, Lyttelton

$127,415.00

Approved grant to 311 Montreal Street, Christchurch

$3,667.00

Approved grant to 39 Kahu Road, Christchurch

$62,326.00

Proposed grant to 37 Valley Road, Cashmere

$39,889.00

Total Available Funds 2016/2017

$461,479.00

 

6.12    The Heritage Protection activity includes the provision of advice, the heritage grants schemes, heritage recovery policy, and heritage education and advocacy. The Council aims to maintain and protect built, cultural and natural heritage items, areas and values which contribute to a unique city, community identity, character and sense of place and provide links to the past. The Council promotes heritage as a valuable educational and interpretation resource which also contributes to the tourism industry and provides an economic benefit to the city.

6.13    Heritage Incentive Grants and conservation covenants provide financial assistance for the maintenance and enhancement of heritage areas and buildings.

6.14    Funding source - The Heritage Incentive Grant budget is an annual fund provided for in the 2015-25 Long Term Plan.

Legal Implications

6.15    Limited conservation covenants are required under the Heritage Conservation Operational Guidelines for properties receiving Heritage Incentive Grants of $15,000 to $149,999.  A full covenant is required for grants of $150,000 or more.

6.16    Covenants are a comprehensive form of protection of the buildings because they are registered against the property title, ensuring that the Council’s investment is protected. A full covenant already exists on this building, so a covenant consent will be required before the works can take place.

Risks and Mitigations

6.17    The grant scheme only allows funds to be paid out upon completion of the works and upon presentation of receipts. This ensures that the grant scheme is effective and that funds are not diverted or lost. Covenants also act as a protective mechanism, ensuring the building is retained once the work is undertaken.

Implementation

6.18    Implementation dependencies - The grant recipient is expected to acquire all resource, building and other consents required for the works. No resource consent is required for this work.

6.19    Implementation timeframe - The grant recipient has an eighteen month time period to undertake the works and to claim the grant. An application to extend this timeframe can be made to the Council.

 

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.20    The advantages of this option include:

·   The work will help to ensure the future protection and ongoing use of this highly significant heritage building. This application meets all the criteria for a grant as provided in the Heritage Incentive Grants Policy – Operational Guidelines.

·   A building associated with one of New Zealand’s leading 20th century literary and theatrical figures, Dame Ngaio Marsh, who was a world-renowned crime writer and theatre director, will be retained as a museum dedicated to her memory.

·   The building will continue to have a compatible use which will enable it to be maintained and protected, and allow public access.

·   With the completion of the works outlined, the building will be repaired and upgraded, and the owner is committed to the continuing use and maintenance of the building.

6.21    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   This is a relatively large grant for a single building, however the sum is not a significant proportion of the total grant funds for the 2016/2017 year.

7.   Option 2 – A lower level of funding

Option Description

7.1       As for option 1 but with a lower level of financial support to the project. Previous HIG Grant support to other projects in the city has varied but has been generally between thirty and fifty percent of the cost of eligible works. A lower grant of thirty percent ($23,933) is shown in the table below. Other grant levels are obviously possible between the two options.

 

Annual Budget for the Heritage Incentive Grant (HIG) fund                           

$740,800.00

Approved grant to 34 St David’s Street, Lyttelton

$13,462.00

Approved grant to 13 Oxford Street, Lyttelton

$29,250.00

Approved grant to 39 Kahu Road, Christchurch (War Memorial)

$3,312.00

Approved grant to 75 St David’s Street

$127,415.00

Approved grant to 311 Montreal Street, Christchurch

$3,667.00

Approved grant to 39 Kahu Road, Christchurch

$62,326.00

Proposed grant to 37 Valley Road, Cashmere

$23,933.00

Total Available Funds 2016/2017

$477,435.00

 

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.2       The advantages of this option include:

·   Would leave more funds available for other projects.

7.3       The disadvantages of this option include:

·   This would be a lower level of support from Council for a highly significant heritage building repair project at a time of significant loss and damage to heritage buildings in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula.

·   Risk that the owner would delay the works or would scale back some of the heritage conservation components.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Statement of Significance - 37 Valley Road, Cashmere

14

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Fiona Wykes - Senior Heritage Advisor

Approved By

Brendan Smyth - Team Leader Heritage

Carolyn Ingles - Head of Urban Regeneration, Urban Design and Heritage

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

  


Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

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Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

 

7.        Multicultural Subcommittee Terms of Reference

Reference:

17/131127

Contact:

Liz Ryley

Liz.ryley@ccc.govt.nz

941 8153

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to recommend to the Social and Community Development Committee for adoption, the Terms of Reference of the Multicultural Subcommittee established for the 2016-19 triennium.

1.2       The Terms of Reference are attached for the Committee’s consideration.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Social and Community Development Committee:

1.         Receives the information in this report.

2.         Adopts the Terms of Reference for the Multicultural Subcommittee, as described in Attachment A.

3.         Notes that Council staff will work with the Chair of the Subcommittee to carry out its responsibilities and activities as per the Terms of Reference.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Multicultural Subcommittee Terms of Reference - 1 March 2017

20

 

 

Signatories

Author

Liz Ryley - Committee Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

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Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017

 

 

8.        Botanic Gardens Spatial Plan

Reference:

17/175139

Contact:

Brent Smith

Brent.Smith@ccc.govt.nz

9418645

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Social and Community Development Committee to endorse the Botanic Gardens Spatial Plan.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report staff generated

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the fact that the projects depicted in the Spatial Plan were extensively consulted on in 2007.

 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Social and Community Development Committee:

1.         Endorse the Botanic Gardens Spatial Plan.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The Botanic Gardens Spatial Plan is an illustration of the key projects contained within the Botanic Gardens Master Plan 2007.

4.2       The Spatial plan will allow staff to define future funding requirements associated to delivery of the management plan and master plan objectives.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Master Plan and Management Plan

5.1       A Master Plan and Management Plan for the Botanic Gardens were adopted by Council in 2007 following extensive consultation with key stakeholders and the wider community, and form the key background documents for the development of the Spatial Plan.

 

5.2       The Master plan sets out an overall strategy for Hagley Park and the Botanic Gardens and contains a series of priority projects, however it does not provide enough guidance in respect to how the various projects and initiatives can develop in a connected manner.

 

Spatial Plan Purpose

5.3       The Spatial Plan is a “top down” or high level operational  tool that “gives effect” and positions projects and objectives of the Master Plan and Management Plan, but does not delve into specific layout and detail.

5.4       The purpose of the Spatial Plan is to visually portray how the various complex components of the Botanic Gardens can be woven together to enrich visitor experience and engagement, and improve operation and management.

5.5       It does not effectively determine a detailed design outcome for any specific master plan project, but provides direction and a detailed scope for any particular development.

5.6       A key driver for development of this illustration of the master plan is to support the fundraising work of the Christchurch Botanic Gardens Charitable Trust. Council signed an Memorandum of Understanding in 2015 with the trust to enable philanthropic fund raising for development of the Botanic Gardens Master plan projects.

Consultation and Design Development

5.7       The Spatial Plan has been developed through an interactive consultative process with the core project team, project partners, specialist staff and key stakeholders.

5.8       The project partners are The Botanic Gardens Trust and Ngai Tuahiriri (represented by Matapopore Charitable Trust).

5.9       The Key Stakeholder Reference Group is Christchurch City Council Heritage Advisors, Heritage New Zealand Advisor, Canterbury District Health Board, Canterbury Museum, Christ’s College, Friends of the Botanic Gardens, Hagley Ferrymead Community Board representative (previous Chair), Inner City West Neighbourhood Association and Victoria Neighbourhood Association.

5.10    Further input was sought from Christchurch Youth Council, Cycling and Active travel groups, Christchurch City Council Recreation planners, Christchurch City Council Visitor experience, CPTED advisors.

Operational Review

5.11    In tandem with the Spatial Plan project, a “bottom up” operational review, including a current asset condition analysis of the Botanic Garden and Hagley park assets has been undertaken. This provides important detail around the condition of existing features that will form the basis for ensuring development of the master plan initiatives consider current conditions and initiatives.

Next steps

5.12    The next steps will be to work through the detail from the Spatial Plan and the operational review, to put together a business case, for inclusion in the next Long Term Plan process for Council endorsement.  This will identify key projects, budgets and timelines for short term projects (0 – 3 years), medium term projects (4 – 10 years) and long term projects (11- 30 years).

5.13    Following confirmation of funding, consultation and detailed design of key projects will occur prior to implementation, and asset renewal work will be undertaken.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Botanic Gardens Spatial Plan Final - Feb 2017

24

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Brent Smith - Team Leader Asset Planning and Management Parks

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Customer and Community

  


Social and Community Development Committee

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Social and Community Development Committee

01 March 2017