Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

A meeting of the Canterbury Waste Joint Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Thursday 15 September 2016

Time:                                    1:00pm

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Councillor David East (Christchurch City Council)     

Councillor Pauline Cotter (Christchurch City Council)                      

Councillor James Leslie (Mackenzie District Council)          

Councillor Dick Davison (Hurunui District Council)   

Councillor Glenn Livingstone (Christchurch City Council)              

Councillor Tony Blunt (Kaikoura District Council)     

Councillor Grant Miller (Selwyn District Council)     

Councillor Darryl Nelson (Ashburton District Council)        

Councillor Peter Burt (Timaru District Council)         

Councillor Miriam Morton (Waimate District Council)        

Councillor Robbie Brine (Waimakariri District Council)                    

 

 

6 September 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Saunders

Committee & Hearings Advisor

941 6436

Mark.Saunders@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

 

 


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 4

2.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes.......................................................................................... 4

STAFF REPORTS

3.       Report back on 2015/16 regional waste minimisation projects........................................... 9

4.       Proposed regional waste minimisation projects for 2016/17............................................. 35

5.       Waste and Environmental Management Team (WEMT) Update Report........................... 49   

 

 


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

 

1.   Apologies

An apology was received from Councillor Davison.

2.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Canterbury Waste Joint Committee meeting held on Friday, 7 August 2015 be confirmed (refer page 5).

 

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Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

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Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

 

3.        Report back on 2015/16 regional waste minimisation projects

Reference:

16/1017531

Contact:

Zefanja Potgieter

zp@ccc.govt.nz

941 8271

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

 

1.1       To report back on 2015/16 regional waste minimisation projects.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Canterbury Waste Joint Committee receive the information in the report.

 

3.   Update on 2015/16 projects

3.1       In August 2015 the Committee approved the following two projects for funding.  The Love Food Hate Waste project continues into 2016/17 while the Rural Waste project has ended, as set out below.

3.1.1   UPDATE OF FOOD WASTE MINIMISATION PROJECT: LOVE FOOD HATE WASTE

Project

UPDATE OF FOOD WASTE MINIMISATION PROJECT:  LOVE FOOD HATE WASTE

YEAR 1: PROJECT LAUNCH 15/16

Budgeted Cost

$21,500.00 excluding GST p.a. ($24,725 incl. GST) 2015/16

$20,000.00 ($23,000 incl. GST) p.a. 2016/17 & 2017/18

Total Cost

$98,370 excl. GST over 4 years

$36,870 in 14/15 (completed; budget was $40,000)

$21,500 in 15/16 (budget $21,500)

·    $10,000 national funding

·    $1,500 regional LFHW license

·    $10,000 event kits, prizes & give-aways incl. courier costs

$20,000 in 16/17 (indicative) + Events Resourcing (separate report)

$20,000 in 17/18 (indicative) + Events Resourcing (separate report)

Time Frame

2015/16 (Year two of 4 years)

Region

Canterbury Region / National

Supervisor

Kitty Waghorn, Waimakariri District Council

Outline

National Update

The funding application to the Waste Minimisation Fund in support of the $1M LFHW campaign was successful. Councils and WasteMINZ are providing $1,600,000 funding (including in-kind services) and the WMF provides $400,000. The final documentation was signed off in May 2016, which meant the launch was delayed until then.

The Love Food Hate Waste NZ website and many of the resources were developed between February and June 2016. The website was launched on 1 June 2016: the themes for the launch were “Love Your Leftovers” and “Love Food, Hate Waste, Save Money”.

The national campaign included coverage on TV and radio, newspapers, newsletters and magazines. The social media campaign covered Face Book, Twitter and Instagram. Details of media coverage and a detailed analysis of website and social media statistics are attached.

At least 40 events were held nationally since February, which includes 12 in Christchurch and Waimakariri. A table of these events are appended to this report.

WasteMINZ used the purchasing power of the combined Councils to obtain very good discounts on prizes, give-aways and event kits. National funding was utilised to develop the event-kit branding and for the purchase of two kits, one for North Island Councils to share and one for the South Island Councils.

Regional funding from Wellington was put forward to buy an additional kit for their own use: staff in Canterbury agreed that it would be more efficient to have three event-kits in the Canterbury region owing to the geographic spread of our Councils. These kits were purchased out of regional funds and are stored in North, Central and South Canterbury.

The give-aways and prizes for Canterbury Councils were also purchased out of the regional CWJC funding, with Timaru and Waimakariri providing additional funds to increase the number of items bought for their Districts.

Local Events

Christchurch CC, Timaru DC, Waimakariri DC and Waimate DC held local launches during June. Christchurch City Council organised & hosted a Canterbury regional launch event on Monday evening 27th June. Christchurch and Waimakariri Councils ran internal LFHW-weeks.

Christchurch City’s week opened with the launch evening, which the Mayor attended, with canapes made from ‘waste food’ products by Guilio Sturla from Roots Restaurant. ‘Leftover’ pies were made by Guilio and Andy Ellis.

Displays were put up at the Council offices and a series of workshops were run by Kate Meads at staff breaks during the week, which were also open to staff from Environment Canterbury and other visiting staff. The documentary ‘Just Eat It’ was played at a social club evening.

More details about CCC’s activities are appended to this report.

Timaru DC sent emails around their staff network via email, and made a copy of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s (River Cottage) book “LOVE YOUR LEFTOVERS” available to borrow for short term loans to staff. They also started to run a series of radio adverts on Radio NZME during June to highlight the LFHW programme.

Waimakariri District Council’s LFHW week was primarily carried out via email and the intranet, and we estimate reached around 300 staff and Councillors. Staff did engage with the emails and activities, which included leftovers for lunch competition, and share your recipes on the intranet.

WDC put up static displays at all 4 service centres and libraries and also ran a series of information stands in front of local supermarkets and at farmers markets. We used the event kit, resources and give-aways and asked people to put their names into a prize draw when they made a pledge to change a food-waste behaviour. Around 260 people spoke to staff at the stands over the 4 week period, and 105 entries were received for the draws.

WDC were also active on Facebook with promoting Love Food Hate Waste and the movie, and over the month the posts had over 31,500 views.

Waimate District Council has had displays up in their library and community centre, and the mayor attended the opening of the display on 1 June: this was covered in the local paper. The give-aways were supplemented by jam from the local community fruit harvesting group.

A number of local papers have run articles on LFHW and Council activities e.g. The North Canterbury News and Timaru Herald.

Some Canterbury Councils have included LFHW in their school education resources and have been delivering this messaging since earlier this calendar year, and some are working with Enviroschools to incorporate LFHW into their programme.

Benefits

National

Local sharing of the National Facebook posts meant the message was shared more widely though local networks. Having a direct link from Council websites to the LFHW website also drove traffic there.

By all contributing Councils providing a portion of funding, the national campaign had sufficient funds available to undertake the initial website and campaign development work before WMF funding was approved, which gave the campaign a good head-start.

In-kind funding by Councils and WasteMINZ (e.g. staff running events) was also used to leverage a higher level of funding from the WMF; this additional funding from the WMF has enabled a higher amount of resource development and advertising activity than could have been provided out of Council budgets.

Local (Canterbury)

The national LFHW campaign has had coverage on TV and radio, and articles in newspapers and magazines: this has spread information far more widely than could have been done in isolation in Canterbury, or by individual districts or cities.

This is supported by staff in Waimakariri District who reported that toward the end of June, people stopping at the LFHW stands knew about LFHW from seeing it on TV or the internet, reading about it or hearing about it on the radio.

Having our own stocks of give-away items and prizes means that individual Councils can run their own individual campaigns in support of the national campaign, but the national purchasing power meant that these were sourced at a much-discounted cost.

The resources provided for running in-house LFHW weeks and food waste workshops have been very useful for Council staff as they provide good step-by-step information to make running the events relatively easy and snag-free.

WasteMINZ promoted local events on their website and Facebook, which gave a wider coverage to local social media.

Deliverables

In 2015/16:

 

Nationally:

·    A project plan with a campaign outline. This was included in the WMF application. A copy of the business plan will be available for Committee members to read at the meeting. Additional details are being finalised for the next phase now that the June launch learnings have been analysed.

·    LFHW NZ Website: On-line at lovefoodhatewaste.co.nz - in June they recorded a total of 31,207 users on the site; 29,039 sessions & 80,653 page views. 77.4% of the people who visited the site came via social media, 99% of whom came from Facebook. Facebook followers increased from 6,000 to 10,000 in June; there was a patchy response to videos and some posts, but the quiz and recipes were most successful.

·    Development and delivery of one main campaign: Love your Leftovers was the main theme, and all resources, posters, recipe cards and advice were provided to Councils at no charge.

·    Development and delivery of two mini campaigns (includes all resources and kits for Councils): Some of the resources have been developed, but this is still under development as it was delayed owing to the delay in funding announcement.

·    Email newsletter: people are invited to register for the email newsletter on the website homepage, and two e-newsletters were sent out (June and July). There were over 1,725 subscribers by 30 June, and the e-newsletters have had an open rate of 46% (a 25-40% open rate is considered to be good); and of those who opened the newsletter 34% clicked through to see more information.

On a local level:

·    Love Food Hate Waste content on Canterbury Council Websites, linking to the national website.

·    Regional launch event hosted by CCC.

·    Local events and activities undertaken in some Council areas in support of the national campaign.

 

3.2       Additional detailed information is in Attachments A -F.


 

3.2.1   New Zealand Rural Waste Minimisation Project

Funding by the Committee for this national programme has ended, and no further funding is required.  An overview of the project follows:

Project

New Zealand Rural Waste Minimisation Project

Total Cost

CWJC contribution

$550,600.00

$40,000.00

Time Frame

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

3 Years (2015-2017)

Milestone 1 (05/01/15-04/09/15)

Milestone 2-4 (02/10/15-10/03/17)

Milestone 5-6 (13/03/17-31/12/17)

Supervisor

Project Lead:

Project Manager

Project Administrator

 

Isla Hepburn, Senior Contaminated Sites Officer, Environment Canterbury.

Fraser Scott, Director, True North Consulting.

Rowan Latham, Senior Hazardous Substances and Waste Officer, Environment Canterbury.

Project Partners

Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

Environment Canterbury

Waikato Regional Council

Bay of Plenty Regional Council

WasteMINZ

Agrecovery Foundation

3R Group Ltd

Synlait Milk Ltd

Region

Nationwide

Outline

The New Zealand Rural Waste Minimisation Project is a three year project, to identify risks associated with current disposal methods, identification of alternatives and developing improved solutions for the treatment of rural waste across New Zealand.

This project has three key phases associated with the following objectives:

1.     To determine the impacts on and risks to New Zealand’s natural resources (land, water and air), economy and social and cultural wellbeing from current rural waste burning, burying and stockpiling processes.

2.     To identify new waste minimisation options for rural waste management and assess the technical and economic feasibility of these.

3.     To develop implementation plans with service providers for feasible waste minimisation options.

Phase 1 of the project was completed in September 2015.

SLR consulting were contracted to undertake a detailed risk analysis of the current methodologies for managing rural waste on farm. This body of work addressed the current on farm practices of burning, burying and bulk storing wastes.

The report for Milestone 1 considered the environmental, social, cultural and economic risks associated with the disposal of waste streams identified. The report identified a priority list of non-natural rural wastes, ranked by incidence of risk.

The top 20 wastes identified were:

1.    Paints, solvents

2.    Oil containers

3.    Used Oil

4.    Aerosols

5.    Vehicle batteries

6.    Waste oil filters

7.    Agricultural sprays

8.    Drench/dip

9.    Sharps

10.  Netting

11.  Animal feed bags

12.  Baleage wrap

13.  Mulch film and crop cover

14.  Silage wrap

15.  Fertiliser bags

16.  Animal health plastic

17.  Seed bags

18.  Plastic (pallet wrap)

19.  Containers

20.  Drums

Overall, this report identified the risks associated with current disposal methodologies and established a set of waste streams to progress into phase 2.

 

Phase 2 commenced in October 2015, with Milestone 2 completed in July 2016.

The Milestone 2 report identifies the barriers and drivers influencing rural waste minimisation and assesses the existing and potential options for managing the priority rural waste streams identified in Phase 1.

Key work has included interviews with industry service providers, comparison with international processes, territorial authority and farmer surveys and a critical review of existing processes. 

The key barriers and drivers relating to alternative rural waste management options are identified as:

•     Costs

•     Inconvenience

•     Lack of Incentives

•     Lack of Awareness

•     Lack of Economic Viability

Specific rural waste collection options are identified as:

•     On-farm collection (private collection companies, Territorial Authority services and back-haulage)

•     Local drop-off collection options (Collection hubs, events and use of retail stores)

 

The report finds that there are viable recycling or processing options available for most rural waste streams as prioritised in Phase 1; however many of these wastes are still being burnt, buried or stored because the economics of collection are unsatisfactory or transporting waste to a location for processing is inconvenient for farmers. A number of existing and expanded services which could help to change this practice by offering a more cost effective, convenient option for rural communities are identified.

Overall, the key project successes to date can be summarised as:

•     Many conversations have been initiated with key service providers, laying the groundwork for future milestones.

•     Existing product stewardship schemes (e.g. Plasback/Agrecovery) are considering additional material types.

•     Commercial waste management companies are expanding service provision in some areas.

•     Some community groups are looking to expand and have useful learnings for engaging farmers.

•     Fonterra is funding an internal pilot project with 30 farmers, and vets, in the Waikato Region addressing the disposal of animal sharps.

•     A clear set of options and strategies has been formed for further assessment, testing and implementation.

 

There are no issues to report with scope, schedule, budget or risks.  Milestone 3 is now underway, due for completion by 21 October 2016.

Full details including all published reports and background reading are available on the Environment Canterbury website (http://ecan.govt.nz/advice/your-land/waste/projects/Pages/rural-waste-minimisation.aspx)

Benefits

This project aims to further understand the risks associated with current rural waste management practices, find viable waste minimisation options and begin behaviour change; the outcome will be the start of a long-term change towards better rural waste minimisation in New Zealand.

This project will benefit all New Zealanders, reducing the negative environmental, social, cultural and economic effects associated with poor management of rural waste.

Deliverables

The three phases of this project will be delivered across 6 Milestone reports:

1.     Risk Assessment of current rural waste management practices

2.     Situational analysis and options for minimising rural waste

3.     Explore potential waste minimisation options

4.     Detailed business cases

5.     Implementation of preferred options and communication strategy

6.     Option pilot trials and communications roll-out

Costs Breakdown

This project has been funded by the Ministry for the Environment’s Waste Minimisation Fund (WMF) and project partner contributions.

·     Total project budget of $550,600.00

·     WMF funding: $348,600.00

·     Partner contributions: $202,000.00 (including $40,000.00 from the CWJC)

Phase 2 is currently in progress with Milestone 2 completed; this phase is due for completion in March 2017 and is tracking an amended project timeline and budget.

Evaluation Criteria

Milestone reports approved by the Ministry for the Environment.

Achievability:

High

Measurability

Publication of 6 Milestone reports

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Appendix A LFHW report

18

b

Appendix B LFHW report

 

c

Appendix C LFHW report

20

d

Appendix D LFHW report

26

e

Appendix E LFHW report

28

f

Appendix F LFHW report

31

 

 

Signatories

Author

Zefanja Potgieter - Senior Resource Planner Solid Waste

Approved By

Ross Trotter - Solid Waste Manager

John Mackie - Head of Three Waters and Waste

  


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

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4.        Proposed regional waste minimisation projects for 2016/17

Reference:

16/1017548

Contact:

Zefanja Potgieter

zp@ccc.govt.nz

941 8271

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The report proposes regional waste minimisation projects for 2016/2017.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

         It is recommended that the Canterbury Waste Joint Committee approves the expenditure of $60,000, as set out in the report.

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       Since its inception, the Committee has annually considered proposals to support and finance waste minimisation projects across the Canterbury region.  Elsewhere in the agenda papers for this meeting is a report that summarises the project achievements of the past year 2015/2016. 

3.2       As resolved by the Committee in August 2015, potential new waste minimisation project proposals were invited from external service providers early in 2016, however, none of the three proposals received passed the Committee’s guidelines for new projects.  Therefore this report reflects only reports proposed by staff.  External service providers will again have an opportunity this financial year to submit proposals for possible evaluation, and inclusion in August 2017.

3.3       The regional waste minimisation projects proposed in this report require funding of $60,000, less than the available budget of $112,000.  The proposals are listed in the table below:

 

2016/17 BUDGET

Regional Waste Minimisation budget

 

$112,000

Proposed projects: 

 

 

Love Food Hate Waste

45,000

 

Consumer Research - Container Deposits and Plastic Bag Charges

3,000

 

Medical Waste at Home

2,000

 

Education resources

10,000

 

Total project cost

 

60,000

Unspent

 

    52,000

 

3.4       Waste Minimisation Proposals

3.4.1   Love Food, Hate Waste

Project

FOOD WASTE MINIMISATION PROJECT: LOVE FOOD HATE WASTE

YEAR 3: 2016/17

Budgeted Cost 2016/17

$45,000

Total Cost over 4 years

$148,370 over 4 years:

$36,870 in 14/15 (completed; budget was $40,000)

$21,500 in 15/16 (budget $21,500)

$45,000 in 16/17 (increased from $20,000)

$45,000 in 17/18 (increased from $20,000)

Time Frame

2016/17 (Year 3 of 4 years)

Region

Canterbury Region / National

Supervisor

Kitty Waghorn, Waimakariri District Council;

Justine Mowe, Christchurch City Council

Outline

National

The main campaign for the first half of 16/17 continues to be “Love your Leftovers”. The steering group are considering the production of a series of short snappy videos similar to those developed by Victoria LFHW (Australia) which have a high relevancy rating and are proving popular with viewers on Facebook. This will be run in November when Auckland Council’s LFHW campaign is launched.

A second campaign is being developed with the theme “Storage” (for freshness and longevity) which includes using containers, fridges and freezers to extend life of foods and which would begin in the 2017 calendar year. Some of the resources have been developed for this already.

Mini campaigns will be developed to be run at other times. It’s proposed to run “Pie Week” in August to continue the leftovers theme, and another will be developed to be run in early 2017, most likely to support the Storage theme.

Local Events

Christchurch City Council had a Q&A session at the screening of “Wastecooking” which was part of the 2016 Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival in early July.

WDC screened the long version of “Just Eat It” at the local cinema on 3 July as a food-waste awareness raiser and fundraiser for Satisfy Food Rescue (a North-Canterbury-based food rescue organisation) and filled all 93 seats in the cinema.

Timaru DC will continue to run a radio adverts on Radio NZME during July to highlight the LFHW programme.

Selwyn District Council will run an internal LFHW campaign over July and send out weekly emails, encouraging people to share photos of their leftover lunches, run a PowerPoint presentation for all staff telling them what LFHW is all about, and send posters out for the libraries to put on display next to cookbooks etc. as well as putting up posters/ meal planners/recipes in their own staff lunchroom.

SDC will also be reaching out to Lincoln University and other local organisations with resources and information on LFHW.

Waimakariri District Council will have a LFHW stand at two annual events in July: the Vege Co-op fun day on 19 July and ‘Toddlers Big Day In’ on 24th July.

All Canterbury Councils are planning to run LFHW promotions and events throughout the year as and when required and as their resourcing allows. Details have as yet to be confirmed, but it is anticipated that the next two years of the campaign will be increased, with attendance required at major public events to maximise on impact from national promotions, the Auckland Council’s launch and national-led mini-campaigns.

Staff resourcing for events or stands is however seen as a barrier for all Councils, particularly as we have a better idea of the costs involved in organising and staffing events. An external service provider is therefore proposed to assist with undertaking planned deliverables throughout the final two years of the national campaign.

A breakdown of employing a suitable person to assist in this task is detailed below (based on costs incurred to date):

                   $18,000                Labour (event delivery & training time)

                      $2,000                Transport

                      $5,000                Site fees

                   $25,000                For 2016/17 and for 2017/18

Benefits

Canterbury

The national LFHW campaign has ability to reach far wider than can be done in isolation in Canterbury, or by individual districts or cities. WasteMINZ promoted local events on their website and Facebook, which gave a wider coverage to local social media.

Use of regional funding to employ a suitable person to attend large events throughout Canterbury will assist all Councils regardless of size, and provide a greater coverage of the LFHW messaging in each Council area than could be provided within each Council’s budget.

National

Local sharing of the National Facebook posts mean the messages can be more widely though local networks. Having a direct link from Council websites to the LFHW website also drives traffic there.

Local events and publicity raise public awareness and support the national messaging – there is reinforcement of LFHW in both directions.

Deliverables

In 2016/17:

National

·    Development and delivery of a second main national-led campaign.

·    Development and delivery of two mini campaigns (includes all resources and kits for Councils).

·    Email newsletter: one per month.

·    Development of 8-10 short videos to continue the “Leftovers” theme, if this is deemed worth-while by the steering group.

Canterbury

·    Internal promotion of LFHW week by Councils, potentially on an annual basis.

·    LFHW presence at local A&P shows and other events where Councils usually have a presence.

·    External service provider attendance at up to 24 major events throughout Canterbury

Incorporation of LFHW into school education programmes where Councils undertake or fund this service.

 

3.4.2   More details on 2015/16 Love Food, Hate Waste deliverables are in Attachment A.

3.4.3   Consumer Research - Container Deposits and Plastic Bag Charges

 

Project

Consumer Research - Container Deposits and Plastic Bag Charges

Total Cost

$3,000 from CWJC.

The total project cost of $18,000 is to conduct nationwide research of 1,000 people with respect to consumer attitudes towards and willingness to pay environmental fees. In particular Container Deposits and Plastic Bag charges.

WasteMINZ is contributing $6,000 to the project and is seeking the balance of funding from territorial authorities throughout New Zealand.

Time Frame

1 August 2016 to 10 October 2016

Supervisor

Craig Goodwin, Ashburton District Council

Region

CWJC region wide

Outline

Background:

In October 2015 the TA Forum (a WasteMINZ sector group focussed on Council specific issues) met at the WasteMINZ Conference to discuss the priority issues for national collaboration (following the successful collaboration on Love Food Hate Waste).

There we are seven possible issues identified, which had the potential for national collaboration. Following the conference, all TAs in New Zealand were surveyed and were asked to rank their most important issues. Two issues pertaining to environmental charges were listed in the top five. These were:

1.   Container deposits

2.   Plastic bag charges

Container deposits: In 2015 Envision NZ developed a report titled The Incentive to Recycle. This report detail how a container deposit system could work in New Zealand. Following this report there were a number of factors that still need to be addressed. These are:

1.   A full Cost/Benefit economic analysis (this work is currently being undertaken and is fully funded by Auckland Council, despite it having a national focus)

 

2.   Comprehensive consumer research to ascertain public support of such a system and its impacts on recycling.

 

Plastic bag charges: In discussions with leading supermarket chains and Retail New Zealand, all have suggested that they will not introduce voluntary bag charges (i.e. without government regulation) due to the adverse impacts on their businesses, as they fear consumers will change where they shop to avoid the charges. They suggest that consumers are vehemently opposed to such charges; this is despite organisations such as The Warehouse successfully introducing bag charges.

With respect to both of these issues, a comprehensive and representative national data set of consumer attitudes is needed in order to better inform future actions, support specific campaign activities and to potentially rebut the claims of various stakeholder groups who may be opposed to action in these areas.

The proposed methodology is a nationwide online survey by a credible market research company of 1,000 consumers (with representation from across New Zealand) and a corresponding report.

This data and report will be used to inform courses of action and it is proposed to form a key part of the TA Forum’s activities.

By working collaboratively with other councils across New Zealand WasteMINZ and the TA Forum will be able to gain an in-depth understanding of these issues in New Zealand and identify potential solutions to the problems.

Benefits

This will be a beneficial project to participate in for a number of reasons.

The survey will provide your Councils details about consumer attitudes with respect to these two priority issues.

The information will potentially be used to inform the development and evaluation of national and local campaigns on these two issues.

Providing funds for a nationwide online survey will ensure that the Canterbury region is included in the survey coverage, and will provide your Councils with some insight into the attitudes and behaviours of residents.

Deliverables

In 2016/17:

·    A survey that will provide nationally representative data on attitudes and behaviours with respect to container deposits and plastic bag charges.

·    A report that synthesizes all of the qualitative and quantitative data and insights gathered from the online survey.

·    Data tables with each question cut by key demographics and customer groups.

Future deliverables will depend on the outcomes of the surveys, and available funding and resourcing.

Costs Breakdown

$3,000 in 2016/17:

3,000 toward a NZ-wide survey on attitudes and behaviours with respect to these two priority issues (being joint funded by WasteMINZ and a number of Territorial Authorities)

Evaluation Criteria

Provide as much detail as possible for the evaluation criteria.

Achievability:

Projects must have the potential to succeed.

 

This project is achievable. Such a survey has previously been undertaken to inform the Love Food Hate Waste campaign.

Measurability

 

Project outcomes must be able to be measured to ensure the delivered project outcomes can be evaluated at the completion of the project. (‘Measure to Manage’)  

 

The on-line survey will provide a comprehensive quantitative data set.

Improving resource efficiency

Projects should have the potential to improve resource efficiency, and to capitalise on potential economic benefits. 

 

The purpose of the research is to inform future action on these two priority issues.

In particular, countries that have introduced Container Deposits typically see recycling rates of 80% to 90%. This recycling is funded through the scheme itself rather than through council rates.

Plastic bags are not recyclable through kerbside, and only a very limited number are addressed through store take back type recycling schemes. Overseas jurisdictions have typically seen 60% to 70% reductions in plastic bag use through the introduction of bag charges.

Quantity

Assess what effect the project will have on waste quantities, either tonnes or volumes

 

The Incentive to Recycle report estimates that a CDS would:

·   increase beverage container recycling every year by 45,000 tonnes. In Canterbury this would equate to circa 5,400 tonnes.

 

·   divert 180,000 cubic metres of waste from landfill. In Canterbury this would equate to 21,600 cubic metres.

Cost effectiveness

Whether the project offers value for money

 

This is a national research project which has been competitively quoted on.

WasteMINZ is contributing 1/3 of the costs through its strategic investment fund. The other 2/3 is being sought from councils.

The cost of participation for Canterbury (at $3,000) is low and allows an important national project to progress.

Reducing the harmful effects of wastes

Assess the risk from wastes of harm on the environment and human health in order to identify and take action on those wastes of greatest concern.

 

Plastic bags and plastic waste cause significant harm to the environment. In particular ocean plastic through litter.

Both plastic bag charges and container deposits are seen as key litter reduction measures, thus resulting in less plastics in the environment.

 

3.4.4   Medical waste at home

 

Project

Medical Waste at home (disposal, collection and education)

Total Cost

$2,000

Time Frame

4 - 6 weeks

Supervisor

Rowan Latham, Environment Canterbury

Region

Canterbury, contributes to national priorities

Outline

Undertake a review of the current disposal practices for medical waste generated by patients receiving at home care. There are three key areas to be considered:

·     Waste infrastructure capacity

·     Health and Safety

·     Education

 

Waste infrastructure capacity

Canterbury Public Health (CPH) have identified particular at home care patients, who may require additional waste infrastructure due to the quantity of waste generated through their at home treatment.

Current patient types identified requiring additional capacity: Peritoneal Dialysis patients, who dialyse 3-4 times daily.

·     CCC working with CPH on a solution (48 peritoneal patients).

·     Timaru offer a special consideration bin for patients on request.

Task: Contact CPH: what is the total number and location by TA of all Peritoneal Dialysis Patients?

Task: Are their additional waste streams/treatment types which need consideration?

Task: What additional capacity options do all Canterbury TA’s offer? (include capacity, cost and number of bins/services active)

Task: What notification system needs to be developed to link new patients with additional services?

 

Health and Safety

CPH have provided guidance on the appropriate waste classification for Dialysis waste: Non-hazardous waste (NZS4304:2002). However this is only true if patients are disposing of liquid wastes correctly. The potential risk that incorrect disposal of waste containing bodily fluids could occur needs to be managed, as such material would be classified as: Non-sharps hazardous: Infectious. Such waste would need to be managed appropriately (packaging and DG 6.2 label). For the purpose of this project it is acknowledged that at home collection of this waste is not a feasible option, patients need to be correctly disposing of any such bodily fluids to the sewer, not placing them into their landfill bin. However monitoring such behaviour is difficult and occurs once material is found in the domestic waste stream.

Additional consideration is given to the risks associated with any sharps entering the waste stream. While CPH has advised that all patients using sharps are provided sharps containers, the level of promotion about this service is unknown, see associated task in Education below.

There is additional concern in TA areas which operate a bagged refuse collection. The manual handling element to this collection methodology has heightened risks associated with needle stick injuries.

Task: review cases of incorrect disposal of material containing bodily fluids across Canterbury/New Zealand and provide recommendations for better education and information provided to patients to ensure correct disposal behaviour.

Task: Review H&S policies of TA’s operating bagged refuse collections. Are the risks associated with needle stick injuries appropriately managed? Is there need for sharing of information/best practice guideline?

 

Education

What information is required to reduce the risks associated with at home medical treatment?

Task: Review the availability of guidance on used sharps disposal. Is this information provided at Pharmacies, GP practices and hospitals?

Task: In addition to the above what guidance relating to Medical waste disposal is currently available, include:

·     Physical information, (leaflets posters etc.): Pharmacies, GP practices and hospitals, and

·     Online: TA, CPH and CDHB websites.

Task: Form recommendations on educational resources required.

Benefits

·     Improved information on the waste infrastructure requirements associated with at-home care.

·     Improved communication between health board and TA’s regarding additional capacity requirements

·     Coordinated H&S guidance for handling medical waste

·     Information relating to current education material available

·     Recommendations for development of additional education material to promote correct disposal of Medical waste

·     Reduces risks to waste collectors

·     Enhances the regions reputation for Managing difficult waste types

·     National applicability

Deliverables

Report outlining the investigation findings

Costs Breakdown

Project supervisor - in kind (staff time)

Student researcher - 20 hrs per week, 4 weeks ($25 x 80 hrs).

Evaluation Criteria

Delivery of a final report which addresses each Deliverable:

Task: Contact CPH: what is the total number and location by TA of all Peritoneal Dialysis Patients?

Task: Are their additional waste streams/treatment types which need consideration?

Task: What additional capacity options do all Canterbury TA’s offer? (include capacity, cost and number of bins/services active)

Task: What notification system needs to be developed to link new patients with additional services?

Task: review cases of incorrect disposal of material containing bodily fluids across Canterbury/New Zealand and provide recommendations for better education and information provided to patients to ensure correct disposal behaviour.

Task: Review H&S policies of TA’s operating bagged refuse collections. Are the risks associated with needle stick injuries appropriately managed? Is there need for sharing of information/best practice guideline?

Task: Form recommendations on educational resources required.

 

Achievability:

Achievable - assistance from TA and CPH contacts

Measurability

A report is produced that fulfils aims of the investigation with recommendations for education strategy.

 


 

3.4.5   Education Resources

Project

EDUCATION RESOURCES

Total Cost

$10,000

Time Frame

1 July 2016 to June 2017

Supervisor

Ruth Clarke, Timaru District Council

Sally Cracknell, Hurunui District Council

Region

CWJC region wide, and national access for members of One Planet website

Outline

To make customisable primary-level resources for schools available online

Benefits

To enable councils to customise resources for their district

To provide teachers with resources to present waste minimisation information using the waste hierarchy.

To promote activity-based learning

Resources will be continually updated (supplied by Hurunui District Council) and refreshed on the website.

Adding resources in a membership portal is expected to increase membership funding enabling further development of resources.

Deliverables

2 versions of the resource pack (one generic non-editable version (PDF) and 1 editable version in Word.

Note: the Hurunui version is about 70 pages long.

Costs Breakdown

$5,000 to buy material from Hurunui District Council

$3,000 for editing and uploading time

$2,000 to upgrade One Planet software to allow for members-only portal

Evaluation Criteria

Provide as much detail as possible for the evaluation criteria.

Achievability:

Projects must have the potential to succeed.

 

Rhys Taylor, who is already writing for the One Planet website, will do the editing and uploading.  Rhys is an experienced resource writer with website capability.

Measurability

Project outcomes must be able to be measured to ensure the delivered project outcomes can be evaluated at the completion of the project. (‘Measure to Manage’)  

 

The 2 versions will be available on the One Planet website in the members-only portal.

Improving resource efficiency

Projects should have the potential to improve resource efficiency, and to capitalise on potential economic benefits.

 

Resources will promote better understanding of environmental issues through personalised information and projects to promote a hand-on approach.

Quantity

Assess what effect the project will have on waste quantities, either tonnes or volumes

 

Not able to assess, but may impact on behaviours of reduction, reuse or recycling.

Cost effectiveness

Whether the project offers value for money

 

As the resources have already been created by Hurunui District Council, re-editing and uploading to enable more people to access makes better use of the resources than just being available in the Hurunui.  Such resources take a lot of time to compile, and the generosity of Hurunui DC in allowing these resource to be used for wider dissemination aids significantly in reducing costs.

Reducing the harmful effects of wastes

Assess the risk from wastes of harm on the environment and human health in order to identify and take action on those wastes of greatest concern.

 

Illegal dumping is addressed in the pack.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LFHW 2015 16 REPORT ON DELIVERABLES

46

 

 

Signatories

Author

Zefanja Potgieter - Senior Resource Planner Solid Waste

Approved By

Ross Trotter - Solid Waste Manager

John Mackie - Head of Three Waters and Waste

  


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

 

5.        Waste and Environmental Management Team (WEMT) Update Report

Reference:

16/1017560

Contact:

Zefanja Potgieter

zp@ccc.govt.nz

941 8271

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       This report summarises the work done by the Waste and Environmental Management Team (WEMT) during the period January - June 2016.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Canterbury Waste Joint Committee receives the information.

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       The report will be attached if it arrives on time, otherwise will be made available during the meeting, and presenter by Mr James Tricker of Environment Canterbury.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

WEMT report placeholder

50

 

 

Signatories

Author

Zefanja Potgieter - Senior Resource Planner Solid Waste

Approved By

Ross Trotter - Solid Waste Manager

John Mackie - Head of Three Waters and Waste

  


Canterbury Waste Joint Committee

15 September 2016

 

PDF Creator