Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Thursday 6 December 2018

Time:                                    9.30am

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Jamie Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

30 November 2018

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

Samantha Kelly

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 6227

samantha.kelly@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 4

2.       Declarations of Interest............................................................................................................ 4

3.       Public Participation.................................................................................................................. 4

3.1       Public Forum....................................................................................................................... 4

3.2       Deputations by Appointment............................................................................................... 4

4.       Presentation of Petitions......................................................................................................... 4

Community Board Monthly Reports

5.       Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council................................. 5

6.       Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council............. 15

7.       Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council........................................ 19

8.       Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council.......... 25

9.       Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council.................... 29

10.     Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council................... 35

11.     Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council......................................... 39

Community Board Part A Reports

12.     Barrington Mall access way improvements, Barrington Street (S-C)................................. 45

13.     Harewood Road Corridor Study Findings and Recommendations (F-W-H)....................... 65

14.     Harewood Road Corridor Study Findings and Recommendations (P-I)........................... 193

15.     Templeton Area - Proposed Speed Limit Review (H-H-R).................................................. 203

16.     Knights Stream and Longhurst  - Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit (H-H-R) 215

17.     Wigram Primary School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions (H-H-R)................................................................................................. 227

18.     Knights Stream School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions (H-H-R)........................................................................................ 235

19.     Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk - Request for Proposals Results and New Lease (L-C-H)....... 243

Staff Reports

20.     Draft submission on the National Disaster Resilience Strategy........................................ 259

21.     Refining the Committee structure....................................................................................... 277

22.     Resolution to Exclude the Public......................................................................................... 307  

 

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation

3.1  Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2  Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared

4.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

5.        Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1222470

Presenter(s):

Karolin Potter, Community Board Chairperson
Melanie Coker, Community Board Deputy Chairperson
Chris Turner-Bullock, Community Governance Manager, Spreydon-Cashmere

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board report for November 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held meetings on 7 and 23 November 2018.  Decisions made under delegation at those meetings were:

·   Approval of a grant of $500 from its 2018/19 Youth Development Fund to Amelia Montague McLuskie towards undertaking a research project on Perceptions of Safety for Prospective Chinese Visitors to New Zealand at Peking University, Beijing, China.

·   Approval of a grant of $300 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to St Martins Ōpāwa Club towards the Club’s Bus Trip to Hanmer Springs.

·   Approval of revocation of all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street, from its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for 192 metres.

·   Approval of revocation all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, from its intersection with Kinver Place southeasterly to its intersection with Stourbridge Street.

·   Approval of revocation of all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, from its intersection with Stourbridge Street southeasterly for 59 metres.

·   Approval that the right turn for vehicles, that have entered Barrington Street from the Barrington Mall exit, be prohibited.

·   Approval of lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes, pedestrian refuge island and road surface changes, on Barrington Street between Kinver Place and Athelstan Street.

·   Approval of no stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street from its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for 39.5 metres.

·   Approval of 15 minutes parking on the north east side of Barrington Street 39.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for 34 metres.

·   Approval  of no stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 73.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for four metres.

·   Approval of a Bus Stop on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at point 77.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly direction for 14 metres.

·   Approval of no stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street 91.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for a distance of 53.5 metres

·   Approval of 120 minute parking and disabled person’s parking on the northeast side of Barrington Street, 145 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, northwesterly for a distance of seven metres.

·   Approval of no stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street 152 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for six metres.

·   Approval  of 120 minutes parking and disabled person’s parking permit on the northeast side of Barrington Street 158 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly direction for seven metres.

·   Approval of 30 minutes parking on the north east side of Barrington Street 165 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street northwesterly for a distance of 26 metres.

·   Approval t of no stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place southeasterly for a distance of six metres.

·   Approval of a bus stop on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at point 6 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending southeasterly for a distance of 14 metres.

·   Approval of no stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 20 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending southeasterly to its intersection with Stourbridge Street.

·   Approval of no stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending southeasterly for 59 metres.

·   Approving an allocation of $1,500 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to the 2018/19 Off the Ground Fund.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Barrington Mall access way improvements, Barrington Street.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Barrington Mall access way improvements, Barrington Street

There have for some time been concerns about the safety of the Barrington Mall entrance/exit on to Barrington Street. The entrance/exit is an interface between motor vehicles turning both right and left into and out from the mall carpark and pedestrians accessing the mall, the adjacent Spreydon Library, bus stops and local shops. The local residents association, the Spreydon Neighbourhood Network in particular has advocated for changes to the configuration of the entrance. Staff have worked with the mall owners and management and residents to develop a proposal that will remove the right turn out of the carpark and incorporates a number of other safety improvements.

A report on the proposal has been consulted and came to the Board for consideration at its meeting on 23 November 2018. The Board’s recommendation to the Council on this are included in this agenda see item 4.1.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Hoon Hay Flooding Issues

Residents in the vicinity of Copenhagen Place/ Marion Street and Weir Place, Hoon Hay have expressed concerned about localised flooding in their streets. Although there has been flooding in Copenhagen/Marion for 40 years or more Weir Place residents advise that there have been more flooding events since the 2011 earthquakes.

A residents meeting was held on 9th December 2017 to discuss the issues with land drainage staff and Board members in attendance. It was agreed at the meeting that staff would investigate the matters raised and provide feedback.

A memorandum explaining the investigations undertaken and commenting on measures already underway or which may be taken to alleviate the flooding has now been prepared by the Land Drainage Unit for distribution to residents. The Board has invited residents to a follow up meeting on 6 December to discuss the information provided.

 

6.2       Hoon Hay Fiesta / South West School Cluster Cultural Festival

The annual Hoon Hay Fiesta is an event run as a collaboration between the local Hoon Hay Community and the Board. This year’s fiesta was held in Hoon Hay Park on 15 November 2018 from 4pm to 7pm.This Fiesta included a partnership with the South West School Cluster Cultural Festival that saw six local schools performing at the Fiesta, and with the Pacific Series rugby league competition that celebrates Christchurch Pacific, Maori and Ethnic communities.

The Fiesta was extremely well attended (with approximately 3,000 people joining in) and enjoyed as usual. The cultural festival component was amazing. The Pacific Series was held in Hoon Hay Park over the weekend of 16-17 November 2018.

Hoon Hay Fiesta

Hoon Hay Fiesta

6.3       Predator Free Ernle Clark

A local community group, “Predator Free Ernle Clark” has been set up to work for the protection of Ernle Clark Reserve from predators. The group recently received an “Off the Ground” fund grant to hold an event in the reserve to raise awareness of its objectives and offer an opportunity for people to build their own rat traps. The event was held on 10th November from 11am to 1pm. The trap building was followed by a Barbecue. The event was well attended with 70-90 people taking part.

Predator Free

 

Predator Free

 

6.4       West Spreydon School Pool opening

West Spreydon School Pool was rebuilt before and after the earthquakes thanks to the drive and Fundraising ability of the local community. The Board supported the rebuild with a grant from its Discretionary Response Fund and sponsored a programme to provide season’s access to families who might not otherwise be able to afford it. The pool initially opened last season and opened for this season on Saturday 17 November 2018.


 

6.5       Addington Fair

The annual Addington Fun Fair was successfully held on Saturday 24 November in Church Square, despite the wet weather, although the usual music concert was unable to go ahead. Stalls and entertainments included preschool carollers and the Faerie Circle. The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Chairperson, and Community Development Worker donned their traditional Tweedle-Dum and Tweedle-Dee costumes to gather views about intensified housing, bus lane proposals for Lincoln Road and Moorhouse Avenue, and the pending Manuka Cottage replacement build. In addition, participants were able to judge and comment on the progress of the Voice of Addington Plan that expresses local aspirations collected over several years at the Fair and other events. Most respondents identified some or good progress.

Addington Fair

Addington Fair

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Age Friendly Cashmere

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan 2017-19’s focus on building strong communities includes the creation of an “Age-Friendly” Action Plan.  The initiative was launched in July 2018 and the Age-friendly Spreydon-Cashmere Steering Group comprising elected members, community representatives and staff was formed on 21 August with the aim of developing and delivering the action plan.

The following four starter priorities and collaborative groups were agreed: Social Isolation - Participation/connection; Transport; Inclusiveness and Health and Wellbeing.  These subgroups undertook to meet and identify goals/actions in their respective areas.  Most of the subgroups met and prepared goal/s and actions in their areas which were reported back to the wider committee meeting on 16 October.  That meeting resulted in a further subgroup Planning and Communications being set up to work on operating policies for the committee to consider to take matters forward.  At its meeting on Tuesday 13 November 2018 the steering Committee meeting considered draft operating policies, the need to report to the Board and the form that reporting might take. The committee will next meet in February 2019.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Cross Over Trust

The Cross Over Trust operates as a Council funded Key Local Project implementing the Primary Project that provides liaison workers with the Rowley, West Spreydon, and Addington school communities to strengthen family and children's participation and achievement in education, recreation and community.  The Trust has also created the Origin Sport strategy that delivers innovative approaches that include children of the Sacred Heart, Cashmere Primary, and Hoon Hay schools in sports participation. 

It is five years since the Primary Project was established and Origin Sport began seven years ago. At its meeting on 7 November 2018 the Board approved a grant of $3,000 from its 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Cross Over Trust towards the costs of the an evaluation of its projects.

The Trust reported the results of the evaluation at a Board Seminar on 19 October 2018. The evaluation indicates positive results from the Trust’s work. A copy of the full report will be provided to the Board and the Trust will come back for a further conversation early next year once the Board has had time to digest the report.


 

8.2       Manuka Cottage

The Addington community development project known as “Manuka Cottage’ has operated in Addington since the 1990s with the support of the Spreydon/Heathcote and Spreydon- Cashmere Community Boards as a Key Local Project.  As a result of the earthquakes Manuka Cottage was forced to re-locate from its former premises at 45 Dickens Street and has been in temporary accommodation since.

"Manuka Cottage” was the first community development project to benefit from the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board bids to the Capital Endowment Fund for property purchase in 2012.  A site on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve has been identified as the site of a new cottage style community centre under Council ownership. Consultation has been undertaken and a tendering process for the design and build of the new Manuka Cottage on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve carried out.

An evaluation has recently been undertaken of the community development processes, outcomes and impacts of Manuka Cottage. The evaluation which was shared with the Board at its meeting on 19 October 2018 included data from volunteers, participants, staff and community stakeholders. The evaluation noted the Cottage’s firm basis of community development and that participants report improved well-being following on from their involvement in the cottages activities.

Significant support for the cottage’s move to its, yet to be constructed, new premises was also noted.

 

8.3       Spreydon Youth Community Trust

The Board recently received an update on the Spreydon Youth Community Trust 24/7 youth workers programme. The 24/7 youth workers programme that provides continuous support for young people started locally and is now being provided nationwide. Recent research indicated that of 5,000 surveyed nationally 92% indicated that the programme had benefitted their life in some way.


 

8.4       Petani Craft Group  

A group of local Tongan women have produced their first series of fabric creations since forming just over six months ago to exchange craft and cultural skills and knowledge, as well as developing practical sewing skills for home use. The group has received Creative New Zealand funding for the craft productions, and the Board provided a small grant towards the cost of a sewing machine. The results of the group’s efforts were displayed and celebrated at the Tongan Methodist church in Selwyn Street on 24 November: traditional quilting patterns making up duvet covers, pillows and cushions. The group has grown by several members since its inception, and aims to continue to expand.

Petani Craft Group

8.5       Hoon Hay Community Centre

In October 2018 the Board made a grant of $1,759 from its Discretionary Response Fund to the committee operating 90 Hoon Hay Road as a community centre towards the costs of purchasing additional seating and a whiteboard for the centre. The group has reported that seating capacity has been increased from 22 to 44 making the venue more attractive and accommodating for community meetings and hirers. The chairs can be used indoors and outdoors as they are easily moved. The use of the centre over the past year has increased, enabling running costs to be met and more recently insurance costs as well.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

6.        Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/847097

Presenter(s):

Pam Richardson, Community Board Chairperson
Joan Blatchford, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board report for November 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū/Banks Peninsula Community Board held meetings on 29 October and 12 November.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Proposed Parking Restrictions - Sign of The Kiwi – the Board approved time restrictions (9.00am – 5.00pm) parks, mobility parks, motorcycle parks and no stopping restrictions for the area adjacent to the Sign of the Kiwi but asked that staff monitor parking demand and vehicle movements across different seasons with a view to road safety management, and report back to the Board next May.

·   Project Lyttelton Lease – the Board granted a 15 year lease to Project Lyttelton for part of 54a Oxford Street, Lyttelton, where it operates a community garden and community trading centre.

·   Funding – the Board approved a grant of $2,000 from its 2018-19 Discretionary Response Fund to the Little River Playcentre towards soft fall bark for the outdoor area.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There are no Part A reports this month.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

          Naval Point Development Plan    

5.1       The Board received an update on the design options and consultation process for the Naval Point Development Plan

Akaroa Wharf Renewal Project

5.2       The Board received an update from the Project Manager who reported on upcoming engagement with key stakeholders and communications and engagement planning.

 

Banks Peninsula Road Maintenance Working Party

5.3       Three community members have been appointed to the Road Maintenance Working Party, which has now had an initial meeting and is scheduled to meet again on 23 November 2018.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forum, Deputations and Correspondence     

6.1       Little River Flooding - Janet Reeves and Glynis Dobson spoke to the Board regarding flooding in the Little River town centre that occurs after rain and results in large puddles outside the Little River Service Centre.  The Board has referred the issue to staff for investigation and report back to create a safer parking area in Little River, and asked staff to follow up with the New Zealand Transport Agency about the open drain alongside the road.

6.2       Lyttelton Port Company and Hectors Dolphins - Genevieve Robinson presented to the Board again regarding the impact of pile driving in Lyttelton Harbour on Hectors Dolphins. The Board asked staff to follow up with the Lyttelton Port Company to make this information available as a matter of urgency in light of piling being due to start mid to late November.  The Board also acknowledged the high level of commitment from the Lyttelton Port Company towards environmental matters as a partner in the Whaka Ora Healthy Harbour.

6.3       Black Cat Building, Akaroa Wharf - Paul Milligan, Chief Executive of Black Cat Cruises, provided an update to the Board on the removal of unlicensed structures that Black Cat have been instructed to remove from the Akaroa Wharf.  He has had some of the signage removed, but has not yet removed the wooden buildouts, ramps, stairs and handrails as he is awaiting a full report from Council staff advising how Black Cat can create a safe internal access to the building for the public.

6.4       Port Hills Reserves - Wendy Everingham spoke to the Board regarding her concern that illegal tracks were constantly being formed on the Port Hills, including some in areas that were still closed because of rockfall risk.  The Board agreed to pass this information to staff, with a request for them to take appropriate action, and also requested that staff provide information on any liability issues the Council has if people are hurt accessing closed reserves.

6.5       Sign of the Kiwi, Proposed Parking – Karolin Potter (Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board) and Mary O’Connor, both spoke to the Board regarding proposed parking changes at the Sign of the Kiwi.

Committee, subcommittee and working party meetings

6.6       The Board received minutes from the Akaroa Design and Appearance Advisory Committee meeting that was held on 3 October, 2018.  The meeting considered plans for signage for the Black Cat building on the Akaroa Wharf.

6.7       The Board received minutes from six Reserve Management Committee meetings:

·    Duvauchelle Reserve Management Committee – 20 August 2018

·    Cass Bay Reserve Management Committee – 23 August 2018

·    Okains Bay Reserve Management Committee – 2 October 2018

·    Lyttelton Reserve Management Committee – 8 October 2018

·    Duvauchelle Reserve Management Committee – 7 September 2018

·    Cass Bay Reserve Management Committee – 18 October 2018

 

Briefings

6.8       The Gaiety - staff provided an update to the Board on the work at The Gaiety, which involves, ongoing maintenance work, replacement of roof, floorboards, toilets and weatherboards, a lighting upgrade and treatment for borer.

6.9       Firefighting Water Supplies in Rural Areas - staff from Council and Fire and Emergency New Zealand provided a briefing to the Board regarding water supplies for firefighting in rural areas, and in particular Birdlings Flat.  Currently rural communities have restricted supplies of potable water, which are inadequate for firefighting purposes so they have to provide an alternative supply for firefighting.  New requirements in the District Plan appear unsuitable for small rural communities and residents of communities such as Birdlings Flat do not want to have to install an additional tank per property to provide water solely for firefighting.  Staff have suggested that tanks specifically for firefighting be installed on Council or public land to remedy the situation.  However no funding is available for this.  The Board has asked for an options report on this issue.

6.10    Project Lyttelton - Strategic Plan for Lyttelton Recreation Centre - the Board received a briefing from Project Lyttelton on its project to activate the centre.  Usage has more than doubled over the year and volunteers have provided a reception service during core hours.  The briefing included a vision for a community led organisational structure and plans for the future layout and use of the Recreation Centre.  The Board noted that it would require further information on this project, including the strategic context and a breakdown of the consultation, before it could consider supporting the concept.

6.11    Community Events Implementation Plan – staff briefed the Board on this Plan.

6.12    Little River Rating District Update – the Board received a briefing from Environment Canterbury staff on tree removal work around Little River waterways.

6.13    Okeina/Okains Bay Reserves Management Plan – the Board was updated on the review of the Okeina (Okains Bay) Reserves Management Plan.

6.14    Stormwater Plan – the Board received an update on the Banks Peninsula Settlements Stormwater Management Plan (SMP) and requested that staff review the existing drainage plans of small communities, such as Little River and Okains Bay, before writing the draft Banks Peninsula SMP.

6.15    Britomart Memorial Landscape Plan – the Board received a briefing on the draft landscape plan for the Britomart Memorial reserve and has asked staff to report back on the next steps in this process.

6.16    Maintenance Contracts – at its 1 November meeting the Council requested that staff provide information to the Board in time for the next Community Board Council meeting (6 December) around contractors, levels of service and maintenance - around when contracts expire and what can be included in new contracts to ensure better levels of service. Staff briefed the Board on this and agreed to the following actions:

·    Contractors will attend Board meetings to update and interact with the Board.

·    Staff will keep the Board informed regarding new contract preparations.

·    Staff will investigate mapping maintenance areas under contract to identify responsibilities and possible gaps in service.

·    Staff will follow up on the employment of an extra Parks Ranger for Banks Peninsula as approved in the Long Term Plan.

·    Parks staff will monitor contracts closely and report to the Board bi-monthly.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The next six monthly progress report against the Board Plan is due as at 31 December 2018 and will be reported to the Board in the new year.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest  

8.1       Dyers Pass Road - the Board requested information from staff on reports that large vehicles (buses) are having to perform three-point turns to negotiate some of the corners on Dyers Pass Road, including information on whether the Council can regulate to prevent this.

8.2       Beach Road, Akaroa - the Board has thanked staff for arranging the replacement of limestone chip and filling of potholes on the Akaroa waterfront.

8.3       Community Orchard/Garden - the Board agreed to provide a letter of support to residents wanting to use the land at the corner of Somes Road and Norton Close, Lyttelton for a community orchard/garden.

8.4       Dogs on Akaroa Beach - the Board requested that staff carry out monitoring and compliance action in relation to dogs being taken onto the Akaroa Beach.

8.5       Lyttelton Port Company Drilling - the Board asked to be informed of the actions taken by the Council in response to its questions to the Lyttelton Port Company on 19 October 2018.

8.6       Akaroa Toilets - the Board requested that staff take action to provide an additional five to six temporary toilets near the Britomart toilet block to cater for the increased demand from cruise ship passengers.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Liz Carter - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

7.        Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1186190

Presenter(s):

Kim Money, Community Board Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board report for November 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waitai/Coastal-Burwood Community Board held meetings on 5 November and 19 November.  Decisions made under delegation were as follows. The Board:

·   Approved the QEII Park No Stopping and Parking Restrictions pursuant to Part 1 Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw.

·   Approved Te Rama Place No Stopping Restrictions pursuant to Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

·   Approved Queenspark Drive Bus Stop Relocation pursuant to Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and the Christchurch City Council Delegations Register.

·   Approved the proposed Bus Stop on Prestons Road near Bluestone Drive.

·   Approved the making of grants from its 2018/19 Youth Development to five individuals to assist with costs to:

·     Represent Canterbury in the Under 18 Mixed Touch Team at the Touch Canterbury Tournament.

·     Represent Canterbury in the Under 14 Girls Red Touch Team at the Touch Canterbury Tournament.

·     Participate in the Aon Maadi Cup.

·     Compete at the 2019 Challenge Cup in Abu Dhabi as part of the New Zealand Women's Under 18 Ice Hockey Team.

·     Attend the Riverside Rangers Minor Ice Hockey Association Annual International Bantam/Midget Tournament in Windsor, Ontario, Canada as part of the K & B Slovakia All Stars Ice Hockey Team.

·   Discretionary Response funding was approved for:

·     South Brighton Community Toy Library – operational costs.

·     Northshore Residents Association - Northshore Pest Trapping.

·     Touch New Zealand - Aranui Community Touched Project.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

There were no Part A recommendations.

 

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area       

5.1       New Brighton Regeneration

Development Christchurch Limited provided the Board with an update on the Christchurch Hot Pools. Work on the complex will begin in early 2019 which will sit between the new playground and the existing sea side car park, at the site of the old whale pool. Aligning with the work that Development Christchurch Limited is progressing, New Brighton Streetscape improvements work will be delivered by Council. The projects are working closely to ensure alignment of design and optimisation of regeneration outcomes.  Five hot salt water pools will be tiered and will range in temperature from 40 degrees Celsius to 28C for the fitness pool and a small circular plunge pool will sit at 12C. The pools will be split into four zones including passive therapeutic, fitness, family passive and family active zones. There will be two buildings either side of the pools housing changing rooms, the steam room and sauna, toilets, a plant room and cafe.

Location of the Christchurch Hot Pools

 

5.2       Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor Project

Regenerate Christchurch provided an update to the Board on the draft Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor Regeneration Plan. The plan will enable short, medium and long-term uses of approximately 600 ha of land within the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor, providing guidance about the area for:

• Residents

• Manawhenua

• Infrastructure providers, including Council

• Wider community

Public consultation runs from 14 November to 19 December 2018 and the Board plans to submit feedback to Regenerate Christchurch on the draft Plan.

 

 

5.3       Renewal of Water mains in McBratneys Road

This renewal will replace and upgrade the existing water mains, which are reaching the end of their life, on McBratneys road from Banks Avenue/Dallington Terrace to Gayhurst Road. Work has commenced and is expected to continue until late January 2019.

5.4       Draft QEII Park Master Plan

Public consultation is currently open for the draft QEII Park Master Plan with the two-month feedback period running until 13 December 2018. The draft plan proposes a long-term vision for QEII Park, considering opportunities and development priorities.  Members of the community have taken advantage of drop in sessions provided by Council staff including guided walks around the park. A Hearings Panel is due to consider the submissions in February next year.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

  

6.1       Rockabilly Show & Shine 2018

Image may contain: 1 person, on stage and outdoor

Rockabilly Show & Shine 2018 was held on a stunning spring day at Rawhiti Domain, New Brighton on Saturday 10 November. Approximately 15000 people came along to the event.

Rockabilly Show & Shine 2018 held at Rawhiti Domain

6.2       ANZAC Fire Station

The ANZAC fire Station are holding an open day on Saturday 8 December 2018. It is a great opportunity for families to meet the crew, receive advice on smoke alarms and take part in an evacuation challenge, there will also be a physical competencies assessment on offer for children.

6.3       New Brighton Seaside Christmas Parade

The New Brighton Seaside Christmas Parade is a fun community parade and a chance to shop around New Brighton Seaside Market while some great entertainment happens and Santa meets the kids in his Grotto. There will be a huge array of arts, crafts giftware and delicious food, a bouncy castle for the littlies and free face painting. An opportunity to meet Santa as he arrives by boat on New Brighton Beach at 10.15am, the parade begins at 10.30am on the corner of Marine Parade and Hawke Street. The Concert begins after the Parade and Santa's Grotto opens at approx. 11:30. The Market runs from 10am - 2pm.

6.4       Residents’ Association Forum

The Coastal-Burwood Community Governance team and Coastal-Burwood Community Board held their final Residents’ Association Forum of the year on Monday 12 November 2018 at the New Brighton Union Parish Church Hall. The Forum was an opportunity for the Community Board and Governance Team Staff to engage with Residents’ Association representatives from across the ward to discuss topics of relevance as well as to provide a networking opportunity for all.  At the Forum, the QEII Master Plan was discussed and the Board sought feedback from Residents’ Associations on how they would like to be engaged by the Board. 

An update was shared on the QEII Park Master Plan

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board approved the Coastal-Burwood Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 16 October 2017. This Plan, can be found at the following link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/Community-Boards/Coastal-Burwood-Community-Board-Plan-2017-19.pdf

7.2       The Board’s ongoing decisions are being included as measures against the Outcomes and Priorities contained in the 2017 – 2019 Community Board Plan.

8.   Community Board Matters of Interest 

8.1       The Board’s Submissions Committee prepared and lodged a submission on the Draft Suburban Parking Policy 2018.

8.2       Burwood, Avondale and Dallington Community Group

The Burwood, Avondale and Dallington community group meetings continue to happen monthly. The group is supported by Coastal-Burwood Community Governance staff and Board members. The group are currently organising three community events, one in each area as well as a combined event to be held in March of 2019.

The group are completing a feasibility study with regards to having a combined Community Hub to collectively service the three suburbs. The Burwood, Avondale and Dallington areas have dramatically reduced community spaces/places as a result of the 2010/2011 earthquakes with approximately over half of the land and housing lost to the red zone.

8.3       New Brighton Project

The Board received a briefing from the New Brighton Project about a number of initiatives they run in the New Brighton area.  These include the highly successful Seaside Market which attracts people from all over the city to the area every Saturday, the Blanket Bank which provides blankets and bedding packs to a range of agencies across the city, and the local newsletter ‘The Wave’ which keeps the community up to date with what is happening locally. 

Picture

 

8.4       Keep Christchurch Beautiful (KCB School Awards)


A celebration was held on 21 November 2018 for the KCB School Awards. It was really inspiring to see children participating in keeping our city clean green and beautiful.

                       

KCB School Awards

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Peter Croucher - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

8.        Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1221971

Presenter(s):

Sam MacDonald, Community Board Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board report for November 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held meetings on 12 November and 26 November 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2018-19 Discretionary Response Fund - the Board approved funding to the Canterbury Westland Kindergarten Association (Kidsfirst) - Hawthornden towards the purchase of equipment for their Avonhead Park and Cemetery project.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2018-19 Discretionary Response Fund - the Board approved funding towards a variety of initiatives as part of the Bishopdale Regeneration project.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2018-19 Youth Development Fund - the Board approved funding to ten young people towards participating in various events.

·   Roydvale Reserve Infill Quarry Remnant - the Board approved the infilling of the quarry remnant, drainage works and sowing of grass on Roydvale Reserve at no cost to Council and subject to Resource Consent being granted.

·   Right-of-Way Name - the Board approved the right-of-way name 'Styxspring Lane' at 384 Sawyers Arms Road.

·   Gardiners Road - Provision of Bus Stops Between Harewood Road and Sawyers Arms Road - the Board approved new bus stops beside 2 St Ives Street and 30 Gardiners Road and requested that the provision of bus stops in proximity to Cullahill Street be reviewed within six months.  The Board also requested that staff investigate moving the west bound bus stop on Harewood Road, near the Breen Road intersection.

·   Proposed Bus Stop Relocation - 78 Rushmore Drive re Bus Stop on main North Road - The Board approved that a marked bus stop being installed on the north-west side of Main North Road near its intersection with Darroch Street.

·   Proposed Remediation of Existing Bus Stop - 420 to 422 Memorial Avenue - The Board approved that a marked bus stop be installed on the north-east side of Memorial Avenue south-east of its intersection with Stableford Green.

·   Wooldridge Road Proposed No Stopping Restrictions and Flush Median - The Board approved the installation of no stopping restrictions commencing on at the intersection of Wooldridge Road and Wairakei Road.

·   Roto Kohato Reserve - Management of Reserve - The Board resolved to endorse the Roto Kohatu Reserve safety imnprovement work to enable vehicle access along the access road Lake Rua carpark; enlarge the carpark at Lake Rua to accommodate 150 cars; widen a section of access road to make it safer for users; install signage to inform and update park users of Lake Rua activities, the Sayer Arms Road entrance and the top carpark.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

4.1       Harewood Road Corridor Study The Board’s consideration and recommendation of the Harewood Road Corridor Study will be considered by the Council at its meeting in conjunction with the recommendations from the Papanui-Innes Community Board.

5.   Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Temporary Closure of Fendalton Library and Service Centre     

The Fendalton Library building will be closing for a period of five months for HVAC repairs and building refurbishment.  The last day that the service centre will be open to the public is 1 March 2019 and the library 2 March 2019.  The building will re-open to the public at the end of July 2019.

Temporary locations for the service centre and Community Governance staff are still to be confirmed.

During the building closure, the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board will be holding their Board meetings at Ōrauwhata: Bishopdale Library and Community Centre.

5.2       Jellie Park Recreation and Sports Centre

Vandalism at Jellie Park Recreation and Sport Centre has delayed the reopening of the newly-repaired and upgraded outdoor pool by a few days.  Vandals jumped a fence last Wednesday night and punched more than 50 holes in a new pool liner about to be installed in the 50 metre pool.

The outdoor pool, along with the outdoor hydroslide and surrounding pool area, was originally set to open on Monday 3 December but will now open on Saturday 8 December, depending on the weather.

The incident has been reported to the police. Any additional costs incurred as a result of the vandalism attack will be covered by the construction insurance.          

6.   Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

All Souls Church, Merivale    

6.1       On Saturday 3 November 2018, the newly completed All Souls Church held a community fun day to welcome the local community to the new building.  The church is located on the site of St Mary's in Church Lane, Merivale.  St Mary's Church was significantly damaged in the 2011 earthquake and they have since merged with St Matthew's Church, St Albans and combined to create the All Souls Church.

6.2       The new building will be home to the Merevale Corner Community Centre which receives funding from the Community Board and provides a range of activities and programmes for the community, particularly older adults.

   

 

Celebrate Bishopdale

6.3       The Celebrate Bishodale event, scheduled to be held on Sunday, 15 November 2018, was cancelled due to the weather.  The Skate Jam component of the event was resecheduled for Saturday 1 December 2018.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The next progress report against the Community Board Plan will be presented to the Board at its first meeting in 2019.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Maryanne Lomax - Community Development Advisor

Bronwyn Frost - Support Officer

Lisa Gregory - Community Recreation Advisor

Margaret Henderson - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Maryanne Lomax - Community Development Advisor

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

9.        Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1149134

Presenter(s):

Mike Mora, Community Board Chairperson
Peter Dow, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board report for November 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held meetings on 30 October 2018, 13 November 2018 and 27 November 2018.  Decisions made under delegation included:

·   Approval of No U-Turn Restrictions at the Blenheim Road/Annex Road Intersection.

·   Approval of No Right Turn and No U-turn Restrictions on Main South Road.

·   Approval of intersection improvements at the Halswell Junction Road/Nicholls Road intersection.

·   Approval of Bus Stop relocation at 212 Main South Road.

·   Approval for an extension of the Canterbury Society of Model and Experimental Engineers train shed at Halswell Domain.

·   Approval of the following road names:

·     Buchanans Road (RMA/2013/1182), 221 Buchanans Road

Mary Carpenter Avenue

Ada Wells Court

Arabella Crescent

·   Allocations of Youth Development funding to 13 local recipients.

·   Allocation of Discretionary Response funding to one organisation.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for the Council’s consideration:

4.1       Templeton Area – Proposed Speed Limit Changes

4.2       Knight Stream and Longhurst – Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit

4.3       Knight Stream School – Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions

4.4       Wigram Primary School – Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions

4.5       Proposed Sale of Land (Public Excluded)

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Strengthening Community Fund Projects

5.1.1   Halswell Heritage Garden

The Cashmere Garden Group have enhanced the garden area with new plantings by Paterson House at the Halswell Quarry.  This was made possible through the use of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board’s Ward Enhancement Fund. 

This group holds working bees on a regular basis. Funding covered plants, together with a hose and fittings to enable the group to water the gardens, as needed. As many as eight members of the group have attended these working bees, making for productive gardening sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


5.1.2   Oaklands Primary School Eco Warriors

The Oaklands Primary School Eco Warriors Team received the National Champions Award in the Junior Community Problem Solving Category at the 25th Future Problem Solving National Championships in Auckland. 

The team (Charlie Barnes, Keisha Byrne, Bea Christie, Ben Hanson, Max McAlister, Isis McKenzie, Madison McKenzie, Aden Veint and Thomas White) have been working hard to develop their project of making Oaklands School rubbish-free and will be continuing with this project in 2019.

       

5.2       Community Facilities (updates and future plans)

5.2.1   Halswell Hub, Halswell Community Project - a lease extension of the former Halswell library building has been completed for a further six months period.  This is in keeping with other leases around the city and is in line with the community facilities review currently being undertaken. 

5.2.2   The former Link building, Wycola Avenue – the building has been vacant since 2017 when the Garden City Fellowship relinquished its lease.  Expressions of interest are being sought by the end of this year. A small number of local groups have been registering interest so far.  The Plunket building alongside the Link building, is also vacant. The Council’s Leasing Team is currently reviewing ways that this building can be utilised.

5.3       Infrastructure projects underway

5.3.1   Harrington Park

With the recent completion of the public toilet, the remaining wall of the building is to be painted and should be achieved once school examinations have finished.

Feedback obtained from the playground upgrade engagement is informing the landscape plan which is under development.  On its completion, the draft plan will be presented to the Board before proceeding to consultation.

5.3.2   Halswell Skate Park

Work is progressing on the construction of the new skate park at the Halswell Domain with completion expected by the end of this year.

A Skate Jam to mark the opening of both the Knights Stream and Halswell Skate Parks will be held on Friday 18 January 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


5.3.3   Riccarton Community Centre

Resource and building consents have both been granted. 

Tenders for the construction of the new building have closed. The Project Team is negotiating with contractors and expect to make an appointment soon for a commencement on site of late November/early December 2018.  A small sod turning ceremony will be held.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       Riccarton Bus Lounge/Division Street Anti-Social Behaviour

Feedback from local businesses, New Zealand Police and the community indicate that youth related anti-social behaviour in the area around the bus lounge has abated considerably. 

Following a discussion between the Mayor and the Police District Commander in late 2017, the New Zealand Police through Senior Sergeant Stephen McDaniel, committed to increasing their presence around the bus lounge, noting that this would be dependent on resourcing.  There has been a reduction in requests associated with incidents to the Police's Crime Prevention Camera Co-ordinator.

While incident reports from the security company indicate that there has been isolated instances of anti-social behaviour, this has not always been attributable to young people and is no more frequent than other similar gathering places.

6.2       Yaldhurst War Memorial Hall – Update

At its meeting on 13 November 2018, the Board received a deputation from the Yaldhurst community seeking a time extension to enable the completion of a business case regarding the community’s future plans for the building.

At this same meeting,the Board also considered a staff report which included a recommendation for the demolition of the building.

The Board decided to give the Yaldhurst community until April 2019 to complete its plan for presentation back to the Board.

6.3       Events Report Back

6.3.1   Riccarton Street Party

The tenth annual Riccarton Street Party, held on Elizabeth Street on Sunday 4 November 2018 was enjoyed by a large crowd, despite a strong wind which kept organisers busy securing marquees and bouncy castles from taking flight. 

Over the three hours, the local community enjoyed a variety of entertainment and offerings including free food and clothing. 

The multicultural diversity of the local community was reflected in those attending and the availability of a variety of ethnic food.  Monitoring undertaken on noise levels from the stage entertainment, which included local talent and El Grego the magician, was not excessive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


6.4       Upcoming Events

6.4.1   Hornby Hoops

Hornby Hoops will be held on Friday 7 December 2018 from 4pm to 9pm.

The event is run in partnership with the Christchurch City Council, the Community Development Network Trust and Hornby High School to provide a 3v3 youth basketball tournament aimed at young people aged 13 to 19 years.

6.4.2   Global Christmas

Global Christmas will be held on Saturday 8 December 2018 from 5pm to 10pm at Ray Blank Park. The event was organised and run by the Philippine Culture and Migrant Services and showcased how Christmas is celebrated by the many different cultures in Christchurch. 

6.4.3   Fun Day on the Park

Fun Day on the Park was held on Sunday 2 December 2018 from 2pm to 4.30pm at Denton Park.

Organised by the Greater Hornby Residents’ Association, the event was a family fun day bringing together people of all ages from the greater Hornby area.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       Updates are being presented quarterly (March, June, September and December) to the Board throughout 2018 on its Community Plan 2017-19  to measure progress against the Board’s approved outcomes and priorities.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Peter Dow - Community Governance Manager

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Noela Letufuga - Support Officer

Approved By

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

10.    Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1151354

Presenter(s):

Sally Buck, Community Board Chairperson
Arohanui Grace, Community Governance Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board report for November 2018.

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held meetings on 29 October and 14 November 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

3.1       The Board approved:

·    Parking Restrictions in:

·    Tuam Street at England Street, Phillipstown

·    Buckleys Road, Linwood

·    Hutcheson Street, Sydenham

·    Nuttall Drive/Desi Place

·   Barbadoes Street – Installation of accessible parking.

·   Nuttall Drive/Desi Place – Give Way Control.

·   200 Milton Street – Naming of right of way to Shingle Lane.

·   Chesterfields Reserve Landscape Plan – Retrospectively approved the alteration to the Reserve Landscape Plan and acknowledged the donation from Williams Corporation to the Chesterfields Community.

3.2       The Board agreed:

·   To lay the report for the relocation of the bus stop outside of 109 Nayland Street until staff have investigated the relocation of the bus stop to outside of 105 Nayland Street.

·   To lay the report for a grant of $16,000 from its 2018-19 Discretionary Response Fund to Edmonds Factory Gardens until the Board hold a funding workshop in late January 2019.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk – Request for Proposals Results and New Lease.  

The following report presenting Part A recommendation from the Board was forwarded to the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee:

4.2       Community Development Approach to Street Based Sex Work – Quarterly Progress Report.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Linwood Pool

5.1       The Project Team have undertaken site surveys and commenced geotechnical investigations.  In parallel the team are proceeding with site planning to explore requirements for each of the spaces within the facility and identify how these would best be positioned on site.  The proposed spatial arrangements will be captured within initial sketches to be shared with the Community Board and then wider community in early December 2018 (Community Open Day planned for 8 December) for their feedback.

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Public Forums

6.1       Kim Morton, Director for IHI Ōtautahi Creative Spaces and Kerry Gray, artist, addressed and gave a presentation to the Board in relation to the Ōtautahi Creative Spaces recent report outlining the outcome and impacts the organisation has within the community.

6.2       Richmond Residents and Business Association

The Richmond Residents and Business Association (RR & BA) was established in May 2018 to give voice to the concerns of the residents of Richmond.  The association’s area is defined as the area bound by Fitzgerald Ave, Whitmore Street, Hills Road, Shirley Road, North Parade, Banks Ave and River Road.  The area is half in the precinct of the Papanui-Innes Community Board and half in the precinct of the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board with North Avon Road as the boundary.  The setting up of the association, its initial concerns and progress were reported to the Board in June 2018. 

6.3       Richmond Village Revitalisation.

The revitalisation of the Richmond Village area is seen by the association as a significant project that is likely to take a number of years to complete.  The Richmond Village area is defined as Stanmore Road from Avonside Drive to North Avon Road and a block or so either side.  The Council has produced a Richmond Commercial Centre Fact Sheet as part of its Commercial Centre Fact Sheet series.  The fact sheet notes that the centre is lineal in nature, lacks identity and focus, has a limited range of retail offerings and has a fragmented pattern of ownership. The rebuilding of Richmond Club, roughly in the middle of the centre, is likely to re-establish some focus to the area while the village green is a widely appreciated and widely used green space. The association sees the proximity of the Richmond Village to the Avon Ōtākaro River corridor as a huge source of potential development that it would like to see better utilised.

6.4       Enliven Places Programme.

The Council’s enliven places programme aims to create interesting, fun and welcoming communities for both residents and visitors by assisting communities to identify issues and generate solutions in identified urban regeneration priority areas. The association is working with Council and others to develop two separate but linked Enliven Places projects.

·    City to Coast Heritage Trail.  The Avon Ōtākaro network has established a transition river trail with funding for further signage and development. Eight community organisations situated along the river have been meeting to establish a heritage trail that would leverage off the existing trail but provide side trails to places of historical interest along the way.  The current strategy is to develop the heritage trail route, provide up to 20 signs along the existing river trial of places of interest; establish some exemplar permanent heritage signs at places such as Avebury House; work on establishing a data base of historical information that can be used to further develop the heritage trail and design a digital strategy to supplement the on-site signage.

The Residential Red Zone Enliven Places funding could potentially support this project by funding some exemplar permanent signs and supporting the development of the Digital Strategy.

Banks Avenue School will be involved in the research and planning for their area of the Heritage Trail.

·     Suburban Centre project.

Funding is available to activate vacant spaces in identified suburban centres, including Richmond Village. Initial discussions have been held between Council staff and the association to identify possible sites and activities or projects.  The association will also survey members to get their ideas for potential sites and activities.

Initial activities have focussed on placing some planter boxes in strategic positions in the village and placing a community notice board in the village green opposite the supermarket.  The planter boxes will be supplied by the Council and maintained by the community.

6.5       Richmond Community Needs Analysis Survey

A contract has been let to independent social researcher, Sarah Wylie, to undertake a Community Needs Analysis for Richmond. The research will:

·    Provide a demographic profile of Richmond using 2018 Census data when it is available.

·    Profile existing recreation, sports, arts, social service and health agencies in the community and predict future demand, including any barriers to access, gaps in services and how residents are interfacing with Council assets and services.

·    Gather information to inform decisions on the future use of the Shirley Community Centre site.

6.6       Roading

The Papanui-Innes Community Board has hosted a number of meetings to look at roading issues in their part of the city particularly in the block bordered by North Avon Road, North Parade, Shirley Road and Hills Road.

6.7       Other Issues

The association has also become involved in other issues such as urban planning and development issues; a clean-up of the Stanmore Road area in conjunction with Keep Christchurch Beautiful and applying for establishment funding.

6.8       Cutler Park

The Community Board have identified Cutler Park in Woolston as a priority. The Council Rangers have been working in collaboration with the Parks Unit contractors to address the issues raised by the Community Board.  The Rangers have been using the same method as with Cross Reserve to reduce the areas that illegal activities can be conducted.  The Parks Unit contractors have worked on reducing the areas in the nature space that people can use for illegal activities.  The nature area is no longer an impenetrable screen.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Community Board will consider progress against the Community Board Plan at a workshop on 30 January 2019.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Liz Beaven - Community Board Advisor

Rosie Carroll - Support Officer

Bruce Coleman - Community Development Advisor

Amy Hart - Community Development Advisor

Gail Payne - Community Development Advisor

Anne Pierre - Hearings and Council Support Officer

Diana Saxton - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

11.    Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

18/1168907

Presenter(s):

Ali Jones, Community Board Chairperson

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of initiatives and issues considered by the Community Board.

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board report for November 2018.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board held meetings on 26 October, 9 November and 23 November 2018.  Decisions made under delegation were:

·   Approved a variation to the lease to reflect the change to the lease plan for the Canterbury Playcentre Association Incorporated for the change to the replacement building footprint area and approve the rebuild plans for the Belfast Playcentre.

·   Approved three new road names for the Spring Grove Stage 3 subdivision as follows: Borderdale Street, Perendale Street and Romney Drive.

·   Approved the installation of P3 Parking Restrictions on Prestons Road by the Redwood School entrance.

·   Approved the installation of No Stopping Restrictions on Momorangi Crescent at the four 90 degree bends.

·   Approved the installation of P3 Parking Restrictions on Tuckers Road by the Northcote Primary School entrance.

·   Approved the installation of road markings for the existing bus stop outside 293 Hills Road.

·   Endorsed the final design for the rebuild of the St Albans Community Centre agreed upon by the St Albans Community Facility Working Party and referred the design to staff to progress the project.

·   Approved the new right of way name at 50 Sawyers Arms Road as Henry Roil Lane.

·   Approved the appointment of the Board’s Recess Committee to cover the Christmas/New Year recess period.

·   Approval of the following grants:

ª $250 from its 2018/19 Positive Youth Development Fund to Kate Davies to attend four competitions and training camps as part of the Athletic New Zealand Jumps Future Squad from 2 November 2018 to 10 February 2019.

ª $450 from its 2018/19 Positive Youth Development Fund to Anna Lee School of Dance on behalf of Alexandria Som towards performing in the “She Shines On” Dance Tour in New York City and Orlando, USA in April 2019.

ª $7,000 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to the St Albans Residents Association Incorporated (SARA) towards the Edgeware Village beautification project.

ª $4,000 from its 2018/19 Discretionary Response Fund to Shirley Community Trust towards the costs of running a Summer Holiday programme.

ª $450 from its 2018/19 Positive Youth Development Fund to Rosa Vesty towards the costs of attending the Australian Volleyball Schools Cup in Melbourne 9-14 December 2018.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Harewood Road Corridor Study

The Board’s consideration and recommendation of the Harewood Road Corridor Study will be considered by the Council at its meeting today in conjunction with the recommendations from the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

Strengthening Community Fund Projects        

5.1       The Santa Claus Workshop Charitable Trust

The “elves” at the Santa Claus Workshop have once again produced the most amazing wooden toys. They brought in samples to the Papanui office of the toys they have made over the past year and they hit their target of making over 1,000 toys for this Christmas which is a sterling effort.

The toys are distributed to local organisations who run Christmas events for disadvantaged families and are given to the children at these functions. Our grateful thanks go to the “elves” who work so hard throughout the year.

5.2       Neighbourhood Trust – The Liberty Project

The Liberty Project Webinars were launched at a function on 13 November 2018. This project is based on comparative research examining biological issues within children following the earthquakes, the resulting behaviours and strategies on how to deal with it, by Canterbury University associate professor, Dr Kathleen Liberty, with assistance from Christchurch teachers Liz McNaughton and Brie Liberty.


 

Well-known comedian, Dai Henwood, is recording voice-overs for the six 90 second webinars titled Stress Inside Out, an animation project produced by the Neighbourhood Trust to help people understand that the behaviours are not the fault of the children or their parents. The Webinars use chatty, everyday language and imagery to show how the accumulation of stress can lead to bursting point and practical suggestions to diffuse or deal with the resulting behaviours.

The project exemplified collaboration with the Neighbourhood Trust and the, Papanui Youth Development Trust creating and producing the Webinars and the Papanui-Innes Community Board, Ministry of Social Development and the Tindall Foundation co-funding this initiative.

The Webinars will be available online through Facebook and in schools in November.

  

 

Other partnerships with the community and organisations

5.3       Papanui Bush – Bridgestone Reserve

The two planting days held earlier this year at the Bridgestone Reserve were a great start to the regeneration of a small part of the original bush that covered the Papanui area before the European settlers moved in.

Staff are working with the Papanui High School arts department on a mural for the site and are also liaising with the Papanui Heritage Group to enhance the original black map for the Papanui Bush area so that it can be displayed in the Reserve.

5.4       Papanui Business Network

The first informal meeting for the Papanui Business Community on 31 October attracted approximately 20 representatives from local businesses. The initial discussions proved positive and staff continue to work with the members around needs that emerge from their meetings.

5.5       Papanui Bush – Bridgestone Reserve

Staff have meet with Papanui High School, the local Rotary chapter and the Papanui Heritage group about the mural and the proposed notice board. Staff are also working internally on Papanui heritage items that need enhancement if they are to be presented in a notice board.

Due to commitments for all groups involved, the enhancement element of this project is taking longer than expected. Papanui High envision that they will have the students working on a mural in Terms one and two 2019.


 

Community Facilities Updates

5.6       St Albans Community Facility

The St Albans Community Facility Working Party agreed to the amended design and footprint for the new facility and recommended that the Board move forward with the project.

The Board endorsed the Working Party’s recommendations and have referred the design to staff to progress the project. It is expected that the detailed design work should be completed late January 2019.

5.7       Redwood Plunket Rooms

The exterior work has commenced on the building and it is hoped that the facility will be nearing completion mid-December. Staff are meeting with the community group regarding the community taking over this space on 9 December 2018 and the different options. The Northcote volunteers are very excited about this space and the potential it holds for the community.

5.8       10 Shirley Road

Staff are working with the Parks team around the placement of a picnic table on the site. The Board also received a report today around the Pump track option for this site as a temporary fixture while future aspirations are worked through within the community for its eventual use.

5.9       St Albans Park

St Albans Park remediation is progressing well and 50% of the sand surface is in place. The drainage has worked perfectly with all the rain which has allowed the works to continue quite quickly after any rain event. Completion date refers to the physical works which will be followed by a three month growing period for the grass. Fences will not come down until the turf is strong enough for some light use.

Optimistic

Realistic

Pessimistic

December 2018

January 2018

February 2019

 

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

Events Report Back       

6.1       St Albans Community Gala Day

The Community Gala Day was held on Saturday 10 November, 10am – 2pm at Empower Church.  This was the fourth year the event has been run and has grown in numbers attending and activities offered.  The event had approximately 300 people attend.  The group are hoping to move the event next year to the park in collaboration with other community organisations.

 

 

6.2       Shirley Shine

Shirley Shine was held on Saturday 3 November, 11am- 3pm on MacFarlane Park. The weather played its part and encouraged many of the community to come and enjoy the local entertainment and family friendly activities. The event had approximately 900 people attend the day. The day would not have been possible without the support of the Council, all the community organisations and fantastic team of staff and volunteers.

 

 

6.3       Whakaoho

After inclement weather in February, Whakaoho finally went ahead on Sunday 4 November.  With a fantastic buy in from the community and locals, the day saw its largest numbers to date.  Local businesses were also out in full support and, with plenty to do, the day was full of smiles, laughter and happy people. The day attracted approximately 1000 people.

            

6.4          The Christchurch City Council Staff Star Awards 2018

                The Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Governance Team were nominated for the Council’s staff Star Awards 2018 in the Team “Integrity” category.  At the Awards ceremony on Friday, 23 November the team were surprised and delighted to be announced as the winners.

                The team see it as a ‘win’ for the Community Support, Governance and Partnership Unit which works very hard to build reciprocal relationships with residents and local communities in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula while carrying out the essential functions of governance.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Lyssa Aves - Governance Support Officer

Elizabeth Hovell - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Christine Lane - Manager Community Governance, Papanui-Innes

John Filsell - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  – 23 November 2018

 

12.    Barrington Mall access way improvements, Barrington Street (S-C)

Reference:

18/1249804

Presenter(s):

Andy Cameron, Junior Project Manager

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 192 metres be revoked.

2.         Approve that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Stourbridge Street be revoked.

3.         Approve that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 59 metres be revoked.

4.         Approve that the right turn movement for all vehicles, when these vehicles have entered the roadway from the Barrington Mall exit onto Barrington Street, be prohibited. This exit turn restriction is located on Barrington Street at a point 30 metres northwest of its intersection with Stourbridge Street.

5.         Approve the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes, pedestrian refuge island and road surface changes, on Barrington Street between Kinver Place and Athelstan Street, as detailed in Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

6.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 39.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting. 

7.         Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 15 minutes on the north east side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 39.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 34 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

8.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 73.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of four metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

9.         Approve that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at point 77.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting. Note 2 applies.

10.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 91.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 53.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

11.       Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.15(1)(a) of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.  This restriction  to apply at any time and be located on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at point 145 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

12.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 152 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of six metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

13.       Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.15(1)(a) of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.  This restriction  to apply at any time and be located on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at point 158 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

14.       Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes on the north east side of Barrington Street commencing at point 165 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 26 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

15.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of six metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

16.       Approve that a bus stop be created on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at point 6 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

17.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 20 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Stourbridge Street, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

18.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 59 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to the Council that it:

 

19.       Approve that all traffic controls except the speed limit on Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly for a distance of 192 metres be revoked.

20.       Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 192 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

21.       Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a northwesterly direction to its intersection with Kinver Place, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.s

22.       Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Athelstan Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017. General

 

2.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 192 metres be revoked.

2.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Stourbridge Street be revoked.

3.         Approves that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 59 metres be revoked.

4.         Approves that the right turn movement for all vehicles, when these vehicles have entered the roadway from the Barrington Mall exit onto Barrington Street, be prohibited. This exit turn restriction is located on Barrington Street at a point 30 metres northwest of its intersection with Stourbridge Street.

5.         Approves the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes, pedestrian refuge island and road surface changes, on Barrington Street between Kinver Place and Athelstan Street, as detailed in Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

6.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 39.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting. 

7.         Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 15 minutes on the north east side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 39.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 34 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

8.         Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 73.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of four metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

9.         Approves that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at point 77.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting. Note 2 applies.

10.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 91.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 53.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

11.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.15(1)(a) of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.  This restriction  to apply at any time and be located on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at point 145 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

12.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 152 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of six metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

13.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.15(1)(a) of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.  This restriction  to apply at any time and be located on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at point 158 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

14.       Approves that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes on the north east side of Barrington Street commencing at point 165 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 26 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

15.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of six metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

16.       Approves that a bus stop be created on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at point 6 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

17.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 20 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Stourbridge Street, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

18.       Approves that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 59 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

Part B

The Community Board also resolved the following:

19.      The Board requests that staff arrange for colouration of pedestrian access in the vicinity of the Mall entrance/exit to Barrington Street, to visually indicate pedestrian priority, and explore with the Mall owners the possibility of replacement of the current Give Way sign with a Stop sign.

 

 

 

3.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approves that all traffic controls except the speed limit on Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly for a distance of 192 metres be revoked.

1.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 192 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

2.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a northwesterly direction to its intersection with Kinver Place, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

3.         Approves that a special vehicle lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Athelstan Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Barrington Mall access way improvements, Barrington Street

51

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan of pedestrian safety improvements at Barrington Mall

63

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Barrington Mall access way improvements, Barrington Street

Reference:

18/947448

Presenter(s):

Andy Cameron, Junior Project Manager

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to:

·    Inform the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board of the outcome of community consultation.

·    Request approval of the proposed changes to Barrington Street as detailed in Attachment A.

·    Request that they recommend Council approve the on road cycle lanes as detailed in Attachment A.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following community consultation.

1.3       Staff attended a seminar with the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board on the 20th July 2018 outlining the project and intention to go out for public consultation.

1.4       This project was initiated by staff at the request of the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board in June 2017.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in Council's Significance and Engagement Policy. The Main factors contributing to a low significance were as follows:

·     Minor changes being proposed to the network.

·     Low impact of changes being proposed.

·     Low number of people that would be affected by proposed changes.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect this assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approve that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 192 metres be revoked.

2.         Approve that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Stourbridge Street be revoked.

3.         Approve that all existing parking and stopping restrictions on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 59 metres be revoked.

4.         Approve that the right turn movement for all vehicles, when these vehicles have entered the roadway from the Barrington Mall exit onto Barrington Street, be prohibited. This exit turn restriction is located on Barrington Street at a point 30 metres northwest of its intersection with Stourbridge Street.

5.         Approve the lane marking changes, kerb alignment changes, pedestrian refuge island and road surface changes, on Barrington Street between Kinver Place and Athelstan Street, as detailed in Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

6.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 39.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting. 

7.         Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of ten minutes on the north east side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 39.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 34 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

8.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 73.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of four metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

9.         Approve that a Bus Stop be created on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at point 77.5 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting. Note 2 applies.

10.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 91.5 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 53.5 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

11.       Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.15(1)(a) of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.  This restriction  to apply at any time and be located on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at point 145 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

12.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the northeast side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 152 metres northwest its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of six metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

13.       Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 120 minutes and be reserved for vehicles with an approved disabled person’s parking permit, prominently displayed in the vehicle, in accordance with section 6.15(1)(a) of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.  This restriction  to apply at any time and be located on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at point 158 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street, and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of seven metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

14.       Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of 30 minutes on the north east side of Barrington Street commencing at point 165 metres northwest of its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 26 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

15.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of six metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

16.       Approve that a bus stop be created on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at point 6 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 14 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

17.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at a point 20 metres southeast of its intersection with Kinver Place and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Stourbridge Street, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

18.       Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the southwest side of Barrington Street commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction for a distance of 59 metres, as detailed on Attachment A to the staff report attached to the agenda for this meeting.

That the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to the Council that it:

 

19.       Approve that all traffic controls except the speed limit on Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly for a distance of 192 metres be revoked.

20.       Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of south-eastbound cycles only, be established on the northeast side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Athelstan Street and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance of 192 metres, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.

21.       Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a northwesterly direction to its intersection with Kinver Place, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017.s

22.       Approve that a special vehicle lane for the use of north-westbound cycles only, be established on the southwest side of Barrington Street, commencing at its intersection with Stourbridge Street and extending in a southeasterly direction to its intersection with Athelstan Street, as detailed on Attachment A. This special vehicle lane is authorised under clause 18 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017. General

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Traffic Safety and Efficiency

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of casualties on the road network - =129 (reduce by 5 or more per year)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Redesign the layout of Barrington Mall access way by:

Banning the right turn out.

Reinforcing pedestrian right of way.

Making associated on road changes to Barrington Street as detailed in Attachment A.   (Preferred Option)

·     Option 2 – Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Improved pedestrian level of service through:

Clearly defined pedestrian right of way through visual separation, and removal of kerbs separating the path from access way.

Banning right turn out reducing points of conflict, and reducing the crossing distance and therefore time taken to cross the entrance way.

A pedestrian island providing the opportunity to safely cross the access way in two movements.

Clear lines of sight provided in all directions.

A widened pedestrian refuge island on Barrington Street providing a shorter crossing distance, better sight lines and encouraging slower vehicle speeds.

Visually impaired pedestrians benefiting from tactile pavers at the pedestrian crossing on Barrington Street and at the two bus stops adjacent to the Mall access way

·     Improved cyclist level of service through:

Fewer conflict points across the mall access way resulting from the removal of the right turn out, and the bus stop being further from the access way.

Cycle lanes provided north and southbound on Barrington Street adjacent to the mall access way

·     Improved vehicle level of service through:

Vehicles leaving the mall will not be held up by right turning vehicles waiting for spaces in traffic.

Greater efficiency entering and exiting the Mall access way as pedestrians will clear the access way quicker due to the shorter distance.  Clarity over pedestrian right of way minimising hesitance for both vehicles and pedestrians that currently exists as they decide who is going to give way.

The re-marking of the bus stop will reduce the conflict that currently occurs when vehicles are leaving the mall southbound when a bus is stopped at the bus stop on Barrington Street.

Slower speeds along Barrington Street will be encouraged by the wider pedestrian island making exiting the mall by vehicles less pressured.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Loss of 8 parking spaces.

·     Vehicles will not be able to right turn out of Barrington Mall on to Barrington Street.

 

5.   Context/Background

Context

5.1       Barrington Mall access way on Barrington Street has the following characteristics:

·   Allows for all traffic movements in and out.

·   Has vehicle movement volumes ranging from low to very high.

·   Currently operates as an intersection with cars generally assuming priority.

·   A bus stop in proximity that impacts on the operation of the access way.

·   Two intersections within 50m and a signalised intersection within 100m of the access way.

Background

5.2       The following have contributed to the development of this project:

·   A history of reported near misses.

·   Complaints from people feeling unsafe using the access way.

·   A high number of accidents relative to traffic volumes.

·   A consent condition of Barrington Mall for annual assessment of the right turn out, which is to be banned if safety is being compromised through this movement.

·   Ranking high as a priority for pedestrian improvements when compared to other location in the city

·   Councils request for staff to investigate improvements to the Barrington Street exit of Barrington Mall in June 2017

·   Council providing budget in the 2018/19 annual plan based upon a scheme presented to the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board on 18th May 2018.

 

5.3       The project has followed the following time line:

·    Initiated in FY18 with the primary objective to improve pedestrian safety and reliability of the Barrington Mall access way on Barrington Street. In addition, the project was to improve the safety and reliability for all road users using or transiting the access way.

·    The project team worked with the mall management to achieve a scheme that best met the need of all users and the needs of the mall.

·    Pre engagement with the businesses that would be directly affected was undertaken in February 2018. All businesses were supportive of the scheme including a strong desire to see the removal of the parking on the west side of Barrington Street by the adjacent businesses.  Couplands bakery and Wilsons Pharmacy on Barrington Street both had concerns over the parking losses that were proposed adjacent to their businesses on the east side of Barrington Street.

·    In March 2018 Barrington Mall management secured an agreement with a key tenant to reduce the size of the trucks that would need to exit onto Barrington Street.  This allowed for further scheme improvements, including a decrease in loss of parking spaces adjacent to Wilsons Pharmacy and Couplands bakery.

·    A seminar was held with the Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board with the Spreydon Neigbourhood Network in attendance in May 2018.

·    Support of the final scheme was given by Barrington Mall management in June 2018.

·    Additional funding released through the FY19 LTP.

·    Consultation carried out July/August 2018.

5.4       Community Consultation

5.5       Community consultation for this project was undertaken from 31 July 2018 to 22 August 2018.

5.6       Affected property owners, residents and businesses were advised of the recommended option by a leaflet drop with face to face conversations with those most affected.

5.7       The leaflet was also sent to 50 absentee landowners and hand delivered to 160 properties.

5.8       Four drop in sessions were held and one community meeting.

5.9       During consultation Council received 152 submissions. 65 were in support (43%), 15 were not in support (10%), and 72 were in support but had some concerns (47%).

 

6.   Option 1 - Redesign the layout of Barrington Mall access way, banning the right turn out and making associated on road changes to Barrington street (Preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Make the following changes to the Barrington Mall Barrington Street access way:

·    Ban the right turn movement out of Barrington Mall onto Barrington Street.

·    Realign access way resulting in a decrease in pedestrian crossing distance and include a central island to allow for it to be crossed in two stages.

·    Create north and south bound on road cycle lanes on Barrington Street in the vicinity of the access way.

·    Realign and widen the pedestrian crossing facility adjacent to the Spreydon library.

·    Re mark the existing bus stop adjacent to the access way to comply with current design guidelines.

·    Remove 8 parking spaces.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low as is consistent with Section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance have been met through the following:

·    A public information leaflet was sent to all key stakeholders.

·    A community meeting was held in partnership with the Spreydon Neighbourhood Network at Whareora House.

·    Two drop in sessions were held at the Spreydon Library.

·    Two drop in sessions were held at Barrington Mall.

·    The Spreydon Library provided access to information and help with online submissions for the duration of consultation.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       The following are directly affected by this option:

·    Local residents and businesses.

·    Barrington Mall owners and patrons.

6.6       Team responses to the common themes raised through consultation are as follows:

·    Does vehicle traffic give way to pedestrians across the entrance way?

Project Team response – The new layout is intended to reinforce the pedestrian right of way. Currently it looks and operates like an intersection not an access way.

·    Will the lights be changed to allow more cars through the intersection from Athelstan Street?

Project Team response – The proposal will not have a significant impact on the way in which the Athelstan Street intersection operates and therefore this proposal will not require a change to the phasing of the intersection. Barrington Street will continue to be the priority route and receive the majority of the green time.

·    Installing a zebra crossing on the access way to Barrington Mall.

Project Team response – A zebra crossing is not appropriate in this location. By reinstating the footpath and providing a vehicle crossing into the mall it will be evident that the pedestrians have the right of way. A zebra crossing will offer no additional benefit, likely creating confusion as to whether this is a road or footpath, and zebra crossings have their legal standing within the road corridor.

·    No exit at all.

Project Team response – The mall has consent to have an access on Barrington Street, therefore this is not feasible.

·    Remove carpark outside pub.

Project Team response – The removal of the parking space adjacent to 250 Barrington Street will be included in the proposed scheme.

·    Removing tactile pavers as they cause issues for people using wheeled walking frames.

Project Team response – Tactile pavers are a standard requirement providing a necessary safety feature for blind and partially sighted people paramount to them leading an active, mobile, and independent life. They will be installed in accordance with RTS 14 Guidelines for facilities for blind and vision impaired pedestrians.

·    Pedestrian refuge – Will the island be wider?

Project Team response – The refuge island on Barrington Street will be wider. This has been widened so that pedestrians can see around the queue of right turning vehicles waiting to enter the mall.

·    Don’t ban the right turn out of the mall.

Project Team response – The existing safety concerns at the intersection are a result of a number of factors which add up to create a significant safety issue. The approach of this design is to simplify the intersection as far as is practical. This has been achieved through reinforcing the priority of pedestrians to remove confusion as to who has right of way, and by removing the right turn. The number of right turning vehicles is low, however they account for several crashes in this location. Removing the right turn contributes to simplifying the intersection, improves the pedestrian safety by reducing the number of lanes which pedestrians have to cross.

·    Indent bus stops.

Project Team response – There is insufficient room to indent the bus stop in this location. Typically, it is not best practice to indent bus stops as it adds delay to bus journey times with the bus finding it hard to re-enter the traffic flow.

·    Speed limit should be reduced.

Project Team response – A 50km/h speed limit is considered safe and appropriate for this area.

·    No stopping zone at entrance of mall.

Project Team response – No stopping is proposed at the mall access to provide adequate visibility for vehicles and pedestrians. The south bound lane will be marked with a standard “Keep Clear” road marking symbol to deter people stopping across the entrance to the mall.

·    Zebra crossing not pedestrian refuge on Barrington Street.

Project Team response – A zebra crossing would not be an appropriate crossing facility in this location. Zebra crossings should only be used where the vehicles flows are low, pedestrian crossing volumes are high, and the vehicle speeds are less than 50 km/h. Evidence shows that where these criteria are not met the crossings are less safe than not having them at all. In this instance the pedestrian refuge, which allows people to cross the road in two stages, is significantly safer than a zebra crossing.

·    Cycle lane widths and extent.

Project Team response – Cycle lanes have been included to clearly define cycle paths to all road users in the vicinity of the mall access way. The width of cycle lanes is constrained by the minimum carriageway width, however they meet current guide lines. The desire for further continuation of the cycle lanes has been noted, however changes beyond the project area are outside of scope.

·    No right turn in to the mall.

Project Team response – Banning the right turn in would have a significant detrimental impact on the efficiency of the network, and could create safety issues. This movement has a high demand and banning it would result in additional queuing and delays at the intersection of Barrington Street / Athelstan Street and result in changes to how the Athelstan Street intersection operates. A knock on effect would also be experienced at the Barrington Street / Frankleigh Street / Milton Street intersection.

·    It is noted by the Project Team that there has been an overwhelming support for the proposed restrictions to parking on Barrington Street.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies as it addresses known safety concerns. Long Term Plan Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of casualties on the road network - =129 (reduce by 5 or more per year)    

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation – Estimated project cost $300,000. This project is eligible for NZTA subsidy at the standard Funding Assistance Rate of 51% on eligible works up to $300,000. Current estimates suggest 80% of costs will be eligible for the subsidy. There are also funding discussions ongoing with the mall for additional work to be carried out on their land at the same time, at their expense.

6.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - This is covered under the area maintenance contract and has been accounted for in forward planning.

6.10    Funding source - 2018-28 Long Term Plan, Barrington Mall Access 2018 (ID# 45042). The Long Term Plan also includes the estimated NZTA subsidy.

Legal Implications

6.11    There is a legal issue relevant to this decision.

6.12    Barrington Mall will be required to apply for a Section 127 variation assessment under the RMA for the changes made to the consented layout, and the changes in trucking movements. Barrington Mall’s legal team is waiting for the scheme to be approved by Waihoro/Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board prior to submitting a Section 127. Councils Transport Network Planning Team have made an assessment of the anticipated Section 127 concluding that there are no known reasons for it not to be granted.

Risks and Mitigations

6.13    If a Section 127 under the RMA is not granted the scheme cannot proceed.

Implementation

6.14    Implementation dependencies – Approval of a Section 127 under the RMA.

6.15    Implementation timeframe – Construction expected February 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.16    The advantages of this option include:

·     Improved Pedestrian level of service through:

Clearly defined pedestrian right of way through visual separation, and removal of kerbs separating the path from access way.

Banning right turn out reducing points of conflict, and reducing the crossing distance and therefore time taken to cross the entrance way.

A pedestrian island providing the opportunity to safely cross the access way in two movements.

Clear lines of sight provided in all directions.

A widened pedestrian refuge island on Barrington Street providing a shorter crossing distance, better sight lines and encouraging slower vehicle speeds.

Visually impaired pedestrians benefiting from tactile pavers at the pedestrian crossing on Barrington Street and at the two bus stops adjacent to the mall access way

·     Improved Cyclist level of service through:

Fewer conflict points across the mall access way resulting from the removal of the right turn out, and the bus stop being further from the access way.

Cycle lanes provided north and southbound on Barrington Street adjacent to the Mall access way

·     Improved vehicle level of service through:

Vehicles leaving the mall will not be held up by right turning vehicles waiting for spaces in traffic.

Greater efficiency entering and exiting the Mall access way as pedestrians will clear the access way quicker due to the shorter distance.  Clarity over pedestrian right of way minimising hesitance for both vehicles and pedestrians that currently exists as they decide who is going to give way.

The re-marking of the bus stop will reduce the conflict that currently occurs when vehicles are leaving the mall southbound when a bus is stopped at the bus stop on Barrington Street.

Slower speeds along Barrington Street will be encouraged by the wider pedestrian island making exiting the mall by vehicles less pressured.

 

6.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Loss of 8 parking spaces.

·   Vehicles will not be able to right turn out of Barrington Mall on to Barrington Street.

7.   Option 2 – Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Status quo remains at Barrington Mall access way on Barrington Street.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low as is consistent with Section 2.

7.3       This option was not consulted on.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       This option was not consulted on, however there is a history of complaints about the safety at this location and the need for improvements.

7.6       Refer to Section 6.6 for consultation feedback on the preferred option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies:

7.7.1   Inconsistency – It does not address known safety concerns raised by the public.  Long Term Plan Level of Service: 10.0.6.1 Reduce the number of casualties on the road network - =129 (reduce by 5 or more per year)    .

Financial Implications

7.8       A small saving will be made in the capital programme which will have negligible rates impact.

Legal Implications

7.9       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    If this option is selected the high crash rate relative to traffic volumes would likely continue.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies  - None

7.12    Implementation timeframe – N/A

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No loss of parking spaces.

·   Vehicles that currently right turn out of Barrington Mall will not be affected.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

Pedestrians remain at risk and feeling unsafe.

Conflicts created by vehicles turning right out of the mall will remain.

Cycle safety will not be improved at this location.

A reduction in crashes at this location is unlikely.

No improvement for visually impaired people using the busses and pedestrian crossing at this location.

No improvement for people using the disability parking adjacent to the library.

The benefits from reinforcing of the pedestrian right of way encouraging pedestrian journeys in the area will not be realised.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Plan of pedestrian safety improvements at Barrington Mall

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Andy Cameron - Junior Project Manager

Samantha Sharland - Engagement Advisor

William Homewood - Traffic Engineer - Investigation & Design

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Sharon O'Neill - Team Leader Project Management Transport

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Patricia Christie - Head of Business Partnership

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

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Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board  – 17 September 2018

 

13.    Harewood Road Corridor Study Findings and Recommendations (F-W-H)

Reference:

18/1275483

Presenter(s):

Mark Gregory, Transport Network Planner

 

 

 

1.  Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Harewood Road corridor study and recommended strategies. 

 

Secretarial Note: This item was withdrawn from the 4 October 2018 Council agenda to enable the report to be considered by the Papanui-Innes Community Board. The report was considered by the Papanui-Innes Community Board on 26 October 2018, its recommendations will be considered by the Council in conjunction with this item.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Harewood Road corridor study findings and recommendations

66

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Harewood Road Corridor Study

72

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Harewood Road corridor study findings and recommendations

Reference:

18/794789

Presenter(s):

Mark Gregory, Transport Network Planner

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board to endorse the findings of the Corridor study.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to Waimāero/Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board to advise upon findings and recommendations of the corridor study.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of high significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by review of the Significance and Engagement Policy (20 June 2017).

2.1.2   There is no Community Consultation required by this project.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waimairi-Harewood Community Board recommend to Council:

3.1       That the corridor study and recommended strategies is received. 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The corridor study (attachment A) has been undertaken in conjunction with a broader area study, in order to identify a network management plan for the future.

The study considers:

4.1.1   Crash safety and treatment priority analysis for all transport modes.

4.1.2   Movement demands and efficiency for all transport modes.

4.1.3   Overall provision for all modes.

4.1.4   Predicted changes to network demands, based on different future options.

4.1.5   Extent to which current corridor design and operations are ‘fit for future’.

4.1.6   Extent to which the Long Term Plan (LTP) is likely to address future needs; and identification of specific future scheme design requirements.

4.1.7   Recommended resolutions to above problems, including a broader network management perspective.

4.2       For each point raised above, the key conclusions include:

4.2.1   Crash safety and treatment priority analysis for all transport modes:

·     The majority of crashes are occurring at intersections, and chiefly include drivers failing to give way in priority situations.

·     The intersection of Harewood Road / Greers Road has the highest corridor ranking in city wide crash analysis (placed at 21st), with specific crash problems including:

-     A high number of crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists.

-     Right turn movements from Greers Road (from north) failing to give way to opposing movements from the south.

-     The Major Cycle Route (MCR) project has capacity to improve the cyclists and pedestrian related crashes; the right turn crashes will likely reduce too as a consequence of falling vehicle demands following wider network improvements (through LTP).

·     Speeding is a problem in the corridor, particularly further west, and this is likely to impact upon safety in the future.

·     The intersection of Harewood / Gardiners / Breens Roads has been reviewed, in response to requests for significant intervention, and the study concludes that:

-     There was a spike in crashes, coinciding with the route being used as a diversion during transformative works on State Highway 1 (Johns Road), and since this time, the crash route has dropped from 6 crashes in 2014 to 2 crashes in the past 3 years.

-     The severity of crashes is low.

-     The intersection ranks as 62nd worst in the CCC network and 81st in the total network (including NZTA).

·   A detailed study of options has been prepared and is presented separately.

The outlook for the corridor includes a reduction in vehicle demands. A reduction in traffic has potential to exacerbate current speeding problem. It is likely that the current speeding problem is caused by the layout of the road being designed for a higher speed than the posted 50 kilometres per hour.

4.2.2   Movement demands and efficiency for all transport modes

·     The busiest intersection is Harewood Road / Greers Road. The worst movements are the Greers Road northbound movement (traffic approaching from the south), having the narrowest approach with the least number of traffic lanes; and the opposing right turn from Greers (from Northcote) west in Harewood (towards Bishopdale).

·     The two movements above as well as being most delayed are also noted as having the highest crash rate.

·     The crashes do not occur during the morning peak when a right turn filter arrow runs. However, to run this arrow throughout the day would be to exacerbate delays affecting the opposing Greers Road northbound movement.

·     Queues can be observed on approaches to Harewood Road, most notably Farrington Avenue and Wooldridge Road; however, this is occurring for short periods within the day, mostly between 1700 and 1730 hours. Operations are expected to improve in the future.


 

 

4.2.3   Overall provision for all modes

·     There is an over provision of capacity for general traffic through much of the corridor, with particularly low flows observed for a two lane divided road. This results in speeding issues and marginalisation of non-motorised users.

·     Cycle facilities are inconsistent through the corridor, with extensive sections offering no facilities at all. Negotiating intersections can be difficult, for example the cycle lane around the roundabout carries cyclists through a middle of a conflict point. The intersection with Greers Road has a particularly high number of crashes involving cyclists.

·     Pedestrian facilities are provided alongside the roads throughout the corridor; however, the location of crossings often do not align with community ‘desire lines’ (for example the crossing 50m west of Breens Road adds 100m walking distance for students accessing Breens Intermediate School).

4.2.4   Predicted changes to network demands, based on different future options

·     The modelled outcome for the corridor is for a reduction in demand, with an increase in demands on Sawyers Arms Road. This has been found where:

-     LTP schemes for the Sawyers Arms Road – Northcote Road corridor increase capacity and the attractiveness of Sawyers Arms Road.

-     A further decrease on Harewood Road is predicted to occur following the MCR scheme.

-     A significant reduction would occur if the NZTA proceed with the Grade separation scheme of State Highway 1 / Sawyers Arms Road (as currently listed in the Land Transport Plan (albeit with a lower priority rating).

·     The decreases in demand will result in:

-     A decrease in delays at the Bishopdale ‘roundabout’.

-     Reduction in the number of ‘car on car’ crashes in the corridor, simply because the exposure to risk will reduce as traffic demands fall.

-     Increase ‘speeding’, as less traffic reduces impediments to travelling at faster speeds.

·     Changes to the strategic planning context:

-     Development of the rezoned industrial land (of up to 50 Hectares) west of Wooldridge Road is not currently forecast to occur at a rapid rate. However, if it does then the effects of development traffic are not anticipated to change the overall conclusions.

-     Any major NZTA upgrades to the Johns Road / Sawyers Arms Road roundabout (and potentially the Harewood Road roundabout) would result in a further reduction in vehicle demands on Harewood Road to that currently forecast. However, this scheme has a low priority ranking, and would be considered unlikely to proceed at this stage.

-     If both the NZTA scheme and rapid development of the rezoned industrial land should occur, then there would be more significant effects on the Council network, due to the impact of adding more traffic to a situation which would include reducing access to and from the Johns Road via Harewood Road. Such a strategy would include providing an improved connection from Harewood Road (around Wooldridge Road) to Sawyers Arms Road. However, this can be considered a low likelihood scenario at this stage.

4.2.5   Extent to which corridor is ‘fit for future’

·     Overall, road layouts are for a higher design speed and cater for greater demands than those observed and predicted. This is likely to result in safety concerns moving forward and greater marginalisation of pedestrians and cyclists. Level of service for pedestrians and cyclists is low.

·     Specific matters include:

-        Road layout including some geometry that enables / encourages speeding

-        Safety concerns at Greers Road / Harewood Road intersection (ranked 21st most hazardous intersection in Christchurch)

-        A corridor wide level of service issue affecting cyclists

-        Stanleys Road will potentially be relied upon to serve access to a new employment site (47Ha of land rezoned from rural to Business Park through the District Plan Review)

4.2.6   Extent to which the LTP is likely to respond well to future needs and identification of specific future scheme requirements.

·     The following schemes are included in the 2018-28 LTP, and have budget allocated:

-        Wheels to Wings Major Cycle Route (MCR) (Section 2, 2025 – 2029)

-        Intersection improvement: Greers / Northcote / Sawyers Arms Road (2026 – 2029)

·     The following schemes are not included in the 2018-28 LTP:

-     Intersection improvement: Greers / Harewood

-     Intersection improvement: Harewood / Stanleys

-     Intersection improvement: Harewood / Wooldridge

·   The MCR is the most significant project on Harewood Road, and has capacity to:

-     Improve upon the ‘design speed’ issue for the corridor.

-     Address intersection safety concerns.

·     The Greers / Harewood intersection will be traversed by the MCR, and the MCR scheme could address the current operational challenges at the intersection, including:

-     Reducing the crashes affecting cyclists and pedestrians by means of improving alignment and increasing conspicuousness

-     Indirectly improve efficiency of Greers Road: following the MCR, demands on Harewood Road are predicted to fall, allowing for greater ‘green time allocation’ to Greers Road movements: potentially increasing capacity without road widening.

·     Indirect effects of the Greers / Northcote / Sawyers Arms road intersection upgrades will include diversion of current right turn (north to west) movements at Harewood Road, thus reducing exposure to the current highest crash movement. (Reallocation of green time in favour of Greers Road would also likely be effective).

·     The District Plan includes an Outline Development Plan (ODP) (Chapter 16, Appendix 16.8.14) which indicates that the intersections of Harewood / Wooldridge and Harewood / Stanleys require improvement. These could potentially be developer funded; however, this would not extend to the widening of Stanleys Road as well.

·     There is no provision in the LTP to address effects of rapid industrial development alongside NZTA Sawyers Arms Road intersection scheme, (e.g. an improved road connection to Sawyers Arms Road); however, this is considered a low probability scenario at this stage.

·     Therefore, it is recommended that the LTP mostly addresses corridor issues, but that additional monies may be needed in the future to address Stanleys Road, if significant take up occurs at the rezoned business park land.

4.2.7   Recommended resolutions to above problems, including a broader network management perspective

·     The Harewood Road corridor should be addressed as part of a broader network based strategy. Such a strategy includes provision of high quality connections for all users, which involves prioritising different models within different corridors. For the northwest of the City, this is achievable by providing:

-     A quality corridor for general traffic in Sawyers Arms Road. The LTP is making provision for a safer, higher capacity corridor, providing a quality connection within the strategic road network.

-     A quality corridor for cyclists and local access in Harewood Road. The MCR scheme can also address the ‘design speed’ issue currently affecting the corridor.

·     Through detailed investigation, the LTP projects have capability to address specific corridor issues and service gaps. Although the LTP line item of Greers / Harewood is unfunded, the MCR will make changes to the intersection that can both directly and indirectly improve safety.

·     A ‘joined up’ outcome for the network can be achieved through the current LTP.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       On 20 June 2017, the Council requested that a corridor study be undertaken for Harewood Road, in order to identify priorities for intersection improvements and renewals works.

·   The Corridor study has been prepared, engaging with:

-     NZTA crash data base (‘Crash Analysis System’) data and ‘KiwiRAP’ analysis of safety priority

-     The modelling of the corridor within the Council’s city wide traffic model (‘CAST’), including several scenarios from ‘Do nothing’, including the (current) LTP schemes and including possible but unlikely changes such as major improvements at Johns Road / Sawyers Arms Road.

-     The testing of more detailed scheme options

-     Several site visits, including traversing the corridor as a driver, pedestrian and cyclist.

·   A seminar was held on 5 March for the combined ITE Committee, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board and Papanui-Inness Community Board including a progress report, and also a presentation given by the Major Cycle Route team

·   Following concerns raised regarding the safety of Harewood / Gardiners / Breens intersection, an interim scheme is being developed (separate to the Corridor study).

·   A briefing on this corridor study was held with the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board on 7 September 2018.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Harewood Road Corridor Study

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Mark Gregory - Transport Network Planner

Approved By

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

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Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Papanui-Innes Community Board  – 26 October 2018

 

14.    Harewood Road Corridor Study Findings and Recommendations (P-I)

Reference:

18/1136283

Presenter(s):

Mark Gregory, Transport Network Planner

 

 

 

1.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board:

1.         Endorses the Corridor study and recommended strategies.

2.         Recommends to the Council that the Corridor study and recommendations be endorsed.

3.         Specifically notes, and requests that the Council note, that the report recommends to:

3.1       Adopts a network management based strategy to the Northwest city corridors, addressing service gaps as necessary including the following explicitly, for

·     Harewood Road

·     Address the issue of ‘design speed’

·     Address service gaps affecting pedestrians and cyclists, including safety matters

·     Address the safety concerns at Harewood Road / Greers Road intersection

·     Sawyers Arms Road

·     Proceed with route improvements, as included in the Long Term Plan (LTP).

3.2       Is aware of and notes, potential changes affecting strategic planning, including major schemes on Johns Road and higher industrial development rates in the west of the corridor: though these are considered lower probability outcomes at this stage.

3.3       Notes the LTP makes provision for a network-based approach to the Northwest, and that continuing support of specific LTP schemes is strongly recommended.

 

2.  Papanui-Innes Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Endorses the Harewood Road corridor study and recommended strategies.

2.         Notes that the report recommends to adopt a network management based strategy to the Northwest city corridors, addressing service gaps as necessary including the following explicitly, for:

a.         Harewood Road

·     Address the issue of ‘design speed’

·     Address service gaps affecting pedestrians and cyclists, including safety matters

·     Address the safety concerns at Harewood Road / Greers Road intersection

b.         Sawyers Arms Road

·     Proceed with route improvements, as included in the Long Term Plan (LTP).

3.         Is aware of and notes, potential changes affecting strategic planning, including major schemes on Johns Road and higher industrial development rates in the west of the corridor: though these are considered lower probability outcomes at this stage.

4.         Notes the LTP makes provision for a network-based approach to the Northwest, and that continuing support of specific LTP schemes is strongly recommended.

5.         Notes that the recent work completed on the Major Cycleway Routes has been included as much as possible at this stage and can be reviewed and updated as can all of the contents as it is a living document.

 

Secretarial Note: This item will be considered by the Council in conjunction with the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board recommendations, item 13. The ‘Harewood Road Corridor Study’ document can be be found in Attachment A of item 13.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Harewood Road Corridor Study Findings and Recommendations

195

 

There are no attachments for this report.

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Harewood Road Corridor Study Findings and Recommendations

Reference:

18/421177

Presenter(s):

Mark Gregory, Transport Network Planner

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Papanui-Innes Community Board to endorse the findings of the Corridor Study.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to Papanui-Innes Community Board to advise upon findings and recommendations of the corridor study (refer to Harewood Road Corridor Study separately attached).

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of high significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by review of the Significance and Engagement Policy (20th June 2017)

2.1.2   There is no Community Consultation required by this project.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipapa/Papanui-Innes Community Board:

3.1       Endorses the Corridor study and recommended strategies.

3.2       Recommends to the Council that the Corridor study and recommendations be endorsed.

3.3       Specifically notes, and requests that the Council note, the report recommends to:

3.3.1   Adopt a network management based strategy to the Northwest city corridors, addressing service gaps as necessary including the following explicitly, for

·   Harewood Road

·     Address the issue of ‘design speed’

·     Address service gaps affecting pedestrians and cyclists, including safety matters

·     Address the safety concerns at Harewood road / Greers Road intersection

·   Sawyers Arms Road

·     Proceed with route improvements, as included in LTP.

3.3.2   Is aware of and notes, potential changes affecting strategic planning, including major schemes on Johns Road and higher industrial development rates in the west of the corridor: though these are considered lower probability outcomes at this stage.

3.3.3   Notes the LTP makes provision for a network-based approach to the Northwest, and that continuing support of specific LTP schemes is strongly recommended.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The corridor study has been undertaken in conjunction with a broader area study, in order to identify a network management plan for the future.

4.2       The study considers:

4.2.1   Crash safety and treatment priority analysis for all transport modes

4.2.2   Movement demands and efficiency for all transport modes

4.2.3   Overall provision for all modes

4.2.4   Predicted changes to network demands, based on different future options

4.2.5   Extent to which current corridor design and operations are ‘fit for future’

4.2.6   Extent to which draft LTP is likely to address future needs; and identification of specific future scheme design requirements

4.2.7   Recommended resolutions to above problems, including a broader network management perspective

4.3       For each point raised above, the key conclusions:

4.3.1   Crash safety and treatment priority analysis for all transport modes:

·   With the exception of pedestrian and cyclist crashes at Harewood Road / Greers Road,   the crash history of the corridor is not particularly high when measured against the whole of the city.

·   The majority of crashes are occurring at intersections and chiefly include drivers failing to give way in priority situations

·   The intersection of Harewood Road / Greers Road has the highest corridor ranking in city wide crash analysis (placed at 21st), with specific crash problems including:

·     An especially high number of crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

·     Right turn movements from Greers Road (from north) failing to give way to opposing movements from the south

·     The Major cycle Route (MCR) project has capacity to improve the cyclists and pedestrian related crashes; the right turn crashes will likely reduce too as a consequence of falling vehicle demands following wider network improvements (through LTP)

·   Speeding is a problem in the corridor, particularly further west, and this is likely to impact upon safety in the future.

·   The intersection of Harewood / Gardiners / Breens Roads  has been reviewed, in response to requests for significant intervention, and the study concludes that:

·     There is a crash pattern at this location,

·     There was a spike in crashes, coinciding with the route being used as a diversion during transformative works on State Highway 1 (Johns Road), and since this time, the crash route has dropped from six crashes in 2014 to two crashes in the past three years.

·     The severity of crashes is low.

·     The intersection ranks as 62nd worst in the CCC network and 81st in the total network (including NZTA) and is therefore not recommended as a priority for safety works.

·     There would be no business case to support signals at the intersection. It is expected that the underlying crash factors can be addressed for a small fraction of the cost of signals.

·   For the corridor as a whole, vehicle demands are forecast to reduce which could result in fewer crashes, but if the matter of speed is not addressed crash outcomes could become more severe over time. Speeding is heavily influenced by the current road layout which includes wider lanes and geometry of a higher ‘design speed’ than the posted speed limit.

4.3.2   Movement demands and efficiency for all transport modes

·   The busiest intersection is Harewood Road / Greers Road. The worst movements are the Greers Road northbound movement (traffic approaching from the south), having the narrowest approach with the least number of traffic lanes; and the opposing right turn from Greers (from Northcote) west in Harewood (towards Bishopdale)

·   The two movements above as well as being most delayed are also noted as having the highest crash rate

·   The crashes do not occur during the AM peak when a right turn filter arrow runs. However, to run this arrow throughout the day would be to exacerbate delays affecting the opposing Greers Road northbound movement.

·   Queues can be observed on approaches to Harewood Road, most notably Farrington Avenue and Wooldridge Road; however, this is occurring for short periods within the day, mostly between 1700 and 1730 hours. Operations are expected to improve in the future.

4.3.3   Overall provision for all modes

·   There is an over provision of capacity for general traffic through much of the corridor, with particularly low flows observed for a two lane divided road. This results in speeding issues and marginalisation of non-motorised users.

·   Cycle facilities are inconsistent through the corridor, with extensive sections offering no facilities at all. Negotiating intersections can be difficult, for example the cycle lane around the roundabout carries cyclists through a middle of a conflict point. The intersection with Greers Road has a particularly high number of rashes involving cyclists.

·   Pedestrian facilities are provided alongside the roads, however alignment of crossings  (for example, location of the crossings of Harewood Road at Breens Road)

4.3.4   Predicted changes to network demands, based on different future options

·   The modelled outcome for the corridor is for a reduction in demand, with an increase in demands on Sawyers Arms Road. This has been found where:

·     LTP schemes for the Sawyers Arms Road – Northcote Road corridor increase capacity and the attractiveness of Sawyers Arms Road

·     A further decrease on Harewood Road is predicted to occur following the MCR scheme

·     A significant reduction would occur if the NZTA proceed with the Grade separation scheme of State Highway 1 / Sawyers Arms Road (as currently listed in the Land Transport Plan (albeit with a lower priority rating).

·   The decreases in demand will result in:

·     A decrease in delays at the Bishopdale ‘roundabout’

·     Reduction in the number of ‘car on car’ crashes in the corridor, simply because the exposure to risk will reduce as traffic demands fall.

·     Increase ‘speeding’, as less traffic reduces impediments to travelling at faster speeds

·   Changes to the strategic planning context:

·     Development of the rezoned industrial land (of up to 50 Hectares) west of Wooldridge Road is not currently forecast to occur at a rapid rate. However, if it does then the effects of development traffic are not anticipated to change the overall conclusions.

·     There is a scheme in the Regional Land Transport Plan, which includes major upgrades to the Johns Road / Sawyers Arms Road roundabout (and most likely include the Harewood Road roundabout as well) which would result in a further reduction in vehicle demands on Harewood Road to that currently forecast. However, this scheme has a low priority ranking, and would be considered unlikely to proceed at this stage.

·     The Council should be advised that if both the NZTA scheme and rapid development of the rezoned industrial land should occur, then there would be more significant effects on the Council network, due to the impact of adding more traffic to a situation that would include reducing access to and from the Johns Road via Harewood Road. Such a strategy would include providing an improved connection from Harewood Road (around Wooldridge Road) to Sawyers Arms Road. However, this can be considered a low likelihood scenario at this stage.

4.3.5   Extent to which corridor is ‘fit for future’

·   Overall, road layouts are for a higher design speed and cater for greater demands than those observed and predicted. This is likely to result in safety concerns moving forward and greater marginalisation of pedestrians and cyclists. Level of service for pedestrians and cyclists is low.

·   Specific matters include:

·     Road layout including some geometry that enables / encourages speeding

·     Safety concerns at Greers Road / Harewood Road intersection (ranked 21st most hazardous intersection in Christchurch)

·     A corridor wide level of service issue affecting cyclists

·     Stanleys Road will potentially be relied upon to serve access to a new employment site (47Ha of land rezoned from rural to Business Park through the District Plan Review)

·     The unlikely issues of NZTA scheme at Sawyers Arms Road, coinciding with a rapid rate of development of the rezoned industrial land.

4.3.6   Extent to which the draft LTP is likely to respond well to future needs and identification of specific future scheme requirements

·   The following schemes are included in the draft LTP, and with funding allocated:

·     Wheels to Wings Major Cycle Route (MCR) (Section 2, 2025 – 2029)

·     Intersection improvement: Greers / Northcote / Sawyers Arms Road (2026 – 2029)

·   The following schemes are included in the draft LTP, with no funding allocated:

·     Intersection improvement: Greers / Harewood

·     Intersection improvement: Harewood / Stanleys

·     Intersection improvement: Harewood / Wooldridge

·   The MCR is the most significant project on Harewood Road, and has capacity to:

·     Improve upon the ‘design speed’ issue of the corridor

·   The Greers / Harewood intersection will be traversed by the MCR, and the MCR scheme could address the current operational challenges at the intersection, including:

·     Reducing the crashes affecting cyclists and pedestrians by means of improving alignment and increasing conspicuousness

·     Indirectly improve efficiency of Greers Road: following the MCR, demands on Harewood Road are predicted to fall, allowing for greater ‘green time allocation’ to Greers Road movements: potentially increasing capacity without road widening.

·   Indirect effects of the Greers / Northcote / Sawyers Arms road intersection upgrades will include diversion of current right turn (north to west) movements at Harewood Road, thus reducing exposure to the current highest crash movement. (Reallocation of green time in favour of Greers Road would also likely be effective).

·   The District Plan includes an Outline Development Plan (ODP) (Chapter 16, Appendix 16.8.14) which indicates that the intersections of Harewood / Wooldridge and Harewood / Stanleys require improvement. These could potentially be developer funded, however this would not extend to the widening of Stanleys Road as well.

·   There is no provision in the LTP to address effects of rapid industrial development alongside NZTA Sawyers Arms Road intersection scheme, (e.g. an improved road connection to Sawyers Arms Road); however, this is considered a low probability scenario at this stage

·   Therefore, it is recommended that the LTP mostly addresses corridor issues, but that additional monies may be needed in the future to address Stanleys Road, if significant take up occurs at the rezoned business parkland.

4.3.7   Recommended resolutions to above problems, including a broader network management perspective

The Harewood Road corridor should be addressed as part of a broader network based strategy. Such a strategy includes provision of high quality connections for all users, which involves prioritising different models within different corridors. For the northwest of the City, this is achievable by providing:

·     A quality corridor for general traffic in Sawyers Arms Road. The LTP is making provision for a safer, higher capacity corridor, providing a quality connection within the strategic road network.

·     A quality corridor for cyclists and local access in Harewood Road. The MCR scheme can also address the ‘design speed’ issue currently affecting the corridor.

·   Through detailed investigation, the LTP projects have capability to address specific corridor issues and service gaps. Although the LTP line item of Greers / Harewood is unfunded, the MCR will make changes to the intersection that can both directly and indirectly improve safety.

·   A ‘joined up’ outcome for the network can be achieved through the current proposed LTP.

·   Note in section 4.3.6 the ‘indirect’ benefits of schemes on current operations.

·   In the unlikely event that the NZTA proceed with the Sawyers Arms Road scheme (noting again that this scheme is given a low priority ranking in the Regional Land Transport Plan) then the likely rate of industrial development should be reviewed and a strategy developed as necessary. (See section 4.3.4).

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       On 20th June 2017, the Council requested that a corridor study be undertaken for Harewood Road, in order to identify priorities for intersection improvements and renewals works.

·   The Corridor study has been prepared, engaging with:

·     NZTA crash data base (‘Crash Analysis System’) data and ‘KiwiRAP’ analysis of safety priority

·     The modelling of the corridor within the Council’s city wide traffic model (‘CAST’), including several scenarios from ‘Do nothing’, including the (current) draft LTP schemes and including possible but unlikely changes such as major improvements at Johns Road / Sawyers Arms Road.

·     The testing of more detailed scheme options

·     Several site visits, including traversing the corridor as a driver, pedestrian and cyclist.

·   A seminar was held on 5th March for the combined ITE Committee, Papanui-Innes Community Board and Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board including a progress report, and also a presentation given by the Major Cycle Route team.

·   Following concerns raised regarding the safety of Harewood/Gardiners/Breens intersection, an interim scheme is being developed (separate to the Corridor study).

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Harewood Road Corridor Study (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Mark Gregory - Transport Network Planner

Approved By

Richard Holland - Team Leader Asset Planning

Lynette Ellis - Manager Planning and Delivery Transport

Richard Osborne - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 30 October 2018

 

15.    Templeton Area - Proposed Speed Limit Review (H-H-R)

Reference:

18/1156631

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve that pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits in the Templeton area be revoked and set as identified on the agenda attached drawing TG132770 Issue 3, dated 10-10-2018, and as listed below in Clauses 1a to 1b including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps;

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour on Hasketts Road, Leggett Road, Maddisons Road, Kirk Road, Newton Road, Dawsons Road and Jones Road.

b.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on Waterloo Road.

2.         Approve that the speed limit on Hasketts Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Buchanans Road and extending to its intersection with Barters Road.

3.         Approve that the speed limit on Leggett Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour.

4.         Approve that the speed limit on Maddisons Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Barters Road and extending in a westerly direction to a point measured 300 metres east of Kirk Road, and commencing from a point measured 360 metres west of Kirk Road and extending in a westerly direction to its intersection with Dawsons Road.

5.         Approve that the speed limit on Kirk Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with West Coast Road and extending in a southerly direction to a point measured 400 metres north of Maddisons Road.

6.         Approve that the speed limit on Newtons Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Kirk Road and extending in a westerly direction to its intersection with Dawsons Road.

7.         Approve that the speed limit on Dawsons Road (boundary road with Selwyn District Council) be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with West Coast Road and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Jones Road.

8.         Approve that the speed limit on Jones Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Dawsons Road and extending in an easterly direction to a point measured 130 metres west of Globe Bay Drive.

9.         Approve that the speed limit on Waterloo Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at a point measured 80 metres west of Pound Road and extending in a westerly direction to a point measured 50 metres east of Bicknor Street.

10.       Approve that the speed limit on Maddisons Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at a point measured 300 metres east of Kirk Road and extending in a westerly direction to a point measured 360 metres west of Kirk Road.

11.       Approve that the speed limit on Kirk Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at a point measured 400 metres north of Maddisons Road and extending in a southerly direction to a point measured 330 metres south of Maddisons Road.

12.       Approve that the speed limit changes listed above in Clauses 1 to 11 come into force following the date of Council approval and installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure as indicated in the attached drawing TG132770 Issue 3, dated 10/10/2018.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Templeton Area - Proposed Speed Limit Review

205

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Templeton Area Proposed Speed Limit Changes - Drawing TG132770 - For Council Approval

214

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Templeton Area - Proposed Speed Limit Review

Reference:

18/844636

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer and Lori Rankin, Engagement Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board’s recommendation to the Council that it approve the proposed speed limit changes on the streets in Templeton area as described within this report in accordance with Attachment A.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests from the community to reduce speed limits in the Templeton area, in alignment with the new speed limits on Selwyn District Council’s road network.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approve that pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits in the Templeton area be revoked and set as identified on the attached drawing TG132770 Issue 3, dated 10/10/2018, and as listed below in Clauses 1a to 1b including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps;

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour on Hasketts Road, Leggett Road, Maddisons Road, Kirk Road, Newton Road, Dawsons Road and Jones Road.

b.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour on Waterloo Road.

2.         Approve that the speed limit on Hasketts Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Buchanans Road and extending to its intersection with Barters Road.

3.         Approve that the speed limit on Leggett Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour.

4.         Approve that the speed limit on Maddisons Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Barters Road and extending in a westerly direction to a point measured 300 metres east of Kirk Road, and commencing from a point measured 360 metres west of Kirk Road and extending in a westerly direction to its intersection with Dawsons Road.

5.         Approve that the speed limit on Kirk Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with West Coast Road and extending in a southerly direction to a point measured 400 metres north of Maddisons Road.

6.         Approve that the speed limit on Newtons Road be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Kirk Road and extending in a westerly direction to its intersection with Dawsons Road.

7.         Approve that the speed limit on Dawsons Road (boundary road with Selwyn District Council) be set at 80 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with West Coast Road and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Jones Road.

8.         Approve that the speed limit on Jones Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Dawsons Road and extending in an easterly direction to a point measured 130 metres west of Globe Bay Drive.

9.         Approve that the speed limit on Waterloo Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at a point measured 80 metres west of Pound Road and extending in a westerly direction to a point measured 50 metres east of Bicknor Street.

10.       Approve that the speed limit on Maddisons Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at a point measured 300 metres east of Kirk Road and extending in a westerly direction to a point measured 360 metres west of Kirk Road.

11.       Approve that the speed limit on Kirk Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour commencing at a point measured 400 metres north of Maddisons Road and extending in a southerly direction to a point measured 330 metres south of Maddisons Road.

12.       Approve that the speed limit changes listed above in Clauses 1 to 11 come into force following the date of Council approval and installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure as indicated in the attached drawing TG132770 Issue 3, dated 10/10/2018.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The recommendations in this report are consistent with the anticipated outcomes of the Traffic Safety & Efficiency Service Plan in the Councils Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Set Speed Limits in accordance with the Attachment A (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Speed limits are set at a level that is appropriate for the nature of the road use and consistent with the speed limits in Selwyn District Council.

·     Reduce potential for crashes with high severity injuries.

·     Proposed speed limits supported by community.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Longer travel times (minimal).

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       There have been several recent concerns raised by members of the public regarding the speed limits in the Templeton area.

5.2       Recently, Selwyn District Council (SDC) reduced the speed limit on its sections of Newtons Road and Maddisons Road from 100 kilometres per hour to 80 kilometres per hour. Members of the public have requested that the Christchurch City Council (CCC) consider making the same changes on the remaining sections of these roads.

5.3       The speed limit changes made by SDC results in a variation of speed limits in the Templeton area. These speed limit variations over short distances of road, are confusing for motorists.

5.4       From a safety perspective, the rural roads, for example Newtons Road, are very narrow with no hard shoulders and no road markings at all.

5.5       In addition, it has been identified that vehicle operating speeds travelling into the Templeton area from Kirk Road, Jones Road and Waterloo Road are  higher than the posted speed limit.

5.6       These speed limit changes are proposed primarily for safety and consistency.

5.7       An earlier engagement with SDC, NZTA, Police and the AA resulted in unanimous support of the proposal. SDC are also in agreement with CCC with regards to the speed limit reduction on Dawsons Road (boundary road with SDC).

 


 

6.   Option 1 – Set Speed Limits in accordance with Attachment A (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The preferred option involves the changing of speed limits in accordance with the Attachment A.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance includes the consultation with the businesses, owner and occupier of any property likely to be affected by the option.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       Affected property owners and residents were advised of the recommended option by receipt of the consultation leaflet. The consultation was also emailed to key stakeholders and was posted on the Council Have Your Say webpage.

6.5       Engagement was undertaken from Wednesday 13 June 2018 to  Friday 6 July 2018.

6.6       A total of 1,000 leaflets were hand delivered to businesses and properties on Barters Road, Dawsons Road, Hasketts Road, Ivey Road, Jones Road, Kirk Road, Leggett Road, Maddisons Road, Miners Road, Newtons Road, Pound Road and West Coast Road.

6.7       The consultation leaflets were also sent to 20 key stakeholders and 198 absentee owners. 

6.8       Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, Hornby Service Centre and Upper Riccarton Community Library.

6.9       During the course of the engagement, the Council received feedback from 96 submitters. Of these, 83 submitters were in support of the proposal and 13 did not support the proposal.

6.10    The following outlines the main themes of the feedback:

6.10.1 Further speed reductions

·    20 submitters requested further speed reductions.

Kirk Road

·    Seven submitters (in support) requested Kirk Road from Templeton to Maddisons Road be reduced to 50 kilometres per hour.

·    Two submitters (one in support and one against) requested Kirk Road from Templeton to Newtons Road be reduced to 60 kilometres per hour.

·    One submitter (in support) requested Kirk Road from Templeton to Maddisons Road or Newtons Road be reduced to 60 kilometres per hour or 70  kilometres per hour.

Barters Road

·    One submitter (in support) requested Barters Road be reduced to 60 kilometres per hour.

Hasketts Road

·    One submitter (in support) requested Hasketts Road near the  Ruapuna Motorsport Park be reduced to 70  kilometres per hour.

 

 

Maddisons Road

·    One submitter (in support) requested Maddisons Road between Dawsons Road and Kirk Road be reduced to 50  kilometres per hour.

Waterloo Road

·    One submitter (in support) requested Waterloo Road between Pound Road and Bicknor Street be reduced to 70  kilometres per hour.

·    One submitter (in support) requested Waterloo Road to the intersection with Wakamuri Road be reduced to 50  kilometres per hour.

·    One submitter (in support) requested Waterloo Road between Kirk Road and Pound Road be reduced to 50 kilometres per hour.  

West Coast Road

·    Two submitters (in support) requested that the intersection of West Coast Road and Kirk Road be reduced to 70 kilometres per hour  (NZTA are the RCA).

·    Two submitters (in support) requested that West Coast Road west of the Hasketts Road intersection be reduced to 70 kilometres per hour   (NZTA are the RCA).

All proposed roads

·    One submitter (in support) requested all roads be reduced to 60 or 70 kilometres per hour.

6.10.2 Exclusions

·    Six submitters requested some roads be excluded, three submitters did not support any speed reductions and one submitter requested an increase in the speed limit on Hasketts Road.

Jones Road:

·    Three submitters in support and one submitter against the proposal did not agree with the speed limit being reduced to 60 kilometres per hour.  

·    One submitter in support did not agree with the speed limit being reduced to 60 kilometres per hour and suggested it be reduced to 80 kilometres per hour instead.

Kirk Road (Maddisons Road to West Coast Road)

·    One submitter who did not support the proposal, suggested Kirk Road (between Maddisons Road and West Coast Road) remain 100  kilometres per hour.

Maddisons Road and Hasketts Road to the intersections with Kirk Road

·    One submitter who was in support of the proposal suggested that Maddisons Road and Hasketts Road to the intersection with Kirk Road remain at 100  kilometres per hour.

Hasketts Road

·    One submitter who did not support the proposal suggested the current 70 kilometres per hour section on Hasketts Road be increased to 80  kilometres per hour to make it consistent with the other proposed 80  kilometres per hour sections.

All roads with proposed speed reductions

·    Three submitters that did not support the proposal, and did not agree to any of the speed reductions.

6.10.3 Heavy vehicle route

·    Nine submitters (seven in support and two against) requested a heavy vehicle route is implemented to direct truck drivers not to use Kirk Road.

6.10.4 Outside the scope of the project

·    14 submitters made requests which were outside the scope of this project.

6.10.5 Additional threshold signage

·    Two submitters in support of the proposal requested extra threshold signage be installed.

6.11    As a result of consultation, the following change(s) has/have been made to the final plan for approval:

·    Proposed 60  kilometres per hour speed limit on section of Waterloo Road between Pound Road and Bicknor Street instead of 80 kilometres per hour.  

·    Proposed 60  kilometres per hour speed limit on the section of Kirk Road approaching Maddisons Road intersection instead of 80 kilometres per hour.  

·    Proposed 60  kilometres per hour speed limit on the section of Maddisons Road approaching Kirk Road intersection instead of 80  kilometres per hour.

·    The above changes would improve the safety at the Kirk Road/Maddisons Road intersection.

·    The access roads such as Kirk Road, Waterloo Road and Jones Road would be reduced to 60  kilometres per hour prior to entering into the 50 kilometres per hour area of Templeton for consistency purposes.

6.12    Overall, it is noted that the majority of the proposed 80  kilometres per hour speed limits are appropriate due to the rural nature of the road, and is consistent throughout the area.

6.13    A heavy vehicle ban on Kirk Road into Templeton, will be reviewed in the near future.

6.14    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising of the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Board meeting and how they can request speaking rights. Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback summary with project team responses.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.15    This option is consistent with the Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan 2012-2042.

Financial Implications

6.16    Cost of Implementation - $30,000 for the installation of traffic controls, plus $3,750 for consultation and the preparation of this report

6.17    Funding source - Traffic Operations Signs and Road Marking Budget.

6.18    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

Legal Implications

6.19    Speed limits must be set in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

6.20    Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides the Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.21    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits to the Community Boards. 

6.22    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

             6.23        None identified

Implementation

6.24    Implementation dependencies - Community Board recommendation to the Council for Council approval.

6.25    Implementation timeframe - Approximately six weeks once the area contractor receives the request.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.26    The advantages of this option include:

·   Speed limits are set at a level that are appropriate for the nature of the road use.

·   Reduced potential for crashes and high severity injuries

·   Proposed speed limits supported by community

6.27    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Longer travel times (minimal)

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing speed limit.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Affected property owners and residents were advised of the recommended option by receipt of the consultation leaflet. The consultation was also emailed to key stakeholders and was posted on the Council Have Your Say webpage.

7.4.1   Engagement was undertaken from Wednesday 13 June 2018 – to Friday 6 July 2018.

7.4.2   A total of 1,000 leaflets were hand delivered to businesses and properties on Barters Road, Dawsons Road, Hasketts Road, Ivey Road, Jones Road, Kirk Road, Leggett Road, Maddisons Road, Miners Road, Newtons Road, Pound Road and West Coast Road.

7.4.3   The consultation leaflets were also sent to 20 key stakeholders and 198 absentee owners. 

7.4.4   Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, Hornby Service Centre and Upper Riccarton Community Library.

7.5       During the course of the engagement, Council received feedback from 96 submitters. Of the 96 submissions, 83 submitters were in support of the proposal and 13 did not support the proposal.

7.6       All roads with proposed speed reductions

·    Three submitters that did not support the proposal, and did not agree to any of the speed reductions.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.7       This option is inconsistent with the Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan 2012-2042.

7.7.1   Inconsistency – Not creating a culture of safety.

7.7.2   Reason for inconsistency – Not ensuring safe and appropriate speed limits which support the design, function and expected level of safety of the road network.

7.7.3   Amendment necessary – Recommend speed limit changes as per Attachment A (Option 1).

Financial Implications

7.8       Cost of Implementation - $3,750 for consultation and the preparation of this report

7.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - $0

7.10    Funding source – Existing staff budgets

Legal Implications

7.11    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this option.

Risks and Mitigations

7.12    Road use and misalignment of safe and appropriate speeds in the area not addressed. This option is inconsistent with the speed limits on adjacent roads in the Selwyn District Council area.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.14    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Retain existing travel times and not incur installation costs.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not have the potential to improve road safety in accordance with changes of speed limits in the Selwyn District Council area.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a  

Templeton Area Proposed Speed Limit Changes - Drawing TG132770 - For Council Approval

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Edwin Tiong - Traffic Engineer

Lori Rankin - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Stephen Wright - Senior Traffic Engineer

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 13 November 2018

 

16.    Knights Stream and Longhurst  - Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit (H-H-R)

Reference:

18/1216157

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits within the Knights Stream and Longhurst subdivisions, be revoked and set as identified in Attachment A of the agenda report, and listed below in clauses 1a. and 1b. including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps:

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Richmond Avenue, Hurutini Way, Luxembourg Crescent, Tongariro Street, Koareare Avenue, Bouma Street, Kokoda Street, Killarney Avenue, Harz Street, Denali Street, Greenwich Street, Jefferson Close, Monsanto Street, Aberdare Street, Oakdene Place, Flagstaff Place, Kruger Road, Elba Crescent, Whincops Road (Halswell Junction Road to Quaifes Road), Caulfield Avenue, John Annan Street, Derek Anderson Place, Bamber Crescent, Meyer Crescent, Piper Street, Greenaway Street, Ashboult Street, Deacon Street, Whitnall Street, Bargrove Close, Ader Close, Hamill Road, Gosling Crescent, Belgrave Close, Graycliffe Street, McDermott Place, Murphys Road, Ishwar Ganda Boulevard, Dobbs Street, Bradwell Crescent, Hillbourne Street, Lockwood Street, David Buist Crescent, Noodlum Way, Packard Crescent, Robalan Close and Maka Lane.

b.         Approve that the permanent speed limit be set at 40 kilometres per hour on Richmond Avenue, Hurutini Way, Luxembourg Crescent, Tongariro Street, Koareare Avenue, Bouma Street, Kokoda Street, Killarney Avenue, Harz Street, Denali Street, Greenwich Street, Jefferson Close, Monsanto Street, Aberdare Street, Oakdene Place, Flagstaff Place, Kruger Road, Elba Crescent, Whincops Road (Halswell Junction Road to Quaifes Road), Caulfield Avenue, John Annan Street, Derek Anderson Place, Bamber Crescent, Meyer Crescent, Piper Street, Greenaway Street, Ashboult Street, Deacon Street, Whitnall Street, Bargrove Close, Ader Close, Hamill Road, Gosling Crescent, Belgrave Close, Graycliffe Street, McDermott Place, Murphys Road, Ishwar Ganda Boulevard, Dobbs Street, Bradwell Crescent, Hillbourne Street, Lockwood Street, David Buist Crescent, Noodlum Way, Packard Crescent, Robalan Close and Maka Lane.

2.         Approve that the speed limit changes listed in clauses 1a. and 1b. above come into force on 31 January 2019, following the Council approval and installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure, as indicated in Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Knights Stream and Longhurst  - Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit

217

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Knights Stream and Longhurst Areas - Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit Drawing TG133047 - For Council Approval

225

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Knights Stream and Longhurst  - Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit

Reference:

18/1116448

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer and Jennie Hamilton, Senior Engagement Advisor

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board’s recommendation that the Council approve a speed limit change from 50 kilometres per hour to 40 kilometres per hour within the Knights Stream and Longhurst areas as shown on Attachment A.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests from local residents and the Community Board to improve safety within the Knights Stream and Longhurst areas. This report also supports the objectives of the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) Speed Management Guide 2016 and the overall vision of the Safer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to Part 4 Section 27 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 and Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, that speed limits within the Knights Stream and Longhurst subdivisions, be revoked and set as identified in Attachment A of the agenda, and listed below in clauses 1a. and 1b. including resultant changes made to the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits and associated Speed Limit Maps:

a.         Revoke the existing permanent speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour on Richmond Avenue, Hurutini Way, Luxembourg Crescent, Tongariro Street, Koareare Avenue, Bouma Street, Kokoda Street, Killarney Avenue, Harz Street, Denali Street, Greenwich Street, Jefferson Close, Monsanto Street, Aberdare Street, Oakdene Place, Flagstaff Place, Kruger Road, Elba Crescent, Whincops Road (Halswell Junction Road to Quaifes Road), Caulfield Avenue, John Annan Street, Derek Anderson Place, Bamber Crescent, Meyer Crescent, Piper Street, Greenaway Street, Ashboult Street, Deacon Street, Whitnall Street, Bargrove Close, Ader Close, Hamill Road, Gosling Crescent, Belgrave Close, Graycliffe Street, McDermott Place, Murphys Road, Ishwar Ganda Boulevard, Dobbs Street, Bradwell Crescent, Hillbourne Street, Lockwood Street, David Buist Crescent, Noodlum Way, Packard Crescent, Robalan Close and Maka Lane.

b.         Approve that the permanent speed limit be set at 40 kilometres per hour on Richmond Avenue, Hurutini Way, Luxembourg Crescent, Tongariro Street, Koareare Avenue, Bouma Street, Kokoda Street, Killarney Avenue, Harz Street, Denali Street, Greenwich Street, Jefferson Close, Monsanto Street, Aberdare Street, Oakdene Place, Flagstaff Place, Kruger Road, Elba Crescent, Whincops Road (Halswell Junction Road to Quaifes Road), Caulfield Avenue, John Annan Street, Derek Anderson Place, Bamber Crescent, Meyer Crescent, Piper Street, Greenaway Street, Ashboult Street, Deacon Street, Whitnall Street, Bargrove Close, Ader Close, Hamill Road, Gosling Crescent, Belgrave Close, Graycliffe Street, McDermott Place, Murphys Road, Ishwar Ganda Boulevard, Dobbs Street, Bradwell Crescent, Hillbourne Street, Lockwood Street, David Buist Crescent, Noodlum Way, Packard Crescent, Robalan Close and Maka Lane.

2.         Approve that the speed limit changes listed in clauses 1a. and 1b. above come into force on 31 January 2019, following the Council approval and installation of all required infrastructure (signage and/or markings) and removal of obsolete infrastructure, as indicated in Attachment A of the agenda.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The recommendations in this report support the Council’s Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Change the permanent speed limit within the Knights Stream and Longhurst areas as shown on Attachment A from 50 kilometres per hour to 40 kilometres per hour (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Aligns with the objectives of the NZTA Speed Management Guide 2016 and overall vision of Safer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020.

·     Better aligns the posted speed limit within the areas with actual operating speeds, and helps to improve credibility of speeds across the network.

·     Aims to further reduce actual operating speeds, with a resultant improvement in safety particularly for vulnerable road users, for example in school areas.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     There are no known disadvantages.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       There have been reports of speed issues from local residents within the Knights Stream and Longhurst areas.

5.2       The new Knights Stream School at the corner of Richmond Avenue and Killarney Avenue will be opened in the first semester next year. Both Knights Stream School and the existing Seven Oaks School on Murphys Road do not have School Speed Zones in place.

5.3       Safer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020 is designed to guide improvements in road safety, with an overall vision of “A safe road system increasingly free of death and serious injury”. This safe system approach has four key pillars, being safe vehicles, safe road use, safe roads and roadsides, and safe speeds. This approach recognises that road user mistakes are inevitable, but that it is everyone’s responsibility to ensure that the system protects people from death or serious injury when those mistakes occur. The Strategy recognises that speed affects the likelihood and impact of all crashes, and notes that small reductions in impact speeds greatly increase the chances of surviving a crash, particularly for pedestrians or cyclists. This is illustrated in Table 4 of the Strategy, as reproduced in Table 1 below.

 

Collision Type

Probability of death

10%

30%

50%

Pedestrian struck by car

30 km/h

40 km/h

45 km/h

Car driver in side impact with another car

50 km/h

65 km/h

75 km/h

Car driver in frontal impact with another car

70 km/h

95 km/h

105 km/h

Table 1. Chance of death at different impact speeds (Source: Safer Journeys Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020)

 

5.4       The Strategy gave rise to a number of action plans, which led to the development of NZTA’s Speed Management Guide in November 2016. The objectives of the Guide are:

·   To achieve a consistent, sector-wide approach to speed management;

·   To support road controlling authorities (RCAs)to identify parts of the network where better speed management will contribute most to reducing death and serious injury, while still supporting economic productivity; and,

·   To support RCAs in better engagement and consultation.

5.5       The Guide recommends that speed management initiatives should be targeted to two areas:

·   Firstly, where there is greatest potential to reduce death and serious injury and improve economic productivity. This typically focuses on both rural and urban roads identified with higher collective and/or personal crash risk. An example of a CCC project aligned to this target area of the Guide is the recent lowering of the speed limit on Dyers Pass Road to 60 kilometres per hour. A number of other projects aligned to this target area of the Guide are being progressed and/or investigated this year, including Springs Road, Marshs Road, Quaifes Road and Halswell Junction Road in the vicinity of the Knights Stream and Longhurst subdivisions.

·   Secondly, and of particular relevance to this report, where there are high benefit opportunities to improve the credibility of speed limits across the road network both locally and nationally. This typically involves corridors where road users already travel at the safe and appropriate speed, but where the speed limit is currently out of alignment. A recent example of a CCC project related to this target area, is the introduction of a 40 kilometres per hour speed limit in the Addington area around St Mary’s Church Square. Investigations are also underway in relation to speed management projects relating to other similar residential subdivisions.

5.6       The Guide provides information and tools to assess the safe and appropriate speed of a road based on its classification, crash risk and other characteristics such as adjacent land use, roadway width, intersection and property access density.

5.7       Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 replaced the previous (2003) version of the Rule in August 2017, and formalises the approach to speed management in the Guide. In particular, the Rule:

·   requires NZTA to provide guidance on and information about speed management to RCAs; and,

·   requires RCAs to set speed limits that are safe and appropriate; and,

·   encourages a consistent approach to speed management throughout New Zealand; and,

·   replaces the methodology of the 2003 Rule with assessment criteria and outcome statements based on the approach in the Guide.

5.8       As with most modern subdivisions, the Knights Stream and Longhurst areas are generally designed to support a 30 to 40 kilometres per hour operating speed on the majority of its roads, many of which are 6 to 9 metre wide local/access roads. This is consistent with the safe and appropriate speed assessed through the Guide. Based on observations by Council staff, and comments received back from residents during the consultation process, current operating speeds on the majority of the roads within the subdivision are within this range.

5.9       Council traffic count data reveals that the 85th percentile operating speed on the Caulfield Avenue (between Noodlum Way and Piper Street) collector road within the subdivisions is higher than the current 50 kilometres per hour posted speed limit, as summarised in Table 2 below.

 

 

Caulfield Avenue

(Noodlum Way – Piper Street)

Month / Year

Sep 2017

Avg Daily Volume

1714 vpd

Avg Peak Volume

186 vph

Mean Speed

46.9 km/hr

85%ile Speed

55.4 km/hr

Percent Heavy Vehicles

8.7%

Table 2. CCC traffic volume and speed summary – Te Korari Street and Te Rito Street

 

5.10    As noted in section 5.3 of this report, Knights Stream and Longhurst are one of a number of similar subdivision developments where a 40 kilometres per hour speed limit is currently being recommended to support the objectives of the NZTA Speed Management Guide 2016 and overall vision of the Safer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020. Lower vehicle speeds within the areas will improve safety, particularly for vulnerable road users (e.g. pedestrians and cyclists) and especially around specific land uses within the areas such as the school, preschools, parks, playground and neighbourhood shops that are now established.

5.11    There is currently no variable speed limit (School Zone) outside Knights Stream and Seven Oaks Schools. If the permanent 40 kilometres per hour speed limit is approved, it would improve the safety around the schools’ area, and this was discussed in person with the Knights Stream and Seven Oaks School principals, who were supportive of the recommendation.


 

6.   Option 1 - Change the permanent speed limit within the Knights Stream and Longhurst subdivisions area from 50 kilometres per hour to 40 kilometres per hour (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       This option is to change the permanent speed limit within the Knights Stream and Longhurst subdivision areas from 50 kilometres per hour to 40 kilometres per hour, as shown on Attachment A. Existing signage at the speed limit change points on Richmond Avenue (to be connected to John Paterson Drive), Denali Street, (at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road), Whincops Road (at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and Quaifes Road), Hamill Road (at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road), and Murphys Road (at its intersection with Halswell Junction Road and Quaifes Road), would be amended to reflect the reduced 40 kilometres per hour speed limit on entry to the subdivisions.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance includes the consultation with the owner and occupier of any property likely to be injuriously affected by the option.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       Consultation on the Knights Stream Park and Longhurst area proposed 40 kilometres per hour speed limit opened on 2 October 2018 and closed on 24 October 2018.

6.5       Information about the speed limit was included in 1,500 leaflets hand delivered to homes, businesses and the schools in the project area, and emailed to key stakeholders.

6.6       Eighty eight submissions were received with 57 (65 per cent) supporting a 40 kilometres per hour speed limit, two (2 per cent) partially or conditionally supporting it, and 29 (33 per cent) opposing it.

6.7       Many of those who supported a 40 kilometres per hour speed limit referred to the large number of children walking to parks and schools in the project area. Cars were often parked on both sides of roads, making them quite narrow.

6.8       The new Knights Stream School is due to open at the beginning of the school year and the Principal of Seven Oaks School said he was happy for the speed limit to change to 40 kilometres per hour.

6.9       Speeding was an issue along a number of roads including Caulfield Avenue, Richmond Avenue, Murphys Road, Hamill Road, Ishwar Ganda Boulevard, Packard Crescent and Whincops Road, according to submitters.

6.10    Seven submitters stated that given all these elements, a 30 kilometres per hour speed limit would be preferable in this area.

6.11    Enforcement was an issue for 10 submitters if any new speed limit was approved.  The traffic engineer has confirmed that speed is monitored and reviewed after a new speed limit is implemented.

6.12    The New Zealand Transport Agency generally agreed with the proposal, except for the proposed 40 kilometres per hour speed limit for John Paterson Drive, which was currently in a rural road environment. Sense testing could have the speed limit at a ‘rural residential’ 60 kilometres per hour, according to a spokesperson.

6.13    The Council intends to connect John Paterson Drive to the northern end of Richmond Avenue in a separate project. This would link it to the residential area and justify a slower speed limit.  It would also stop many drivers turning from Halswell Junction Road onto Denali Street. At times cars are driving 10 metres on the wrong side of Halswell Junction Road to get around the traffic island and drive down Denali Street without performing a U turn, according to one submitter.  The Council is to install temporary bollards and additional signage to stop this occurring. 

6.14    The Halswell Residents’ Association supported the proposed 40 kilometres per hour speed limit but added that the change must be accompanied by a review that puts in place consistent and predictable speed limits across Halswell, and a comprehensive programme of driver behaviour change education, and enforcement.

6.15    It submitted that Longhurst and Knights Stream had 50 per cent more dwellings per hectare than older areas of Christchurch (15/ha vs 10/ha), meaning that there were 50 per cent more driveways and (potentially) 50 per cent more people.  This density meant more chance of a collision, whether between motor vehicles or between a motor vehicle and a person walking or biking.

6.16    The Association said that local residents were frustrated by the multiplicity of speed limits around Halswell, and poor enforcement of existing speed limits.

6.17    Nineteen of the submitters who opposed the blanket 40 kilometres per hour speed limit in the Knights Stream Park and Longhurst areas said that the proposed limit should target specific streets, and not the whole subdivision. Twelve said they supported a 40 kilometres per hour school speed zone outside the schools.

6.18    Other locations and methods to curb speed were also suggested but these were outside the scope of this project.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.19    This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.20    Cost of Implementation - $3,000 for the replacement and installation of speed limit signs, plus $2,750 for consultation and the preparation of this report.

6.21    Funding source - Traffic Operations Signage and Road Marking Budget

6.22    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

Legal Implications

6.23    Speed limits must be set in accordance with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

6.24    Clause 27 (Part 4) of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides the Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.25    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits.

6.26    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

              6.27      None identified

Implementation

6.28    Implementation dependencies - Council approval

6.29    Implementation timeframe – Signs and/or markings associated with the traffic control devices to be installed by 31 January 2019.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.30    The advantages of this option include:

·   Aligns with the objectives of the NZTA Speed Management Guide 2016 and overall vision of Safer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020.

·   Better aligns the posted speed limit within the subdivision areas with actual operating speeds, and helps to improve credibility of speeds across the network.

·   Aims to further reduce actual operating speeds, with a resultant improvement in safety particularly for vulnerable road users.

·   Less signs and less speed changes in the area.

6.31    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   There are no known disadvantages.

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain the existing permanent 50 kilometres per hour speed limit within Knights Stream and Longhurst subdivision areas.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Refer to sections 6.4 to 6.18 of this report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $2,750 for consultation and the preparation of this report.

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - $0

7.8       Funding source – Existing staff budgets.

Legal Implications

7.9       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this option.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Not applicable

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Has no impact on existing speed limits.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The posted speed limit would remain out of alignment with actual operating speeds, and would therefore not help with the credibility of speed limits across the network as sought through the objectives of the NZTA Speed Management Guide 2016 and overall vision of Safer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Knights Stream and Longhurst Areas - Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour Speed Limit Drawing TG133047 - For Council Approval

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Edwin Tiong - Traffic Engineer

Jennie Hamilton - Senior Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Mark Millar - Senior Traffic Engineer

Steffan Thomas - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 27 November 2018

 

17.    Wigram Primary School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions (H-H-R)

Reference:

18/1264344

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved to:

2.         Approve under Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles on the part of Curtis Street, Porter Street and The Runway as indicated by ‘Proposed No Stopping’ in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report, be prohibited.

3.         Approve under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 that a marked bus stop for the exclusive use of school buses only subject to the following restriction: between the hours of 8.30am and 3.30pm School Days Only, be installed on the south side of Curtis Street as indicated in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report.

4.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Curtis Street as indicated in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report, is reserved as a parking place for any vehicles, subject to the following restriction: the maximum time for parking of any vehicle is three minutes between the hours of 8.30am and 9.30am, 2.30pm and 3.30pm School Days Only.

5.         That any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls on Curtis Street, Porter Street and The Runway made pursuant to any bylaw or the Local Government Act 1974 to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls referred to in resolutions 1. to 4. above, are revoked.

6.         That the resolutions 2. to 5. above take affect when the traffic control devices that evidence the restrictions described in the staff report, are in place.

 

2.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to the powers vested in it by section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule - Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council hereby authorises the head teacher of the Wigram Primary School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Curtis Street school crossing point as indicated in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018  in Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Wigram Primary School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions

229

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Wigram Primary School - Proposed Kea Crossing and Other Parking Restrictions - Drawing TG133402 - For Council and Board Approval

234

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Wigram Primary School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions

Reference:

18/1170279

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer, and Kate Moir, Engagement Delivery Assistant

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider traffic management measures to support the Wigram Primary School, which will open on its new Wigram Skies site in Term One 2019. 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests from the Wigram Primary School community.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to the powers vested in it by section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule - Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council hereby authorises the head teacher of the Wigram Primary School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Curtis Street school crossing point as indicated in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018  in Attachment A of the agenda report.

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve to:

2.         Approve under Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles on the part of Curtis Street, Porter Street and The Runway as indicated by ‘Proposed No Stopping’ in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report, be prohibited.

3.         Approve under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 that a marked bus stop for the exclusive use of school buses only subject to the following restriction: between the hours of 8.30am and 3.30pm School Days Only, be installed on the south side of Curtis Street as indicated in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report.

4.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Curtis Street as indicated in drawing TG133402 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report, is reserved as a parking place for any vehicles, subject to the following restriction: the maximum time for parking of any vehicle is three minutes between the hours of 8.30am and 9.30am, 2.30pm and 3.30pm School Days Only.

5.         That any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls on Curtis Street, Porter Street and The Runway made pursuant to any bylaw or the Local Government Act 1974 to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls referred to in resolutions 1. to 4. Above, are revoked.

6.         That these resolutions take effect when the traffic control devices that evidence the restrictions described in the staff report, are in place.

4.   Key Points

4.1       The recommendations in this report are consistent with the anticipated outcomes of the Traffic Safety and Efficiency Service Plan in the Council’s Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install Kea Crossing, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions for Wigam Primary School (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Improving safety in the school area during the school hours.

·     The Kea Crossing provides a supervised and safe crossing location for school children before and after school on Curtis Street.

·     Drop-off and pick-up parking provisions to support the school.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Restrictions on the use of parking.

5.   Context/Background

5.1       The Wigram Primary School site under development in the Wigram Skies subdivision will open on Term 1 of 2019.  Council staff have meet with the school staff to determine appropriate traffic controls to assist the safe and efficient operation of the surrounding streets. 

6.   Option 1 - Install Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions for Wigram Primary School (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install school patrolled Kea Crossing on Curtis Street, No Stopping, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions as shown on Attachment A. 

6.2       A Kea Crossing is a school patrol with swing out stop signs on a crossing point that does not have the zebra markings.  The New Zealand Police Education Team is satisfied that this site is suitable for a Kea Crossing and can train the children to operate it. The Kea Crossing is compliant with the Lane Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and Council staff are satisfied the site is suitable for a Kea Crossing.

6.3       Kerbside parking demand in the site would be displaced further along Curtis Street.  There is ample parking along Curtis Street, but it is acknowledged that there will be additional parking demands at peak pick-up and drop-off times associated with the school, irrespective of the decisions arising from this report.

6.4       The school bus parking allows a safe area to pick-up and drop-off school children using the school bus.

6.5       The P3 parking allows for a safe pick-up and drop-off area for parents using cars.

6.6       The No Stopping restrictions will prevent key areas from being congested at peak times. 

Significance

6.7       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance includes the consultation with the owner and occupier of any property likely to be injuriously affected by the option.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.8       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.9       Community engagement for this project was undertaken from Monday 8 October to Tuesday 13 November 2018.  Information leaflets were distributed to the affected residents and available at the Hornby Library. Key stakeholders were contacted about the project and how to get in touch if they had any concerns.

6.10    Comments were received from a resident seeking No Stopping restrictions in other areas.  This will be considered separately as it is outside the scope of the project. 

6.11    The Principal of the Wigram Primary School supports this option.

6.12    The Team Leader Parking Compliance supports this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.13    This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.14    Cost of Implementation - $17,000 for the installation of Kea Crossing and traffic controls, plus $750 for consultation and the preparation of this report

6.15    Funding source - Traffic Operations School Safety Budget

6.16    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

Legal Implications

6.17    Part 1, Clauses 7 and 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides the Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

6.18    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of traffic control devices. The Council has not delegated its powers to approve Kea Crossings.

6.19    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.20        None Identified

Implementation

6.21    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval, dependent on endorsement by the Community Board and approval by the Council to formalise the Kea Crossing.

6.22    Implementation timeframe - installed by 25 January 2019

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.23    The advantages of this option include:

·    Improve safety in the school area during the school hours.

·    The Kea Crossing provides a supervised and safe crossing location for school children before and after school on Curtis Street.

·   Drop-off and pick-up parking provisions to support the school.

6.24    The disadvantages of this option include:

·    Restrictions on use of parking. 

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Maintain the status quo of the exiting road marking and traffic controls.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Refer sections 6.9 to 6.12 above.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $750 for consultation and the preparation of this report.

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - $0

7.8       Funding source – existing staff budgets

Legal Implications

7.9       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this option.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    None identified 

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Does not affect on-street parking.

·   No cost to the Council.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not support safe and efficient operation of the school. 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Wigram Primary School - Proposed Kea Crossing and Other Parking Restrictions - Drawing TG133402 - For Council and Board Approval

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Edwin Tiong - Traffic Engineer

Kate Moir - Engagement Delivery Assistant

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 27 November 2018

 

18.    Knights Stream School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions (H-H-R)

Reference:

18/1264305

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part C

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolved:

2.         Under Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles on the part of Richmond Avenue, Killarney Avenue and Bouma Street as indicated by ‘Proposed No Stopping Restriction’ on the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report, be prohibited.

3.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that a marked bus stop for the exclusive use of public transport buses be installed on the south side of Richmond Avenue as indicated in the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018  in Attachment A of the agenda report.

4.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that a marked bus stop for the exclusive use of school buses only subject to the following restriction: between the hours of 8.30am and 3.30pm School Days Only, be installed on the south side of Richmond Avenue as indicated in the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report.

5.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Richmond Avenue and Killarney Avenue as indicated in the attached drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018, is reserved as a parking place for any vehicles, subject to the following restriction: the maximum time for parking of any vehicle is three minutes between the hours of 8.30am and 9.30am, 2.30pm and 3.30pm School Days Only.

6.         That any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls on Richmond Avenue, Killarney Avenue and Bouma Street made pursuant to any bylaw or the Local Government Act 1974 to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls referred to in resolutions 1. to 5. above, are revoked.

7.         That resolutions 1. to 6. above, take affect when the traffic control devices that evidence the restrictions described in the agenda staff report, are in place.

 

2.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to the powers vested in it by section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule - Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, that the Christchurch City Council hereby authorises the head teacher of the Knights Stream School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Richmond Avenue school crossing point as indicated in the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report. 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Knights Stream School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions

237

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Knights Stream School Proposed Kea Crossing and Other Parking Restrictions - Drawing TG133401 - For Council and Board Approval

242

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Knights Stream School - Proposed Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions

Reference:

18/1166078

Presenter(s):

Edwin Tiong, Traffic Engineer and Kate Moir, Engagement Delivery Assistant

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to consider traffic management measures supporting Knights Stream School, which will open on its new site in Term One of 2019.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests received from the Knights Stream School community.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by comparing factors relating to this decision against the criteria set out in the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Approve, pursuant to the powers vested in it by section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule - Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, that the Christchurch City Council hereby authorises the head teacher of the Knights Stream School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Richmond Avenue school crossing point as indicated in the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report.

That the Waipuna/Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board resolve:

2.         Under Clause 7 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the stopping of vehicles on the part of Richmond Avenue, Killarney Avenue and Bouma Street as indicated by ‘Proposed No Stopping Restriction’ on the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report, be prohibited.

3.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that a marked bus stop for the exclusive use of public transport buses be installed on the south side of Richmond Avenue as indicated in the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018  in Attachment A of the agenda report.

4.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that a marked bus stop for the exclusive use of school buses only subject to the following restriction: between the hours of 8.30am and 3.30pm School Days Only, be installed on the south side of Richmond Avenue as indicated in the drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018 in Attachment A of the agenda report.

5.         Under Clause 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017, that the part of Richmond Avenue and Killarney Avenue as indicated in the attached drawing TG133401 Issue 1, dated 7/11/2018, is reserved as a parking place for any vehicles, subject to the following restriction: the maximum time for parking of any vehicle is three minutes between the hours of 8.30am and 9.30am, 2.30pm and 3.30pm School Days Only.

6.         That any previous resolutions pertaining to traffic controls on Richmond Avenue, Killarney Avenue and Bouma Street made pursuant to any bylaw or the Local Government Act 1974 to the extent that they are in conflict with the traffic controls referred to in resolutions 1. to 5. Above, are revoked.

7.         That resolutions 1. to 6. above take effect when the traffic control devices that evidence the restrictions described in the agenda staff report, are in place.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The recommendations in this report are consistent with the anticipated outcomes of the Traffic Safety and Efficiency Service Plan in the Council’s Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028)

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions for Knights Stream School (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Improving safety in the school area during the school hours.

·     The Kea Crossing provides a supervised and safe crossing location for school children before and after school on Richmond Avenue.

·     Drop-off and pick up parking provisions to support the school.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Restrictions on the use of parking.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       The Knights Stream School site under development in the Knights Stream subdivision will open in Term One of 2019. Council staff have meet with the school staff to determine appropriate traffic controls to assist safe and efficient operation of the surrounding streets. 

6.   Option 1 - Install Kea Crossing, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions for Knights Stream School (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install school patrolled Kea Crossing on Richmond Avenue, No Stopping, Bus Stop, P3 and School Buses Only Parking Restrictions, as shown on Attachment A.

6.2       A Kea Crossing is a school patrol with swing out stop signs on a crossing point that does not have the zebra markings.  The New Zealand Police Education Team is satisfied that this site is suitable for a Kea Crossing and can train the children to operate it. The Kea Crossing is compliant with the Lane Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and Council staff are satisfied the site is complimentary for a Kea Crossing.

6.3       Kerbside parking demand in the site would be displaced further along Richmond Avenue.  There is ample parking within the Knights Stream Park carpark, but it is acknowledged that there will be additional parking demands at peak pick-up and drop-off times associated with the school, irrespective of the decisions arising from this report.

6.4       The school bus parking allows a safe area to pick up and drop off school children using school bus.

6.5       The access configuration of the school coincides with an existing bus stop, which is relocated in this option. 

6.6       The P3 parking allows for a safe pick-up and drop-off area for parents using cars.

6.7       The No Stopping restrictions protect sight lines and minimise the potential for congestion at peak times.

Significance

6.8       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.  Engagement requirements for this level of significance includes the consultation with the owner and occupier of any property likely to be injuriously affected by the option.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.9       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.10    Community engagement for this project was undertaken from Monday 8 October to Tuesday 13 November 2018.

6.11    Information leaflets were distributed to the four directly affected residents and available at Te Hāpua:Halswell Centre. Staff also contacted key stakeholders, including the Halswell Residents’ Association, New Zealand Police, and the affected school and preschool about the project and how to get in touch to make a comment if they had any concerns. No comments were received.

6.12    The principal of the new Knights Stream School supports this option.

6.13    The Team Leader Parking Compliance supports this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.14    This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.15    Cost of Implementation - $17,000 for the installation of Kea Crossing and traffic controls, plus $750 for consultation and the preparation of this report.

6.16    Funding source - Traffic Operations School Safety Budget

6.17    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

Legal Implications

6.18    Part 1, Clauses 7 and 8 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2017 provides the Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

6.19    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of traffic control devices. The Council has not delegated its powers to approve Kea Crossings.

6.20    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.21    None identified

Implementation

6.22    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval, dependent on endorsement by the Community Board and approval by the Council to formalise the Kea Crossing.

6.23    Implementation timeframe – installed by 25 January 2019

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.24    The advantages of this option include:

·    Improving safety in the school area during school hours.

·    The Kea Crossing provides a supervised and safe crossing location for school children before and after school on Richmond Avenue.

·   Drop-off and pick-up parking provisions to support the school.

6.25    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Restrictions on use of parking

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Maintain the status quo of the existing road marking and traffic controls.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Refer to sections 6.10 to 6.13 above.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $750 for consultation and the preparation of this report.

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - $0

7.8       Funding source – existing staff budgets

Legal Implications

7.9       There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this option.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    None identified

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Does not affect on-street parking

·   No additional cost to the Council

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not support the safe and efficient operations of the school

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Knights Stream School Proposed Kea Crossing and Other Parking Restrictions - Drawing TG133401 - For Council and Board Approval

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Edwin Tiong - Traffic Engineer

Kate Moir - Engagement Delivery Assistant

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

06 December 2018

 

Report from Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board  – 29 October 2018

 

19.    Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk - Request for Proposals Results and New Lease (L-C-H)

Reference:

18/1250903

Presenter(s):

Luke Rees-Thomas, Property Consultant

 

 

 

1.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Consideration

 

The Board also took into consideration the deputations from Ali Jones, Jenny Gillies, Alan Jolliffe and Ray King, and Jeanette Christensen.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to Council:

1.         A new lease be granted to the Canterbury Horticultural Society, pursuant to Section 61(2) of the Reserves Act 1977, for a period of five years, over premises located within the Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk building, being approximately 200 square metres, on terms as consistent with the report.

2.         Note the willingness of the Canterbury Horticultural Society to promote the building as a shared community space, with a portion of the premises able to be utilised by other groups.

3.         Note upon expiry of the five year lease term, the Council will review and determine, in their sole discretion, whether a further extension be granted.

4.         Delegated authority be granted to the Manager Property Consultancy to conclude all necessary lease negotiations and documentation with respect to Recommendation 1.

 

3.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

 

Part C

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board requested:

5.         Staff advice to be provided to the Board regarding the future use of the Botanic Gardens Information Centre.

 

4.  Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.      Approve a new lease be granted to the Canterbury Horticultural Society, pursuant to Section 61(2) of the Reserves Act 1977, for a period of five years, over premises located within the Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk building, being approximately 200 square metres, on terms as consistent with the report.

2.      Note the willingness of the Canterbury Horticultural Society to promote the building as a shared community space, with a portion of the premises able to be utilised by other groups.

3.      Note upon expiry of the five year lease term, the Council will review and determine, in their sole discretion, whether a further extension be granted.

4.      Delegate authority to the Manager Property Consultancy to conclude all necessary lease negotiations and documentation with respect to Recommendation 1.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk - Request for Proposals Results and New Lease

245

 

No.

Title

Page

a  

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Request for Proposal -Canterbury Horticultural Society Response (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

b  

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Request for Proposal  - Jenny Gillies Response (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

 

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk - Request for Proposals Results and New Lease

Reference:

18/1087259

Presenter(s):

Luke Rees-Thomas, Property Consultant

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board to recommend to Council that a new lease be granted over premises contained within the Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Building for a total period of five years.

1.2       The Botanic Gardens are classified as Local Purpose (Botanic Gardens) Reserve and administered under the Reserves Act 1977.  In essence this Act requires any use within the building to exist with a purpose that is consistent with the classification (Botanic Gardens) and to support patrons of the grounds.

1.3       The Botanic Gardens are administered under the Reserves Act 1977 and deemed a metropolitan asset, therefore final decision needs to be made by the full Council, via recommendation from the Community Board.

Origin of Report

1.4       This report is being provided to fulfil Council resolution CNCL/2018/00150:

Council Resolved CNCL/2018/00150

             That the Council:

1.      Approve the operational use for the available premises within the Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk building be determined as community based for the duration of a fixed term lease.

2.      Issue a closed Request for Proposals (RFP) process to both Request for Information applicants. This ‘RFP’ to include a definition of what constitutes a ‘community use’, with relevant evaluation attributes in order to allow effective comparison. The results of that process would then be reported via the Community Board to Council for decision.

Councillor Swiggs/Councillor Templeton                                                                           Carried

1.5       Staff have now completed a closed RFP evaluation process.  The results of which are now presented to the Council for consideration and final decision.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low-medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the project being low cost and affecting a limited group of residents (visitors to the Botanic Gardens).  While the decision is not easily reversible, this is not significant enough to change the overall significance value.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Waikura/Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board recommend to Council:

1.         A new lease be granted to the Canterbury Horticultural Society, pursuant to Section 61(2) of the Reserves Act 1977, for a period of five years, over premises located within the Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk building, being approximately 200 square metres, on terms as consistent with the report.

2.         Note the willingness of the Canterbury Horticultural Society to promote the building as a shared community space, with a portion of the premises able to be utilised by other groups.

3.         Note upon expiry of the five year lease term, the Council will review and determine, in their sole discretion, whether a further extension be granted.

4.         Grant delegated authority to the Manager Property Consultancy to conclude all necessary lease negotiations and documentation with respect to Recommendation 1.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2018 - 2028):

4.1.1   Activity: Parks & Foreshore

·     Level of Service: 6.2.2.0 Overall customer satisfaction with the presentation of the City’s Parks - Botanic Gardens & Mona Vale presentation: resident satisfaction =95%.

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Grant new lease to the preferred respondent (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Decline new lease to preferred respondent, negotiate with second  respondent

·     Option 3 – Do not grant a lease to either party

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Certainty will be provided on the medium term operational use for the Tea Kiosk building.

·     A fixed term lease will be granted to a stable Lessee with strong ties to the Botanic Gardens.

·     The premises layout will invite the public to enter at no cost.

·     The majority of the premises will be reconfigurable space and utilised by the Lessee for various uses which support the surrounding area.

·     The Lessee will work with other like-minded community groups and incorporate these groups into a booking schedule (for uses that support visitors to the Botanic Gardens).

·     The premises will not be altered and the heritage value will be preserved.

·     The Council will be able to review progress in 5 years and consider whether any further term is warranted.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The Council will only receive a market rent over a portion of the leased space (approximately 25%).

·     No other entity will be able to book the space on a permanent basis.

4.4       Staff are recommending an option which seeks to accommodate an established community group with existing ties to the Botanic Gardens, whilst also ensuring continued access for other groups and the general public.

4.5       Should the Council elect to grant a new lease to the Canterbury Horticultural Society, the Council will have the ability to review progress upon the five year expiry and determine whether any further term is appropriate.

4.6       The Canterbury Horticultural Society understand the significance of the Tea Kiosk Building and have recorded a willingness to work with the Council in order to achieve a positive outcome for patrons of the Botanic Gardens.

 

5.   Context/Background

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Building

5.1       The land encompassing the Botanic Gardens is classified as Local Purpose (Botanic Gardens) Reserve and administered under the Reserves Act 1977.  The grounds receive approximately 1.2 million visitors per year and are a major draw card for tourists and locals alike.

5.2       The Tea Kiosk building is situated in a pivotal location within the Botanic Gardens.  As patrons enter the grounds via the Armagh Street foot bridge, they are immediately greeted with the building entrance.  Originally constructed in 1910, the facility sustained fire damage and was rebuilt in the 1920’s.  Historically, the building has mainly housed public café operations, hence the ‘Tea Kiosk’ name.  Following the Canterbury Earthquake events in 2011, this heritage building received a full repair and strengthening programme.

5.3       Currently, a portion of the building is leased by the operators of the ‘Duck Duck’ Ice Cream Shop, this lease also includes an adjoining commercial kitchen which services the Ilex Café (located in the new Visitor Centre).  That lease will remain in place and has a term which expires 29 October 2032.  The balance of the building (which is the focus of this report) comprises of an octagon shaped room with internal toilet/storage area.  This space has been occupied by a Floral Art Exhibition since late 2016.

5.4       With the current occupant’s agreement now approaching expiry, it has been prudent for the Council to consider all uses for the building in order to ensure value is achieved for the public.  As such, the Council’s Property team were instructed to initiate a process to gauge leasing interest. That process resulted in the Council resolving to allocate the space for a community use.

Premises Limitations

5.5       The building and location constrains the ability for any Lessee:

§ Reserves Act Classification – The land upon which the grounds are located is classified as Local Purpose (Botanic Gardens) Reserve. The governing legislation (Reserves Act 1977) requires any use of the building to be in keeping and exist to serve patrons of the surrounding grounds. Therefore this rules out a portion of the general leasing market i.e. a shop could not operate which sold items that had no obvious link or benefit to the gardens and visitors.

§ Fit-out Limitations – The building fabric is of a heritage nature and fit-out alterations are likely to be extremely limited. The building has undergone a substantial repair and strengthening programme post-earthquake. The premises are being made available in an ‘as is’ state with only portable fit-out being preferable.

Procurement Practices

5.6       The Council’s leasing policy states:

§ Where the Council recognises there is only one logical lessee for a public property, the Council will unilaterally deal with that lessee.

§ However, when seeking to lease premises where there is an obvious and potentially broader market and public interest, the Council shall not deal unilaterally, but shall seek tenants through an open transparent and public process e.g. by tender, by request for proposal or by using a sound public advertised marketing process to attract tenants.

5.7       In this case, recent enquiries have shown there exists a broader market (multiple applications) and public interest in these premises.

Request for Information (RFI) Process

5.8       On 14 February 2018 the Council advertised a public Request for Information (RFI) process.  The purpose being to determine potential uses and receive interest in leasing the available Tea Kiosk premises.  The key driver from Council staff is to ensure the premises are utilised in a capacity which will provide benefit to visitors of the Botanic Gardens.

5.9       Results of the RFI process were submitted within an options report to the Community Board (2 July 2018) and Council (2 August 2018).  The Council resolved for a community use to be applied to the premises in question. Staff were instructed to complete a closed RFP evaluation process between the two  remaining applicants, being:

§  The Canterbury Horticultural Society (CHS)

§  The Jenny Gillies Art Exhibition (incumbent tenant)

Request for Proposals (RFP) Process

5.10    On 22 August 2018 Council staff issued RFP documentation to both parties.  The RFP documentation included the Council’s requirements for use of the premises, including a definition of what the Council considers to be a ‘Community Use’:

“A community use is envisaged as a space which may meet the following general criteria:

§ A space which is open, inviting and accepting of visitors to the Botanic Gardens

§ A space which has potential to cater for adaptable uses

§ A use that is affordable for visitors of the Botanic Gardens

§ A use that is aligned to the nature of the Botanic Gardens

A premises used for a community use provides either artistic, social or cultural facilities or community support services to the public. The tenant will be a not for profit organisation in that the use of the premise would not be primarily commercial in purpose and profits are not distributed to a set of directors, stockholders or managers. Generally non-profit organisations can generate surpluses in the course of their operations, but any such surpluses must be reinvested in the objectives of the organisation.

The Lessee must provide:

§ An image that is welcoming and vibrant

§ A high standard of presentation

§ A high level of general cleanliness

§ A philosophy and presentation style which is ‘in keeping’ and appropriate for this Property

§ A friendly and accessible environment

§ Cooperation with the Council operations team with in the Botanic Gardens”

5.11    Legal advice previously sought by the Council staff, did not conclusively determine whether or not the Jenny Gillies Exhibition should be considered a ‘community use’.  This uncertainty remains, however for the purposes of achieving a balanced outcome to this process, this issue has been put to the side.

5.12    Responses to the RFP were to be received on or before 19 September 2018. Both responses were received on time - refer Attachments A & B.

RFP Evaluation

5.13    An evaluation panel was established to review, discuss and score the received proposals. This team consisted of a chairperson, three evaluators and a probity service provided by the Council’s procurement team.  The appointed evaluators were Council staff that hold a professional connection to the premises and are well versed in the applicable subject matter.

5.14    RFP responses were graded on the following criteria:

A.        Personnel and Track Record – 30%

B.         The Proposed Use meets the Community Use Criteria – 35%

C.         Lease and Conformity with Management Plan – 35%

D.        Financial Viability – Pass/Fail

5.15    Criteria sections A, B & C included a number of specific questions that delve into the history, operating model and relevance to the Council’s specific requirements. Section D is a straight forward pass or fail score based on the Respondent’s financial operating status.

5.16    Proposal Evaluation:

Upon receipt of all information, consideration and discussion between the evaluation panel members concluded the final consensus scoring as follows:

Section

Canterbury Horticultural Society (CHS)

Jenny Gillies Art Exhibition (JG)

TOTAL

75.3

63.3

 

5.17    Evaluation commentary (summarised):

Section A - Personnel and Track Record

 

CHS - The Respondent has solid experience relating to the ownership and management of a large community space.  Several good references provided and no issues noted with their approach to health & safety.  An established hierarchy of staff on hand to assist with operations, along with members/volunteers.

 

JG - The Respondent has operated the existing lease without issue. It appears the operation relies heavily on the involvement of Jenny Gillies with part time staff in support.  Basic health and safety statement provided, which is acceptable.

 

Section B - The Proposed Use meets the Community Use Criteria

 

CHS - Detailed information has been provided, including a large range of diverse uses proposed for the premises.  The Respondent has clarified and reassured the evaluation panel of the group’s core offering.  The group has outlined an ambitious vision which includes other community groups and volunteers.  The group understands how to connect and interact with visitors of the Botanic Gardens.  The group facilitates many events including educational programmes.  The panel noted it may be a test for the group to coordinate the large volumes of projected participation.

 

JG - The proposal includes a static exhibition which does hold relevance to the surrounding setting. However the offering is limited in certain areas, such as flexibility to incorporate other uses and what level the use connects to wider community outcomes.  There was discussion amongst the panel that the exhibition is potentially more aligned with art/fashion than horticulture or botany.

 

Section C - Lease and Conformity with Management Plan

 

CHS - The respondent has requested a longer lease term than offered.  The proposed use(s) would be a clear fit within the Botanic Gardens.   The Respondent provides a series of objectives and a primary goal which is consistent with the Reserve Management Plan.  Clarity was needed around the Group's funding model, which has been advised as a combination of; grants, membership fees, sponsorship and community events.  The respondent is offering a market rental over 25% of the premise and a nominal rental for the balance.

 

JG - The respondent is able to meet lease terms offered under the RFP.  A link has been provided to the Reserve Management Plan, the relationship appears to hold a greater connection to art with a lesser effect on horticultural education.  The respondent is offering a nominal rental over the entire premises, in return for a three yearly painting obligation.

 

Section D – Financial Viability

 

CHS - No financial concerns are noted. The respondent holds substantial funds and investment scheme from the sale of their building in Hagley Park. The letter of support from ANZ and the CHS's accountant provides sufficient reassurance.  Pass mark determined.

 

JG - The respondent’s financial viability is supported by their accountant and the company is solvent. However the Tea Kiosk operation itself has run at a loss (for the year ended 31 March 2018) and there are concerns whether the Tea Kiosk operation is viable.  In response, the company directors have committed to personally guaranteeing any shortfall incurred by the Tea Kiosk operation.  Pass mark determined.

 

5.18    The tender process was managed within the Property team with probity support, to ensure the evaluation was conducted in a transparent manner and was fair to all participants, from the Councils Procurement and Contracts unit.  A professionally qualified procurement manager attended all of the appropriate evaluation sessions to confirm no bias was applied to either respondent based on professional or personal knowledge and that the recommendations were sourced directly from the information provided in support of each prospective tenant.

5.19    Further clarifications sought from each party were also witnessed and assurance provided as to the overall robustness of the tender and evaluation process.  In the professional opinion of the procurement manager acting as probity, this process was free from undue influence and focussed solely on determining the best outcome for the community and people of Christchurch.

RFP Evaluation Summary and Recommendation

5.20    A Preferred respondent has been appointed by the evaluation panel and a subsequent recommendation is made, that a lease be granted to The Canterbury Horticultural Society, for the following primary reasons:

§ Tenure would be provided to a group with clear ties to the Botanic Gardens, including horticulture, education and sustainability.

§ The Council will seek a balance between community benefit and financial return.

§ The CHS are in a strong financial position to meet ongoing lease obligations.

§ The group have shown a willingness to promote and operate the space as an ‘open door’ community facility on a no fee basis.

§ The CHS coordinate many different initiatives throughout the year, these events will seek to increase park patronage and general community engagement with the grounds.

§ The CHS will incorporate several other community groups within their endeavours.

5.21    Staff believe in these circumstances, an important factor to consider is visitation frequency. If the space is flexible in layout and offering, then the chance of repeat visitation is increased. The preferred Respondent has detailed in their proposal the varied uses they are able to apply to the premises.

5.22    When reviewing the available use options, elected members need to consider which avenue will provide a balance of certainty for the building, a financial return and also maximum benefit to the majority of park visitors.

Proposed Lease – Canterbury Horticultural Society

5.23    The CHS are an Incorporated Society administered by a board of nine members.  The Canterbury Horticultural Society began with the colonisation of Canterbury in the 1850’s.  It was originally called the Christchurch Agricultural, Botanical and Horticultural Society.  In 1861 the group split and the horticultural arm became the Christchurch Horticultural Society.  This changed its name in 1898 to become the Canterbury Horticultural Society, which today is the largest horticultural club for home gardeners in New Zealand.  Further information is publically available on the group’s website - www.chsgardens.co.nz

5.24    Under the group’s proposal, the CHS intend to partner with other like-minded entities, including ‘The Friends of the Botanic Gardens’, who would also occupy the space sporadically.  ‘The Friends’ currently utilise the adjacent ‘Old Information Centre’ building.  This building is booked for Council staff exercises and earmarked for a new Science Hub within the Long Term Plan.  As a spin off benefit, any new lease of the Tea Kiosk premises would also solve a future issue for that group.

5.25    Summarised, the CHS propose to use the space for a diverse number of activities which would benefit both their members and general visitors;

Office Space / Hot desks

Seminars/Workshops

Speaker Series

Education / Training

Displays/Exhibitions

Society Member Meetings

Digital Displays

Tea/Coffee Facilities

Meeting Space (other groups)

Floral Design

Base for Guided Tours

Plant Sales

Information/Conservation Hub

CCC Programmes

Use within Autumn Garden Show

5.26    The CHS have signalled their intent to ensure the adaptable portion of the premises (150m2) are utilised to their potential and will be promoted for the use by other groups.  The CHS intend to promote availability of the space on their website and other mediums.

5.27    It is noted CHS membership numbers have declined by approximately 10% over the period 2016-2017.  Council staff understand that the group are currently prioritising efforts to promote the benefits of Society membership to the younger generation and regain growth into the future.

5.28    Staff have not pre-determined the decision of elected members, however in order for full consideration of this option to take place, indicative lease terms have been discussed with the respondent to ensure the option is viable.

5.29    A rent structure would be likely based on the following apportionment:

§ A market rent for the area of permanent office space, being 50m2 (subject final measure and registered Valuer’s report).  Rental reviews to be completed an annual Consumers Price Index (CPI) basis.

§ The balance of the space, being 150m2 will be leased on a nominal rate which would allow the Lessee to recoup their costs including management of the space and consumables.

5.30    The CHS have provided the Council with their Annual report for year end 31 December 2017.  The Council’s Finance team have reviewed the group’s position and provide comment:

“The CHS having sold its building in Hagley Park and settled its insurance claim on that building have an investment portfolio of $2.2 million.  This is currently invested via ANZ Private Bank in conservative investment funds. The CHS has indicated that it is looking to preserve the capital value of the portfolio long term.

 

The CHS has a strong balance sheet at 31 December 2017 which can support the financial obligations which the proposed lease would place on the organisation.”

 

5.31    Staff are satisfied that the CHS hold sufficient ties to the Botanic Gardens and regional horticulture in order to recommend a lease be granted under the Reserves Act. Staff are also confident in the ability of this group to perform as their proposal promises including a continued level of access to the space for other groups.

Transition and Fit-out

5.32    Should the Council elect to proceed with a lease to the Canterbury Horticultural Society, Council staff would seek to accommodate a smooth transition from the current occupant to a new lessee.

5.33    Given the heritage nature of the building and post-earthquake refurbishment, any incoming lessee would only be permitted free-standing fit-out items.  Alterations to the building structure are unlikely to be approved.

5.34    The CHS have provided an indicative layout plan for the premises, which is included on page 46 within Attachment A.

Delegations

5.35    Section 61(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 determines the administering body of a local purpose reserve (that is vested in the administering body) to be a ‘leasing authority’ of that reserve for the purposes of the Public Bodies Leases Act. Under Sections 7(c) and 8(6) of the Public Bodies Leasing Act, the ‘leasing authority’ may grant a lease of up to five years at will without necessarily running a public tender. Granting a lease pursuant to Section 61(2) of the Reserves Act does not require a public notification process.

5.36    The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board hold the delegation to grant new leases over reserve land. However, the Botanic Gardens as a whole is considered a metropolitan asset, i.e. a local asset with city-wide recognition.  Therefore the recommendations contained within this report require the resolution of the Council.


 

 

6.   Option 1 - Grant new lease to the preferred Respondent (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       The Community Board recommend, that the Council grant a new lease to the Canterbury Horticultural Society for five years.

6.2       This option seeks to achieve a positive balance for both rental income and community benefit.

6.3       The Society proposes to pay a commercial rental on a 50m2 area allocated for permanent office space, the balance of 150m2 would be an adaptable area that can be utilised by other like-minded groups.

Significance

6.4       The level of significance of this option is low-medium and consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.5       Engagement requirements for this level of significance have been met.  The Council, as territorial authority, holds existing powers to grant leases over Local Purpose Reserves to a voluntary organisation, under Section 61 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.6       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.7       Patrons of the Botanic Gardens are affected as the Tea Kiosk building is located in a prime location within the park.  The space has historically been occupied by lessees that exists to serve public clients.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.8       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.9       Cost of Implementation – Staff time to finalise lease negotiation and documentation.

6.10    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Lease management over five years.

6.11    Funding source – Existing budgets.

Legal Implications

6.12    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

6.13    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

6.14    The legal consideration is lease documentation requires drafting.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.15    There is a risk that the lessee may not facilitate use of the space as agreed. This will result in the premises not being used to their potential. In the unlikely event this occurs, Council staff would enforce lease conditions and monitor the situation through to resolution.

Implementation

6.16    Implementation dependencies - Council decision, time to finalise lease terms and draft agreement.

6.17    Implementation timeframe – Three months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   Certainty will be provided on the medium term operational use for the Tea Kiosk building.

·   A fixed term lease will be granted to a stable Lessee with strong ties to the Botanic Gardens.

·   The premises layout will invite the public to enter at no cost.

·   A majority of the space will be adaptable and utilised by the Lessee for multiples uses which support the surrounding area.

·   Lease conditions will allow other community groups to book a portion of the space (for uses that support visitors to the Botanic Gardens).

·   The premises will not be altered and the heritage value will be preserved.

·   The Council will be able to review progress in five years and consider whether any further term is warranted.

6.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The Council will only receive a market rent over a portion of the leased space.

·   No other entity will be able to book the space on a permanent basis

7.   Option 2 - Decline new lease to preferred Respondent, negotiate with Second Respondent

Option Description

7.1       Following recommendation from the Community Board, should the Council determine that the Canterbury Horticultural Society are unsuitable for valid reasons in accordance with the RFP terms, then endorse staff to commence negotiations with the second respondent.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low-medium and consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance have been met.  The Council, as territorial authority, holds existing powers to grant leases over Local Purpose Reserves to a voluntary organisation, under Section 61 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Patrons of the Botanic Gardens are affected as the Tea Kiosk building is located in a prime location within the park.  The space has historically been occupied by lessees that exists to serve public clients.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

7.6.1   Inconsistency – Declining a new lease over Council premises.

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – The Council would generally approve an operator that is recommended via an evaluated RFP process.

7.6.3   Amendment necessary – Elect to resolve on Option 1 as recommended.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation - Additional staff time will be incurred.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Lease management over five years.

7.9       Funding source - Existing budgets.

Legal Implications

7.10    There is a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.11    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

7.12    The legal consideration is lease documentation requires drafting.

Risks and Mitigations  

7.13    There is a risk of negative media or even legal challenge from the preferred respondent.

Implementation

7.14    Implementation dependencies - Council decision, time to finalise lease terms and draft agreement.

7.15    Implementation timeframe - Three months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.16    The advantages of this option include:

·   A lease would be installed and provides certainty for the building’s medium term future.

7.17    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Time will be incurred to negotiate with the runner up respondent.

·   A lesser rental income will be received than option 1, The Jenny Gillies Exhibition has requested a nominal rental charge i.e. $1 per annum.

·   A negative perception of the Council’s decision making processes may be incurred.

8.   Option 3 – Do not grant a lease to either party

Option Description

8.1       Following recommendation from the Community Board, should the Council determine that neither the Canterbury Horticultural Society, nor The Jenny Gillies Exhibition are suitable for valid reasons in accordance with the RFP terms, then terminate the process and request staff to source a future operator through a different process.  The current operator will continue to occupy the premises on a month to month basis until a future occupant is sourced (or a different use is determined for the premises).

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is low-medium and consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are not required as no lease is being granted.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       Patrons of the Botanic Gardens are affected as the Tea Kiosk building is located in a prime location within the Park. The space has historically been occupied by lessees that exists to serve public clients.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

8.6.1   Inconsistency – Declining a new lease over Council premises.

8.6.2   Reason for inconsistency – The Council would generally approve an operator that is recommended via an evaluated RFP process.

8.6.3   Amendment necessary – Elect to resolve on Option 1 as recommended.

Financial Implications

8.7       Cost of Implementation – Additional staff time will be incurred in order to either source a different operator or review the Council’s use of the premises.

8.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – None.

8.9       Funding source – Existing budgets.

Legal Implications

8.10    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

8.11    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations  

8.12    There is a risk of negative media should the Council elect not to make a decision on the future use of the premises. There is also potential for the building to become unoccupied should the incumbent tenant decide to make other arrangements.

Implementation

8.13    Implementation dependencies - A new Request for Proposals process to be run, followed by Council reporting for decision.

8.14    Implementation timeframe – 6 to 8 months.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   None.

8.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Substantial time and staff resource will be incurred to re-run a tenant sourcing process in order to find a new kiosk operator.

·   A negative perception of the Council’s decision making processes may be incurred.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Request for Proposal -Canterbury Horticultural Society Response - Confidential

 

b 

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Request for Proposal  - Jenny Gillies Response - Confidential

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Luke Rees-Thomas - Property Consultant

Keith Murphy - Manager Procurement

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Andrew Rutledge - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

20.    Draft submission on the National Disaster Resilience Strategy

Reference:

18/1213363

Presenter(s):

Rob Orchard, Head of Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to approve the draft submission on the National Disaster Resilience Strategy.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management’s consultation document.

1.3       The full consultation document is on the Ministry’s website: https://www.civildefence.govt.nz/cdem-sector/plans-and-strategies/proposed-national-disaster-resilience-strategy/. Consultation closes on Friday 7 December 2018.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Council:

1.         Approve the draft submission on the National Disaster Resilience Strategy (Attachment A).

 

 

 

3.   Context/Background

National Disaster Resilience Strategy

3.1       The Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (the Act) governs the operation of New Zealand’s civil defence emergency management framework. In addition to the Act, the framework is comprised of the national civil defence emergency management strategy, the national civil defence emergency management plan, civil defence emergency management group plans, and non-legislative guidelines.

3.2       The Minister of Civil Defence is required to ensure there is a national civil defence emergency management strategy at all times. The strategy (of up to 10 years’ duration) sets the Crown’s long-term goals, objectives and measurable targets in relation to civil defence emergency management. There is no provision for the strategy to have directive powers but the Director of Civil Defence Emergency Management and Civil Defence Emergency Management Groups (which are comprised of a region’s local authorities) must not act inconsistently with the strategy.

3.3       The current strategy expires on 9 April 2019. It pre-dates lessons learned from the past decade, including significant and damaging emergencies in New Zealand and overseas.

3.4       The proposed new strategy:

·   Reflects lessons learned, an increased understanding of national risks, and increased performance expectations built up over the past 10 years;

·   Builds on the core concept of resilience established in the current strategy – confined to disaster-related aspects of resilience;

·   Incorporates many of the decisions resulting from the Ministerial reviews on better responses to natural disasters and other emergencies;

·   Has a more explicit focus on communities and societal resilience, including building partnerships with iwi, recognising the need for a strategic approach to recovery and the importance of reflecting culture and cultural differences in building resilience.

Key submission points

3.5       Overall, the Council is supportive of the proposed strategy but makes the following recommendations to the Ministry:

·   Ensure that the strategy is capable of translating into action by cascading items of critical importance through the National CDEM Plan and also the Group CDEM plan.

·   Support the strategy by providing an in-depth implementation plan that complements the Minister's response to the TAG review, the National and also the Group CDEM plans.

·   Consider also giving effect to the 'Recovery' component of emergencies through this strategy.

·   Continue to enable territorial authorities to manage community development activities, inclusive of facilitating resilience capacity and capability.  Emergency response may need to be focused at regional level, with community resilience and development continuing to be the focus of Councils.

·   Enable the Regional CDEM function to establish 'Disaster' risks within each regional boundary and work collaboratively with all sectors public, private and societal.

·   Consider making ongoing strategy governance and implementation arrangements more explicit, including the role of CDEM Groups.

·   Reduce the deadline for Controller accreditation to no later than 2025.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft CCC submission National Disaster Resilience Strategy November 2018

262

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Jenna Marsden - Senior Policy Analyst

Libby Elvidge - Policy Analyst

Nancy Bonner - Business Support Administrator

Claire Bryant - Team Leader Policy

Approved By

Robert Orchard - Head of Civil Defence & Emergency Management

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

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Council

06 December 2018

 

 

21.    Refining the Committee structure

Reference:

18/1267197

Presenter(s):

Mary Richardson, General Manager Citizens and Community

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to provide advice on a governance and decision-making structure for the Council. 

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is in response to the resolution made as part of adopting the 2018-28 Long Term Plan (LTP), that the Mayor would report to Council on a proposal for adjustments to the Committee and Council meeting structure, in order to facilitate the establishment of a Capital Programme Review Committee.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Resolves that the Finance and Performance Committee be a Committee of the Whole of Council and appoints the Mayor and all Councillors to the Committee.

2.         Adopts the revised Terms of Reference for the Finance and Performance (Attachment A).

3.         Delegates to the Finance and Performance Committee all the powers, responsibilities and duties set out in the Terms of Reference in Attachment A.

4.         Notes that these delegations to the Finance and Performance Committee excludes those powers that the Council cannot legally delegate.  For the avoidance of doubt, where the Council has made a specific delegation for certain capital projects to a different decision-making body or decisions are delegated to the Chief Executive or staff which overlap with this general delegation, the specific delegation shall take precedence. 

5.         Discharges the Strategic Capability Committee.

6.         Discharges the Insurance Committee and notes that the Finance and Performance Committee will establish an Insurance Sub-Committee.

7.         Establishes a Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee.

8.         Delegates to the Innovation and Sustainable Development Committee the authority to make decisions on all applications to the Enliven Places Projects Fund beyond the staff delegations.

9.         Delegates to the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee authority to approve:

a.         all Heritage Incentive Grant applications;

b.         extensions of up to two years for the uptake of Heritage Incentive Grants; and

c.         applications to the Events and Festivals Fund.

10.       Requests that the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee establish a Disability Issues Taskforce to be Chaired by Councillor Keown.

11.       Adopts the revised Terms of Reference for the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee (Attachment B).

12.       Adopts the revised Terms of Reference for the Innovation and Sustainable Development Committee (Attachment C).

13.       Adopts the revised Terms of Reference for the Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee (Attachment D).

14.       Adopts the Terms of Reference for the Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee (Attachment E).

15.       Appoints Councillor Scandrett to the Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee and accepts his resignation from the Innovation and Sustainable Development Committee.

16.       Appoints the Mayor as the Chair of the Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee.

17.       Appoints the Deputy Mayor and Chairs of Finance and Performance; Innovation and Sustainable Development; Social, Community Development and Housing; Infrastructure, Transport and Environment and Regulatory Committees to the Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee.

18.       Agree that when establishing future Working Groups or Taskforces, the Council will consider whether there should be a finite time the body has to fulfil its purpose and tasks. 

19.       Adopts the calendar of scheduled Council meetings, noting that there are two Council meetings per calendar month on a Thursday (one of which will include reports from the seven Community Boards), and another Thursday in the month scheduled for the meeting of the new Finance and Performance Committee of the Whole.

20.       Delegates to the Hearings and Council Support Manager the ability to make any changes to the calendar of scheduled Council meetings as necessary to meet circumstances as required.

21.       Agree that these Resolutions take effect from 1 January 2019.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The appointment and establishment of Council Committees facilitates the efficiency and effectiveness of Council’s business.  

4.2       Section 41A of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002) provides mayors with a discretionary power to establish the committees of the Council, and appoint the chairperson of each committee.

4.3       The Council can establish committees, discharge committees, appoint the membership and make delegations to committees, as long as the Council complies with set out in Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002

4.4       The Mayor and Council have identified several issues associated with the current Committee structure, which impact on the effectiveness of the decision-making processes.  Along with a resolve to look at establishing a capital programme review Committee, the Council wishes to look at ways to:

4.4.1      Ensure alignment between Committees’ terms of reference and the Council’s strategic priorities and community outcomes;

4.4.2      Improve alignment between Committees;

4.4.3      Reduce repetition of matters at Committee and Council meetings;

4.4.4      Address the high volume of reading and Committee and Council time commitments for Mayor and Councillors, contributing to a lack of time for elected members to fulfil their community representation and liaison roles.          

4.4.5      Ensure adequate time for meetings and sufficient support and advice to Committees.

4.5       Options for alleviating these identified problems have been informally discussed with the Strategic Capability Committee.

4.6       Based on this, a revised Committee structure is proposed. 

4.7       It is proposed to:

4.7.1      Re-establish the Finance and Performance Committee as a Committee of the Whole Council. The Committee of the Whole’s Terms of Reference would include monitoring the delivery of the capital programme, along with all that is in the scope of the current Finance and Performance Committee.  It is noted that the new Committee will require the proposed delegations to make certain decisions as final decision-maker, if it is to achieve the time-use efficiencies sought.  

4.7.2      Discharge the Strategic Capability Committee, and reassign most of its responsibilities to the Finance and Performance Committee; and also establish a Chief Executive Performance Committee to deal with matters related to the Chief Executives performance and remuneration.

4.7.3      Some other minor changes to the Terms of Reference of two Committees are also suggested, to delegations and financial thresholds for funding decisions they can make.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       The Council makes decisions on behalf of the public interest, taking into account the needs of current and future generations and its vision and priorities for the city. The appointment and establishment of Council committees ensures that the decision-making processes are robust and open, transparent, and democratically accountable.

5.2       Section 39 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002) sets out a number of principles in relations to governance that the Council is required to act in accordance with.

5.3       Under section 41A of the LGA 2002 the Mayor has the power to establish the Committees of the governing body and appoint the chairperson of each Committee of the governing body before the other members of the Committees are determined.

5.4       This does not limit or prevent the Council from discharging or reconstituting a Committee established by the Mayor; appointing more Committees in addition to any established by the mayor; or discharging the appointment of the chairpersons. However, the Council must comply with the rules in Schedule 7 of the LGA. 

5.5       The Council can establish:

·     A Committee of the whole of Council (Committee of which all Councillors are members i.e. the Council forms itself into a Committee);

·     A standing Committee or special Committee appointed by the Council (membership is confined to a limited number of Councillors);

·     A standing Committee or special Committee appointed by the Mayor;

·     A joint Committee appointed under clause 30 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002;

·     A Sub-Committee (noting that Committee may also establish their own subcommittees; and

·     A subordinate decision-making body.

5.6       Over the last 30 years the Council has tried different models of governance involving Committees, portfolio groups and the various timing of Council meetings.  It has had periods with a number of Committees and a triennial with no Committee but portfolio groups.

5.7       Committees of the Whole Council have not been a significant part of the Christchurch City Council’s decision making, apart from the Metropolitan Funding Committee, the Long Term Plan Committee and the Earthquake Recovery Committee of the Whole.

5.8       The Council has the discretion to delegate powers unless expressly provided otherwise in the Local Government Act 2002, or any other Act.

5.9       Clause 32 (4) of Schedule 7 of the LGA states that a Committee, Sub-Committee or other subordinate decision-making body to which powers or duties are delegated may exercise or perform those powers or duties with same effect as that of the local authority.  Therefore, where a Committee exercises a power legally delegated to it the Council cannot rescind or amend the decision.  The Council does have the ability to change or revoke the delegation.

5.10    However, while the Committee to which powers are delegated will usually exercise the delegated power, it is not obliged to do so.  For example, if a matter has become publicly or politically contentious and finely balanced the committee with the delegation might choose not to exercise the particular power or function and to the refer decision back to Council.  

6.   Rationale for Change

6.1       Along with resolving to look at a mechanism to ensure closer oversight of the capital programme, the Council has identified a number of issues with the current governance structure, that are affecting its ability to consider and make decisions in the most effective way. These include:

·     Subject overlaps between committees’ agendas – there is confusion about which Committee a particular matter should be referred.  At times more than one Committee is considering similar matters and asking for similar advice;

·     Repetition and re-litigation of matters at Committee and Council meetings, for example overall, 58% of staff reports going to first tier committees go on as Part A reports to Council. 84% of reports going to Finance and Performance go on as Part A reports to Council.  49% of reports to Council were made up of Committee Part A reports (29%, 184) and Committee Minutes (20%, 124). This repetition is perceived to be a misuse of valuable time;

·     High volume of reading for Mayor and Councillors - the number of Committees directly impacts on the amount of reports elected members are required to read;

·     Committee commitments contribute to a lack of time for elected members to fulfil their community representation and liaison roles;

·     Logistical difficulties finding adequate time for meetings – the number of Committees and frequency of meeting means that it is difficult to find time for critical meetings and hearings.

·     Operational difficulties providing sufficient support and advice to Committees – the organisation is finding it difficult to provide the appropriate support to governance structures, both secretariat and advisory support. There has been a 54% increase in reports over the last four years.  There has been a significant increase in resolutions requiring action;

6.2       A number of options were suggested:

·     Establishment of a Capital Committee;

·     Establishment of Portfolios rather than Committees;

·     Disestablishment or reduction of Committees with all significant reports going to Council for decision;

·     Mix of Committees of the whole and smaller committees with a limited number of members.

6.3       Some Councillors believed that a Capital Committee would ensure:

·     Direct governance of all major capital projects;

·     Capital project are significant expenditure;

·     Consideration at a governance level of potential coordination and alignment on capital projects;

6.4       However, a capital Committee has some disadvantages:

·     Lack of alignment between capital and service delivery;

·     Focus on development and construction and not on outcomes i.e. building a facility with little alignment to the services that will be delivered from it, demographic trends or trends in provision.

 

7.   Proposed Governance Structure

Critical Factors for Success

7.1       The proposed governance structure has been developed in accordance with the provisions and requirements of the Local Government Act 2002 and is based on the following factors:

·     To have as few governance levels as possible;

·     The decision-making of Council is transacted transparently and inclusively, whenever possible;

·     Decisions are made once, not twice;

·     Committees are strategically aligned to Council’s priorities;

·     Delegations to Committees and the Chief Executive are optimised;

·     The expectation of full attendance by Elected Members at Council and Committee of the Whole meetings;

·     Task force groups or working groups be established as needed to address special or particular issues; these will report directly to Council or the relevant Committee but must be approved by Council.

Proposed Structure

7.2       The following structure is proposed:

 

 

7.3       The following adjustments to the Committee structure are proposed: 

7.3.1      Re-establish the Finance and Performance Committee as a Committee of the Whole. The Committee’s scope would include monitoring of the delivery of the Capital Programme, along with all that is in the current Finance and Performance Committee’s Terms of Reference and most of what is in the current Strategic Capability Committee’s Terms of Reference;

7.3.2      Alter the schedule of Council meetings so that there are two Council meetings per calendar month on Thursdays (one of being primarily reports from the Community Boards), with a third Council meeting day on a Thursday each month becoming the Finance and Performance Committee meeting time (and thus freeing up the current monthly Finance and Performance meeting time);

7.3.3      Disband the Strategic Capability Committee and re-assign the responsibilities in its Terms of Reference to the Finance and Performance Committee of the Whole, with exceptions of matters which will be the responsibility of the proposed Chief Executive Performance Committee (see section 7.7);

7.3.4      Establish a Chief Executive Performance Committee, with Terms of Reference encompassing the relevant matters currently with the Strategic Capability Committee;

7.3.5      Make adjustments to the delegations with regard to financial decisions by Committees as outlined in this report.

Proposed Responsibilities of Finance and Performance Committee

7.4       The focus of the Finance and Performance Committee is the financial and non-financial performance of the Council and its subsidiaries, and monitoring the delivery of the Council’s Capital Programme.

7.5       The Finance and Performance Committee would consider and, if the matter is not within the Committee’s delegated authority, report to Council on issues and activites relating to:

7.5.1      The delivery of the Council’s Capital Programme. Where another decision making body has the delegated decision making authority for a specific capital project, the Finance and Performance Committee’s role will be to monitor the delivery of that project once construction or delivery of the project has commenced.

7.5.2      Monitoring the Council’s operational and capital expenditure, and inquiring into any material discrepancies from planned expenditure.

7.5.3      Leading and overseeing specific strategic projects of shared interest and interface with the Crown, including the Cost Share Agreement and matters under the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act.

7.5.4      Monitoring the financial and non-financial performance of the Council and Council Controlled Organisations.

7.5.5      Exercising the Council’s powers under Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002 which relates to Statements of Intent for Council Controlled Organisations.

7.5.6      Exercising the Council’s powers as a shareholder or given under a trust deed, including but not limited to modification of constitutions and/or trust deeds, granting shareholder approval of major transactions, appointing directors or trustees, and approving policies related to Council Controlled Organisations.

7.5.7      Approving the Council’s financial and funding policies under section 102 of the Local Government Act 2002.

7.5.8      Debt write-offs.

7.5.9      Approval of submissions to external bodies if the submission is within the terms of reference of the committee.

7.6       Refer to Attachment A for the proposed revised Committees’ Terms of Reference.

Proposed Responsibilities of Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee

7.7       The Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee would consider and, if the matter is not within the Committee’s delegated authority, report to the Council on issues and activities relating to:

7.7.1      Overseeing the performance of the Chief Executive in line with the performance agreement and his/her ongoing relationship with the Council, and report regularly to the Council on his or her performance.

7.7.2      Facilitating regular performance reviews of the Chief Executive and reporting on a regular basis to the Council.

7.7.3      Undertaking reviews of the Chief Executive’s remuneration package in accordance with the employment agreement and make recommendations to the Council.

7.7.4      Engaging relevant external advice including independent legal advice to assist the committee with all or any of these matters, as appropriate, ensuring such advisors are not otherwise contracted to the Council for similar services.

7.7.5      As may be necessary from time to time, matters relating to succession planning and the appointment of a Chief Executive, including:

7.7.6      Overseeing the recruitment and selection process for a Chief Executive.

7.7.7      Recommending candidates and remuneration to the Council for consideration.

Discharging the Strategic Capability Committee

7.8       It is proposed that the Strategic Capability Committee (comprising the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and chairs of Committees) be discharged.

7.9       The Committee has, in its Terms of Reference, been tasked with maintaining strategic alignment across all aspects of the Council decision-making and service delivery.

7.10    As part of the 2018-28 LTP, the Council adopted a Strategic Framework which identifies 16 outcomes across four broad areas and six strategic priorities. The intention is that having this framework at the forefront of decision-making discussions will help ensure that decisions are aligned with ‘what we want to achieve together as our city evolves’ and ‘focus on improvement’ in the six priority areas.

7.11    Inclusion of the strategic priorities in all Committee and Council decision-making will reduce the need for the separate Strategic Capability Committee (SCC).  Agendas for all Committees now include the Strategic Framework, to encourage consideration of alignment in all decision-making discussion and debate.

7.12    The current Strategic Capability Committee has other responsibilities set out in its Terms of Reference:

7.12.1    Advising and supporting the Mayor to lead the development of the Long Term Plan and Annual Plan, including setting the overall parameters, strategic direction and priorities, and the development of a consultation document.

7.12.2    Leading and overseeing the Council’s strategic relationship with the Crown.

7.12.3    Leading and overseeing specific strategic projects of shared interest and interface with the Crown, including the Cost Share Agreement and matters under the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act.

7.12.4    Matters relating to the performance of the Chief Executive, including appointment and succession planning as may be necessary from time to time.  

7.12.5    Organisational capability, workforce planning and development.

7.12.6    Council remuneration and employment policy.  

7.13    It is proposed that the responsibilities detailed in 7.12.1, 7.12.2, 7.12.3 and 7.12.6  (above) are reassigned to the Finance and Performance Committee; 7.12.4 becomes the responsibility of the proposed, new Chief Executive Performance Committee; and that 7.12.5 is incorporated into the existing Chief Executive’s Report to the Council when required. 

Amendments to delegations of other Committees

7.14    To reduce the ‘double-handling’ of reports, discussion and decisions at Council meetings the following changes are proposed:

7.14.1    That the Innovation and Sustainable Development Committee has authority to make decisions on applications to the Enliven Places Projects Fund beyond the staff delegations.

7.14.2    That the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee has authority to:

·     Approve Heritage Incentive Grant applications.

·     Approve extensions of up to two years for the uptake of Heritage Incentive Grants.

·     Approve applications to the Events and Festivals Fund.

Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    It is anticipated that this proposal can alleviate some of the issues with the current structure:

7.15.1    Provide all Councillors with much closer oversight of the Capital Programme delivery, capital projects’ progress and budgets;

7.15.2    The establishment of a Whole of Council Committee, with oversight of financial, organisational performance and the delivery or the capital programme, will assist all Councillors by providing them a more effective forum to better express and represent constituent interests and concerns, and provide them with closer and greater knowledge of Council business and performance;

7.15.3    Reduce the ‘double-handling’ of reports, discussion and decisions at Council meetings by delegating a greater number of decisions to the Finance and Performance Committee of the Whole;

7.15.4    Encourage timely and full discussion at Committee and Sub-Committee stage about alignment of reports’ proposals with strategic priorities and outcomes, so that decision-makers have greater assurance at the Council table that reports coming through from Committees have been considered with a strategic lens.

7.15.5    Free up some additional time for the Mayor and Councillors to engage in other aspects of their duties as elected members, including community engagement

7.15.6    Provide stronger focus by all Committees on aligning planning and decisions with the Strategic Framework;

7.16    However, the proposal will not necessarily reduce the volume of reports and there will still be significant meeting commitments for elected members.

8.   Impact on Mana Whenua

8.1       The proposal does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

8.2       However, it is important to note that the proposed changes to the Committees continues to affirm the Council’s firm commitment to its relationship with Ngā Papatipu Rūnanga.

8.3       Te Hononga Council – Papatipu Rūnanga Committee will continue to be a formal partnership Committee, with its membership of the Mayor, Standing Committee chairs, the chair of the Multicultural Sub-Committee and the leaders of the district’s six Rūnanga.

9.   Community Views and Preferences

9.1       The Council’s LTP resolution to revise its Committees’ structure sought to ensure that all Councillors have closer oversight of the performance and delivery of Council services and, in particular, the budgets and progress with major capital projects.  In expressing this, they are confident they echo the views of their constituents, who want to know that their elected representatives are overseeing achievement of the commitments made (and consulted on) through annual and long term planning.

9.2       Though there has not been explicit consultation with the community to ascertain their views and preferences on the proposed Committees’ structure, elected members understand that citizens want to be able to easily understand and participate in the democratic processes of Council, and can be assured that decision-making is being carried out transparently. The proposed changes will contribute to achieving this.

10. Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

10.1    This option fulfils the Council’s resolution made as part of the adopting the 2018-28 LTP. Also, it supports the Council’s strategic priority of enabling active citizenship by making improvements to the way in which elected members participate in decision making, on citizens’ behalf.

11. Financial Implications

11.1    Any costs associated with making the technical and administrative changes to support the revised structure will fall within existing operational budgets of the Citizens and Community Group.  

11.2    Whilst delivering greater efficiencies in use of time, cost savings are not anticipated from the changes as the same level of staff governance and secretariat support will be required, albeit servicing a different configuration of meetings.

12. Legal Implications

12.1    The proposed governance structure has been developed in accordance with the provisions and requirements of the Local Government Act 2002. The Council will need to follow the provisions required in Schedule 7 of the Act in giving effect to the proposal.

13. Risks and Mitigations

13.1    There is a short-term, low risk that the changes to the Committee structure will cause confusion for citizens who have become familiar with the current Committee names, scope of Committee terms of reference and agendas, and cycle of meetings. This can be mitigated by providing clear public communications in advance, explaining the changes and assisting with redirection. 

14. Implementation

14.1    Implementation dependencies: 

·     Technical changes to InfoCouncil, the information/document management system used to manage reports, agenda and meeting minutes;

·     Updating of Elected members and public calendars;

·     Minor re-assignation of advisors and secretariat to support Committee and Council meetings;

·     Rollout of a short communications plan to citizens;

·     Update of Council’s delegations register required.

14.2    Implementation timeframe:

·     The commencement of the Finance and Performance Committee as a Committee of the Whole would to start in the New Year,2019.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference Finance and Performance Committee of the Whole

288

b

Terms of Reference Social, Community Development and Housing

290

c

Terms of Reference Innovation and Sustainability Committee

292

d

Terms of Reference Infrastructure, Transport and Environment Committee

294

e

Terms of Reference Chief Executive Performance and Employment Committee

296

f

2019 Calendar of scheduled Council meetings

297

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

Approved By

Vivienne Wilson - Associate General Counsel

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

06 December 2018

 

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Council

06 December 2018

 

 

22.  Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

06 December 2018

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

19

Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk - Request for Proposals Results and New Lease (L-C-H)

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment 1 - Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Request for Proposal -Canterbury Horticultural Society Response

s7(2)(i)

Conduct Negotiations

Protection of Applicant's submitted information

Upon expiry of said lease

 

Attachment 2 - Botanic Gardens Tea Kiosk Request for Proposal  - Jenny Gillies Response

s7(2)(i)

Conduct Negotiations

Protection of Applicant's submitted information

Upon expiry of said lease

23

Proposed sale of land (H-H-R)

s7(2)(i)

Conduct Negotiations

This matter involves the possible sale of land not required for land drainage or other purposes.  If approved staff will need to negoiate the sale.  The release of information in this report may affect the ability to obtain the best outcome for Council.

Once settlement is complete

24

Community member appointments to zone committees

s7(2)(a)

Protection of Privacy of Natural Persons

To give the Council the opportunity to consider the recommended community members for the three zone committees, prior to applicants being advised of the outcome of the selection process

 After the successful nominees have been confirmed by the Council, Environment Canterbury and Selwyn District Council.

25

Update on Central City Reduced Fee Parking

s7(2)(h), s7(2)(i)

Commercial Activities, Conduct Negotiations

If Council implements some of the options within the report, it may need to enter into, and agree, commercially confidential agreements with individual parking building owners and operators. Some aspects of those individual agreements may subsequently contain commercially sensitive information.

On activation date of individual agreements (noting some information in those may remain commercially sensitive)