Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An Ordinary meeting of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Friday 2 March 2018

Time:                                    12.30pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

 

 

 

 

Acting Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

Pam Richardson

Felix Dawson

Janis Haley

John McLister

Jed O'Donoghue

Tori Peden

Andrew Turner

 

 

27 February 2018

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

02 March 2018

 

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 5

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 5

B       3.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 5

STAFF REPORTS

4.       Proposed No Overtaking Lines and 60 Kilometres per Hour Speed Limit - Dyers Pass Road 7   

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

02 March 2018

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Deputations by Appointment

3.1

Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

John Bannock will address the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.2

Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

Karen Banwell will address the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.3

Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

Hamish Grant will address the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.4

Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

Phil Jacksonwill address the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.5

Dyers Pass Road – Propsed Safety Improvements

Pete Simpson will address the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.6

Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

Marie Gray will speak on behalf of the Summit Road Society regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.7

Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

Alma Sturgess will address the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements

 

3.8

Dyers Pass Road –Proposed Safety Improvements

Andrew Barclay will speak to the Board regarding Dyers Pass Road – Proposed Safety Improvements.

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

02 March 2018

 

 

4.        Proposed No Overtaking Lines and 60 Kilometres per Hour Speed Limit - Dyers Pass Road

Reference:

17/804982

Contact:

John Dore

John.dore@ccc.govt.nz

9418875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Joint Meeting - Spreydon-Cashmere and Banks Peninsula Community Boards to consider:

·    Approval of ‘No passing Lines’ on Dyers Pass Road as shown on Attachment A

·    Recommendation that Council approves a posted speed limit change from, 70 kilometres per hour and 100 kilometres per hour  to 60 kilometres per hour on Dyers Pass Road from Governors Bay to the existing 50 kilometres per hour limit near Hackthorne Road as shown on Attachment A

·    Resolve that Traffic Operations staff report on the feasibility to install variable speed or warning signs on Dyers Pass Road approaches to its intersection with Summit Road.

1.2       In addition to no passing lines and a change in speed limit, Traffic Operations propose to install new raised reflective pavement markers and curve advisory signage. These improvements do not require a decision from the community boards or Council to implement.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated to help address road safety risk on Dyers Pass Road.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the number of people who drive the route at more than 60km/h and the minimal increase in travel time for regular users.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

 

3.   Staff Recommendations.

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board:

1.         Approves that no passing lines be installed along the centre of Dyers Pass Road, commencing at its intersection with Hackthorne Road and extending in a southerly direction for 3.45 kilometres as shown on Attachment A.

That the Banks Peninsula Community Board:

2.         Approves that no passing lines be installed along the centre of Dyers Pass Road, commencing at its intersection with Summit Road and extending in a southerly direction for 2.94 kilometres as shown on Attachment A.

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends that Council:

3.            Approves that pursuant to Part 4 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw           2017, speed limits be revoked and set as listed below in clauses 3a and  3b and includes the                   resulting changes in the Christchurch City Register of Speed Limits and Speed Limit Maps:

                a.         Revoke the 70 kilometres per hour speed limit on Dyers Pass Road, commencing at a                      point 340 metres south of its intersection with Hackthorne Road and extending                                           generally in a southerly direction to its intersection with Summit Road.

                b.         Approve the speed limit of Dyers Pass Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour,                                      commencing at a point 340 metres south of its intersection with Hackthorne Road and                    extending generally in a southerly direction to its intersection with Summit Road.

4.            Approves that the speed limit changes listed above in clauses 3a and 3b come into force once    the new speed limit signs have been installed, approximately 20 working days following                             Council approval.

That the Banks Peninsula Community Board recommends that Council:

5.            Approves that pursuant to Part 4 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw           2017, speed limits be revoked and set as listed below in clauses 5a and 5b and includes the                    resulting changes in the Christchurch City Register of Speed Limits and Speed Limit Maps:

                a.         Revoke the 100 kilometres per hour speed limit on Dyers Pass Road, commencing at its                  intersection with Summit Road and extending generally in a southerly direction to a                                  point 340 metres north of its intersection with Governors Bay Road.

                b.         Approve the speed limit of Dyers Pass Road be set at 60 kilometres per hour,                                      commencing at its intersection with Summit Road and extending generally in a                                   southerly direction to a point 340 metres north of its intersection with Governors Bay                               Road.

6.            Approves that the speed limit changes listed above in clauses 5a and 5b come into force                            once the new speed limit signs have been installed, approximately 20 working days following               Council approval.

 

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·    Option 1 – Change speed limit from 70 kilometres per hour and 100 kilometres per hour to a consistent safe appropriate speed of 60 kilometres per hour as shown on Attachment A (preferred option) and install no passing lines.

·    Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·    Aims to lower speeds further with a high potential to reduce death and serious injury accidents

·    Provide clarity and confirmation that it is not safe to overtake a motor vehicle

·    Low cost solution to provide reduction in accidents

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·    Creates minor delay to small portion of daily commuters

·    Vehicles being stuck behind slow motor vehicles and not being legally permitted to pass

 

5.   Context/Background

Summary

5.1       Attachment B shows the calculated road safety risk of Dyers Pass Road compared to all other roads within Christchurch City Councils control. As shown the measured personal risk is high and the collective risk is medium high. Dyers Pass Road has the highest risk rating compared to other rural roads controlled by Council on Banks Peninsula. Road safety risk and accident data clearly show there is a significant road safety problem on Dyers Pass Road.

5.2       NZTA speed management guidelines identifies Dyers Pass Road as high benefit site for speed management and a first priority intervention where there is the greatest potential to reduce death and serious injuries.

5.3       The proposed change in posted legal speed limit from 70 kilometres per hour and 100 kilometres per hour on the City and Banks Peninsula sides respectively to 60 kilometres per hour across the entire Dyers Pass route as shown on Attachment A – aims to reduce the average actual vehicle speeds. A reduction in speed reduces the chance of an accident by allowing a vehicle to stop over a shorter distance and lower speed reduces the risk of a death or serious injury if an accident occurs.

5.4       The proposed double yellow lines aim to reduce the number of overtaking and head on accidents by providing a clear message that it is illegal and unsafe to overtake another motor vehicle. The double yellow lines also narrow road lanes and may help lower vehicle speeds.

5.5       There are currently limited opportunities to pass a slower vehicle. No passing lines and a reduced posted speed limit will remove freedom to pass resulting in increased travel times. The increase in travel times over a short route are low and discussed further in paragraph 5.26.

5.6       Motor vehicles can legally cross the double yellow lines to overtake a cyclist. To clarify this additional signage has been added to the route as shown on Attachment A. It is expected that double yellow lines will make motor vehicles take more care when passing a cyclist and cars will not queue for long periods behind a cyclist.

Road Safety Risk and Distribution of Accidents

5.7       Christchurch City Council uses software that calculates road safety risk on their network based on a methodology developed by NZTA (KiwiRap). The software uses existing reported death or serious injury accidents and also factors in the probabilities of a recorded minor injury accident resulting in a death or serious injury. This software allows Council to compare the road safety risk of all roads within Council’s control.

5.8       KiwiRap looks at two different measures of risk, Personal and Collective. The key differences are:

·   Collective Risk, is the number of accidents per kilometre

·   Personal Risk, is the number of accidents that have happened per 100 million vehicle kilometres of travel on the section of road.

5.9       Personal risk is the danger to each individual using the road. If two roads of the same length have the same number of accidents, Personal Risk is higher for the road with the lowest traffic volume.

5.10    Dyers Pass Road has a high Personal Risk and a medium high number of accidents per kilometre of road (Collective Risk).

5.11    Attachment C shows the location of accidents along the route recorded from 2007-1016, accidents that occurred within 50m of each other have been grouped together as one location. The map shows a relatively even distribution of accidents across the entire route, some locations have a higher concentration of recorded accidents but do not form a significant portion of the total. It is also noted that reporting of accident location is reliant on a reported distance from a nearby intersection, given there are few intersections along Dyers Pass Rd the accuracy of reporting is unreliable and it is reasonable that some of the reported locations could be out by hundreds of metres.

5.12    The types of accident trends identified are typical across the route and therefore an area wide treatment is proposed.

5.13    The lower section of Dyers Pass Road on the Governors Bay side has a lower level of reported accidents compared to balance of the route. However the accidents along this section are considered high relative to other roads in Christchurch and given the similar nature of this section of Dyers Pass Road, an area wide treatment is also applicable here.

Scope of Improvements

5.14    The scope of this recommendation is to provide benefits that can be achieved in the short term, by delivering improvements to posted speed limit, road markings and signage.

5.15    Longer term road safety improvement such as guardrails and seal widenings are also planned along Dyers Pass Road within the next two years and are included within the Long Term Plan.

5.16    If approved it is planned to install road markings and speed limit changes before the longer term improvements, as likely to have an immediate impact.

Road Environment and Traffic Data.

5.17    Dyers Pass Road connects Banks Peninsula to the city and provides access to the Port Hills. Traffic volumes are approximately 3,000 vehicles per day during the week and the route is popular with cyclists, with approximately 135 cyclists in each lane per day recorded on a weekend.

5.18    Dyers Pass Road is classified as a minor arterial from Colombo Street to Governors Bay Road. The portion of Dyers Pass from approximately 400 metres south of Hackthorne Road to Governors Bay Road is rural in nature with a posted speed limit of 70 kilometres per hour on the city side and 100 kilometres per hour on the Governors Bay side except a portion of approximately 350m that is 50 kilometres per hour immediately prior to Governors Bay Road.

5.19    Dyers Pass Road is a windy narrow route cut into the existing hillside. The route provides for one lane of traffic in each direction separated by a white dashed centre line marking. Lane widths range from 2.5m to 3m wide.

5.20    Dyers Pass Road has an open drain between the edge of seal and the hillside cut, and sections of W section guardrails protecting vehicles from rolling down steep banks on the opposite side of the road.

5.21    Speed counts have been completed at locations shown on Attachment D. The average speed is 63km/h, the distribution of speeds is shown on Attachment E.

5.22    Further detailed analysis of traffic data is included within Attachment G - responses to submitters.

Accident Record

5.23    The NZTA accident data base reports 178 accidents on Dyers Pass Road from Sign of the Takahe to Governors Bay from 2007-2016.

5.24    There were 76 accidents resulting in 104 injuries over the analysis period. Of these, 14 were serious injuries, 89 had minor injuries and one fatality. The below trends were noted:

·    Vehicles losing control while cornering accounted for 75% of reported accidents

·    Head on, vehicles overtaking and changing lanes accounted for 20% of reported accidents

·    Inappropriate speed entering a curve accounted for 37% of accidents reported

·    Fourteen death or serious injury accidents recorded

·    Head on, vehicles overtaking and changing lanes accounted for approximately 30% of reported death or serious injury accidents

·    Vehicles losing control while cornering accounted for 50% of reported death or serious injury accidents

·    Over 50% of accidents occurred at night in the dark

·    72% of accidents were reported dry road conditions. The balance of accidents occurred in wet or icy conditions

Attachment F illustrates these trends.

Travel Times

5.25    The NZTA speed management guide provides travel time data collected from Tom Tom GPS navigational devices and reports an average speed of 45-49 kilometres per hour to travel Dyers Pass Road. Measured travel time data measured by Council staff during peak times recorded an average speed of 54 kilometres per hour to travel the route. Further details on collected travel time data is included in response to submitters in Attachment G.

5.26    Council staff have recorded route travel times in both directions on Dyers Pass Road from the existing 50 kilometres per hour speed change points at Governors Bay and near Hackthorne Road.

·    Typically a weekday commuter trip anytime between 7am-9am and 4pm-6pm, takes approximately on average 6 minutes and 39 seconds.

·    A trip where a driver travelled at no more than 40 kilometres per hour takes approximately 9 minutes and 6 seconds.

·    A trip where a driver travelled at no more than 60 kilometres per hour takes approximately 7 minutes and 40 seconds

5.27    If a typical commute trip is constrained by a vehicle in front travelling at 40 kilometres per hour the entire journey, the result is approximately 2.5 minutes extra travel time. The difference between a typical commute trip and driving no more than 60km/h is about 1 minute.

5.28    The increase in travel time is conservative as it is unlikely that faster vehicle will be constrained along the entire route.

NZTA Speed Management Guide

5.29    The NZTA Speed Management Guide was published in November 2016 and has been followed up by a revision of, Land Transport Rule (The Rule): Setting of Speed Limits 2003. The revised Land Transport Rule: has been active since 21 September 2017.

5.30    The guide is an integral part of the Safer Journeys Safer Speeds Programme. The overall goal of the safer speeds programme, which sets the direction for speed management in New Zealand, in line with the governments Safer Journeys Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020 is to:

Reduce death and serious injuries, and support economic productivity through travel speeds that are safe and appropriate for road function, design, safety and use.

5.31    The Speed Management Guide introduces a modern approach to speed management in New Zealand roads. The 2017 Rule formalises the approach to speed management in the Guide. In particular the Rule: -

·    Requires RCAs to set speed limits that are, in the RCAs view, safe and appropriate; and

·    Encourages a consistent approach to speed management throughout New Zealand; and

·    Replaces the methodology of the 2003 Rule with assessment criteria and outcome statements based on the approach in the Guide.

5.32    The guide identifies Dyers Pass Road as high benefit site for speed management and a first priority intervention where there is the greatest potential to reduce death and serious injuries.

5.33    First priority interventions streets provide the greatest potential to reduce death and serious injuries and improve economic productivity, particularly in the short term. In both rural and urban environments this is likely to mean a focus on roads that have a higher collective accident risk and/or higher personal accident risk.


 

6.   Option 1 – No passing Lines and 60km/h Speed Limit (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Change speed limit from 70 kilometres per hour and 100 kilometres per hour to a consistent safe appropriate speed of 60 kilometres per hour as shown on Attachment A (preferred option) and install no passing lines.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       In accordance with the New Zealand Land Transport rule section 2.5 initial engagement was carried out with the New Zealand Transport Association and Police prior to formal consultation, both provided their support.

6.5       Consultation leaflets were hand delivered to approximately 670 residents in both Cashmere near the Sign of the Takahe, and Governors Bay. Leaflets were also delivered to 198 absentee property owners and 30 copies to libraries and service centres.

6.6       In accordance with the New Zealand Land Transport rule section 2.5 the New Zealand Automobile Association, Spokes, Environment Canterbury and the Road Transport Forum New Zealand were notified as part of the formal consultation.

6.7       An email was sent to 137 stakeholders with a link to the consultation website. These included Cass Bay, Charteris Bay, Church Bay, Corsair Bay, Diamond Harbour, Governors Bay, Purau, Lyttelton and Cashmere community and resident associations.

6.8       A Newsline story and  Facebook post were written and posted on 18 November 2017.

6.9       Consultation was carried out from 21 November 2017 to 18 December 2017. During this time 538 submissions were received.

6.10    Submitter preferences;

60km/h speed limit

Double yellow lines

Generally support

293 (55%)

267 (50.5%)

Do not support

163 (30.5%)

171 (32.2%)

Have some concerns

77 (14.5%)

91 (17.3%)

Total

533

529

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.11    Key themes raised in the comments are as follows;

Theme

Mentions

% of total

Cyclists are the main issue

65

15%

Can cyclists pass on double yellow lines

50

11%

Boy racers are the main issue

50

11%

Driver behaviour is the main issue

42

10%

Passing bays need to be added

35

8%

travel time increasing

35

8%

Need to add signage

34

8%

Can an uphill cycle lane be added?

29

7%

Can the road be widened

18

4%

Can the double yellow lines be limited to dangerous areas

17

4%

How will it be enforced?

29

7%

Road maintenance would have a large impact on safety

14

3%

Retain existing change point at Northern end

14

3%

Issues at Summit Road intersection

6

1%

slow vehicles cause most of the issues

4

1%

 

442

For responses to key issues raised refer Attachment G

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.12    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.13    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $100,000 to remove existing road markings, install new road markings, raised reflective pavement markers and signs.

6.14    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – covered under the area maintenance contract.

6.15    Funding source – Traffic Operations - Black Spot Remedial Works.

Legal Implications

6.16    Speed limits must be set in accordance with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 and subsequent amendments. 

6.17    Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010 provides Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.18    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits. 

6.19    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284).

Risks and Mitigations   

6.20    Vehicles being stuck behind slow motor vehicles and not being legally permitted to pass, creating driver frustration.

6.21    Dyers Pass Road is relatively short and takes no more than 10 minutes to travel. Due to this short length, it is unlikely to create frustration to the point of impaired decision making. The difference between typical commute times and driving at 40km/h the entire route is about 2.5minutes. The extra travel time is low compared to the risk of overtaking on a road that provides little opportunity to do so.

Implementation

6.22    Implementation dependencies - dependent on endorsement and approval by both the Spreydon Cashmere and Banks Peninsula Community Boards and approval by the Council to legalise the speed limit.

6.23    Implementation timeframe – Approximately 20 working days to install no passing lines following board approval, note that road marking delivery is weather dependent.

6.24    Approximately 20 working days to install speed limit change signage following Council approval.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.25    The advantages of this option include:

·   Aims to lower speeds further with a high potential to reduce death and serious injury accidents

·   Provide clarity and confirmation that it is not safe to overtake a motor vehicle

·   Low cost solution to provide reduction in accidents

6.26    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Creates minor delay to small portion of daily commuters

·   Vehicles being stuck behind slow motor vehicles and not being legally permitted to pass

7.   Option 2 – Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Do Nothing

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       Refer to section 6.5 to 6.11

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.5.1   Inconsistency – it does not improve road safety and reduce the number of reported crashes on the network.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Not applicable

7.8       Funding source – Not applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations    

7.10    The current high accident risk remains.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies  - Not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No additional cost to Council.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not address the high crash risk on Dyers Pass Road and will not help Council meet its goal of an annual 5% reduction in deaths and serious injuries.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

18

b

Road Safety Risk Maps

19

c

Accident Distribution

21

d

Speed Counts and Traffic Volume

22

e

Speed Distribution

23

f

Accident Trends

24

g

Response to Submitters

25

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Dane Moir - Engagement Delivery Assistant

Approved By

Stephen Wright - Senior Traffic Engineer

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

02 March 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board and Banks Peninsula Community Board

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