Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Friday 16 February 2018

Time:                                    8.00am

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

13 February 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 2

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 2

C       3.       Confirmation of Previous Minutes................................................................................. 2

B       4.       Public Forum.................................................................................................................... 2

B       5.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 2

B       6.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 2 

B       7.       Correspondence............................................................................................................... 2  

STAFF REPORTS

C       8.       Proposed 40km/h Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square.......................................... 2

C       9.       Proposed Parking Restrictions - Dyers Pass Road, Maryhill Avenue, Upland Place, Beckenham School.......................................................................................................... 2

C       10.     Hoon Hay Park - Proposed basketball court lighting and future upgrades............... 2

C       11.     Curletts Basin Tree Removals and Landscape Plan....................................................... 2

C       12.     Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report - February 2018....................... 2

B       13.     Elected Members’ Information Exchange...................................................................... 2 

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

1.   Apologies

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Tuesday, 30 January 2018  be confirmed (refer page 2).

4.   Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes may be available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

It is intended that the public forum session will be held at <Approximate Time>

OR

There will be no public forum at this meeting

 

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared. 

6.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

 

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

Open Minutes

 

 

Date:                                     Tuesday 30 January 2018

Time:                                    5.00pm

Venue:                                 Boardroom, Beckenham Service Centre,
66 Colombo Street, Beckenham

 

 

Present

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Karolin Potter

Melanie Coker

Helene Mautner

Phil Clearwater

Lee Sampson

Tim Scandrett

 

 

30 January 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Arohanui Grace

Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

941 6663

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

 

The agenda was dealt with in the following order.

1.   Apologies

Part C

There were no apologies.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Part B

There were no declarations of interest recorded.

3.   Confirmation of Previous Minutes

Part C

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2018/00194

Community Board Decision

That the minutes of the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board meeting held on Friday, 8 December 2017 be confirmed.

Lee Sampson/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

4.   Public Forum

Part B

1.1       Youth Development and Achievement scheme grant recipient Evelyn Ponga spoke to the Board about her experience at the Big Sing competition in Auckland from 24th to 26th August 2017. Evelyn attended as a member of the Villa Maria senior Con Brio choir which was selected to attend the event as one of 24 New Zealand school choir finalists. Evelyn thanked the Board for the grant towards her participation. She advised that the Villa Maria Choir had received a silver award and the ambassador’s award.

 

The Chairperson thanked Evelyn for her presentation.

5.   Deputations by Appointment

Part B

There were no deputations by appointment.

6.   Presentation of Petitions

Part B

There was no presentation of petitions.    

 

7.   Tree Removal for the Colombo & Beckenham St. Wastewater Project

 

Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board approve:

1.         The removal of 1 street tree to allow the wastewater project to be fully implemented.

2.         The implementation of the proposed tree planting, comprising 3 replacement street trees.

 

Board Consideration

The Board discussed the proposed tree removal and indicated its preference for the use of native trees to replace any removed.

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2018/00195

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves the removal of one street tree to allow the Colombo and Beckenham Streets wastewater project to be fully implemented.

2.         Requests that replacement trees, where required, be appropriate native species (two kowhai and one kahikatea)

Helene Mautner/Phil Clearwater                                                                                                                         Carried

 

 

8.   Youth Achievement and Development Scheme 2017/18 - Millicent St Clare Smith

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2018/00196 (original Staff recommendation adopted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $500 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Millicent St Clare Smith towards participation in the 2017-2018 New Zealand Under18 Women’s  Ice Hockey Challenge Cup of Asia competition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from the 7th March to the 12th March 2018.

 

   Tim Scandrett/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                             Carried

 


 

 

9.   Youth Achievement and Development Scheme 2017/18 - Te Marino Violet Rose Roberts

 

Community Board Resolved SCCB/2018/00197 (original Staff recommendation adopted without change)

Part C

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves a grant of $250 from its 2017/18 Youth Achievement and Development Scheme to Te Marino Violet Rose Roberts towards participation in the Canterbury Under 17 Girls National Softball Tournament in Dunedin from the 17-21 January.

 

Lee Sampson/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                                 Carried

 

10. Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report

 

Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update for January 2018.

 

Community Board decided SCCB/2018/00198

Part B

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board decided:

1.         To receive the Area Update for January 2018.

2.         That a letter be written to the owners of 26 Grove Road advising that the property is not required as an addition to Cornelius O’Connor Reserve.

3.         That Lee Sampson and Helene Mautner be part of a working party to work on the creation of a Spreydon-Cashmere Age Friendly Action Plan.

4.         That Karolin Potter be substituted for Melanie Coker on the Hearings Panel to receive deputations, consider public submissions, and make a recommendation to the Council on the Summit Road proposed prohibited times on road restrictions proposal as Melanie has declared a conflict of interest.

 

 

Tim Scandrett/Melanie Coker                                                                                                                                Carried

 

 


 

 

11. Elected Members’ Information Exchange

Part B

Board Members shared the following information:

·    Spreydon Pool has received consents sign off.  There will be an opening ceremony on 22 February.

·    An alcohol Licensing workshop for residents has been held by the Spreydon Neighbourhood Network ahead of the planned hearing of an application for an alcohol retail outlet on Barrington Street. 

·    Provision for dredging of the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River and detention basins in the Long Term Plan is being looked at.

·    Cashmere/Centaurus/Colombo/Dyers Pass road intersection has been identified as the second most dangerous in Christchurch.

·    Hoon Hay Community Centre is being well used.

·    Nominations for Edible Garden Awards are still open.

·    Initial testing results for the Cashmere View Retirement Village air discharge have been received by residents.

·    Information on the future of Coronation Hall is still awaited.

·    The removal of the pedestrian steps at the Hackthorne Road and Dyers Pass Road intersection is still causing problems for pedestrians.  Staff are currently investigating.

·    The Old Stone House is re-opening on 7 February 2018.

·    Members have been liaising with Age Concern.

 

 

 

   

Meeting concluded at 6.26pm.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 16TH DAY OF FEBRUARY 2018

 

Karolin Potter

Chairperson

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

7.        Correspondence - Pedestrian safety at Barrington Mall

Reference:

18/128957

Presenter(s):

 

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

Correspondence has been received from:

Name

Subject

John McKirdy

Pedestrian Safety at Barrington Mall

Ester Valero

Traffic on Tennyson Street

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receive the information in the correspondence report dated 16 February 2018

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Correspondence - Barrington Mall Pedestrian Safety

2

b

Correspondence - Tennyson Street

2

 

 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator 


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

8.        Proposed 40km/h Speed Zone - St Mary's Church Square

Reference:

16/1382067

Contact:

John Dore

John.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board’s recommendation that Council approves a change from 50km/h to 40km/h around the St Mary’s Church Square area as shown on Attachment A.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to requests from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommend that Council:

1.         Approve that pursuant to Section 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, speed limits be revoked and set as listed below in clauses 1.a to 1.c and include the resulting changes in the Christchurch City Register of Speed Limits & Speed Limit Maps:

a.         Revoke the 50 kilometres per hour speed limit of Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street, Church Square and Grove Road.

b.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 50 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Moorhouse Avenue and extending in a southerly to its intersection with Harman Street.

c.         Approve that the speed limit of Grove Road be set to 40 kilometres per hour commencing at its intersection with Harman Street and extending in a southerly direction to its intersection with Church Square.

d.         Approve that the speed limit of; Spencer Street, Poulson Street, Feast Place, Parlane Street, Fielding Street, Meredith Street, Dickens Street, Collins Street, Emerson Street, MacAulay Street, Ward Street, Cotterill Street, Harman Street and Church Square be set to 40 kilometres per hour.

2.         Approve that the speed limit changes listed above in clauses 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d come into force following date of council approval and installation of signs shown on Attachment A. Approximately April 2018.

 

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users – minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

·     Levels of Service: 10.0.36 Promote modal shift: Increase the percentage share of cycling trips

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Change the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h as shown on Attachment A (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Aim to lower actual speeds further

·     Aligns posted speed limit with actual speeds in the area

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     There are no known disadvantages

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       At is meeting 8 June 2016, The Spreydon – Cashmere Board resolved that:

That the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board decided to request that staff provide a report on the introduction of a 30 kilometre per hour speed limit around St Mary's Church Addington and in wider Addington between Selwyn Street and Spencer Street, including the latter but not the former, and from Brougham Street to Lincoln Road.

5.2       The study area is shown on Attachment A. The roads within the study area and nearby are classified within the road network as noted below:

·    Brougham Street (SH76) is classified as a major arterial road and is part of the strategic freight network

·    Lincoln Road and Memorial Avenue are classified as major arterial roads

·    Selwyn Street, Harman Street is classified as a collector route

·    The balance of roads within the study area are classified as local roads

5.3       The land use within the study area is predominately residential with some industrial between Harman Street and Hazeldean Street. Recorded traffic volumes are shown on Attachment C.

5.4       The Little Rive Major Cycle Route has recently been completed along Collins Street and Grove Road and includes a two way off road cycle facility. This work also included banning left turns from Brougham Street into Collins Street.

5.5       Traffic calming features such as road humps and narrowing’s are on the majority of streets within the area.

5.6       Recorded mean operating speeds are shown on Attachment B.

NZTA Speed Management Guide

1.1       The NZTA Speed Management Guide was published in November 2016 and has been followed up by a revision of, Land Transport Rule (The Rule): Setting of Speed Limits 2003. The revised Land Transport Rule: has been active since 21 September 2017.

1.2       The guide is an integral part of the Safer Journeys Safer Speeds Programme. The overall goal of the safer speeds programme, which sets the direction for speed management in New Zealand, in line with the governments Safer Journeys Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020 is to:

Reduce death and serious injuries, and support economic productivity through travel speeds that are safe and appropriate for road function, design, safety and use.

1.3       The Speed Management Guide introduces a modern approach to speed management in New Zealand roads. The 2017 Rule formalises the approach to speed management in the Guide. In particular the Rule: -

·    Requires RCAs to set speed limits that are, in the RCAs view, safe and appropriate; and

·    Encourages a consistent approach to speed management throughout New Zealand; and

·    Replaces the methodology of the 2003 Rule with assessment criteria and outcome statements based on the approach in the Guide.

1.4       Application of the guide to the study area identifies opportunities to improve credibility of speed limits. These are streets where road users already travel at a safe and appropriate speed, but where the posted speed limit is out of alignment. 


 

6.   Option 1 - Change the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h (preferred)

Option Description

Change the speed limit from 50km/h to 40km/h as shown on Attachment A.The proposed speed limit change to 40km/h aligns posted speed limit with actual speeds and gives the speed limit credibility and is in accordance with NZTA speed management guidance.Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance included, a letterbox drop to the local community, publication on the Have Your Say website and notification to the Addington Times.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       In accordance with the NZTA Land Transport Rule – Setting Speed Limits, NZTA and Police were consulted with prior to consultation and provided their support for this project. In addition, any local and territorial authorities were informed of the consultation. This included the NZAA, E-Can, Spokes, Road Transport Association New Zealand and the Taxi Federation.

6.7       There is local community interest in this project as any changes would have the greatest effect on those living locally.  Their views are outlined below.

6.8       Engagement was undertaken from Monday 20 November 2017 – Monday 11 December 2017.

6.9       A total of 1300 leaflets were hand delivered to properties in Church Square, Collins Street, Cotterill Street, Dickens Street, Emerson Street, Feast Place, Grove Road, Harman Street, Lincoln Lane, MacAulay Street, Meredith Street, Parlane Street, Spencer Street, and sections of Barrington Street, Brougham Street, Hazeldean Road, Jerrold Street North, Lincoln Road, Moorhouse Avenue, Poulson Street, Selwyn Street and Ward Street. 

6.10    The consultation leaflets were also sent to 151 key stakeholders and 480 absentee owners.

6.11    Additional leaflets were made available at Civic Offices, Beckenham Service Centre, Spreydon Community Library and Pioneer Recreation and Sport Centre.

6.12    During the course of the engagement, Council received feedback from 117 people. Of the 117 submissions, 78 submitters were in support of the proposal, 27 were in support but had some concerns, six did not support the proposal and six did not state their preference. Of the 117 submissions, five identified as being part of an organisation.

6.13    The following outlines the main themes of the feedback:

Requests for the speed limit to be reduced further

·    31 submitters commented that the speed limit should be reduced further than 40km/hr

Safety concerns/suggestions

·    25 submitters noted safety concerns or made suggestions to improve the road layout, such as making streets one-way or removing on-street parking

Unnecessary

·    Nine submitters commented that the speed reduction was unnecessary

 

Support for the speed reduction

·    15 submitters included in their comments their support for the speed reduction

Requests for the area to be adjusted

·    Nine submitters requested additional streets be included

·    Two submitters requested Harman Street be excluded from the reduced speed restriction area

·    One submitter requested the speed limit be reduced to 40km/hr for Harman Street and Ward Street and 30km/hr for the other streets.

6.14    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Board meeting and how they can request speaking rights. Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback summary with project team responses.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.15    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.16    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $9,500 to supply and install signs, poles and any repeater road markings.

6.17    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effect will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.18    Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget.

Legal Implications

6.19    Speed limits must be set in accordance with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 and subsequent amendments. 

6.20    Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010 provides Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.21    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits. 

6.22    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.23    Not applicable.

Implementation

6.24    Implementation dependencies - Council approval.

6.25    Implementation timeframe - Approximately four weeks following Council approval.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.26    The advantages of this option include:

·   Aim to lower actual speeds further

·   Aligns posted speed limit with actual speeds in the area

6.27    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   No known disadvantages

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing speed limit.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       In accordance with the NZTA Land Transport Rule – Setting Speed Limits, NZTA and Police were consulted with prior to consultation and provided their support to reduce the speed limit. In addition, any local and territorial authorities were informed of the consultation. This included the NZAA, E-Can, Spokes, Road Transport Association New Zealand and the Taxi Federation.

7.5       There is local community interest in this project as any changes would have the greatest effect on those living locally. 

7.6       During the course of the engagement, Council received feedback from 117 people. Of the 117 submissions, 78 submitters were in support of the proposal, 27 were in support but had some concerns, six did not support the proposal and six did not state their preference. Of the 117 submissions, five identified as being part of an organisation.

7.7       Of the 117 submitters, eight submitters commented that the speed reduction was unnecessary.

7.8       This option is inconsistent with the community board request and would not achieve safety improvements associated with a speed limit change.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.9       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.10    Cost of Implementation - $0

7.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $0

7.12    Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.13    Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

7.14    Not applicable.

Implementation

7.15    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.16    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   Has no impact on existing speed limit.

7.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Speeds on streets within the area that do not have traffic calming are likely to remain at current levels.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

2

b

Measured Speeds

2

c

Traffic Volumes

2

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Lori Rankin - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

9.        Proposed Parking Restrictions - Dyers Pass Road, Maryhill Avenue, Upland Place, Beckenham School

Reference:

17/1386519

Contact:

John Dore

john.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.2       To approve the installation of 'No Stopping' restrictions at the following locations:

·    Dyers Pass Road opposite property number 45 as shown on Attachment A.

·    Maryhill Avenue opposite property number ten as shown on Attachment B.

·    Upland Place as shown on Attachment C.

1.3       To approve the installation of P3 parking restrictions at the following locations:

·    Sandwich Road outside Beckenham School as shown on Attachment D.

1.4       To approve the installation of a Bus Stop at the following locations:

·    Eastern Terrace outside Beckenham School as shown on Attachment D

1.5       The sites are located within the road network as shown on Attachment E.

Origin of Report

1.6       This report is staff generated in response to requests from local residents.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

Dyers Pass Road – Attachment A

1.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Dyers Pass Road commencing at a point 260 metres south west of its intersection with Sulby Road Place, and extending in a south westerly direction for 10 metres, as detailed on Attachment A.

 

Maryhill Avenue – Attachment B

2.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on school days from 8:20 to 9:00 and from 14:30 to 15:15  on the south west side of Maryhill Avenue commencing at a point 86 metres south west of its intersection with Wyn Street and extending in a south westerly for 46 metres.

3.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited on school days from 8:20 to 9:00 and from 14:30 to 15:15  on the south east side of Maryhill Avenue commencing at a point 86 metres south west of its intersection with Wyn Street and extending in a south westerly direction for 46 metres.

Upland Place – Attachment C

4.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south east side of Upland Road commencing at a point 160 metres south west of its intersection with Hoon Hay Road, and extending in a south westerly direction for four metres.

Beckenham School – Attachment D

5.         Approve that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes on school days from 8:15 to 9:15 and from 14:30 to 15:30, on the north side of Sandwich Road commencing at a point 133 metres west of its intersection with Eastern Terrace and extending in a westerly direction for 52 metres.

6.         Revoke the parking restrictions on the west side of Eastern Terrace commencing at a point six metres north of its intersection with Sandwich Road and extending in a northerly direction for 118 metres.

7.         Approve that the stopping of vehicles be prohibited at any time, on the west side of Eastern Terrace commencing at a point 59 metres north of its intersection with Sandwich Road and extending in a northerly direction for 15 metres.

8.         Approve that a marked bus stop be installed, on the west side of Eastern Terrace commencing at a point 74 metres north of its intersection with Sandwich Road and extending in a northerly direction for 44 metres.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

4.1.2   Activity: Parking

·     Level of Service: 10.3.8 Optimise operational performance

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – As shown on Attachments A, B, C and D (preferred options)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

 

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages  (Preferred Option)

Dyers Pass Road – Attachment A

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Improves visibility at driveway

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes some kerbside parking spaces

Maryhill Avenue – Attachment B

4.3.3   The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides improved visibility for high number of pedestrians that cross road before and after school

4.3.4   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes kerbside parking for approximately 1 hour per school day

Upland Place – Attachment C

4.3.5   The advantages of this option include:

·     Clarifies that kerb space between driveways is illegal for parking

4.3.6   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     No known disadvantages

Sandwich Road and Eastern Terrace– Attachment D

4.3.7   The advantages of this option include:

·     Allows for short term parking such as drop off and pick ups before and after school, improving operational efficiency and safety in the area

·     Formalise bus stop area, for buses servicing school related activities

4.3.8   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes longer term kerb side parking spaces

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Dyers Pass Road – Attachment A

5.1       A member of the public raised a concern regarding parked vehicles around the entrance to a vehicle access to properties 1/45, 2/45 and 47 Dyers Pass Road. Parked vehicles in this area restrict visibility for vehicles leaving access way.

5.2       The access way is parallel with Dyers Pass Road. This unusual layout does not allow a vehicle exiting to position its self for better visibility of on coming traffic.

5.3       The proposed carpark removals are outside a frontage to council potable water infrastructure, and the four to five remaining parks are adequate supply for the three residential properties that share the subject access.

5.4       Dyers Pass Road is classified as a minor arterial road, and is primarily residential around the subject site.

5.5       The proposed no stopping restrictions removes parking from an area that can create visibility issues if heavily parked. Approximately four to five vehicles will be pushed further out to park.

Maryhill Avenue – Attachment B

5.6       Representatives from Hoon Hay School and submissions as part of the school travel plan process, expressed concerns regarding pedestrian visibility and safety on Maryhill Avenue outside one of the schools entrances.

5.7       High numbers of pedestrian cross Maryhill Avenue before and after school. Visibility between pedestrians and on coming traffic is often obscured by parked vehicles close to the existing entrance into Hoon Hay School.

5.8       Traffic surveys report 57 pedestrian crossing Maryhill Avenue and approximately 140 pedestrians recorded in and out of the school entrance from 3pm to 330pm.

5.9       Maryhill Avenue is classified as a local road and has an estimated average daily traffic volume of 1000-1500 vehicles per day. Around school start and finish time up to 130 vehicles per hour were recorded by surveys.

5.10    Traffic surveys report a mean speed of 35.3km/h and 85% of vehicles travelled less than 47km/h.

5.11    To improve visibility around school start and finish times a no stopping restriction is proposed. The no stopping is time restricted to reduce adverse impacts on the surrounding residential properties.

Upland Place – Attachment C

5.12    A member of the public raised concerns about vehicles illegally parking between the driveways of number 9 and number 11, and obstructing access / egress.

5.13    A short section of kerb is currently between number 9 and 11 that can’t accommodate a parked vehicle, without partially obstructing the adjoining driveways. It is reported the vehicles regularly park between these two driveways

5.14    The proposed no parking restrictions helps clarify that this section of kerb is unsuitable for parking.

Sandwich Road and Eastern Terrace– Attachment D

5.15    A Beckenham School staff member bought to the attention of council staff the ongoing issues with parking demand on Sandwich Road and bus stop operations on Eastern Terrace.

5.16    Council staff and Beckenham School staff met on site to discuss the issues and staff recommend the proposal on Attachment D to help manage parking on Sandwich Road and adjust bus stop signage on Eastern Terrace to meet demand of the newly built school.

5.17    The proposed restrictions remove long term kerbside parking spaces. The P3 parking restriction is for a short time before and after school and only on school days, all other times there are no parking restrictions.

5.18    There is adequate kerbside parking available on Sandwich Road for residents and the proposed restriction optimises the kerbside space available for short stay parking and helps with overall traffic management and safety around the school.

5.19    The existing bus stop has been reduced in length since no longer required to ferry pupils to another campus while construction of new school being completed.

5.20    Sandwich Road and Eastern Terrace are both low volume local roads.

6.   Option 1 - Install Parking Restriction (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install parking restrictions, as shown on Attachment A, B, C and D.

6.2       The options as shown on Attachment A, B, C and D, have a minimal impact to on street parking and:

·    Dyers Pass Road – Attachment A -  Improves visibility at a shared driveway

·    Maryhill Avenue – Attachment B - Optimises visibility for pedestrians

·    Upland Place – Attachment C – Helps clarify illegal for vehicles to park over driveways

·    Sandwich Road and Eastern Terrace– Attachment D - Optimises short term parking turnover and changes bus stop length to meet current demands

 Significance

6.3       The level of significance of the proposals shown on Attachments, A, B, C and D is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       The proposals shown on Attachments, A, B, C and D do not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

Dyers Pass Road – Attachment A

6.5       Affected property owners and residents were advised of the recommended option by post. Two responses were received that both support the proposal.

Maryhill Avenue – Attachment B

6.6       Affected property owners and businesses were advised of the recommended option by post. Two responses were received. One supported the proposal the other did not.

6.7       The opposing response was concerned about losing kerbside parking for tenants. Explained the balance of maintaining safety for school children and kerbside parking outside of these times, adequate on street parking nearby to cater for properties.

Upland Place – Attachment C

6.8       Affected property owners who raised the concerns support the proposed change. The proposal has no effect on any other residential properties, since already illegal to park in this location.

Beckenham School – Attachment D

6.9       The school principal and board of trustees support the proposal. The proposal has no effect on any other residential properties.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.10    These options are consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.11    Cost of Implementation – No more than $900 to install road markings and signage as shown on Attachments, A, B, C and D.

6.12    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effect will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.13    Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget.

Legal Implications

6.14    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides Council with the authority to install parking restrictions by resolution.

6.15    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes the resolution of stopping restrictions and traffic control devices.

6.16    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.17    Not applicable.

Implementation

6.18    Implementation dependencies - Community Board approval.

6.19    Implementation timeframe – Approximately one month following board decision.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.20    Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages  (Preferred Option)

Dyers Pass Road – Attachment A

6.20.1 The advantages of this option include:

·     Improves visibility at driveway.

6.20.2 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes some kerbside parking spaces

Maryhill Avenue – Attachment B

6.20.3 The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides improved visibility for high number of pedestrians that cross road before and after school

6.20.4 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes kerbside parking for 1 hour on a school day

Upland Place – Attachment C

6.20.5 The advantages of this option include:

·     Clarifies that illegal to park in area between driveways

6.20.6 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     No known disadvantages

Sandwich Road and Eastern Terrace– Attachment D

6.20.7 The advantages of this option include:

·     Allows for short term parking such as drop off and pick ups before and after school, improving operational efficiency and safety in the area.

·     Formalise bus stop area, for buses servicing school related activities.

6.20.8 The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Removes longer term kerb side parking spaces for short periods before and after school.

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Retain existing

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with community requests for improvement.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - $0

7.8       Funding source - Not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Not applicable.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   Has no impact on kerbside parking.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not address the issues identified.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Dyers Pass Rd - Preferred Option

2

b

Maryhill Ave - Preferred Option

2

c

Upland Place - Preferred Option

2

d

Beckenham School - Preferred Option

2

e

Location Plan

2

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

10.    Hoon Hay Park - Proposed basketball court lighting and future upgrades

Reference:

17/1470082

Contact:

Megan Carpenter

Megan.Carpenter@ccc.govt.nz

941 6761

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to make its recommendation to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park and approve the Hoon Hay Park basketball court lights landscape plan.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is being provided to fulfil Spreydon/Heathcote Community Boards request for staff to investigate the proposal for lighting for the basketball court at Hoon Court at their meeting on 19 February 2016:

The Board indicated that it was impressed by the initiative shown by these young men and their community spirit. It noted that staff intended to liaise with the group to investigate the proposal.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined on the suggested thresholds for assessing criteria, which had a medium level of positive social impacts such as an increase in physical activity and medium level of benefits to the Council and ratepayers as the project can encourage community ownership of the park. There is a medium-low assessment for the level of community interest, possible costs/risks to the Council and Ratepayers and whether the impact of the decision can easily be reversed with a medium-low assessment for the other criteria.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Recommend to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park as per Attachment A, subject to:

a.         The approval and use of the lighting be subject to being on an automatic switch-off at 9pm every evening.

2.         Approve the landscape plan for the Hoon Hay Park basketball court lights as per Attachment A.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Sports Parks

·     Level of Service: 7.1.2 Deliver a high level of customer satisfaction with the range and quality of sports parks

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Recommend to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park and approve the landscape plan for the Hoon Hay basketball court lights (preferred option).

·     Option 2 – Do no recommend to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park and do not approve the landscape plan for the Hoon Hay Park basketball court lights.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Social benefits will result in the improvement of this sports park.  It will encourage more community gatherings and the installation of lights would mean more ability to use the basketball courts, so an increase in physical activity.

·     Encourages community ownership of Hoon Hay Park.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Possible increase of noise in park.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Hoon Hay Park is a sports park located at 61 Mathers Road, Hoon Hay.

5.2       A group of Hoon Hay youth who are part of the Cross Over Trust presented a deputation to the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board on 19 February 2016. The Board indicated that it was impressed by the initiative shown by these young men and their community spirit and noted that staff intended to liaise with the group to investigate the proposal.

5.3       Council staff have meet onsite to discuss the lighting proposal with the group of youth. These discussion led to a concept plan being drawn up for community consultation. The youth suggested that they wanted to space to be family orientated, therefore suggested the idea of a barbeque and Shelter. They also requested platform seating suited to watching basketball and the court to be painted red and blue (Hoon Hay colours).

Funding

5.4       Capital funding is included on the Long Term Plan 2015 – 2015 for financial year 2018 in CPMS 2186 Sports Parks Structures (New). The Spreydon Cashmere Community Board has also contributed funding through their Discretionary Response Funding and Annual Plan Funding. The funding has been drawn down into CPMS 47610 – Hoon Hay Park basketball court area and lighting project with a total of $79,526 available.

Delegation

5.5       The Head of Parks has the delegation to make decisions on the siting of floodlights on sports parks, subject to the necessary resource consents and consultation with the appropriate Community Board.

 

 


 

6.   Option 1 - Recommend to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       To install basketball court lights at Hoon Hay Park as per Attachment A which is based on a plan produced by Connetics. The project also includes unfunded activities such as painting the existing court in blue and red, installing platform seating for watching basketball games and installing a barbeque and shelter.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance involves gathering feedback from the local community and key groups that use the park.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Community Consultation on the Hoon Hay Park proposed basketball court lighting and future upgrades was undertaken from Friday 25 November to Monday 18 December 2017. The submission form asked submitters to indicate whether yes they supported the lighting, no they do not support the lighting or yes they generally support the lighting but have some concerns. Submitters were also asked to indicate and rank from one to four their preference for additional unfunded features including a shelter and barbeque, painting the court and platform seating.

6.6       Approximately 850 consultation leaflets (refer Attachment B and C) were hand delivered to properties around Hoon Hay Park, including 120 absentee land owners, these leaflets were also posted and emailed to 10 key stakeholders. The information was posted in the Spreydon-Cashmere bulletin and on the Council’s “Have Your Say” website https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/109

6.7       At the close of consultation 80 submissions were received with 74 submitters (92.5%) supporting the concept plan, three submitters (3.75%) supporting the concept plan but with some concerns, two submitters (2.5%) who do not support the concept plan and one submitter (1.25%) who did not indicate whether they supported or did not support the concept plan.

6.8       Of those that supported the proposal:

6.8.1   There were numerous positive comments which included “I fully support this proposal and think it would be good for the community” and “the people who use these facilities are passionate about their local park and see it as the perfect space to engage with others in the community”.

6.8.2   There was a request for cycle stands. At this stage there is no funding available, however the request has been noted and if/when budget is available, bike stands can be considered.

6.8.3   Three submitters suggested to encourage a group of young people to be ‘unofficial caretakers” of the site. Staff have meet with leaders of the youth group to discuss how the youth can be involved with being guardians of the park. They are in support of the idea, so the next step is to meet with the Parks Unit to see how the community (all ages) can be involved in achieving desired outcomes.

6.8.4   Six submitters raised concerns around the amount of rubbish in Hoon Hay Park. Concerns were passed onto the Parks Maintenance team and an assessment was made. Two of the bins are to be relocated and an additional bin is being installed beside the basketball court.

6.8.5   Four submitter wanted to ensure that the lights do not impact on people living across the street and suggested the light turn off after 9pm. A self-imposed curfew time for operating the lights will be implemented outside the hours of 1600 – 2100 via an automatic time clock setting and time delay switch. This will ensure the lights are not inadvertently left on by users or used outside these times.

6.8.6   One submitter was concerned that the site would become a place for anti-social behaviour and suggested that CCTV would be wise. There has to be exceptional circumstances for Council to put CCTV camera into parks. For the best solution to support safety and discourage antisocial behaviour it is important to consider Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED).

6.8.7   One submitter suggested that the youth organise teams and have a regular competition. The youth with support from Council already organise a yearly three versus three basketball completion called Hoon Hay Hoops.

6.8.8   Six submitter that supported the lights but did not support the installation of a barbeque due to an increase in rubbish, it being located close to houses so won’t be used much, increase in vandalism/barbeque will be stolen and whether it will be cleaned regularly enough. Rubbish refer to 6.8.4. The barbeque has a sterilisation cycle that sterilised the barbeque before each use, cleaning of the barbeque is also included in the parks maintenance contract. Refer to 6.8.3 around Council working with the community to create a sense of ownership of Hoon Hay Park.

6.8.9   Two submitter raised concerns around traffic, specify around when events are on at Hoon Hay Park. The increase in traffic leads to Mathers Road becoming narrow making the road unsafe to cyclists and people crossing the road. These comments were passed onto Council’s traffic operation team.

6.8.10 One submitter suggested some small speakers that hang off the lights so music could be played. The suggestion was noted, however staff have suggested that users bring their own portable speakers etc.

6.9       Three submitters indicated that they support the concept plan but they had some concerns:

6.9.1   One submitter was concerned around increased use leading to more rubbish, that the Barbeque would get dirty and that painting the court has no real purpose. It was suggested that the money would be better spent on the pathway beside the macrocarpa belt.  Rubbish refer to 6.8.4. The barbeque has a sterilisation cycle that sterilised the barbeque before each use, cleaning of the barbeque is also included in the parks maintenance contract. The request for painting the court has come from the youth and helps create a sense of ownership of the space. The path beside the macrocarpa belt in on the Council renewal list. Dependent on funding in the Long Term Plan 2019 – 2029, it is expected that the path will be renewed in financial year 2019.

6.9.2   Two submitter suggested that the lights have a timing device. Refer 6.8.5

6.10    Two submitters that did not support the plan:

6.10.1 One submitter was concerned around vandalism of the lights, cost to fund the lights and questioned the need with daylight saving. Refer to 6.17 for details around funding. The youth have requested lighting thought the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board so they can continue to play basketball through winter.

6.10.2 One submitters were concerned around the lights being too bright and an increase in rubbish. The lights have been designed with the purpose of minimising the effect of light spill and based on calculations the lights will comply with the Christchurch District Plan. Rubbish refer to 6.8.4

6.11    The submitter that did not indicate support either way recommended CCTV cameras, refer to 6.8.6.

6.12    In relation to the preference for additional equipment the most popular first option was painting the basketball court. Seating was the second most popular option followed by a shelter. A barbeque was the least popular option (refer 6.8.8), this was also reflected in the comments provided. At this stage there is funding available to install the lights and the preferred option of painting the court. The other options will be implemented when funding is available through future Long Term Plans.

Options

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 4

Barbeque

18

13

12

26

Shelter

19

22

23

8

Seating

9

31

15

19

Paint

30

8

20

15

 

6.13    The following changes have been made to the landscape plan used for consultation, resulting in the final plan for Board approval (refer attachment A)

6.13.1 Two rubbish bins are being relocated from the edge of the park to closer to the playground and Skate Park. One of these bins will be near the proposed shelter and barbeque.

6.13.2 Installing an additional rubbish bin beside the basketball court.

6.13.3 Council will continue to work with the youth involved in this project to encourage ongoing ownership and how to encourage the community to look after the park.

6.14    All submission with names and addresses have been provided to the Spreydon – Cashmere Community Board members. All submission with names but without names and addresses and contact details are publicly online at https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/109

6.15    All submitters from the consultation (who provided contact details) have been advised of the results of the community feedback, the staff recommendation, the Community Board meeting details and how they can request to speak at the decision meeting if they wish to do so. They were also provided with the updated landscape plan for Hoon Hay Park.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.16    This option is  with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.16.1 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

6.16.2 Children’s Policy 1998

6.16.3 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

6.16.4 Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED)

Financial Implications

6.17    Cost of Implementation – The construction quote for the installation of lights is $62,541.49 and the cost to paint the court is $35 per m2 (approximate total is $12,740.00). Therefore the cost to implement these two items from the landscape plan is approximately $75,281.49.

6.18    Funding source - Capital funding is included on the Long Term Plan 2015 – 2015 for financial year 2018 in CPMS 2186 Sports Parks Structures (New). The Spreydon Cashmere Community Board has also contributed funding through their Discretionary Response Funding and Annual Plan Funding. The funding has been drawn down into CPMS 47610 – Hoon Hay Park basketball court area and lighting project with a total of $79,526 available.

6.19    The youth have fundraised $2,500 towards some platform seating beside the basketball court.

6.20    The barbeque and shelter are unfunded items and staff will investigate suitable funding in future long term plans.

6.21    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The annual planned maintenance costs in Hoon Hay Park will increase by a total of $1456.20 given the financial year 2018 contract terms. This is made up of $1268.45 per annum for barbeque cleaning, $148.98 for an annual barbeque compliance check and $38.78 per annum for Bin cleaning. Lights, seating and the hard surface of basketball courts are not in the current parks maintenance contract.

Legal Implications

6.22    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision

Risks and Mitigations

6.23    There is a risk of an increase in costs for the supply and install of the lights due to the quote being from November 2016. Staff have requested an updated cost.

6.23.1 Treatment: Obtaining a final quote. If the cost is higher than expected, staff can investigate additional cost savings such as painting a smaller area of the court.

6.23.2 Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.24    Implementation dependencies - Gaining Community Board support for the recommendation to the Head of Parks to approve the lighting of the basketball court. And gaining Community Board support for the approval of the Hoon Hay Park basketball court lights landscape plan

6.25    Implementation timeframe –

·   Board support of lights and approval of landscape plan – February 2018

·   Head of Parks approval of basketball court lighting – February 2018

·   Construction April/May 2018

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.26    The advantages of this option include:

·   Social benefits will result in the improvement of this sports park.  It will encourage more community gatherings and the installation of lights would mean more ability to use the basketball courts, so an increase in physical activity.

·   Encourages community ownership of Hoon Hay Park.

6.27    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Possible increase of noise in park.

7.   Option 2 – do not recommend to the Head of Parks to approve the installation of basketball court lighting at Hoon Hay Park and do not approve the landscape plan for the Hoon Hay Park basketball court lights.

Option Description

7.1       The landscape plan (attachment A) for the installation of basketball court lighting and unfunded activities such as painting the existing court in blue and red, installing platform seating and a barbeque and shelter is not approved and the Community Board request staff to consider alternative designs and re-consult with the community.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       No feedback was sought for this option. Two submitters did not support the lighting proposal refer 6.10.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.4.1   Nil.

Financial Implications

7.5       Cost of Implementation – Further funding would be required to cover the cost of a Landscape Architect to draft a new landscape plan and for an Engagement Leader for further community engagement

7.6       Funding source – Existing project budget. This would have an impact on the total budget available for the install of the basketball court lights.

Legal Implications

7.7       There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option.

Risks and Mitigations

7.8       There is not considered to be any risk arising from this option.

Implementation

7.9       Implementation dependencies - gaining Community Board support for a new lighting project and approval of a revised landscape plan.

7.10    Implementation timeframe:

·   Redesign of lighting and landscape plan – March – April 2018

·   Community Board seminar – April 2018

·   Community Engagement – May 2018

·   Community Board Support and Approval of Landscape Plan – July 2018

·   Head of Parks approval of basketball court lighting – July 2018

·   Construction – August – September 2018

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.11    The advantages of this option include:

·   The Community has the opportunity to consider alternative landscape plan designs.

7.12    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Delay in providing basketball court lighting. This option would not allow for an install before Winter 2018.

·   Potential for the cost of lighting and additional activities to increase.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hoon Hay Park - Basketball court lights landscape plan tp351701 

2

b

Hoon Hay Park Proposed basketball court lighting and future upgrades - Public Information Leaflet December 2017

2

c

Hoon Hay Park proposed basketball court lighting and future upgrades - submission form December 2017

2

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Megan Carpenter - Recreation Planner - Greenspace

Dane Moir - Engagement Delivery Assistant

Approved By

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

11.    Curletts Basin Tree Removals and Landscape Plan

Reference:

18/58738

Contact:

Keith Davison

keith.davison@ccc.govt.nz

941 8071

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to approve:

·   The Curletts Basin (201 Annex Road) landscape plan which includes approximately 98,000 of native vegetation areas (including significant woodland areas).

·   The removal of approximately 107 healthy and structurally sound trees within the Curletts Basin Utility Reserve.

1.2       Decisions on the removal of healthy and structurally sound trees is delegated to the Community Board, under Part D, Sub-part 1, 5.15  of the Council’s delegations register:

·   “Determine to plant, maintain and remove trees on reserves, parks and roads under the control of the Council within the policy set by the Council."

1.3       The purpose of this report is to also inform the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board regarding the removal of approximately 41 trees that are unhealthy or structurally unsound.

1.4       Decisions on the removal of unhealthy and structurally unsound trees and trees causing infrastructure damage is delegated to the Head of Parks, under Part B, Sub-part 3, 20 Parks/Trees of the Council’s delegations register:

·   “In consultation with any other units affected, to authorise the following work on any tree from any reserve, park, open space or road corridor: planting and maintenance; removal of structurally unsound and unhealthy trees, trees causing damage to infrastructure or other safety concerns where there is no viable alternative other than to remove the tree.  The relevant Community Board is to be informed of any removals that have been carried out under this delegation.”

Origin of Report

1.5       This report staff generated.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the impact on the surrounding environment and the small number of adjacent affected residents.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Approves the landscape plan for the Curletts Stream flood storage and stormwater treatment project at 201 Annex Road, which includes approximately 98,000 m² of native vegetation areas (including significant woodland areas).

2.         Approves the removal of approximately 107 healthy and structurally sound trees (in areas 1, 2 & 3) to allow the project to be fully implemented.

OR

 Approves the removal of approximately 66 healthy and structurally sound trees in areas 2 & 3, retain the healthy and structurally sound trees in area 1 resulting in modifications to the design and a small loss in capacity.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Flood Protection and Control Works

·     Level of Service: 14.1.5 Implement Land Drainage Recovery Programme works to reduce flooding

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Approve the landscape plan and tree removals (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Decline the landscape plan and tree removals

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Enables flood protection works to proceed without delay

·     Water quality enhancement provided through the creation of treatment wetlands

·     Increased native tree and vegetation planting

·     The proposed planting plan will result in an increase in the native vegetation area and improve the amenity value of the land

·     Provides a formed path connection between Annex Road cycleway and the existing cycle and pedestrian pathway between Mokihi Gardens and Curletts Road

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     The removal of approximately 107 trees that are in a good and fair condition.

·     Immediate loss of tree cover and amenity where this occurs

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Curletts Basin is being constructed at 201 Annex Road as part of the Land Drainage Recovery Programme (LDRP) Upper Heathcote Storage Scheme and also to meet water quality objectives as part of the Heathcote Stormwater Management Plan. A location plan showing the Curletts Basin site and contributing catchment is shown in Figure 1. The total site area is 10.1 hectares.

Figure 1 Location of Curletts Basin

Upper Heathcote Storage Scheme

5.2       The Upper Heathcote Storage Scheme consists of four new flood basins, with a total combined additional capacity over and above planned projects of 800,000m³. The basins have been approved and are in varying stages of construction or design as described below. The four basins are all required to be implemented to provide the full benefits due to the hydrological characteristics of the upper Heathcote network. The location and status of each of the basins is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 Location of basins within the Upper Heathcote Storage Scheme

 

5.3       The purpose of the storage basins is to store flood waters during the peak of a storm and to slowly release the stored water after the water levels downstream have dropped. The effect of this is to result in a lower peak water level than would have occurred if there was no storage upstream.

5.4       It is estimated (Table 1) that the upstream storage will protect over 100 buildings currently at risk of overfloor flooding in extreme floods (i.e. a 1 in 50 AEP event), including the majority of those upstream of Colombo Street and over two thirds of those between Colombo and Radley Streets. This will reduce the risk of flooding above floor in extreme events upstream of Radley Street to below pre-earthquake levels.

5.5       In frequent floods (i.e. 1 in 10 AEP event in Table 1), the upstream storage will protect half of the buildings at risk of overfloor flooding upstream of Radley Street. This reduces the risk of flooding in frequent events upstream of Hansen Park to below pre-earthquake levels, but does not eliminate all the increased risk which resulted from the earthquakes downstream of Hansen Park.

Table 1: Number of buildings with overfloor flooding pre-earthquake, immediately post-earthquake and with the planned upstream storage

Area

10 year ARI (existing development)

50 year ARI (existing development)

PreEQ

PostEQ

PostEQ with storage

PreEQ

PostEQ

PostEQ with storage

Radley Street to Hansen Park

0

16

8

27

69

61

Hansen Park to Colombo Street

4

7

4

58

83

51

Upstream of Colombo Street

3

1

0

90

70

2

Totals

7

24

12

175

222

114

Water Quality Improvements

5.6       Curletts Stream is a tributary of the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River catchment with a highly impervious, mostly industrial catchment.  The catchment has no collective stormwater treatment system and the stream suffers from high levels of contamination which contributes to extremely poor water quality in the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River.  The fully developed nature of the catchment presents significant challenges in terms of high contaminant loads and lack of sufficient land to implement effective retro-fit stormwater mitigation.

5.7       Council monitors the water quality within Curletts Stream at two sites on a monthly basis.  This monitoring shows that Curletts Stream consistently has the poorest water quality out of all of the 42 waterway monitoring sites across the city[1].  The stream has particular issues with high levels of copper, zinc, sediment, ammonia, nitrogen, phosphorus and low dissolved oxygen.  This reflects the largely industrial and commercial nature of the catchment, with many untreated discharges from high risk industrial sites entering the stream.  Consequently, the stream has been a focus for catchment management by Christchurch City Council, the Christchurch West-Melton Zone Committee and Environment Canterbury.   

5.8       The basin site is located within the Curletts Stream catchment with the stream itself passing through it.  The land is located near the bottom of the catchment it serves, making it uniquely situated for siting of a large collective stormwater mitigation facility.  The facility would capture contaminated stormwater runoff from Curletts Stream, treat it to remove contaminants, and discharge it back into the waterway prior to reaching the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River.

5.9       Providing large-scale stormwater treatment facilities to manage one of the most polluted streams in the City is an unprecedented opportunity to improve water quality in the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River, and will represent significant progress toward meeting the Council’s stormwater network discharge consent obligations.

5.10    Initially consideration was given to using both 201 and 205 Annex Road for stormwater management. However, 205 Annex Road (the former SCIRT site) was not considered to offer value for money from a treatment perspective due to the high cost of the land, and optimisation of the 201 Annex Road site was undertaken to ensure significant treatment could still occur. However, this means that treatment areas at the 201 Annex Road site need to fully occupy the site and this increases the number of tree removals required and also constrains the public amenity potential at the site.

Landscape Plan

5.11    The proposed stormwater basin and wetland is based on Council’s six-values approach to stormwater management and will provide enhanced values to both the site and the catchment across:

·     drainage

·     culture

·     ecology

·     heritage

·     landscape

·     recreation

5.12    The landscape plans are included as Attachment A. The concept is for the first flush basin to be managed as a marsh area, followed by a treatment wetland (Figure 3). A low flow channel through both the first flush basin and the wetland will allow the base flow to pass through the facility with minimal evaporation and heat transfer while also allowing for fish passage to be maintained.

Figure 3 Curletts Basin site layout

 

5.13    The outer perimeter of the site down to the basin’s wetland edge will primarily be planted as a dense native woodland for erosion control, shelter, native bush bird habitat, and shading of the water to minimise water temperature gain and maximise aquatic habitat values. The approximately 40,000 m² of new native woodland will be dominated by upper canopy tree species such as kahikatea, matai, and totara, and smaller tree species such as kowhai, kanuka, manuka, ti kouka and pittosporum. This area of native woodland planting will also be an important addition to the wider Wigram Basin and Nga Puna Wai areas of native plant habitat.

5.14    Within the first flush basin, wetland and along the wet edge a range of  lower native grasses, sedges, ground covers and ferns will contribute to the stormwater treatment function of the wetland, provide shade and habitat for aquatic life, and allow for views across the wetland and first flush pond areas. The area planted with this mix is approximately 58,000 m².

5.15    Walking tracks around the wetland will enhance local recreation opportunities, while access will be provided from Curletts Road, Annex Road and Mokihi Gardens. Views in to, across, and out of the site will be managed through appropriate siting of plant mixes and open style fencing where required. A series of access points to the wetland edge will be provided for both public and maintenance use. A shared cycle/pedestrian path will link the Annex Road Major Cycle Route to the path network around the Mokihi Gardens subdivision.

Tree Removals

5.16    A tree assessment has been carried out within the project areas to assess the condition of the trees, and inform the design to minimise potential adverse effects on trees that are healthy and structurally sound (refer to Attachment B, the tree report from Arbor Vitae Ltd, dated 29 January 2018).

5.17    The condition of each tree was evaluated using the Christchurch City Council tree assessment system.  During the tree survey, the results for individual trees were documented but some of the trees were assessed as groups with estimated quantities and dominant condition ratings.  The site is currently managed as farmland, and none of the trees to be removed are listed in the Council tree asset database. 

5.18    The tree removals to be undertaken in the Curletts Basin site are within the areas shown in Figure 4.  Approximately 107 healthy and structurally sound trees removal within the areas shown on the plan.  Full details are provided in Attachment B.

Figure 4 Curletts Basin Tree Removals

 

5.19    Due to site constraints, including the relatively small size of the available area in relation to stormwater management requirements and high water table limiting the depth of excavation possible, the extent of earthworks required will result in the removal of all existing trees within the stormwater and wetland site.

5.20    Area 1 includes a row of Lombardy Poplar trees in which is located near the western boundary of the site.  The removal of these trees will allow both the flood mitigation (storage) and water quality treatment capacity of the basin to be maximised. If these trees were not removed then both these objectives would be compromised.

5.21    The trees within Area 2 require removal as the project will involve realigning Curletts Stream to maximise the water quality treatment provided by the site.  The dominant trees within this area include exotic species such as Willow, Radiata Pine, Black Poplar and Silver Birch, and there is also a small area of young native tree and shrub plantings near the motorway culvert at the northern end of the stream.

5.22    The extent of earthworks required to form the basin will result in the removal of the trees and vegetation along the existing stream alignment within Area 3. However, as far as possible the existing trees in the southern third of Area 3 will be retained, but this will be dependent on construction footprint required. The dominant trees within these areas include exotic species such as Willow, Radiata Pine, Black Poplar and Silver Birch.

5.23    Remaining trees within the vicinity of the site, including along the Curletts Road frontage and in the southern corner of the site, will be retained and receive appropriate physical protection during the implementation of the construction works.  To achieve this, further arboricultural assessments and recommendations will be required during the works to ensure that appropriate tree protection measures are implemented.

6.   Option 1 - Approve the landscape plan and tree removals (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       This option allows for tree removals to take place to facilitate the water quality treatment and flood protection provided by the works.

6.2       This option will result in the formation of a first flush basin and wetland and the removal of:

·   Approximately 107 healthy and structurally sound trees within the Curletts Basin Utility Reserve (noting that due to the dense grouping of trees it is not possible to accurately quantify the total number)

·   Approximately 41 trees that are unhealthy or structurally unsound.

Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are to seek approval from the Community Board for the landscape plan and tree removals.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Engagement with the adjacent residents is ongoing.

6.7       In terms of the wider community, at community meetings held in October 2017 the views expressed were that flood mitigation works are required and that the current level of flood risk is unacceptable. Residents have reported high levels of anxiety in anticipation of further flooding.

6.8       Water quality improvement is a significant issue for the community and the improvements provided by these basins will contribute to achieving healthy waterways.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.9       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.10    Cost of Implementation - The cost of the landscape planting and removal of the trees is included within the construction of this project and there is no additional cost above that already approved.

6.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – The ongoing maintenance costs of the first flush basin and wetland will be higher than the cost of the grazed land at present.

6.12    Funding source – Curletts Basin is funded from CPMS ID 45455.

Legal Implications

6.13    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

6.14    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations  

6.15    There is a risk that tree removals or landscape plan are not approved.  This may result in additional costs and time delays arising from redesign.

6.15.1 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) is implemented will be low.

6.15.2 The current treatment is to seek approval from the Community Board and provide sufficient information for them to make an informed decision.

Implementation

6.16    Implementation dependencies - Implementation is dependent on approval from the Community Board.

6.17    Implementation timeframe - If approval is obtained then the works will begin in March 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   Enables flood protection works to proceed without delay

·   Water quality enhancement provided through the creation of treatment wetlands

·   Increased native tree and vegetation planting

·   The proposed planting plan will result in an increase in the native vegetation area and improve the amenity value of the land

·   Provides a formed path connection between Annex Road cycleway and the existing cycle and pedestrian pathway between Mokihi Gardens and Curletts Road

6.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   The removal of approximately 107 trees that are in a good and fair condition

·   Immediate loss of tree cover and amenity where this occurs

7.   Option 2 - Decline the landscape plan and tree removals

Option Description

7.1       This option involves declining the landscape plan and removal of the trees. The facility will need to be redesigned to accommodate changes and will result in a delay to the delivery of the flood protection and water quality benefits.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are likely to require community consultation to gather further information about the views and preferences of the community.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Declining the landscape plan and tree removals impacts the delivery of the facilities and delay to the flood mitigation and water quality benefits of the works. This is not consistent with the feedback received to date on community views and preferences.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.6.1   Inconsistency - Level of Service: 14.1.5 Implement Land Drainage Recovery Programme works to reduce flooding would not be fully implemented.

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - the Upper Heathcote storage scheme cannot be fully implemented.

7.6.3   Amendment necessary - the design would require revision and further options would need to be investigated.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – the cost of re-design has not been quantified but could be significant.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – no change from the current situation.

7.9       Funding source – Curletts Basin is funded from CPMS ID 45455.

Legal Implications

7.10    There is not a legal context, issue or implication relevant to this decision.

7.11    This report has not been reviewed and approved by the Legal Services Unit.

Risks and Mitigations

7.12    There is a risk that the project will be delayed and incur additional design costs if approval is declined.  This may result in a delay to the delivery of the flood mitigation and water quality benefits.

7.12.1 Residual risk rating: The residual rating of the risk after the below treatment(s) is implemented will be Medium.

7.12.2 The planned treatment is to seek approval to continue the main basin earthworks outside of tree removal areas so that the contract can begin and make use of better weather conditions. While this part of the earthworks is undertaken then further development of the landscape plan and required tree removals can continue.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies  - Redesign and Community Board approval

7.14    Implementation timeframe - Re-design may take a period of several months

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   No immediate loss of tree cover

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Delay to the project delivery by up to two months design time, and potentially further delays due to working in the wetter winter period

·   Higher risk of extending the works further into the wetter winter period

·   Reduction in treatment and flood storage capacity of the wetlands and basins due to reducing the area available for use by retaining areas with trees

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Curletts Stormwater Basin Landscape Plan

2

b

Curletts Stormwater Basin and Wetland Tree Report - 29 January 2018

2

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Peter Christensen - Senior Water Engineer

Matt Jackson - Project Manager

Approved By

Keith Davison - Manager Land Drainage

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

John Mackie - Head of Three Waters and Waste

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

12.    Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Area Report - February 2018

Reference:

18/93450

Contact:

Arohanui Grace

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

7592

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

This report provides information on initiatives and issues current within the Community Board area, to provide the Board with a strategic overview and inform sound decision making.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board:

1.         Receives the Area Update for February 2018.

2.         Agrees to hold the 2018 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Pride Garden Awards Ceremony on Tuesday 27 March 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Cashmere Club, Sydenham Room.

3.         Agrees to hold the 2018 Spreydon-Cashmere Edible Garden Awards Ceremony will be held on Tuesday 17 April 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Old Stone House.

4.         Agrees to include the following matters in its report to Council:

·    The re-opening of the Old Stone House

·    Community Seminar on Alcohol Related Matters

 

 

 

3.   Community Board Activities and Forward Planning

3.1       Upcoming Meetings:

Community Seminar regarding Alcohol licensing, Tuesday 20 February 2018, 5pm.

Joint Spreydon-Cashmere/Banks Peninsula Community Boards Meeting, Friday 2 March 12.30pm- 5.00pm   at Beckenham. 

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Meeting, Tuesday 6 March 2018, 5pm.

3.2       Memos/Information/Advice to the Board

3.2.1   Climbing Boulders

A deputation to the meeting to the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board on 2 August 2016, suggested that climbing boulders be installed on areas of public land to help replace what was lost to the sport of rock climbing through rock face collapse during the earthquakes.  The Board decided to request that staff investigate and provide advice on the installation of climbing boulders on suitable in the area.

Staff have now responded (see attached memorandum) advising that a climbing boulder is to be installed in Barrington Park as part of the playground renewal.  There is further advice that there are a number of sites in the Spreydon-Cashmere ward where climbing boulders could be installed including the installation of individual climbing boulders as part of playground renewals included in the Long Term Plans.  There is, however, currently no funding for a specific Spreydon-Cashmere Climbing Boulder Park. The estimated cost of such a project is approximately $120,000 over two financial years; $20,000 would be required for site investigation and selection, community engagement and detailed design in the first year and $100,000 for construction and installation in the second year.

3.2.2   Cultural Development

Cultural development workshop(s) are currently underway for elected members of the Council and local Community Boards.  The aim of the workshops is to familiarise and educate Councillors and Community Board members with Maori process and protocols, especially when welcoming and greeting groups to a deputation or presentation at the Council or local board.

The Community Governance team in partnership with the Ngāi Tahu/Māori relationship advisors seek to advise and embed a process and protocol that can be utilised consistently by community board members and Councillors.

Recent gifting of Maori names to the Community Boards has been a catalyst to deliver specific training and support to community boards and Council, further strengthening and promoting local area knowledge and understanding by local board members and Councillors.

3.2.3   Coronation Hall

Staff have advised that Coronation Hall has been included in a public engagement process seeking interested people or groups who may want have a use for a number of our heritage buildings across the city. The engagement period commences on 16 February with a memorandum to the Board on Thursday 15 February providing more information about this process.

The Coronation Hall has been included in this public engagement process as it requires funding to repair the building and the future use of the building needs to comply with the reserve classification of the land. There has been some interest in the past from groups of people who would like to use the Hall. The process that is about to start on Friday 16 February 2018 will give everybody interested in the building an opportunity to express their interest and to supply information for any applications to be considered. There will be more information coming to the Board over the next week or so on the public engagement process.

 

3.3       Board area Consultations/Engagement/Submission opportunities

3.3.1   Nothing to report.

 

3.4       Annual Plan and Long Term Plan matters

3.4.1   Nothing to report.

 

3.5       Board Reporting

3.5.1   The Board is asked to consider which matters it would like include in its report to Council, including the following:

·    The re-opening of the Old Stone House

·    Community Seminar on Alcohol Related Matters

 

3.6       Requests for information from Board meeting on Newsline

3.6.1   The Board is asked to consider which matters it would like suggest as articles for the Council’s Newsline and /or the Community Board Newsletter.

 

4.   Community Board Plan – Update against Outcomes

4.1       Community Board Plan Review

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan 2017-19 adopted last year outlines local issues, ambitions and concerns that the Board plans to address, pursue and try to resolve.  Work is already underway on a number of these matters and a process of reviewing the progress made to date and considering what still needs to be done is about to get underway with a workshop on 23 February 2018.

4.2       City Sounds

A metropolitan event - City Sounds is to be held in Victoria Park on 24 March 2018 between 12-1:30pm. See 6.1 of this report.

5.   Significant Council Projects in the Board Area

5.1       Strengthening Community Fund Projects

5.1.1   Spreydon-Cashmere Strengthening Communities Grants End of Project Summary Report

A report summarising the results of projects for which Strengthening Communities grants were provided is attached.

5.2       Other partnerships with the community and organisations

5.2.1   Manuka Cottage

The tendering process for the design and build of the new Manuka Cottage on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve has commenced.  Tenders were required to be submitted by 7 February 2018. Two tenders were received and the evaluation process to determine the successful tenderer is currently underway.

5.3       Community Facilities (updates and future plans)

5.3.1   Old Stone House

The Old Stone House was re-opened on 7 February 2018 following a two million dollar Restoration.  First built in 1870 by Sir John Cracroft Wilson as worker accommodation the building was partially destroyed by fire in 1971.  Through the efforts of community members it was rebuilt in 1979 and became a much-loved and well used community facility for meetings, craft groups, clubs and as a premiere wedding and function venue. Damage sustained in the February 2011 earthquake forced closure of the building.

The Old Stone House required extensive repairs and earthquake strengthening work to be done to meet 67 percent of the New Building Standard.  The work included installing new diaphragm walls and roof connections, deconstruction and reconstruction of the chimneys, replacement of the stone lintels and sealing the concrete walls and foundations with pressure injected epoxy. 

The Mayor officially reopened the building at a ceremony attended by descendants of the original owners and occupants among others.

5.3.2   Pioneer Recreation and Sport Facility

Repair of the earthquake damage to Pioneer stadium and pool complex is currently underway. Repairs to the Recreation pool area closed in December are not expected to be completed until April 2018.

 

5.4       Infrastructure projects underway

5.4.1   Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation - Stage 1 Landscape Plan and Tree Removals

Work has commenced on the Ōpāwaho/Heathcote River Bank Stabilisation - Stage 1 Landscape Plan and Tree Removals approved late last year.

 

5.5       Events Report back

5.5.1   Nothing to report

 

6.   Significant Community Issues, Events and Projects in the Board Area

6.1       City Sounds

At its meeting on 8 December 2017 the Board requested that staff arrange a City Sounds event to be held in Victoria Park, or another venue within the Spreydon-Cashmere area if Victoria Park proves unsuitable, on a Sunday afternoon in early 2018.  The request was in line with an objective in the Community Board Plan to host a metropolitan event in the Board area.

The City Sounds programme of events sponsored by “The Hits” radio station provides local bands, musicians and buskers the opportunity to perform in various locations across the city. It started in December 2017 and will continue until the end of March 2018.  An event is planned to be held in Victoria Park on 24 March 2018 between 12-1:30pm.  The event will provide good music and an opportunity for people from across the city to come together to enjoy the music, games and barbecue food.  The event will be well promoted.

6.2       Alcohol Licensing

Local residents have for some time expressed interest in the licensing of alcohol outlets in the area.  The Board therefore took the opportunity to invite resident association representatives to attend the Safer Christchurch Governance Group forum on Reducing Alcohol Related Harm held in December 2018.  Board members, local staff, and residents all found the forum informative and useful. The Board plans to follow up with a local community alcohol seminar on 20 February 2018 to provide residents with an opportunity to hear about the process for licensing the sale of alcohol and how they may become involved in the consideration of applications.

Faced with a local alcohol retail application that required feedback to be provided prior to February the Spreydon Neighbour Network has held its own seminar for its residents harnessing the expertise of contacts made via the Safer Christchurch Governance Group forum.  This provided information on the licensing process including submissions and hearings to assist those considering their response to the application.

6.3       Community Events Project

Local staff are currently working on developing a framework for a project to deliver a programme of community events sponsored by the Board.  This will be put to the Board for consideration.


 

 

6.4       Spreydon-Cashmere Garden Awards Ceremonies

6.4.1   Spreydon-Cashmere Community Pride Garden Awards

It is proposed that this year’s Spreydon-Cashmere Community Pride Garden Awards Ceremony will be held on Tuesday 27 March 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Cashmere Club, Sydenham Room.

6.4.2   Spreydon-Cashmere Edible Garden Awards

It is proposed that this year’s Spreydon-Cashmere Edible Garden Awards Ceremony will be held on Tuesday 17 April 2018, 5.30pm - 7.30pm at the Old Stone House

 

7.   Parks, Sports and Recreation Update (bi-monthly)

7.1       The Spreydon/Cashmere Neighbourhood and Sports Parks Update is attached.

8.   Community Board funding budget overview and clarification

8.1       Funding update attached.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Climbing Boulder Memo

2

b

2016-17 Spreydon-Cashmere STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES GRANTS End of Project Summary Report

2

c

Funding Update February 2018

2

d

Parks Spreydon-Cashmere bi-monthly update

2

 

 

Signatories

Author

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

  


Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

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Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

16 February 2018

 

 

13.  Elected Members’ Information Exchange

 

This item provides an opportunity for Board Members to update each other on recent events and/or issues of relevance and interest to the Board.

 

 

 



[1] Margetts, B, et.al. (2016, July 21). Surface Water Quality Monitoring Report for Christchurch City Waterways: January – December 2015.  Christchurch City Council.