(Draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan

Hearings Panel

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

A Hearings Panel meeting will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Friday 2 February 2018

Time:                                    10.00am

Venue:                                 Akaroa Sports Pavilion, Rue Lavaud, Akaroa

 

 

Panel

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor David East

Third member – To be confirmed

 

 

29 January 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Liz Ryley

Committee and Hearings Advisor

941 8153

liz.ryley@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

 

 


Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 4  

2.       Election of a Chairperson......................................................................................................... 4

STAFF REPORTS

3.       Hearings Panel Report - Takapūneke Reserve Draft Management Plan.............................. 5   

4.       Hearing of Submissions........................................................................................................... 73

5.       Hearing Panel Consideration and Deliberation.................................................................... 73 

 

 

 


Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Election of Chairperson   


Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

 

3.        Hearings Panel Report - Takapūneke Reserve Draft Management Plan

Reference:

18/61912

Contact:

Russel Wedge

russel.wedge@ccc.govt.nz

03 941 8270

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Hearings Panel to be informed of the submissions received and staff comments for the (Draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan.

1.2       At the Banks Peninsula Community Board meeting of 9 October 2017 the Board resolved BKCB/2017/00140 to:

Approve the release of the (draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan for public consultation commencing 11 October 2017 until 5pm 15 December 2017 as per the Reserves Act 1977 section 41 and invite persons and interested organisations to submit written submissions.

 

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Hearings Panel:

1.         Receive the information in the Hearings Panel Report – (Draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan, dated 2017.

2.         Consider all the submissions received for the (Draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan through the public consultation process and make their recommendations for the revised and finalised Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan to Council for adoption.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       The (Draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan (referred to as draft management plan) was released for public consultation on Wednesday 11 October 2017 and closed on Friday 15 December 2018. 

3.2       Twenty seven written submissions were received (please note the numbering of the submissions is not sequential due to the type of database being used). Ten submitters have confirmed they would like be heard by the Hearings Panel.

3.3       All of the submitters were in support of the draft management plan. Just under 50 percent of the submitters were concerned with the draft management plan’s reference to the possibility of a future of a car park and bus turning area being constructed on Beach Road by the Akaroa Sewerage Treatment Plant. The submitters were concerned the construction of these facilities would result in an increase of vehicles along Beach Road, which could result in safety issues for walkers and cyclists as the road is narrow in places and there is no footpath or road kerb.

3.4       Under the Reserves Act 1977 the reserve management plan can only focus on the reserve areas collectively referred to as Takapūneke Reserve in the plan. Although Beach Road is outside the jurisdiction of the draft reserve management plan, the future development of Takapūneke Reserve does have implications on Beach Road as this will be one of the main routes for people to access the reserve. Beach Road is a legal road and is open to anybody to use it and at any time. One of the main purposes of the draft management plan is to provide direction for the management and future development of the reserve, and it could be considered irresponsible of the Council if the management plan did not raise any future issues that could affect the community through the future development of the reserve. 

3.5       If a car park was required on Beach Road for visitors to the reserve, research into the requirements and implications of road widening, footpaths and kerbs would need to be undertaken as well as the existing condition of the road, including future budget requirements approved in the Long Term Plan (LTP). There is no funding or timeline in the LTP for any future development of a car park or upgrading of Beach Road that is associated with Takapūneke Reserve.

4.   Submissions with Staff Comments

4.1       The submissions below are organised in the order the submitters are to be heard. Staff comments have been included against the points raised by the submitters for the Hearings Panel’s consideration.

Submission Number and Submitters Name

Staff Comments

12 - Banks Peninsula Community Board

The Banks Peninsula Community Board appreciates the opportunity to make a submission on the Draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan (Draft Plan).

The Board's statutory role is, “to represent, and act as an advocate for, the interests of its community” (Local Government Act 2002, section 52). The Board provides this submission in its capacity as a representative of the communities around Banks Peninsula.

Takapūneke has immense cultural heritage value. Up until the mid-19thcentury, this was a major trading post. In 1830 many Ngāi Tahu people were massacred here, with assistance from a British ship. In response the British Government appointed an official resident to discourage any further atrocities. This was the first formal intervention by Britain in New Zealand, and led to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Surviving Ngāi Tahu considered Takapūneke to be tapu and resettled at Ōnuku, meaning ‘at a distance’.

The Board supports the Draft Plan as it acknowledges this value and puts in place a plan for how to preserve this area for future generations. Given Takapūneke’s national significance, the Board strongly supports the Council’s intent to seek National Reserve Status. Adoption of the Draft Plan is a prerequisite for an application for this status.

The Board commends the Council for forming a successful partnership with Ōnuku Rūnanga to develop the Draft Plan. This recognises the strong connection between the Rūnanga and the land at Takapūneke as well as the Rūnanga’s future involvement in the management and development of the area as part of the governance body

 

Acknowledge the support of the Community Board and their support through the process.

18 - Suky Thompson

I thank the Christchurch City Council and Ōnuku Runanga for the preparation of the draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan and acknowledge the work and thought that has been put into its development. I support the concepts of the Reserve Management Plan as laid out and acknowledge the Mana Whenua of Ōnuku Runanga over this sensitive and significant site.

My submission addresses only the linkages between Akaroa and the Reserve, specifically the need for pedestrian access to be given consideration in the plan as well as vehicular access. I have been involved with promotion of walking access in Akaroa for 20 years, as author of walking publications, as a walking guide, and as manager of the Rod Donald Banks Peninsula Trust. I also chair the nearby Garden of Tane Reserve Management Committee, a reserve principally accessed on foot.

I suggest that the Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan include another map setting Takapūneke into the context of Akaroa township and showing its proximity to the main Wharf, Garden of Tane, cemeteries and Britomart Monument and the roads and walking routes that link them together.

The draft Plan proposes vehicular access with a car park off Ōnuku Road and a car park and turning area on Beach Road, with upgrades to Beach Road to accommodate visitor buses and vehicles. It is silent on the matter of pedestrian or cycling access.

Both Beach Road and Ōnuku Road have been used for walking for many years.  Pedestrians have enjoyed a stroll from the Akaroa town centre along the Beach Road waterfront to the Lighthouse and beyond through the Glen, on what was once known as the Lovers Walk. In more recent times the route has been promoted as the Lighthouse and Monument walking circuit, returning via Ōnuku Road and a link track to the Anglican Cemetery. Once the Takapūneke Reserve has been developed with interpretation and walking tracks, it will provide a natural extension to this walk. It may also prove popular as a short cycle from Akaroa.

I submit that upgrading Beach Road to encourage access to Takapūneke by vehicles including buses will degrade the experience of this peaceful area for walkers, including those wishing to reflect at Takapūneke. I suggest that policies 5.10 (2) and (5) are reworded to indicate that Beach Road is made more pedestrian friendly, promoted as the walk to Takapūneke, and vehicles are discouraged.

I support vehicular access to Takapūneke from Ōnuku Road and the concept of a car park on the landfill site, and suggest that this is where vehicular traffic should be principally directed. Ōnuku Road is a sealed through road, leading on to Ōnuku where many people in vehicles may also wish to visit. I suggest that Management Plan expresses that the Ōnuku Road entrance is the principal entrance to the Reserve. I would also like to see it include a policy to upgrade Ōnuku Road with a footpath between the Anglican Cemetery Track and the Takapūneke site to encourage pedestrian access to Takapūneke via the loop route, particularly if vehicular activity on this road increases once the Reserve is developed.

I suggest that if the Red House becomes part of the Reserve later and there is support for its development as a major visitor facility, then good walking access should be provided (perhaps with a stairlift for disabled people) from the Ōnuku car park to this facility.

I apologise for making a late submission and trust that it will be accepted, arriving as it will at the start of the first working day since the submission period closed.  I wish to be heard in support of my submission.

Acknowledge the support for the Reserve Management Plan.

 

It would not be appropriate to include a map that includes roads and walking routes of the surrounding areas outside the Takapūneke Reserve.  The focus of the Reserve Management Plan prepared under the Reserves Act 1977 can only be on the area identified in the (draft) Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan.

There are walking maps produced for Akaroa and this would be the appropriate document to show linkages and walking tracks to Takapūneke Reserve.

 

Signs indicating walking tracks to Takapūneke Reserves from adjoining roads and key locations could certainly be suggested by the submitter to the Christchurch City Council if they are on legal road or within land administered by the Council.

 

Beach Road is a legal road and outside the jurisdiction of the Reserve Management Plan.

 

The future of the Akaroa Sewage Treatment Plan is uncertain l change at some time in the future. The future of the Red House in relation to the City Council is also uncertain.

 

The car park off Ōnuku Road will provide good access and view from the top of the reserve. The car park proposed for Beach Road will provide different experiences and access to the lower part of the reserve. People with disabilities or the elderly will probably find it difficult to walk up and down the side of the hills in the reserve.

10 - Mary Smillie

While I think the ideas for the park are very satisfactory in that they keep the area quiet and natural and seem to be in line with Ōnuku Runanga's wishes, I am very concerned with the proposition to put a car park near the sewage plant for these reasons. Firstly Beach Road is often busy with children, yachties, swimmers, walkers, canoers and boaties crossing backwards and forwards to the beach, and visitors having picnics on the verges. More traffic and especially buses would cause a serious safety risk in summer with accidents waiting to happen.

I would hate to see this go ahead both for safety reasons as above and as it would mean the end of the historically special nature of the area -the beautiful quiet peaceful part of Akaroa. My place would no longer be the haven it is with the sight and noise of many more cars, and buses going by. It may even cause a reduction in bird numbers. Akaroa has become changed and damaged enough. Let’s not let it get any worse.

Along with these concerns I think it would be very difficult if not impossible to improve the corner by the lighthouse, the cliff which is already crumbling badly and the cemetery trees threatening to fall onto the road. The corner before the Red House also would appear to be impossible to widen and if Beach Road was to be upgraded it would surely cost many millions of dollars which could better be spent elsewhere.

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

 

Takapūneke Reserve is a very special place and it is an important part of our history. Visitors and residents should have the opportunity to visit and appreciate the significance of the reserve, this will mean an increase in people and their means of transport.

 

The draft management plan includes Objective 5.7 Animals, Birds and Invertebrates to increase the number of plants that will encourage more bird and native life back to the reserve.

6 - John Wilson

I support almost all the practical detail of the draft management plan.

But in one very important respect the plan falls short by failing to give adequate recognition to the unique and national historical significance of Takapuneke.

What I have to say must not be construed as questioning the primary importance of the site to Ōnuku and Ngai Tahu as a place where many of their tupuna were slaughtered. But Takapuneke has historical significance greater than that of similar sites where great slaughter occurred during the Musket Wars. Examples of such sites are Pukerangiora (Te Ati Awa), Lake Horowhenua (Muaupoko) and Matakitaki Pa (Waikato). These are only three of the best-known of the very many Musket Wars sites where there were massacres. Each of these sites is as important to the iwi concerned as Takapuneke is to Ngai Tahu, for the same reasons.

Takapuneke and Greens Point
What distinguishes Takapuneke from these other sites is that the massacre there, unlike the massacres at the other sites, was a key event in the story of the acquisition by the British of sovereignty over New Zealand. Takapuneke therefore has significance in other vital ways besides being a place of mourning and remembrance for the local hapu and iwi. Takapuneke is unique because a direct line can be drawn from the events that occurred there in November 1830 to the events of 1840 “the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi at Waitangi in February and, locally, the signing of the Treaty at Ōnuku in May and the demonstration of British sovereignty (the event commemorated at Greens Point) in August.

It is this connection between the events of 1830 and those of 1840 that give Takapuneke its national significance and its significance to those Pakeha who value that New Zealand is, or aspires to be, a truly bi-cultural nation. Acknowledging that the connection gives Takapuneke additional importance does not diminish the crucial, and primary, importance of the site as a sacred place of remembrance to Ōnuku and Ngai Tahu.

I recognise that there is a passing reference to the Treaty of Waitangi on page 19 of the Draft Management Plan and that on page 23 there is a clear statement that the heritage interpretation of Takapuneke will cover the site’s Maori and European history and that the special relationship of the events at Takapuneke to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi will be explained in the interpretation. I note also that on page 35 of the Draft Plan it is stated that the Ōnuku Rūnanga and the Christchurch City Council (and by extension, I presume, the people of Christchurch of all ethnicities whom the Council represents) connect to the reserve in different ways with an implication that the different ways people connect to the reserve will all be respected.

Only the latter two of these three statements pertain directly to the wider historical significance of Takapuneke. Both occur relatively late in the Draft Plan giving the impression (I presume inadvertently) that recognition of the broader historical importance is a subsidiary afterthought. I believe the Draft Plan needs to be re-written in parts to give the wider, national, historical significance of the site greater weight in the management of the reserve.

The statement in the Draft Plan I found most troubling occurs on page 8, where it is stated that the Britomart Memorial ˜is not considered by the Ōnuku Rūnanga to be part of their cultural heritage of Takapūneke”. I do not question the right of the Rūnanga to define what ˜their cultural heritage of Takapūneke” is. But the Britomart Memorial is a key part of the national historical heritage of Takapuneke. Recognition of this does not, I need to repeat, mean that “outsider” are telling Ōnuku what their cultural heritage is, but is essential for proper interpretation of the site, and to make an effective argument for national reserve status for Takapuneke. Ideally, the Britomart Memorial and the small reserve on which it stands should be included, seamlessly, within the Takapuneke Reserve. The prior Conservation Report on Takapuneke makes the importance of the connection between Takapuneke as the site of the massacre and Greens Point as the probable site of the British demonstration of sovereignty abundantly clear.

I think it is necessary for the statement that the Britomart Memorial ˜is not considered by the Ōnuku Rūnanga to be part of their cultural heritage of Takapūneke” to be followed immediately by a statement that, however, the two sites have a most important historical connection that should be recognised by including Greens Point and the Britomart Memorial in the Takapuneke Reserve.

I think it is also necessary that the outline of Mana Whenua values on pages 16 to 19 of the Draft Plan be followed by a statement of the national historical values of Takapuneke.

I note that the Draft Plan envisages continuing to pursue the goal of having the status of Takapuneke raised to that of a national historic reserve. I think it will be difficult to justify that status for Takapuneke if it is treated as ˜just” one of the number of Musket Wars massacre sites, but easy to justify that status if Takapuneke is seen as significant to both the local iwi (for one set of reasons) and to the nation as a whole (for another set of reasons).

(I would emphasise that the word ˜just” is not meant to deprecate or diminish the significance of what happened at Takapuneke to the people of Ōnuku.)

Whether the Britomart Memorial should be incorporated into the Takapuneke Reserve may seem like a relatively minor point, but I believe that incorporation is essential “both to ensure interpretation of the site is historically accurate and complete and to justify the argument that Takapuneke should become a national historic reserve.

The ˜Red House” property
The Draft Plan is not, to my mind, decisive enough about the eventual incorporation into the Takapuneke Reserve of two other parcels of land. The inclusion of the Red House property in the Reserve is an objective of the Plan, but elsewhere it is stated that the Red House property will be obtained by the Council “if possible”. The final Plan should state clearly that the Council will obtain the Red House property when it comes onto the market and that it will take immediate steps to attempt to secure a right of first refusal from the current owner.

The intention of not incorporating the property into the reserve to allow for a wider scope of activities and uses is sensible but to my mind poses the risk that at some time in the future activities and uses which are not compatible with the cultural and historical values of Takapuneke could be undertaken on the property. The Plan should state (I am not sure exactly how that would be done but believe it is possible) that the land will be given an underlying status as a reserve so that there is no risk of future alienation of the land once the Council has acquired it and no risk of activities and uses of the land or buildings on it which could violate the cultural and historical values of the Reserve and in particular infringe on the Mana Whenua values as laid out on pages 16 to 19 of the Draft Plan.

The sewage treatment plant land and road reserve
I believe the final Plan should also state that the Council will include the land at present occupied by the Akaroa sewage treatment plant in the Reserve once the plant has been decommissioned.  The Draft Plan is not definite enough on this point. The final Plan should also state that interpretation on the former site of the sewage treatment plant will be forthright in stating that the use of the land for that purpose was culturally offensive and that the Council regrets the hurt and affront to mana whenua values caused by siting the plant on that land.

I note also that the road around the water’s edge is to remain a legal road. The Draft Plan seems not to address whether special by-laws or some other means of controlling use of and behaviour on the road reserve and the foreshore below the road reserve are needed. I think it should at least be raised in the final plan whether, because of the very special status of the Takapuneke Reserve, some special controls over the road reserve and foreshore should be recommended to the Council or to some other appropriate authority.

Other particular points
Although I have expressed serious concerns about one fundamental point in the Draft Plan (the absence of a clear statement of the national historic values of the reserve to be read in conjunction with the statements about Mana Whenua values on pages 16 to 19 of the Draft Plan), and have suggested that the final Plan be decisive about the incorporation into the Reserve of the Britomart Memorial Reserve and the sewage treatment plant land and more definite about the acquisition by the Council of the Red House property and its legal status subsequent to its becoming Council property, I can see no reason to question, and am happy to support, most of the specific objectives and policies in the Draft Plan.
Specifically:
1. I think the proposed division of the Reserve into three parts which will be managed differently is an admirable solution to what I thought would be a very difficult problem, marrying the need to respect Takapuneke as a place sacred to the Ōnuku Rūnanga with allowing an acceptable level of public access and use and being able to erect on-site interpretation.
2. Co-governance of the Reserve by the Ōnuku Rūnanga and the Christchurch City Council is entirely appropriate for Takapuneke, with the proviso that City Council representation on the governing body or committees set up under it include representatives of the wider local Akaroa or Banks Peninsula community.

3. The proposed use of the former immigration barracks for education, learning and training is exactly what should be done with a building which is historic and must be preserved but which is, in a sense, not related to the key cultural and historic values of Takapuneke.

4. Cultural harvesting in the areas of the Reserve which are to be replanted is entirely appropriate in a Reserve which has been set aside for cultural and historical reasons, not to protect existing natural values.

5. I was pleased to see recognition that the maintenance of view shafts from different vantage points on the Reserve is crucial to effective on-site interpretation. Only if those view shafts are protected will it be possible to properly include Tuhiraki and Onawe in the stories told to visitors to the Reserve, as they need to be.

Specific recommendations
I would like to see the following changes made before the Draft Plan is formally adopted:

1. A concise statement to be placed immediately after the section on Mana Whenua values of the national historical values of Takapuneke, which is needed to inform and make fully intelligible later sections of the Plan, notably the sections on the need for interpretation to reflect the dual significance of Takapuneke and the sections in which elevation of the status of Takapuneke to a national historic reserve is envisaged. The statement on the Reserves national historic values should acknowledge that these values are subordinate to the Mana Whenua values of Takapuneke but still of great importance in guiding management of the Reserve.

2. That it be a stated policy to include the Britomart Memorial and the small reserve on which it stands in the Takapuneke Reserve.

3. That it be clearly stated that the City Council will acquire the Red House property and that the property will be given a status which ensures that whatever activities and uses are made of the land and the buildings on it are compatible with the Mana Whenua values of Takapuneke.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan Project Group did discuss how much of the historic events should be included in the draft management plan and decided the management plan should refer to the Takapūneke Conservation Report, which provide in-depth information on European history. 

 

The Project Group did not want the draft management plan to duplicate or try and provide a cut-down version of the historic events, which might have unintentionally offended a group or person not mentioned.

 

The decision was made by the Project Group to refer people to the Conservation Report for further historic information.

 

 

The draft management plan respects the past but is focused on the future management and development of the reserve. The Takapūneke Conservation Report recognises and discusses in detail the historic significance of the past events associated to the reserve.

 

The management plan is prepared under the Reserves Act 1977 and can only focus on the area of land identified within the management plan. The Conservation Report addresses the wider, national historical significance of the site.

 

The Britomart Memorial historical significance is to be recorded in its own Conservation Plan and management plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The mana whenua values (page 16) are appropriate and relevant to the future management and development of Takapūneke Reserve. The mana whenua values are related to the spiritual beliefs of Māori and their culture as part of their lives. The national historical values of Takapūneke are related to the historic events that occurred in relation to Takapūneke. These are to be acknowledged and recognised through interpretation, signage and education.

 

The application for National status for Takapuneke Reserve should be considered in the wider context, using the Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan and the Takapuneke Conservation Report as the basis for the application.

 

The Red House property is privately owned and the Council has clearly indicated its intention to purchase the property, should it become available and the conditions of purchase are agreeable to the Council. 

 

 

Comments noted.

 

 

 

 

The Akaroa Sewage Treatment Plant is situated on a separate title of land. The current activity is in conflict with the Reserves Act 1977 and has not been included in the draft management plan. The intention is not to include it as part of the reserve in the future. For these reasons it has not been discussed and Objectives or Policies have not been included in the management plan.

 

 

 

 

Section 4, Mana Whenua Values explains the spiritual and cultural relationship between mana whenua (the people of the land) with Takapūneke Reserve.

 

The national historic values are recognised through the Historic Reserve classification, the recognition by the Historic New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

 

Support acknowledged

 

 

Comments noted

 

 

 

 

 

Support acknowledged

 

 

 

 

Comments noted

 

 

 

Comments noted

 

 

 

Specific recommendations:

1. Not supported. The Mana Whenua Values are related to the spiritual beliefs of Maori and their culture as part of their lives. The national historical values of Takapūneke are related to the historic events that occurred in relation to Takapuneke. These will be acknowledged and recognised through interpretation, signage and education.

 

2. Not supported for reasons stated above and as stated in draft management plan.

 

3. Acquisition of Red House not supported for reasons stated above.

Statement to be included that the use of land support mana whenua values – supported.

 

7 - Victoria Andrews on behalf of The Akaroa Civic Trust

Since 1999 the Akaroa Civic Trust has worked actively towards the protection and recognition of the land known as Takapuneke. The Trust has worked in close association with George Tikao, Ōnuku Rūnanga and historian Harry Evison.

 

The first public presentation which told the history of the land was given by Melany Tainui in November 2001 at the Civic Trust’s Annual General Meeting. Melany Tainui was joined by historian John Wilson who discussed the European importance of the site. The Civic Trust’s view has always been that the location is of national significance because it interweaves Maori and European bicultural history. The landscape tells a key chapter in the story of the founding of Aotearoa New Zealand as a modern nation. Events that took place along the shoreline and in the surrounding countryside in 1830 were contributing factors to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. If the site is to become a National Historic Reserve equal to Waitangi then it is imperative that due consideration also be given to creating a Britomart Memorial Management Plan. The two sites are inseparable from both the visual and the historic standpoints. They form a related visual context and specific setting with regard to the landscape. To not include a Management Plan for the Britomart Memorial at the time the proposal for National Reserve status is sent to the Minister of Conservation for consideration would diminish the status of the overall site as a National Reserve which is equal to Waitangi.

The points of the Trust’s submission are as follows.
The application to the Minister of Conservation should present the overall site with due consideration given to

a. The waste treatment area which is in the process of being decommissioned and relocated.

b. The foreshore area which is road reserve. The road reserve and shoreline feature are key components of the overall site.

c. It is important for ratepayers as well as visitors to understand that the red house and land will likely be incorporated into the Takapuneke reserve. Funding will be necessary to acquire the property, therefore it should be considered in the context of the Council’s Long Term Plan.

d. The Britomart Memorial and reserve area forms an integral part of the history of the site. As such it requires Conservation and Management Plans.

e. A map of proposed walkways, parking areas and access points would be helpful to define exactly what is being proposed in the draft Takapuneke Management Plan.

f. The draft Takapuneke Management Plan should be consistent with the Takapuneke Conservation Report 2012 with regard to bicultural history, heritage significance assessments, conservation principles and policies.

With all due respect to Ōnuku Rūnanga it is important for residents as well as visitors to fully understand the complexity and depth of bicultural history that is contained within the landscape.

The area around the foreshore is the location where cattle were first landed in the South Island. Farming is an integral part of the land’s history. This is important historically in terms of how the landscape is viewed.

Takapuneke is often viewed from boats out on the harbour. Important view shafts should be considered from the harbour to the land. Appropriate historic interpretation should be provided to tourism operators to ensure the accuracy of what visitors are told.

The Akaroa Civic Trust is generally supportive of the Draft Management Plan and acknowledges the importance of the area as a place of reflection and understanding for everyone involved as well as members of the public. The creation of a National Historic Reserve will bring about a greater understanding of the values of Ōnuku Rūnanga, Ngai Tahu as well as tell the bicultural history of the site. 

The Civic Trust considers it well-timed and auspicious that the Takapuneke management plan is being finalised in the year that sees the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Ngai Tahu Deed of Settlement and 20 years after the meeting house Karaweko was opened at Ōnuku Marae.

 

Acknowledge and thank the support of the Akaroa Civic Trust through the preparation of the draft management plan.

 

 

 

(a)  The application to the Minister of Conservation for national reserve status can mention in the background to Takapūneke Reserve reference to the Akaroa Sewage Treatment site but as this site is not part of the draft management plan it is not appropriate to include it in the overall management plan area.

(b)  There is historical significance of the road reserve and foreshore but they are outside the draft reserve management plan area.

(c)   If the red house was to become available for purchase by the Council the funding and amount would be confidential between the property owners and Council. Funding could not be shown or itemised in the LTP.

(d)  Agreed the Britomart Memorial would justify its own Conservation Plan and separate Management Plan.

(e)  Page 14, Item 2.4 Reserve Map – Takapūneke Reserve- Landscape Features indicates parking areas, access/entrance ways to the reserve. Proposed walkways could not be shown due to further investigation of the paths throughout the reserve is required. Objective 5.11 Access and Paths, 5.11.2 provides information on the path network and connections.

(f)   The Takapuneke Conservation Report’s principles and policies have been reviewed and incorporated into the draft management plan. The history of the reserve has not been repeated in the draft management plan as this document should be read in conjunction with the Conservation Plan. The reference to landing of cattle on the foreshore is covered in-depth in the Conservation Plan and the decision was made not to duplicate it in the management plan.

(g)  The view shafts from the harbour have been identified Objective 5.5 Key Viewing Areas and by maintaining these from the land it is intended to keep clear views into the reserve from the harbour.

 

27 - Jocelyn Davison & Richard Goord

It has only very recently come to our attention that there is a draft plan for the management of the Takapuneke Reserve.
We are an affected party as we have a holiday bach.  When we went down over New Year, we were surprised to find that communications regarding the draft plan had been put into the letter box rather than mailed to us at our postal address used as rate payers.  We were therefore completely unaware of the proposed draft plan prior to the submission date.  We therefore had no opportunity to make a submission but we request to be heard at any hearing.

This is clearly a very important draft plan involving considerable changes which will affect both ourselves and the whole of Akaroa

 

There has been a thorough public notification process, which included letter drop, notices in the local Akaroa paper plus notices in the national papers throughout the country. There has also been notices and the draft management Plans in the Service Centres and libraries. The submissions were open for just over 2 months.

26 - Rod Naish, on behalf Stanley Park Reserve Committee

I do not agree with the proposed upgrade of Beach Rd to take cars & vans of tourists to the Reserve along past the Lighthouse, Boatshed (small boat boat) Family yachting, and the Akaroa Yacht Club.  All areas like Beach Rd in Akaroa should be maintained constricted to walking cycling & local cars only.  The character of the village is already being destroyed by shiploads & bus loads of tourists.  Do not put tourism car parks at the distall end of a non exit roads.  If you must - make Onuku Road & the access and put the carpark behind the Red House.  Keep the water front for walkers, recreation & safe.

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

These Policies have been included as an indication of what might be required in the future should the development of Takapūneke result in an increase in visitors. Although there is no funding allocated in the LTP for these activities, the management plan Objectives have identified any future actions required as part of the future planning process. The area proposed for these actions is Legal Road.

 

20 - Simon Austin, on behalf of Akaroa Yacht Club

I write on behalf of the Akaroa Yacht Club, Beach Road, Akaroa.  The Club wishes to make the following comment on the Draft Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan in support of the submission submitted by Mr and Mrs Tim Gresson and Mrs Rosie Davidson.

The Akaroa Yacht Club incorporates the Akaroa Sailing Club and operates from two sites on Beach Road.  It is a concern that the facilities for parking and access to the sites is already restricted and that extra pressure from the increased usage on Beach Road will only add to this.

Safety is also an issue which needs to be considered with many people using the facilities on race day and with many children using the sailing club facilities both during the week and on weekends.  At busy times it is very cramped with cars parked along Beach Road adjacent to the club facilities and children using the road to walk from vehicles to the club buildings.  Most vehicles have boat trailers attached which adds to the restricted access.  It is a concern that increased traffic and larger vehicles will create safety issues.

The Akaroa Yacht supports and acknowledges the hard work put into the Plan by the Council and Onuku Runanga and supports the vast majority of it and the contribution it will make to the cultural heritage of Akaroa.

The Club wishes to be heard in support of this submission

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

These Policies have been included as an indication of what might be required in the future should the development of Takapūneke Reserve or the adjoining properties occur and result in an increase in visitors. Although there is no funding allocated in the LTP for these activities, the management plan Objectives should identify any future actions required associated with the reserve for future planning.

 

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

11 - Ken Paulin

The Conservation Plan and Draft Management Plan have been well prepared, and generally we support the draft plan.  There is concern about the use of the foreshore as a stockpiling area now. This need to stop as the reserve is developed.

 The proposed car parks should be developed for the reserve related activities, not general parking.

The hybrid poplars which have spread by suckering through the reserve need urgent attention now.

 

Agree the use of the foreshore as a place to stockpile should stop.

 

Agree the car park should be for the reserve visitors.

 

Agree the suckering of poplars in the reserve needs to be addressed.

21 – Gresson Dorman & Co Barristers & Solicitors – on behalf Tim & Jo Gresson, Simon and Kenna Bassett-Smith, The Akaroa Lighthouse Preservation Society, Peter and Robyn Guthery, Rosie Davidson, Lilly Jessica Cooper

We Gresson Dorman & Co Barristers & Solicitors write this submission on behalf of the following parties (the submitters)
1.1  Mr and Mrs Tim & Jo Gresson
1.2  Mr and Mrs Simon and Kenna Bassett-Smith
1.3  The Akaroa Lighthouse Preservation Society
1.4  Mr Peter and Mrs Robyn Guthrey
1.5  Mrs Rosie Davidson.  Mrs Davidson's property has access off Beach Rd
1.6  Lilly Jessica Cooper

2.  The submitters wish to make the following submission on the Draft Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan (Plan)
Submission
3.  Beach Road and the properties stemming from it enjoy a quiet and peaceful amenity.  This is primarily due to Beach Road being a no exit and the narrow, winding form of the road.  The road is predominantly single lane for its majority with a steep cliff or hillside properties abutting it on one side and the sea wall or beach cliff abutting it on the other.
4.  Beach Road provides excellent pedestrian access to and from the Akaroa village and due to its proximity to the village, its scenic qualities and access to the water, many people including tourists walk along it with their children and pets.  Due to topographical constraints, there is limited room for footpaths, and pedestrians often walk along the road.
5. Beach Road also provides access to the Akaroa Yacht and Sailing Clubs and so vehicles towing boats along this stretch of road, particularly in the summer months is common.  The Akaroa Lighthouse is positioned along it and creates a further attraction for residents and tourists to traverse its length.
6. Accordingly, Beach Road is a valuable shared user resource connecting parts of Akaroa village and it can become very busy with pedestrians and vehicles in the summer months.
7.  The Submitters acknowledge and recognise the hard work put into the Plan by the Council and Onuku Runanga and support the vast majority of it and the contribution it will make to the cultural heritage of Akaroa.
8.  However, the Submitters are particularly concerned with, and oppose:
8.1  Objective 5.10 and supporting policies (eg Policies 2 and 5) which seek to develop a car park adjacent to the Akaroa Sewage Treatment Plant and to upgrade Beach Road to accommodate visitor buses and vehicles;
8.2  Objective 5.16 and supporting policies which seek to establish non-residential uses in the Red House.
9.  As noted, Beach Road is already constrained by the topography on either side, and particularly by the mixed nature of road users.  The road would require significant widening to accommodate additional traffic to the car park, for the buses proposed to access the reserve, and for the non-residential use of the Red House, for which the majority of it, would not be possible due to these topographical constraints.
10.  The Submitters are concerned that there does not appear to be any consideration of the traffic and safety effects, effects on pedestrians, and effects on the amenity of the surrounding neighbourhood if this scenic road is opened up to buses and car parking at the end and for non-residential uses.
11.  There also does not appear to be any consideration as to whether a commercial / non residential use is desirable for this part of Akaroa nor any consideration of the potential adverse effects of creating such a use in this location.  It is noted that any non-residential use of the Red House would likely require either a resource consent or plan change and it is submitted that such a use would be strongly opposed by a number of residents and users of this Road.
12. For the foregoing reasons the Submitters oppose any provisions of the Plan (including but not necessarily limited to Objectives 5.10 and 5.16 and supporting policies) which seek to form a car park, upgrade the road for buses, and allow for non-residential uses.
13.  The relief the Submitters seek is that these provisions be deleted from the Plan.
14.  The Submitters wish to be heard in support of their submission.

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

Some areas of Beach Road are narrow and the end of Beach Road has a gravel surface.

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

 

The Policies (above) have been included as an indication of what might be required in the future should the development of Takapūneke Reserve or the adjoining properties occur and result in an increase in visitors. Although there is no funding allocated in the LTP for these activities, the management plan Objectives should identify any future actions required for future planning.

 

Objective 5.16 The Red House (Currently in private ownership), Policy 1.

This Objective was included even though the property is privately owned. Should the opportunity arise to purchase the property the management plan prefers not to restrict the future use of the property providing it was conducive to the adjoining Takapūneke Reserve and of benefit to the community and the city.

Any non-residential use of the property would require a resource consent and possibly a plan change under the District Plan in the future.

8 - Kathleen Reid

I am concerned to read in the (Draft) Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan that a car park is possibly to be developed at the end of Beach Road to accommodate buses and for a turnaround.  (See page 30 No. 5)

Beach Road is a narrow road with residences and baches built close to the road.  Residents and holidaymakers enjoy the coastal environment and children, boaties and swimmers are often crossing the road.  There are no footpaths on Beach Road.  This would surely be dangerous for any pedestrians if buses and extra cars are using the road.

Akaroa town is struggling to cope with the large influx of tourist numbers and the associated pressure on the infrastructure.  Much of this is generated by the huge cruise ships.  It would seem that every corner and extremity of the town is now under pressure to accommodate more and more traffic with the associated amenity loss for the property owners.

 

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

 

Comments noted.

30 - Bruce Hyland, Akaroa Boating Club

As Chair of the Akaroa Boating Club, I would like to reserve speaking rights at any public discussions on the above plan, as it relates to traffic and roading issues on Beach Road

 

 

 

Comments noted.

1 - David Barwick

The retirement of grazing in the gully systems in the reserve and the replanting/restoration of bush cover within them, is both sensible and exciting. Firstly for mitigating soil erosion and flooding, secondly for the myriad of biodiversity and cultural/landscape values.

I do have some concerns with early removal of the willow, poplar and gums in the gullies. Ideally, the gullies should be revegetated first and the exotic trees killed or ringbarked at a later stage when the native plantings are fully established (the dead standing trees could provide useful roosting and perching spots for birds) especially when there is a strong likelihood of slip reactivation.

The warm, low altitude gullies are drought prone, but relatively frost free ( -opportunities for planting Nikau Palm, Shining Broadleaf or even Mamaku Treefern may be possible after canopy closure of the bush) and the addition of Lowland Totara, Matai, Black Beech, Kowhai among the revegetated gullies would provide good long term soil  protection, carbon storage and bird/insect habitat.

 

 

Agreed

 

Objective 5.6 Vegetation and Landscape refer Explanation

There was concern if the poplars and willow were taken out when the native plants were established, the poplars and gums would damage the native plants as they were felled or removed.

 

Only native plants indigenous to this area can be planted.

2 - Mrs G Van Tulder

As the Reserve is adjacent to our property please keep us informed when you have a plan to view

 

Noted and contact details included to contact list

3 - Francis Helps

Botanical history as I see it, as this is only what I feel competent to comment on.

Pre human times around the bisecting stream and to the south the vegetation would have been podocarp, Totara, Matai, titoki, etc.  Close to the coast would have been coastal mixed hardwoods, coastal grey shrubs with Harakeke and native sedges.  To the north of stream because it is warm facing and dryer would have been Ngaio, Kanuka, Coprosma with areas of silver tussock and sedges.


Human times.
South side and stream would have been as it was before with some careful timber use as a resource.  There is evidence that there were gardens on the north side because of the deep rich tussock/bush soil and beach shingle that Steve and Peter found in the soil, same as at Pohatu.

Europeans wrecked all this for pastoral farming.
The history of this place is very much in my thoughts of how the reserve should be managed.
The poplars should be removed because they will suppress any other plant regrowth, plant warfare.

Both sides of the stream and south side should be replanted in the correct native species indigenous to Akaroa Harbour.  Because of long rank naturalised exotic grasses, Cocksfoot, self-restoration could take a century and provide habitat for introduced mammalian predators, cats and mustelids.  Tiri in the Haraki Gulf is a good example of restoration planting on a larger area than Takapuneke.  Given the size of the reserve this is quite achievable.  The north side and coast line needs some careful thought given its importance to Ōnuku historically and as a food source.  However it would be good to keep in mind how this part was in pre Maori and Maori times, this is something that I am reluctant to comment further on.

In the short term the rank exotic grasses need to be controlled by grazing and mowing.  I am willing to continue the light grazing with hogget’s as at present.  Because of the difficulty of moving stock on and off the reserve set stocking is the best I can do. In the past I have contracted Peter to top the rough grass left behind in the late summer to reduce fire risk and make the north side of the reserve look tidy.  Also each year have sprayed the vigorous variegated thistles to get some more permanent ground cover and tidy things up. Where needed have done minor fence repairs.  I see grazing being removed as the reserve develops

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments noted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Objective 5.6 Vegetation and Landscapes

provides Policies on sourcing, plant species, the purpose of the plants and to provide management practices to protect and encourage growth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Objective 5.7 Animals, Birds and Invertebrates, policy 2 endorses using sheep to maintain the open grassed areas until a landscape plan is developed. As the reserve is developed and planted up grazing by sheep may not be required.

4 - Simon Curtis

I support the draft proposal in its current form

Comments noted

5 - Kenna Worthington

Firstly I am impressed by the plan as set out & think it is a great way to use this very special reserve, I am also pleased that Ōnuku Rūnanga have been listened to, I have a couple of concerns, the council want to put a car park at the end of beach Rd for visitor buses & vehicles to park & turn around & aim to widen the road to accommodate this? Currently in Akaroa "The Glen" part of Beach Rd is one of the few remaining quite/ safe areas for many people who come to Akaroa to enjoy, daily I see walkers/runners/dog walkers (designated dog area) & young families enjoying the peace & quite with few vehicles causing safety concerns an increase in vehicles & especially buses would take this away. My other concern is encouraging vehicles to park at green point unless this is monitored 24hrs I would expect to see an increase in undesirables as at the moment I often come across people parked up partaking in not so pleasant things - a public toilet would also need to be monitored 24hrs as goodness knows what would happen down there out of sight!! this is a special area & I feel should be respected, no rubbish bins would equal litter as sadly we are not a rubbish free society, perhaps visitors could be encouraged to walk down there or perhaps just the one carpark up on Ōnuku Rd would be a more safer idea as less foot traffic & young families up there. Hopefully together everyone can come up with a safe/respectful plan for this special area.

 

 

Support for the plan noted.

 

 

 

The Glen Picnic area is a maintenance issue that the operation team should address. The safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated if there is any increases in vehicle numbers and any safety measures required to be implemented.

9 - Ronald Birch

I am deeply concerned with aspects on page 29-30 of the (Draft) Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan with respect to the proposal to "upgrade Beach Road to accommodate visitor buses and vehicles including an area to turn around".  Before embarking on such a proposal the Council needs to consider firstly the needs of the community that lives here, ahead of the desire to cater for those that just occasionally visit here. Presently Beach Road is the ONLY (and I repeat ONLY) significant area of flat walking street outside the main urban area. For those residents (and visitors I guess) wishing to take a pleasant and undemanding stroll along a pleasant quiet area, there is no significant alternative to Beach Road. Everything else is hilly, and therefore not suitable for those not reasonably fit or aged. As it stands when walking Beach Road you have to be aware of the traffic from cars and the occasional campervan. Please do not destroy the walk completely by adding buses to the mix. For walkers who enjoy that relatively quiet stretch of road, buses would be intolerable. How the Council could consider foisting this prospect on to the local residents is beyond belief.  If you want to upgrade the road, consider instead a proper footpath along it so that pedestrians can stroll along there more securely. Don't make it a hazard by adding buses to the traffic. 

An added detrimental prospect is that tour buses waiting to collect passengers from cruise ships would also use the upgraded road to drive down, turn around in the proposed turning bay, then park back along the road waiting to be called up to collect passengers. The last thing anybody wants is for Beach Road to become a bus holding bay.

I do not live along that stretch of road myself, however currently I do enjoy it as a quiet relatively safe and scenic section of coastal road. This would be spoiled considerably by having tour buses using it. I additionally can sympathise completely with those residents living there. In summer it is a nice holiday area with children, swimmers and boaters crossing the street, people picnicking on the grass verge and road edge and so on. The summer ambience of this delightful area would be destroyed by the presence of buses, and additionally there would be an increased potential for accident.

At a time when the council is strapped for cash, when our Akaroa urban streets are a mess (bumps, holes and oozing tar) through lack of proper maintenance, this is not the time to be wasting money on some expensive proposal geared around a few visitors instead of the roading needs of the locals.

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

These Policies have been included as an indication of what might be required in the future should the development of Takapūneke Reserve or the adjoining properties occur and result in an increase in visitors.

 

Although there is no funding allocated in the LTP for these activities, the management plan Objectives should identify any future actions required for future planning that are associated with the reserve.

 

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

13 - Elizabeth Mars

The Council and Ōnuku Rūnanga are to be congratulated on the historic and cultural values of Takapūneke recognised in this comprehensive draft plan, however I have serious concerns about:

 

5.10 VEHICLE PARKING, Policy 5:  to upgrade Beach Road to accommodate visitor buses and vehicles including an area for vehicles to turn around.  

Beach Road, from the toilets at the Britomart Reserve by the Aylmers Stream bridge to the Akaroa lighthouse, becomes a ˜walking road” during the peak tourist and holiday seasons.  Walkers include many families with small children and pushchairs, elderly people and all ages in between.  From the entrance to The Garden of Tane to the Akaroa Yacht Club boat slip, the hillside is subject to land slips therefore the only way this stretch of Beach Road can be safely upgraded is to build a cantilevered pedestrian walkway on the seaward side of the road.  This may well involve the Council in environmental argument.

 

As Beach Road approaches the southern end of Glen Bay the road narrows as it goes downhill towards the private jetty corner, and already it is often necessary to pull over and stop when trucks and other large vehicles are using this stretch of road.  With the sea on one side and a private residence at the top of the cliff on the landward side, how does the Council propose to safely upgrade this section of each Road to accommodate a substantial increase in vehicular and bus traffic?  Widening Beach Road on the seaward side would involve reclamation work and will involve the Council in environmental argument. 

 

In addition to walkers using the Monument walkway, Glen Bay from the private jetty to the Monument Walkway, is a very popular holiday area for families with children and for people who use the beach for fossicking, swimming, kayaking and general beach activities.  The increase in vehicular traffic and buses caused by the development of a car park in Beach Road adjacent to the Akaroa Waste Water plant will make this stretch of Beach Road dangerous for pedestrians. 

Heading towards Takapūneke, the last corner in Beach Road, as it slopes down towards the Red House, is narrow and the proposed increase in traffic, particularly buses, will result in a serious accident.  Widening the road on the landward side is not an option because this corner is below the Britomart Monument fence and is already subject to erosion.  Does the Council propose to move the Monument further back from the edge of the cliff?

 

The proposal as stated in 5.1 will make Beach Road significantly more dangerous for cyclists.  In recent years there has been an increase in the number of cyclists using Beach Road, particularly during weekends and holidays, the peak time for traffic travelling to and from the proposed Takapūneke Beach Road car park.  It seems ironic that while the Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan draft recognises and secures the cultural and environmental values of Takapūneke, it proposes to seriously degrade the environmental values of Beach Road between the Aylmers Stream Bridge and Takapūneke. The words 'to upgrade Beach Road to accommodate visitor buses and vehicles' slip easily off the tongue, but the financial cost will be substantial and the Beach Road environment will be seriously degraded.  The Council needs to recognise this reality and use the proposed Beach Road car park for work and service vehicles only.  

 

 

 

 

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

 

These Policies have been included as an indication of what might be required in the future should the development of Takapūneke Reserve or the adjoining properties occur and result in an increase in visitors.

 

Although there is no funding allocated in the LTP for these activities, the management plan Objectives should identify any future actions required for future planning.

 

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

 

The management plan does not include the Britomart Monument.

 

 

 

The costs to construct a car park at Beach Road could not be justified if it was only for work and service vehicles.  Any future car park should provide space for visitors to the reserve as well as the beach and bay area.

 

 

 

14 - Shelia Watson, on behalf of Heritage NZ Pouhere Taonga

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan.

2. Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (Heritage New Zealand) considers Takapūneke Reserve to be of outstanding cultural and historical significance to all New Zealanders. The cultural and historic significance of Takapūneke is strengthened by its proximity to Onuku Marae where, amongst many significant events that took place there, te Tiriti o Waitangi, the Treaty of Waitangi was signed.

3. In recognition of its cultural, spiritual and historical significance to tangata whenua, Takapūneke  was entered on the New Zealand Heritage List Runanga K
ōrero as a wāhi tapu area by Heritage New Zealand in 2002 (New Zealand Heritage List number 7521) .  Additionally, the entire Takapūneke foreshore is entered on the List as part of the Akaroa Waterfront Historic Area (entered on the List in 1996, List number 7330).

4. Heritage New Zealand supports the intent of the draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan, and provides the following comments.

Objective 5.1 Cultural Heritage and History

5. Heritage New Zealand strongly supports the protection of wāhi tapu and wāhi taonga of Takapūneke Reserve (Policy 5.1.1). As stated above, Heritage New Zealand considers Takapūneke Reserve to be of outstanding cultural and historical significance.

6. Policy 5.1.3 refers to the Historic Places Act 1993. The Historic Places Act 1993 was repealed on 20 May 2014, by section 105 of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014. The Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 should be referred to.

7. There is a recorded archaeological site (NZAA ArchSite N37/11) located within the Takapūneke Reserve. This site consists of a variety of features including midden, terraces, and oven stones, and is an indication of the presence of archaeological remains in this landscape. While elements of this site have been destroyed by development in the past, the area retains significant archaeological values and there is the potential for archaeological remains and features to be disturbed by any subsurface works. It is recommended that an assessment is sought for any proposed earthworks in the Reserve as any earthworks that may impact an archaeological site require an authority from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga under the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014.

8. The risk of damage to unrecorded sites is referred to throughout the plan, and Policy 5.1.2 refers to the development of an accidental discovery protocol. Heritage New Zealand’s view is that for an area such as this with a long history of human occupation, a discovery protocol is only appropriate if an initial archaeological assessment undertaken prior to the work beginning has concluded that the discovery of archaeological material is very unlikely.

9. Takapūneke Reserve is in a coastal area, and any accidental discovery protocol should also address the potential for archaeological sites to be uncovered through natural processes such as coastal erosion.

10. Heritage New Zealand recommends that any proposal for an activity in the Reserve that will involve earthworks, such as walking tracks or interpretation, should be assessed archaeologically by a suitably qualified archaeologist. An archaeological assessment will assess the potential for archaeological remains in the project area to be affected by the proposed works, and make recommendations as to the necessity of obtaining an archaeological authority for the works.

Heritage New Zealand’s recommended wording for policies 5.1.2 and 5.1.3 are as follows:
5.1.2     To obtain an archaeological authority from Heritage New Zealand under the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 prior to any work commencing that may modify or destroy any archaeological remains within Takapūneke  Reserve, including the recorded archaeological site (NZAA ArchSite N37/11).  Advice should be sought from Heritage New Zealand prior to any proposed earthworks commencing in Takapūneke Reserve, such as landscaping, road or walkways, service trenching or geotechnical testing.

5.1.3     To develop an accidental discovery protocol in consultation with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and Onuku Runanga. Where an archaeological assessment deems that an archaeological authority is not required, the accidental discovery protocol will apply. The accidental discovery protocol will also apply where archaeological remains are uncovered though natural processes such as coastal erosion.

Objective 5.3 Ngai Tahu Values and Dual Heritage
11. The provision of cultural and historical interpretation helps people appreciate our heritage resources and their need for protection. Heritage New Zealand supports the development of an interpretation plan and materials that reflect both Tangata Whenua and European heritage (policies 5.3.2 and 5.3.3).

12. There is some duplication with policies 5.3.3 and 5.9.5 around the development of interpretation materials, and different groups to work with on the development of interpretation are identified in different policies. These policies could be clarified in order to improve consistency and clarity.

Heritage New Zealand is as ever, more than willing to provide any assistance as required.

Objective 5.4 Tu Ahu Tahi (Park of Silence)
13. Heritage New Zealand recognises that the area of the Reserve, Tu Ahu Tahi, has significant cultural meaning and access restrictions are necessary for the protection of that part of the Reserve.

Different terms are used throughout the draft Management Plan in reference to the restrictions on access; the plan refers to this area being controlled/restricted/closed off to public in different sections. As these terms can have different meanings and may be interpreted differently, using a consistent term is recommended.

Objective 5.9 Signage
14. As noted above, there is some duplication with policies 5.3.3 and 5.9.5 around the development of interpretation materials.

Objective 5.12 Buildings, Furniture and Structures
15. It is clear from the explanation of this objective and policies, and from policy 5.12.7 that new buildings are prohibited in Takapūneke Reserve. The wording of objective 5.12 is not as clear in this respect, and the following amendments are suggested:

To provide and maintain existing buildings, and to provide and maintain furniture and structures that are culturally and environmentally sensitively designed and complement the natural rural locations.

Objective 5.14 Infrastructure and Technology
16. Policy 5.14.3 refers to the investigation of undergrounding of infrastructure, providing the heritage or archaeological values of the site are not comprised or damaged. Due to the potential for subsurface archaeological remains, Heritage New Zealand reiterates the need for an archaeological assessment for any earthworks proposed within the reserve.

Objective 5.15 Co-Governance and National Reserve Status
17. Heritage New Zealand seeks that the whole of Takapūneke should be preserved and managed for the protection of its archaeological, historical and cultural heritage values in perpetuity in the national interest.  Takapūneke Reserve is a sacred place to Ngai Tahu and a place of outstanding historical and cultural significance to New Zealand. Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga supports the Council’s plans to make a formal application for National Reserve status under s13 of the Reserves Act 1977, as stated in policy 5.15.1.

18. Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on the Draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan.  Heritage New Zealand looks forward to providing any assistance required for the implementation of the Plan to Ōnuku Rūnanga and Council in the future.

 

 

 

 

Acknowledge and thank the submitter for their support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

Notes the change and will make the correction within the management plan.

 

Item 7.

Notes the recommendation to include a Policy under Objective 5.1 Cultural Heritage and History, for an archaeological assessment to be undertaken.

 

 

 

Item 8.

Noted an archaeological assessment should be undertaken before commencing any work in the reserve that might trigger an accidental discovery protocol to be implemented.

 

Item 9.

There is legal road between the coast and the reserve boundary. An accidental discovery protocol could be undertaken for legal road.

Item 10.

Suggestion noted and recommend an additional policy within the Objective 5.1 is included.

 

 

 

Item 5.1.2.

Recommended wording noted and proposed to replace the existing wording in the draft management plan.

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.1.3.

Recommended wording noted and proposed to replace the existing wording in the draft management plan.

 

 

 

Item 11.

Support noted.

 

 

 

Item 12.

Duplication noted and recommend reviewing both 5.3.3 and 5.9.5 to provide one conclusive policy and delete one policy. Plus Heritage New Zealand’s offer of assistance noted.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments noted and content to be reviewed to ensure consistency of terms, if the intention of the statements are similar.

 

 

Item 14, 5.9

Duplication noted and recommend reviewing both 5.3.3 and 5.9.5 to provide one conclusive policy and delete one policy.

 

Item 15.

Noted and recommend the management plan adopts the revised wording for 5.12 as proposed.

 

 

Item 16.

Noted and recommends as stated above that a new policy is included in 5.1 for an archaeological assessment to be undertaken.

 

 

Item 17.

Support noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 18.

Thank Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga for their offer of assistance.

15 - Dirk De Lu

Spokes is happy to see Council focusing on the preservation and use of reserves. Please provide safe, secure, well located cycle parking to encourage people to bicycle to reserves.

 

Submission acknowledged and cycle parking will be provided off the reserve.

16 - Hugh Wilson

I had hoped to peruse the draft Takapuneke Reserve Management Plan when last in Akaroa, but ran out of time.  So this is not much of a submission, but I just wanted to reinforce suggestions I have made earlier that in any planting undertaken, suitable native species sourced from close by and strictly of local Akaroa ecological district genetic stock be used.  I have some local botanical knowledge and would be happy to provide a checklist of suitable planting species for the site (you may already have information from me provided earlier) if asked - at no charge.  I am delighted that Takapuneke is at least being recognised and looked after the way it should.

Objective 5.6 Vegetation and Landscape policy 2, 4, & 7 require locally sourced seeds or cuttings indigenous to the area to be planted. The Council Botanist will assist with identifying and sourcing plant species indigenous to the area.

22 - Diana Manson
The Council is not looking after the Glen Picnic area where there is parking available letting the grass grow to waist high.  How will they manage to keep a park tidy further out of Akaroa.  The road is also a major walking area for visitors, residents and cruise ship people with the Stanley Memorial on route.  Therefore buses using the road would be dangerous and also more cars.  Otherwise great to have our history recognised.

The Glen Picnic area is a maintenance issue that the operation team should address. The safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated if there is any increases in vehicle numbers and any safety measures required to be implemented.

23 - Catherine Bell

As a Beach Road bach owner I would urge the Council to find another area for bus turning/carpark accommodating visitor buses and vehicles. Post the enormous rains we had this winter road access was compromised and the road has narrowed. The ambience of The Glen and Beach Road being a quiet idyll would be completely destroyed should this sort of vehicle access being made. Please allow this sanctuary to remain unsullied.  I fear much of Akaroa's tranquility has gone for good.

The area is a much loved haven away from the busyness of the main beach which allows my own childhood to be repeated for my grandchildren. I am a third generation Akaroa bach owner and my own children and grandchildren share this unique history in a much loved part of the world.

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

 

Beach Road is a legal road that continues to the existing Akaroa Sewage Treatment Plant. If there was an increase in vehicles the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures implemented.

25 - Anthony & Anna Dalzell

We would like to express our concern about the proposed upgrade of beach road beyond the lighthouse with a parking area near the sewage plant. With many driveways opposite the waterfront and people including small children crossing to the water along with future concerns about rising sea levels and the changes this may have on the waterfront it would seem that increasing traffic and in particular heavy traffic like buses and campervans would be unwise. Encouraging these vehicles in and then out again along a section of road that is narrow and currently has trees of significance, erosion issues and people using waterski areas and small boats, has to be a questionable decision.

Surely it would make more sense to encourage the buses and campervans along the top where they can continue their interest in this cultural aspect of our country and travel on towards the marae as this road is already more suitable and appropriate for this type of visitor. Visitors can then look down over the site/reserve and not have to have a required level of fitness to walk up a track.

A carpark at the end of the road would encourage camping and overnight stays by campervans and the associated rubbish and issues that go along with that, including the consequences that a lack of amenities and services would raise.

Further commercialising a residential part of the village detracts from the special character of the area.

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

Some areas of Beach Road are narrow and the end of Beach Road has a gravel surface.

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required should be implemented.

 

Objective 5.13 Policy 1.

A car park is proposed on the old land fill site in Takapūneke Reserve, with the entry/exist off Ōnuku Road.

 

Any future car park along Beach Road would need to consider illegal camping, overnight stays and security. There is no funding or timeline for a car park on Beach Road

28 - John MacDonald

Congratulations to the team who are responsible for the draft plan, it will certainly create a great reserve for Onuku Runanga, the people of Canterbury & visitors to the area. It will be a wonderful place of peace.

My only concern is the increased traffic along Beach Road and especially “visitor buses”, this road is very much shared by meandering pedestrians, children playing, yachties, canoeists, swimmers, water skiiers, picnicers etc AND the small amount of existing traffic. There is no dedicated pedestrian area or footpath along most of this end of Beach Road. This is very much the “lifestyle” of this area.

Access to the reserve from Beach Road could be limited to pedestrians, cyclists and very light traffic. All visitor “motor traffic” and “visitor buses” to use Onuku Road and the parking area on the capped landfill area as mentioned in the plan. This would certainly alleviate the need to upgrade Beach Road, no need to create a parking area on the foreshore and a turning bay would not be required. Keeping the special foreshore area and the Beach Road entrance to the reserve the peaceful haven it is now and respecting the special characteristics of the site.

I hope this will be discussed and taken into consideration, so much of the foreshore in Akaroa has become very busy with traffic and commercial activity. How great to keep pockets of beauty like the South West end of Beach Road as it is now and the proposed Takapuneke Reserve but with main access from above

 

 

Support acknowledged

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

The need and provision of footpaths would also need to be considered.

 

The car park proposed for Beach Road will provide different experiences and access to the lower part of the reserve. People with disabilities or the elderly may find it difficult to walk up and down the side of the hills in the reserve if they could only park in the top car park accessed from Ōnuku Road.

 

29 - Elizabeth Ashford

We are concerned at the proposed car park to be built at the end of Beach Rd and plans to upgrade Beach Rd to accommodate visitor buses and vehicles including an area to turn around.

Our concerns are:

1. Beach road is often busy with pedestrians: visitors and locals often walk

along the road to and from the township. As you are aware there is no formed pedestrian pathway and all have to walk on the road.

2.  Children, yachtsmen and women, swimmers, canoers and boaties cross backwards and forwards to the beach from properties and parked cars.

3. Visitors often have picnics on the verges.

 

We believe more traffic and especially buses would cause a serious safety risk especially in summer.

 

 

Objective 5.10 Vehicle Parking, Policy 5.10.2 and 5.10.5.

If there was an increase in vehicles along Beach Road the safety aspects of the road would need to be investigated and any safety measures required would need to be implemented.

The need and provision of footpaths would also need to be considered.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Volume 1 Heard and No Longer Wish to be Heard

27

b

Volume 2 Not Heard

51

 

 

Signatories

Author

Russel Wedge - Senior Network Planner Parks

Approved By

Brent Smith - Head of Parks

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

 


Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

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Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

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Hearings Panel

02 February 2018

 

 

4.    Hearing of Submissions

 

Submitters who indicated they wished to be heard will participate in facilitated group discussions.

 

 

 

5.    Hearings Panel Consideration and Deliberation