Christchurch City Council

Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An ordinary meeting of the Christchurch City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Thursday 9 November 2017

Time:                                    10am 9am (please note change of start time)

Venue:                                 Council Chambers, Civic Offices,
53 Hereford Street, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mayor Lianne Dalziel

Deputy Mayor Andrew Turner

Councillor Vicki Buck

Councillor Jimmy Chen

Councillor Phil Clearwater

Councillor Pauline Cotter

Councillor Mike Davidson

Councillor David East

Councillor Anne Galloway

Councillor Jamie Gough

Councillor Yani Johanson

Councillor Aaron Keown

Councillor Glenn Livingstone

Councillor Raf Manji

Councillor Tim Scandrett

Councillor Deon Swiggs

Councillor Sara Templeton

 

 

3 November 2017

 

 

 

Principal Advisor

Dr Karleen Edwards

Chief Executive

Tel: 941 8554

 

Christopher Turner-Bullock

Committee Advisor

941 8233

christopher.turner@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
Watch Council meetings live on the web:
http://councillive.ccc.govt.nz/live-stream

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1.       Apologies................................................................................................................................... 5

2.       Declarations of Interest............................................................................................................ 5

3.       Public Participation.................................................................................................................. 5

3.1       Public Forum....................................................................................................................... 5

3.2       Deputations by Appointment............................................................................................... 5

4.       Presentation of Petitions......................................................................................................... 5

Papanui-Innes Community Board

5.       Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council............................................................ 7

Banks Peninsula Community Board

6.       Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council....................................................... 13

Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board

7.       Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council.............................. 35

8.       Veitches Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit........................................... 41

Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board

9.       Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council................................................ 49

10.     Vista Place - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions........................................ 55

11.     Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing................................................................ 75

Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

12.     Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council..................................... 85

13.     Aidanfield Drive - Aidanfield Christian School - Proposed School Speed Zone................ 91

Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board

14.     Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council................................... 99

Coastal-Burwood Community Board

15.     Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council................................................... 103

16.     9021 Rothesay Road - Application for formed access........................................................ 109

 

17.     Chief Executive's Report - October 2017............................................................................. 181

STAFF REPORTS

18.     Zone Committees' Quarterly Update.................................................................................. 189

19.     2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment for Christchurch and Banks Peninsula ........................ 195

20.     Adoption of the 2018 meeting schedule for the Council and its Committees, Subcommittees and Working Parties ............................................................................................................ 613

21.     Regenerate Christchurch - August 2017 Status Report..................................................... 627

22.     Resolution to Exclude the Public......................................................................................... 635  

 

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Public Participation

3.1  Public Forum

A period of up to 30 minutes is available for people to speak for up to five minutes on any issue that is not the subject of a separate hearings process.

3.2  Deputations by Appointment

Deputations may be heard on a matter or matters covered by a report on this agenda and approved by the Chairperson.

There were no deputations by appointment at the time the agenda was prepared 

4.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no Presentation of Petitions at the time the agenda was prepared.  

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

5.        Papanui-Innes Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1260656

Contact:

Matt McLintock
Ali Jones, Chairperson

matthew.mclintock@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Papanui-Innes Community Board held meetings on 13 October and 30 October 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved the following applications to the Papanui-Innes Community Board’s  2017/2018 Discretionary Response Fund:

Edible Garden Awards                                                                      $4,000

Youth Recreation Project                                                                $3,500

Engagement with the Community                                                  $500

Community Pride Garden Awards                                               $3,000

·   The Board approved an easement to the Council for the right to drain sewage over part of Erica Reserve, a Council-owned recreation reserve. The Council has repaired a damaged sewer pipe that runs parallel to Grants Road. The location of the sewer pipe has been moved from the original location to prevent damage by tree roots, hence requiring a new easement. No public notification was required as all of the work is underground. An easement will help identify the location of the pipe on the land title and will also appear on spatial databases that use property information.

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Veitches Road – 40 Kilometre per Hour Speed Restriction – a joint recommendation from the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood and Papanui-Innes Community Boards.

The Veitches Road – 40 Kilometre per Hour Speed Restriction report will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 9 November 2017.

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

5.1       Strengthening Communities Funded Projects

Papanui Baptist Freedom Trust are still progressing through the review that they have been undertaking over the past six months. The review should be near completion by the end of 2017.

A community survey is also underway. This will be a partnership between both Northgate and Papanui Baptist Freedom Trust and it is intended that the findings will shape programmes going forward. Both community organisations are also starting to plan a Papanui Community Event for early March 2018.

5.2       MacFarlane Park Update

Relevant information has been provided to the project planner. Most of the written consents from affected parties have been received with a few outstanding including Housing New Zealand.

The project planner has submitted the Resource Consent. This is supported by a letter from the Community Board.

5.3       Redwood Plunket Rooms

Funding has been approved for this repair project and this is expected to occur in the 2017/18 financial year.

The Building Project Plan has been completed and the tender process will begin in November.

5.4       280 Westminster Street

Staff are working with local community groups on a proposal for the use of the building and this will be presented to both the Parks and the Property Units.

5.5       St Albans Park and Pavilion

The project is progressing and organisations that use the pavilion have been contacted to remove their equipment in preparation for the demolition of the building. Demolition is planned to be complete by the end of November and the construction of a new building could start in December. The new building will have accessible toilets, two changing rooms with toilets and showers, a referee’s room and storage for sports equipment. The Council has worked with sports clubs to ensure the planned upgrade meets their needs.

Tender documents for the field upgrades and playground drainage are underway and a timeline will be available once the tendering process is completed. Work includes a new drainage system and the existing turf will be replaced with a new sand-based turf surface plus the installation of two artificial cricket wickets.

Communication with the community and regular updates on the building and field upgrades will be posted on the Council’s Newsline page.  https://www.ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/newsline/

An artist’s impression of the new St Albans Park pavilion.

5.6       The Palms Suburban Interchange Upgrade

A joint seminar to discuss options for this structure has been arranged for the Papanui-Innes and Coastal-Burwood Community Boards.

6.   Significant Community Issues

6.1       Positive Aging Expo

This annual event, organised by Age Concern Canterbury, was held on Monday 2 October at Papanui High School. Members of the Community Recreation Team were present to talk to attendees and reported good interest. Also on display and creating a great deal of interest was an example of the new ‘smart’ parking meters that are to be installed in Christchurch.

6.2       The Breeze Walking Festival

The Breeze Walking Festival ran from 30 September to 15 October. The event, which was organised by the Council Community Recreation team, has been very popular with walkers of all ages and abilities. The team effectively partnered with organisations to integrate culture, mental health awareness, art, links with Antarctic, latest developments, heritage and the environment to deliver the festival.

‘We’re going on a Bear Hunt’ was a very successful children’s event, held on Monday 2 October as part of the Breeze Walking Festival and starting from Mairehau High School.

             

This was a collaborative event with Te Puna Oraka, the Shirley Community Trust and the Papanui-Innes Community Board and staff.

6.3       Social Enterprise World Forum

The Social Enterprise World Forum took place from 27–29 September 2017 in Christchurch City. There were over 1,000 attendees with the theme of “Ka koroki te manu – Creating our tomorrow” Council Staff were in attendance along with community organisations who are interested or already within the Social Enterprise scene.

6.4       Belfast Community Network Report

Lynda Goodrick, Manager of the Belfast Community Network (BCN) and Joss Buttriss, Northcote Community Worker, presented information to the Board in the Public Forum regarding Joss’s work with the users of the Redwood Library including the publicising of the work of the BCN and assisting with the behaviour issues of some users of the library.

6.5       Main North Road Bus Priority Consultation

An information session to outline and explain the bus priority proposal for the Main North Road, including walking and biking improvements and changes to car parking, has been held at Northlands Mall.  Two evening drop-in sessions will be held in the Papanui Boardroom over the next two weeks. The proposal includes a full-time bus lane running north from Harewood Road to Grassmere Street.

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan

7.1       The Papanui-Innes Community Board Plan has been uploaded to the Community Board website.

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Edgeware Road Street Trees

Following a request from a resident for new street trees to be planted along the berms in their part of Edgeware Road to improve the appearance of the neighbourhood, the Christchurch City Council Arborist advised the Board of the process for this at its meeting on 31 March 2017. The Board then asked for more information to be provided about the feasibility of planting trees in this location.

At this briefing the Arborist noted that Edgeware Road is designated as a collector road in the roading heirachy. Traffic safety measures together with the overhead and underground infrastructure placement (power, communications, water, etc.) preclude the planting of trees in the berms along a major part of Edgeware Road, including the area requested by the resident.

Advice received from the Arborist was that tree plantings are not an option due to the location of the overhead and underground infrastructure services.

Residents also requested that the Board look at traffic calming measures especially at the Hills Road end of Edgeware Road.

The Board decided to ask for staff advice regarding traffic calming measures such as cut outs or wider berms for Edgeware Road.

8.2       Removal of Bus Stop Main North Road

A memorandum was tabled from the Passenger Transport Engineer responding to a request from the Board at its meeting on 30 June 2017 to investigate the feasibility of providing a bus stop on Main North Road northbound lane between the Northlands Superstop and the next bus stop outside St Joseph’s School.

Councillor Davidson had a number of questions regarding the information supplied and agreed to forward these to staff. The Board decided to request that the Passenger Transport Engineer respond to the questions raised by Councillor Davidson when received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Judith Pascoe - Community Board Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

6.        Banks Peninsula Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1249533

Contact:

Christine Wilson, Chairperson, Penelope Goldstone and Joan Blatchford

penelope.goldstone@ccc.govt.nz
joan.blatchford@ccc.govt.nz

941 5689
941 5643

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in September and October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

2.         Receive the Diamond Harbour Village Development Plan for information.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Banks Peninsula Community Board held meetings on 25 September and 9 October 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   Funding for Community Projects Across Banks Peninsula

The Board approved funding for community projects, which will support priority outcomes in our Community Board Plan by strengthening communities, building resilience and enhancing our environment.

·    $2,789.50 to 24 locals for Neighbourhood Week to bring people together with activities ranging from beach clean ups to street parties

·    $2,000 to Ataahua Reserve Management Committee for a tank to provide water for Kaituna Hall

·    $500 to the Takamātua Ratepayers Association to control sediment in Takamātua Stream

·    $850 to Project Lyttelton for the 21 Day Challenge to start new habits to improve our environment and well-being

·   Takapūneke Reserve – A Place of Outstanding Cultural Heritage

Takapūneke Reserve, near Akaroa, is a site of immense cultural significance to Ngāi Tahu and, in particular, to local iwi Ōnuku Rūnanga. Up until the arrival of Europeans to New Zealand in the early 19th century, Takapūneke was a major trading village. In 1830, a significant event involving the massacre of many Ngāi Tahu people resulted in the reserve becoming tapu.

The reserve was registered as wāhi tapu (place of outstanding historical or cultural heritage value) in 2002 by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, and in 2009, Takapūneke was classified as an Historic Reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. In 2012, the Council adopted the Takapūneke Conservation Report.

Acknowledging the site’s cultural significance and recognising that it should be protected for future generations, in 2012 the Council agreed to seek National Reserve status from the Minister of Conservation. The first step in this process is for the Council to prepare a Reserve Management Plan in partnership with Ōnuku Rūnanga and with input from the public.

The Board has approved the draft Takapūneke Reserve Management Plan for consultation from 11 October to 15 December.

·   Akaroa Treated Wastewater Reuse Options Working Party Reconvened

The Board reconvened this Working Party so that the Board, community representatives and Papatipu Rūnanga can consider options for the reuse of treated wastewater in Akaroa.

The Working Party met from February to April 2017 and agreed on a Joint Statement on the matters set out under its Objectives prior to planned broader consultation. Subsequently additional technical information was discovered which may change the parameters around the reuse options and it is now necessary to reconvene the Working Party to further consider those options.

·   Practical and Cost Effective Stock Regulations Needed

While the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 requires all reasonably practicable steps to be taken to identify, eliminate, minimise or manage risks, it also requires that regulations are practical and balance risk and cost. The Council has stated that moving stock along or across roads has not been identified as a significant or frequently occurring traffic safety issue in the district.

The Board made a submission on the Council’s Stock on Roads Bylaw arguing that given this low risk the proposed bylaw is too onerous for farmers, creating unnecessary work and considerable cost. Additionally if rules are not cost effective and simple, sometimes farmers will just ignore them. This will increase the risk to people, traffic, stock and the condition of roads.

·   Limited Residential Parking on Banks Peninsula

On-road parking is in high demand by Banks Peninsula residents as many settlements have limited off-street parking due to historically small section sizes. These residents sometimes need to partly park on kerbs, grass berms or footpaths as many roads are very narrow.

The Board made a submission on the Council’s Traffic and Parking Bylaw asking for this type of parking to be permitted on very narrow roads, provided that prams and wheelchair users can continue to use footpaths.

·   New Playground and Landscaping in Governors Bay

The Board approved a concept plan for a new playground and landscaping near the Governors Bay Community Centre and pool. The local community plans on helping with planting, and construction is expected to be completed in time for Christmas.

·   Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke Aims to Restore Rāpaki Church and Launch Training Initiatives

Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke is seeking funding to restore the whare karakia at Rāpaki Marae and launch a series of training initiatives. The historic whare karakia has been an important meeting place and integral part of the community since it was built in 1869, while training initiatives including knowledge of the takiwa and whakapapa will grow the cultural capacity of the hapū. The Board was delighted to provide letters of support for funding applications for these two projects.

 

 

·   Tradition of Whakairo (Māori Wood Carving) Lives On in Lyttelton

Whakaraupō Carving Centre is seeking funding for operational costs to continue teaching whakairo (Māori wood carving). The Centre has an “open door” policy, enabling anyone who wishes to participate and learn about Māori culture in a welcoming and supportive environment. It also provides mentoring to those in need of direction, including those recently released from prison. The Board was thrilled to provide a letter of support for the Centre’s funding application.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Naval Point Development Plan Options – Public Excluded

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

       Progress Continues with Head to Head Walkway

5.1       Status

5.1.1   At its 10 October meeting, the Council requested information on the Head to Head Walkway.

5.1.2   This is an aspirational project to create a continuous walkway around Whakaraupō/Lyttleton Harbour, which will attract locals and visitors from Christchurch City and across New Zealand to enjoy the spectacular coastline and native bush. The Walkway will also pass through several of our idyllic settlements, which will contribute to thriving local economies.

5.1.3   This project is driven by the Board and passionate community organisations from around Lyttelton Harbour.

5.2       Action Required

5.2.1   Recently completed work includes upgrading the track through Urumau Reserve above Lyttelton to make it more walkable and constructing a new footbridge in Cass Bay. The Cass Bay Reserves Management Committee have expressed appreciation for the high-quality footbridge.

5.2.2   Upcoming work includes upgrade of the Coastal Track from Purau to Church Bay (photo above). Local volunteers have expressed interest in helping with these upgrades.

5.2.3   The Head to Head Walkway Working Party, which includes community and Board representatives, will hold its next meeting in late-November.

5.3       Timeframe

5.3.1   Ongoing.

       Lyttelton Wastewater Project

5.4       Status

5.4.1   The Lyttelton Wastewater Project is driven by the expiry of existing resource consents for the discharge of wastewater into Lyttelton Harbour, which requires discharges from the Governors Bay wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to stop by December 2018, the Diamond Harbour WWTP by December 2021 and the Lyttelton WWTP by August 2029.

5.5       Action Required

5.5.1   This will be achieved by piping untreated wastewater to Bromley through the Lyttelton Tunnel. The project is expected to go out to tender by early-2018.

5.5.2   Works include decommissioning the WWTPs, building new pump stations at each location, constructing submarine pipelines from Governors Bay and Diamond Harbour to Lyttelton and constructing a pipeline through the Lyttelton Tunnel.

5.5.3   The Project Manager has liaised with the community about any possible disruptions.

5.6       Timeframe

5.9.1   Out to tender by early-2018.

6.   Significant Community Issues

       Urgent Briefing on Access to Diamond Harbour Ferry       

6.1       Status

6.1.1   In early-October the Board requested an urgent briefing from Lyttelton Port Company (LPC), Environment Canterbury (ECan) and Council staff on the impact of LPC’s proposed staff car park on bus and car access to the bus stop on Lyttelton Wharf, which connects to the Diamond Harbour ferry.

6.2       Action Required

6.2.1   At this briefing, LPC and ECan agreed to further investigate options for access to the bus stop before LPC finalises the car park layout. LPC and ECan will provide a second briefing to the Board in late-October.

6.3       Timeframe

6.3.1   Briefing to the Board in late-October.

       Native Revegetation Thrives in Diamond Harbour

6.4       Status

6.4.1   The Diamond Harbour Reserves Management Committee, a subcommittee of the Board, looks after several local reserves in partnership with Council staff. While Sams and Morgans Gullies are outside the Committee’s area of formal responsibility, locals have been transforming these gullies into native forest over the last several years.

6.4.2   The Committee has asked for its area of responsibility to be extended to include these gullies so that it can take on the role of coordinating local organisations in this work.  


 

6.5       Action Required

6.5.1   The Board resolved to support in principle, and request that staff provide information on, the request from the Committee to include these gullies under its area of responsibility and, if appropriate, how that request can be actioned.

6.5.2   The Board also requested that staff provide information on how the two gullies can continue to be protected as reserve areas into the future.

6.6       Timeframe

6.6.1   Late-2017

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board approved its Banks Peninsula Community Board Plan for 2017-19 on 31 July 2017. This Plan, developed by talking with the community, is the Board’s vision for Banks Peninsula’s future.

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/how-the-council-works/elected-members/community-boards/banks-peninsula/

7.2       Progress against the Community Board Plan will be reported quarterly.

 

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Huge Participation in Community-Owned Village Plans

The Little River and Diamond Harbour communities have driven and produced two community-owned plans, with support from Council staff. These Village Plans serve as guides to decision-making by the community, organisations and authorities, including the Council.

Little River Village Plan

The Board endorsed the community-owned plan Little River–Big Ideas in late-2016, and presented this to the Council for information in early-2017 (see link below).

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/plans/community-planning/little-river-big-ideas

Background

In June 2015, as part of decisions on the 2015/25 Long Term Plan, the Council resolved to allocate resources to develop a community-led plan for Little River, with support from staff. A key driver for the resolution was to promote a coordinated and integrated approach to issues affecting the community, and to enable proper consideration of village improvement projects during Council funding processes (i.e. Annual and Long Term Plans).

Priority Projects

The Little River Wairewa Community Trust has now identified priority projects, and is continuing to work these up in more detail. The Trust plans to make a submission on the Long Term Plan 2018/28 for the following projects.

·    Little River wastewater feasibility study

·    Multi-purpose recreation and medical centre

·    Lakeside recreational facilities

·    Playground upgrade

·    Renovation of Goods Shed for community use

·    Streetscape improvements

·    Sculpture trail

Diamond Harbour Village Development Plan

The Board endorsed the updated Getting to the Point action plan and the Diamond Harbour Village Development Plan in September 2017, and these are attached for the Council’s information.

             Background    

             In June 2015, as part of decisions on the 2015/25 Long Term Plan, the Council resolved to allocate resources for a Diamond Harbour master planning initiative. A key driver for the resolution was to harness community energy to improve the Diamond Harbour village, and to enable proper consideration of village improvement projects during Council funding processes (i.e. Annual and Long Term Plans).

             The Diamond Harbour community, with support from staff, have now updated the Getting to the Point action plan, a community-led initiative prepared in 2013 and prepared a Diamond Harbour Village Development Plan, which is an identified action in Getting to the Point.

             Priority Projects

             The Diamond Harbour Village Development Plan focuses on improvements to pedestrian and vehicle circulation and safety.

             The Diamond Harbour community has identified the first two projects as priorities for the Long Term Plan 2018/28 based on their anticipated benefits and comparatively lower costs.

            

Project description

High level cost estimate

1

New footpaths, landscaping and paving treatments on Waipapa Ave, and improvements between Waipapa Ave and the community hall, library, Stoddart Cottage and medical centre.

Intention: improve safety, accessibility and connectivity between village landmarks and improve vehicle parking.

$533K

2

Pathways and tracks through Stoddart Point Reserve (comprising $77K for “recreational use paths” and $18K for “high use accessible paths”).

Intention: improve accessibility and connectivity by different pedestrians of different abilities.

$96K

3

New threshold treatments, landscaping and paving, parking layout and courtyard space opposite the village centre shops.

Intention: create more space for public seating, and/or for al fresco seating by local businesses.

$1,079K

 

4

Godley House and Cemetery parking area upgrade and new one-way circular road link

$479K

5

Stoddart Point Reserve parking area upgrade

$266K

6

Croquet and bowling club parking area upgrade

$735K

7

Improved pedestrian access from wharf to village

Intention: improve safety, accessibility and connectivity between village landmarks and the wharf.

$461K

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Getting to the Point Action Plan

20

b

Diamond Harbour Village Development Plan

34

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Penelope Goldstone - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Akaroa

Joan Blatchford - Manager Community Governance, Banks Peninsula/Lyttelton

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

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Council

09 November 2017

 

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Council

09 November 2017

 

 

7.        Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/441390

Contact:

Matt McLintock
David Cartwright, Chairperson

matt.mclintock@ccc.govt.nz

941 6231

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board held meetings on 9 and 24 October 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   School Road – Parking Restrictions - The Board approved that the parking of vehicles be restricted to a maximum period of three minutes between 8am to 9am and 2.30pm to 3.30pm on schooldays, on School Road just north of its intersection with Guys Road and that parking be restricted to 90 degree angle parking and reserved for vehicles with approved disabled person’s parking permit on the north side of School Road for 7 metres just southeast of the intersection with Guys Road.

·   Waimairi Road – No Stopping – The Board approved that the stopping and parking of vehicles be prohibited at any time on the south side of Waimairi Road just north of its intersection with Grahams Road.

·   Merivale Lane – P3 Parking Restrictions – The Board approved three minutes parking restrictions between the hours of 8am to 9am and 3pm to 4pm on school days and P120 Parking Restrictions from 9am and 3pm on school days in Merivale Lane.

·   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood 2017-18 Youth Development Fund – Applications – The Board approved grants totalling $2,500 to support 10 young people competing in various competitions in Australia, Singapore and New Zealand.

·   Correspondence – The Board received correspondence from the follow:

-      Westall Trust regarding issues previously raised relating to remaining character, amenity and health in Glandovey and Idris Roads.

-      The Office of the Chief Executive – addressing matters raised by Mr Wilding and a group of residents during their deputation to the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board on 28 August 2017.

The Board decided to request an urgent meeting with staff prior to the Working Party being established.

·   Briefing – The Board was introduced to the new Park Rangers that will be looking after parks in the city.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Veitches Road – 40 Kilometer Per Hour Speed Restriction – A joint recommendation from the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood and Papanui-Innes Community Boards.

The Veitches Road – 40 Kilometer Per Hour Speed Restriction report will be considered by the Council at its meeting on 9 November 2017.

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

       5.1     Sawyers Arms Road Pedestrian Crossing

Status

5.1.1   Work has begun on the installation of a new pedestrian crossing with traffic signals in Sawyers Arms Road, between Cotswold Avenue and Glasnevin Drive.

Temporary lane closures through the site may cause minor traffic delays whilst works are being undertaken.

Timeframe

5.1.2   Work is weather and road operations dependent, but it is expected that the installation will be completed by late November 2017.

5.2       University Parking Plan Review

5.2.1   The University Parking Plan Review – Area One, which is the Fendalton-Waimairi_harewood Community board area, opened for feedback on 20 October 2017 and will close on 10 November 2017. 

The changes proposed are:

·        Current P120 restriction area’s that include March-November are proposed to be changed to year round Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm.

             All other current P120 restrictions that are not 9am-5pm will be changed to these times.

·        Proposed new P120 restrictions to be year round Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm (applies to the streets of Hamilton, Lothian, Ilam, Tuirau, Swanleigh, Ryeland, Braithwaite)

Scheme plan

         5.3       Groynes - Culvert Replacement and Road Widening

5.3.1   Work is continuing on the replacement and upgrading of an existing culvert and the widening of the road access where it crosses the causeway at the entrance to the Groynes Reserve.

             The existing culvert is in very poor condition with sections of it breaking off and tree roots growing through, creating blockages and further breakdown of the structure.

             Widening of the road will allow for two-way traffic, as well as pedestrian access on both sides of the road over the causeway. 

             The expected completion date will be the end of November 2017.

https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/staticmap?markers=color:red|-43.4494,172.6099|-43.4494,172.6099&size=300x300&key=AIzaSyB_8rc2gD7BBK8dpTKjNnCX1r9b4U0f7fI

 

         5.4       Jeffreys Reserve Replacement Water Tank

5.4.1   The 200 cubic metre damaged suction tank in Jeffreys Reserve needs to be replaced by a 500 cubic metre suction tank. The larger tank complies with the new design requirements to balance peak demand, and will ensure water quality including the ability to treat the water, if needed in an emergency.

             The existing tank will be removed as part of the construction process and the surrounding area re-landscaped to blend in with the park space.

             The Jeffreys Reserve Replacement Water Tank project opened for feedback from 6 October 2017 and ran through until 24 October 2017.  In addition, two “Drop in” sessions for local residents were held on 11 October and 18 October 2017.

             A report will be presented back to the board in due course.

 

Proposed replacement tank location

             5.5       Western Belfast Bypass

                          The New Zealand Transport Agency’s Western Belfast Bypass project is due to open to traffic in                       stages from 31 October 2017.

             The Western Belfast Bypass is a new four-lane stretch of highway extending the Christchurch Norther Motorway (SH1) and connecting into State Highway 1 Johns Road, west of the Groynes entrance.  It is one of 6 six sections of the Western Corridor that runs between Belfast and Hornby.

                         Prior to being opened to traffic, the New Zealand Transport Agency has invited people to walk, run and cycle on the 4 kilometre long bypass at its Open Day from 10am until 2pm on Sunday, 29 October 2017.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues

6.1       Traffic Issues and Speeding

Status

6.1.1   Concerns relating to traffic issues, including the increased traffic flow, parking, and speeding, continue to be raised by members of the local community.

Action Required

6.1.2   Staff are responding to issues raised on an individual basis.

Timeframe

6.2.3      Ongoing.

         6.2       Tree Issues

                      Status

                      6.2.1   With spring upon us, concerns relating to trees continue to be raised by members of the              community.

Action Required

6.2.2      Staff are responding to issues raised on an individual basis.

Timeframe

                      6.2.3      Ongoing.

6.3       The Breeze Walking Festival

The Breeze Walking Festival ran from 30 September to 15 October. The event, which was organised by the Council Community Recreation team, has been very popular with walkers of all ages and abilities. The team effectively partnered with organisations to integrate culture, mental health awareness, art, links with Antarctic, latest developments, heritage and the environment to deliver the festival.

Over 60 people turned out for the Mona Vale Spring Splendour walk and hear about this gracious historic property.

         

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board will received its next progress report as part of the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Board Area Report at its meeting on 13 November 2017.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Kay Rabe - Governance Support Officer

Margaret Henderson - Committee Advisor

Matthew McLintock - Manager Community Governance, Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood

Maryanne Lomax - Community Development Advisor

Lisa Gregory - Community Recreation Advisor

Bronwyn Frost - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

Report from Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board  – 9 October 2017

 

8.        Veitches Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit

Reference:

17/1204171

Contact:

Penny Gray

penny.gray@ccc.govt.nz

941 8633

 

 

 

1.      Comment

1.1   This project is on the boundary of the Papanui-Innes and Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Boards.  It was considered and supported by the Boards at their respective meetings on 29 September 2017 and 9 October 2017 noting that in this instance the boundary between the two Boards, is Grampian Street.

 

 

2.   Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood and Papanui-Innes Joint Recommendation to Council

 

(Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour Variable Speed Limit on Veitches Road (School Speed Zone), Land Transport Rule Setting of Speed Limits 2017, and the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a Variable Speed Limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on:

a.         Veitches Road, commencing at a point 138 metres west of its intersection with Cavendish Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 255 metres.

3.         Approve that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 and 2 above, the above mentioned Variable Speed Limit shall come into force on completion of infrastructure installation.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Veitches Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit

42

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Casebrook Intermediate School Plan TG132033 - School Speed Zone - Veitches Road

47

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

Veitches Road - 40 Kilometres Per Hour Variable Speed Limit

Reference:

17/974910

Contact:

Wayne Anisy

Wayne.anisy@ccc.govt.nz

941 8346

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board to consider the installation of a new variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour) on Veitches Road opposite Casebrook Intermediate as shown on Attachment A, and make a recommendation to the Council for approval and its inclusion in the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits.

1.2       This project is on the boundary of the Papanui-Innes and Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board areas.  At its meeting on 29 September 2017 the Papanui/Innes Community Board supported the staff recommendation.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated, in response to community requests and this site being a top priority on the Council’s approved school zone implementation priority list.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by assessment of the magnitude of the problem and the number of properties affected by the preferred option. The decision is easily reversible.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Approve the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit on Veitches Road (school zone), Land Transport Rule Setting of Speed Limits 2017, and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve that, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed zone) apply on:

a.         Veitches Road, commencing at a point 138 metres west of its intersection with Cavendish Road and extending in a westerly direction for a distance of 255 metres.

3.         Approve that subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 and 2 above, that the above mentioned variable speed limit shall come into force on completion of infrastructure installation.

          Note:  In relation to item 2a above, the Fendalton-Waimairi-Harewood Community Board                                                recommendation covers the Veitches Road section west of Grampian Street.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users - minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install 40 Kilometre per hour variable speed limit (preferred option)

·     Option 2 – Do nothing.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Likely reduction in operational speed, therefore improving the safety in the area during the school hours.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increased amount of signage on the traffic route.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Council Traffic Operation have an ongoing programme of installing 40 kilometre per hour variable speed limits outside schools. The signs operate for short periods before and after school, and aim to reduce vehicle speeds at times when on-road school related activity is high - making it safer for school children to cross busy roads near their school.

5.2       Potential sites must meet a specified criteria set by New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) and are prioritised using  a methodology process endorsed by Council on 25 August 2011 as the most appropriate method of improving road safety outside certain schools, where no other traffic control device(s) are practical or feasible.

5.3       A 40 kilometre per hour variable speed limit on Veitches Road outside Casebrook Intermediate ranks as a priority for implementation in the 2017-2018 financial year.

5.4       The proposed 40 kilometre per hour variable speed limit meets the warrant and control method criteria specified by NZTA.

5.5       Veitches Road is classified a collector route with an average weekday traffic volume of around 3,400 vehicles and an 85th percentile speed of 56.5 kilometres per hour.

5.6       As shown on Attachment A, variable signs are located on Veitches Road, with static ‘School Zone Ends’ signs on the opposite side of the road. Grampian Street also requires static signs to inform motorists they are entering/exiting a different speed limit at certain times.


 

6.   Option 1 – Install a 40 Kilometre Per Hour Variable Speed Limit School Zone on Veitches Road (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install the 40 kilometre per hour Variable Speed Limit School Zone on Veitches Road as shown on Attachment A.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Key Stakeholder Engagement was carried out with the NZTA, New Zealand Police and Casebrook Intermediate School. The New Zealand Police, NZTA and Casebrook Intermediate School have provided written support for the proposal.

6.6       On Monday 28 August 2017, an information leaflet was delivered to all properties on the north side of Veitches Road between 69 Veitches Road to Cavendish Road and on the south side between Northfield Road and Cavendish Road.  On Grampian Street from Cavendish Road to Jocelyn Street and number 23 Grampian Street.  This included a plan of where the new signage was to be located and contact details should any residents have any concerns regarding this proposal.

6.7       In addition to the delivered leaflet, on Friday 8 September 2017 residents at 2 Brockham Place, 102 and 1/106 Veitches Road were door knocked.  They had no objections to the variable signs being installed out in front of their properties.

6.8       To date no other responses have been received.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.9       This option is consistent with the Christchurch City Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.10    Cost of Implementation – Approximately $40,000 to supply, install and commission signs.

6.11    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - covered under the area maintenance contract.

6.12    Funding source - School Speed Zone Signs budget.

Legal Implications

6.13    Speed limits must be set in accordance with Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 and subsequent amendments. 

6.14    Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Speed Limits Bylaw 2010 provides Council with the authority to set speed limits by resolution.

6.15    The Council has not delegated its authority to set speed limits. 

6.16    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and the New Zealand Gazette notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284).

Risks and Mitigations    

6.17    None identified.

Implementation

6.18    Implementation dependencies - dependent on endorsement by the Community Board and approval by Council to legalise school speed zone.

6.19    Implementation timeframe - Installed by February 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.20    The advantages of this option include:

·     Likely reduction in operational speed, therefore improving the safety in the area during the school hours.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

6.21    The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increased amount of signage on the traffic route.

7.   Option 2 – Do nothing

Option Description

7.1       Do nothing.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       This option was not consulted on.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with the Christchurch City Council’s Plans and Policies

7.6.1   Inconsistency - it does not address the concerns raised by the school and community.

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - it does not offer any protections to vulnerable road users.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation - $0.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – Not applicable.

7.9       Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.10    Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations    

7.11    The risk of an accident and the severity of it is increased with this option.

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable.

7.13    Implementation timeframe – Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·     No additional cost to Council.

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·     It does not address the safety concerns of the school and that of the community.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Casebrook Intermediate School Plan TG132033 - School Speed Zone - Veitches Road

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Anisy - Traffic Engineer

Penny Gray - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

PDF Creator


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

9.        Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1233299

Contact:

Arohanui Grace

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

941 6663

 

 

1.       Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October 2017.

2.       Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.              Receives the Community Board report.

3.       Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board held meetings on 3 and 20 October 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

3.1          Approving, pursuant to the Reserves Act 1977, the granting of a right of way easement for a period of six months to McVicar Holdings Limited for the purpose of a logging road between Cashmere Forest and the Summit Road over part of the Marleys Hill Scenic Reserve subject to:

·     Use by vehicles only between the hours of 6am to 5pm weekdays.

·           A speed limit of 30 kilometres per hour.

·     Full reinstatement and active restoration of the land.

3.2          Approving the landscape plan for the playground renewal at Barrington Park.

3.3          Approving the location of a gifted Pou and the Kahikatea tree in Ernle Clark Reserve

3.4          Approving a grant of $3,000 from the 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to Spreydon OSCAR Incorporated towards running costs.

3.5          Approving a grant of $1,759 from the 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Hoon Hay Community Centre Group towards the Hoon Hay Community Centre equipment costs.

3.6          Approving a grant of $750 from the 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to Hillmorton High School towards the Hillmorton High School A Girls' Basketball Team to compete in the Secondary Schools National Basketball tournament in Palmerston North on 1-6 October 2017.

3.7          Approving a grant of $2,000 to Hillmorton High School towards the Hillmorton High School A Boys’ Basketball Team to compete in the Secondary Schools National Basketball tournament in Palmerston North on 1 to 6 October 2017.

3.8          Approving a grant of $250 from the 2017/18 Youth Development Fund to Bella Gruindelingh to compete in the New Zealand Aerobics and Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships in Auckland on 6 to 10 October 2017.

3.9          Adopting the 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan.

3.10       Approving amended landscape plans for the location of Manuka Cottage on Cornelius O’Connor Reserve showing changes made to the playground location, reduction in car park spaces, inclusion of a storm water swale and bike stands.

3.11       Approving a grant of $3,000 from the 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club, as fund holder, towards the Pacific Series 2017.

3.12       Approving a grant of $1,000.00 from the 2017/18 Discretionary Response Fund to Christchurch South Community Watch towards a Digital Radio for the Community Watch Patrol Vehicle.

4.       Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Vista Place and Roystone Way - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions

4.2       Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing

5.       Significant Projects and Initiatives (e.g. major community or infrastructure projects)

       Edible Garden Awards       

5.1       Status

                In July 2015 the Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board decided to investigate initiating an          annual edible/sustainable/rain garden award for the ward.  Staff researched the proposal                      including information about the edible garden award model and partnership underway with at                      least two other Community Boards and the Canterbury Horticultural Society. This model,                                  while focussed on food production, can also recognise special gardening approaches such as                   organics or sustainability.

                During the latter part of 2015 and 2016 local staff met with a selection of local stakeholders,         representatives of the Canterbury Horticultural Society, and relevant staff.  Local views on how                       the model is delivered in            other areas were explored.  Information was presented to the Board               which agreed to delivery of the event via a partnership with the Canterbury Horticultural                        Society.

                Promotional material has been prepared and distributed.  The awards will congratulate and         encourage existing, new, or potential gardeners in the area, working together or as individuals.              Entries have been called for and may be made any time up till 12 February 2018.  Judging will                 occur during March.

 

5.2       Action Required

Local staff will organise an awards ceremony where gardeners will be presented with certificates recognising their achievements.

 

5.3       Timeframe

Judging of the nominated gardens will be in March 2018 with the award ceremony is planned for mid- April.


 

         Land Drainage Recovery Plan- Heathcote flood mitigation options Public Meetings

            

5.4       Status

             The risk of flooding remains a major concern to residents living in the vicinity of the Heathcote River. There has been considerable investigation into the risks and options for mitigation measures that can be implemented have been developed.  Residents have been keen to learn the results of the investigations and discuss the options with the Council.  Two community meetings have been held recently by Land Drainage Recovery Programme staff to introduce the options that have been developed and to provide an opportunity for those affected to discuss these.  In conjunction with these public meetings, two consultant reports were released one on dredging, and the other on the frequent flooding response.

             The options presented included:

• Dredging

• Bank stabilisation

• Low stopbanks

• Storage basins

 

The Council’s Flood Intervention Policy, which offers assistance to properties that are at risk of flooding, where the flood risk has been worsened by the earthquakes.

 

The meetings were run in a workshop style, where Land Drainage team members with specialist knowledge on each option leading the discussions at separate areas for each of the five options.

The meetings were well attended, by approximately 180 residents over the two sessions.

5.5       Action Required

 

There is to be consultation on the bank stabilisation option in November.  Approval from the Infrastructure Transport and Environment Committee and Council is to be sought for the options not already approved.  Funding is to be sought through the Long Term Plan.

 

5.6       Timeframe 

It is planned that staff will come to the Board in early December with the results of consultation on the proposed bank stabilisation works.

 

6.       Significant Community Issues

 

District Plan Zoning provisions

6.1       Status

The Board is aware of ongoing expressions of community concern around new developments and how they fit in terms of the District Plan. Recent development proposals in particular have highlighted that the District Plan provisions and Resource Management Act 1991 processes are not well understood by local residents. 


 

6.2       Action Required

The Board plans to host a seminar for residents associations and other interested persons to hear presentations from appropriate planning staff on the zoning provisions of the District Plan and the consenting process under the Resource Management Act 1991.  There will also be an opportunity for residents to ask questions.

6.3       Timeframe

The date of the seminar is planned to be held early in 2018.

Ashgrove Reserve

6.4       Status

The Lower Cashmere Residents Association is working with local parks staff to become involved in the management and maintenance of Ashgrove Reserve.  At a community meeting earlier this month a "Friends of the Ashgrove Reserve" was formed.  The group has held a 'weeding bee' where much of the invasive weed growth at the top of the reserve was removed and empty bottles/cans were cleared out.  The group has a desire to not just maintain the reserve, but to nurture it and plans to arrange smaller, frequent working bees to begin the nurturing process.

“The Friends” have already planted some small plants they were given (two Pokaka, three Clematis foetida, one Kahikatea) with awareness of their needs and has found another kauri tree in the reserve so now there are two. 

6.5       Action Required

Local Parks staff are working with the group going forward.  The local arborist is currently discussing with the group plans to do some initial work on the reserve canopy.  

7.       Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

The 2017-19 Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Plan was adopted by the Board at its meeting on 3 October 2017.

8.       Community Board Significant Matters of Interest

8.1          Hoon Hay Hoops

                At the request of local youth the skate jam event that was previously run by the                               Spreydon/Heathcote Community Board was replaced last year with a three on three basketball             tournament.  The second “Hoon Hay Hoops” was held on Friday 13 October from 11.30am to                5.30pm at Hoon Hay Park, Mathers Road.  The event was organised and run by a collaboration                         of local youth, Cross Over Trust, Spreydon Youth Trust and the Community Recreation                                     Advisor. Prior to the 2017 Hoon Hay Hoops event the youth attended a “Get Set Go workshop”                  to learn the basics of event management.  With the skills learned at the workshop they much                       of the on the day management was undertaken by these young people.

                The day was sunny and the competition keen. Many sausages were consumed. Overall the         event was extremely well attended and enjoyed by all. Participants and spectators are already               looking forward to next year’s “Hoops”.


 

8.2          Vista Place

                Elected members and staff have been responding for some time to residents in the vicinity of                Vista Place regarding their concern about anti-social road use in the street. These include              complaints of groups of young people parking in the turning circle of the Place and using                         the area to drink, use drugs, play loud music as well as using their vehicles to do wheel spins                          and burnouts in the street.  In addition, there are incidents of people entering                                           resident’s properties.  Residents have indicated to the Board that they find the some of the                frequent and ongoing behaviour intimidating.

                Following investigation a proposal for a road access restriction at night, under the ‘Prohibited      Times on Roads’ Bylaw was developed.  Under the proposal, the night time no stopping                             restrictions would apply from 10pm to 5am, seven days a week.  Property owners, occupiers,               and their bona fide visitors will be exempt from the restrictions.  Those who infringe risk a                   $750 penalty.

                The proposal was considered by the Board at its meeting on 20 October 2017 and a                          recommendation for the Council to approve the restrictions for the entire length of Vista Place                        and Roystone Way is on the agenda for this meeting.

 

8.3       Tree and Urban Forest Plan Workshops

To support the upcoming release of the proposal for development of a Tree and Urban Forest Plan the Board recently hosted two community workshops.  A workshop to introduce the proposal to the culturally and linguistically diverse community was held on 17 October 2017, followed by a workshop for Spreydon-Cashmere residents associations, local environmental groups and other interested persons on 24 October 2017.  The workshops explained that the Council wants to work with the community to develop a long-term vision and strategy to maximise the health and sustainability of the city’s urban trees and forests and the benefits we receive from them.

The workshops also provided an early opportunity for participants to share their ideas for the plan.  Participants at both workshops were interested and enthusiastic and they provided the project team with thoughtful feedback and ideas for the plan.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Faye Collins - Community Board Advisor

Arohanui Grace - Manager Community Governance, Spreydon-Cashmere

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

Report from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  – 20 October 2017

 

10.    Vista Place - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions

Reference:

17/1257721

Contact:

Arohanui Grace

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

941 6663

 

 

 

 

1.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

             Approve that pursuant to the Christchurch City Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014, Part 2, Clause 7, motor vehicles weighing less than 3,500 kilograms are prohibited from being operated between the hours of 10pm to 5am on the following roads:

a)    Vista Place (entire length)

b)    Roystone Way (entire length)

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Vista Place - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions

56

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

61

b

Consultation results

62

c

Feedback

63

d

Team responses

73

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

Vista Place - Proposed Prohibited Times on Roads Restrictions

Reference:

17/924139

Contact:

John Dore

john.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8875

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the approval of prohibited times on roads restrictions on Vista Place and Roystone Way, in accordance with Attachment A.  The proposed restrictions reduce likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing
New Zealand Police a practical tool for enforcement.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to community requests and the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to advise on options available to control the occurrences of anti-social behaviour.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.2       The level of significance was determined by the significance matrix including the relatively small area affected by the proposal in relation to the Christchurch District, the proposal’s ability to be reversed and the limited impact on the Council’s role to carry out its roles and functions.

2.3       The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommend that the Council resolve to:

1.         Approve that pursuant to the Christchurch City Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014, Part 2, Clause 7, motor vehicles weighing less than 3,500 kilograms are prohibited from being operated from 10pm to 5am on the following roads:

a)    Vista Place (entire length)

b)    Roystone Way (entire length)

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install Prohibited Times on Roads restriction

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.2       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Option 1 – Preferred Option)

a)         The advantages of this option include:

·     Reduces likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing NZ Police a practical tool for enforcement.

b)        The disadvantages of this option include:

·     No person may use a motor vehicle weighing less than 3,500kg on Vista Pl or Roystone Way from 10pm to 5am, Monday to Sunday. Unless the vehicle is conveying the owner or occupier of any land having a frontage to Vista Pl and Roystone Way or the owner or occupiers bonafide visitors. Other exceptions are included in the Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       Residents on and in the vicinity of Vista Place have been experiencing antisocial behaviour at night, with vehicles often congregating at the Vista Place cul-de-sac head.

5.2       Residents are being woken by loud noise from cars doing burnouts, loud music and partying.

5.3       There are reports of people accessing private property, intimidating behaviour towards residents and littering.

5.4       The Police have been to this area in response to numerous call outs from the public.

5.5       Vista Place and Roystone Way are both local Cul de sac roads in a residential area.

5.6       Council proposes a Prohibited Times on Road restriction. The restriction reduces the likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing NZ Police a practical tool for enforcement.

5.7       Roads subject to ‘Prohibited Times on Roads’ are identified by ‘No Entry’ signs (as shown on Attachment A). The restrictions will apply from 10pm to 5am, seven days a week.

5.8       The Council’s ‘Prohibited Times on Roads’ Bylaw clause enables it to restrict night time access to a street to legitimate users only, such as residents and their visitors. The purpose of the Bylaw clause is to prevent nuisance or antisocial road users from accessing the street and creating problems. Those who infringe risk a $750 penalty.

5.9       The restrictions are planned for the entire length of Vista Place and Roystone Way.


 

6.   Option 1 - Install Prohibited Times on Road Restrictions (preferred)

Option Description

Install a night time access restriction for motor vehicles less than 3,500 kg between the hours of 10pm to 5am, Monday to Sunday for the entire length of the following roads:·     Vista Place (entire length)

·    Roystone Way (entire length)

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       Local residents in the Vista Place area have expressed their concerns regarding the ongoing level of disruption to their daily lives created by anti-social activity in Vista Place.

6.5       A group of residents, representatives from NZ Police, Council Area Traffic Engineer and community board members met to discuss the issues identified and possible options to resolve the problem. These key stakeholders agreed that a proposed restriction as described in Attachment A, would provide a practical tool for Police to enforce anti-social behaviour in the area.

6.6       The NZ Police also noted that enforcement is dependent on available Police resource at the time given other high priority and high risk call outs.

6.7       Consultation on the Prohibited Times on Roads restriction was undertaken from 9 August to 25 August 2017. Council delivered 150 consultation leaflets to residents in and around Vista Place and Roystone Way, Council libraries and service centres. They were also posted and emailed to 48 key stakeholders.

6.8       Of the 62 individuals and organisations that responded, 53 (85 per cent) supported the night-time restrictions, with one not in support.

6.9       Please see Attachment B, C and D for the results, feedback and team responses.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.10    This option is consistent with the Council’s Prohibited Times on Roads Policy.

Financial Implications

6.11    Cost of Implementation – approximately $2000 for the installation of signage.

6.12    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.13    Funding source - Traffic Operations Budget

Legal Implications

6.14    Part 2, Clause 7 (1) of the Christchurch City Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014 provides that “The Council may by resolution specify any road or part of a road and the days and times during which motor vehicles weighing less than 3,500 kilograms are prohibited from being used on that road or part of that road or roads”.

6.15    Part 1, Clause 5 of the Christchurch City Council Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2008 provides the Council with the authority to install parking, stopping and standing restrictions by resolution.

6.16    The Community Boards have delegated authority from the Council to exercise the delegations as set out in the Register of Delegations.  The list of delegations for the Community Boards includes does not include the installation of light vehicle prohibitions. 

6.17    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations

6.18    Not applicable

Implementation

6.19    Implementation dependencies - Community Board and Council approval

6.20    Implementation timeframe - Approximately four weeks once the area contractor receives the request.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.21    The advantages of this option include:

·   Reduces likelihood of anti-social behaviour on Vista Place and Roystone Way by providing NZ Police a practical tool for enforcement.

6.22    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   No person may use a motor vehicle weighing less than 3,500kg on Vista Pl or Roystone Way from 10pm to 5am, Monday to Sunday. Unless the vehicle is conveying the owner or occupier of any land having a frontage to Vista Pl and Roystone Way or the owner or occupiers bonafide visitors. Other exceptions are included in the Council Cruising and Prohibited Times on Roads Bylaw 2014.

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Maintain the status quo in Vista Place and Roystone Way

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with community requests for improvements to the road environment.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Prohibited Times on Roads Policy.  The process set out by the Policy, supports the approval of night time access restrictions as sought under Option 1 of this report.

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation - $0

7.7       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Costs of repairing damage and cleaning up rubbish.

7.8       Funding source - Not applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations

7.10    Further complaints to staff, New Zealand Police, Community Board and the Council.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.12    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No installation cost to the Council.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Likely that antisocial behaviour will continue.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Preferred Option

 

b 

Consultation results

 

c 

Feedback

 

d 

Team responses

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Samantha Sharland - Engagement Advisor

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


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09 November 2017

 

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Report from Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board  – 20 October 2017

 

11.    Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing

Reference:

17/1257740

Contact:

Arohanui Grace

arohanui.grace@ccc.govt.nz

941 6663

 

 

 

 

1.  Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

(Original staff recommendation accepted without change)

Part A

That the Council:

1.         In pursuance of the powers vested in it by Section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule- Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, authorises the head teacher of Spreydon School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Hoon Hay Rd school crossing point as shown on Attachment A, located at a point more or less 132 metres northwest of its intersection with Mathers Road.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing

76

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Preferred Option

82

b

Location Plan

83

c

Table 1 - Travel Modes to School

84

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

Spreydon School, Hoon Hay Road - Kea Crossing

Reference:

17/1045385

Contact:

John Dore

John.dore@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board to seek approval from council to install a School Patrolled Kea Crossing on Hoon Hay Rd as shown on Attachment A.

1.2       The site is located within the road network as shown on Attachment B. A Kea crossing is a school patrol with swing out stop signs on a crossing point that does not have the zebra markings.

Origin of Report

1.3       This report is staff generated following discussions with St Peters School.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the project being low cost and affecting a limited group of residents. The decision is easily reversible.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Spreydon-Cashmere Community Board recommends to Council that:

1.         In pursuance of the powers vested in it by Section 8.3(1) of the Land Transport Rule- Traffic Control Devices 2004 (Rule 54002), and pursuant to the powers vested in it by the Local Government Act 1974 and 2002, the Christchurch City Council authorises the head teacher of Spreydon School to appoint appropriately trained persons to act as school patrols at the Hoon Hay Rd school crossing point as shown on Attachment A, located at a point more or less 132 metres northwest of its intersection with Mathers Road.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users - minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install a school patrol kea crossing for the new Spreydon School site on Hoon Hay Rd as shown on Attachment A.

·     Option 2 – Do nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides supervision and priority for children of all school ages, when needing to cross Hoon Hay Rd before and after school.

·     Cost effective solution to providing road safety for school children.

 

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Short delay in traffic flow as vehicles have to stop to allow children to cross the road.

 

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       The Ministry of Education (MOE) is relocating the current Spreydon School from Lincoln Road to the former Manning Intermediate site on Hoon Hay Road. The new Spreydon School is expected to open around July 2018.

5.2       Spreydon School has been actively engaged with council school travel plan staff to help work through potential issues at the new Hoon Hay site and are proactively engaging with their school community to help educate and train pupils for the transition. 

5.3       Spreydon school staff approached council and requested a school patrolled kea crossing. A Kea crossing is a school patrol with swing out stop signs on a crossing point that does not have the zebra markings.

5.4       Christchurch City Council can approve the installation of school crossing points (Kea Crossings), provided the crossing comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 (the rule).

5.5       The school board of trustees should formally agree to the establishment and operation of a Kea crossing, as the school is responsible for operating the crossing and working with the Police to train children and staff in accordance with the School traffic safety team manual, published by NZTA.

5.6       NZTA traffic note 29 revision 2 provides guidance on how the rule should be applied including the range of vehicle and pedestrian volumes where a kea crossing is effective (Warrants).

5.7       The proposed kea crossing as shown in Attachment A, is compliant with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and meets the required warrant. Council staff and NZ Police are satisfied the site is complementary for a Kea Crossing and can train the children to operate it.

5.8       Since the school is not operational, pedestrian demand at the proposed Kea crossing has been estimated based on data gathered from the Spreydon School Travel Plan Survey recently undertaken with assistance from Council staff, a summary of the findings is tabled in Appendix C.

5.9       The survey was completed in June 2017 and involved 208 children. Similar survey results were reported for walkers and scooters in the afternoon. It is estimated that at least half the surveyed walkers and scooters will cross Hoon Hay Rd outside the school.

5.10    Hoon Hay Road is classified as a minor arterial and is surrounded by residential dwellings around the school site. Spreydon Domain is located behind houses to the east and a pedestrian access links the domain with Hoon Hay Rd near the proposed kea crossing. Hoon Hay Rd has an average weekday traffic volume of approximately 13,000 vehicles per day. 

5.11    There is an operational School Speed Zone already in place on this section of Hoon Hay Rd. 


 

6.   Option 1 – Install Kea Crossing (preferred)

Option Description

6.1       Install a school patrol kea crossing for Spreydon School on Hoon Hay Rd as shown on Attachment A.

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       The Spreydon School Board of Trustees (BOT), have formally agreed to the establishment and operation of a school patrol.

6.5       The NZ Police community constable has been consulted and agrees that a kea crossing can be operated in the proposed location and children/staff be trained to operate.

6.6       No other parties have been consulted, the proposal has no effect on surrounding properties. The proposal is an improvement to the existing crossing location.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.7       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

6.8       Cost of Implementation - $12,000

6.9       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - approved Council Maintenance budget.

6.10    Funding source – Traffic Operations Capital Budget.

Legal Implications

6.11    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004.

Risks and Mitigations    

6.12    None identified.

Implementation

6.13    Implementation dependencies - dependent on approval by Council to legalise the school patrol operation and training of the school patrollers and staff by the Police Community Education Officer.

6.14    Implementation timeframe –. Plan to complete work in January/February 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.15    The advantages of this option include:

·     Provides supervision and priority for children of all school ages, when needing to cross Hoon Hay Rd before and after school.

·     Cost effective solution to providing road safety for school children.

6.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Short delay in traffic flow as vehicles have to stop to allow children to cross the road.

7.   Option 2 – Do nothing

Option Description

7.1       No changes to existing road.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       This option is inconsistent with the school request.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.5       This option is inconsistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

Financial Implications

7.6       Cost of Implementation – $0

7.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable

7.8       Funding source – No applicable

Legal Implications

7.9       Not applicable.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.10    Ongoing concern from school about road safety.

Implementation

7.11    Implementation dependencies - not applicable.

7.12    Implementation timeframe – not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.13    The advantages of this option include:

·   No additional cost to Council.

·   No delays in traffic flow as vehicles don’t have to stop to allow children to cross the road.

7.14    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Does not respond to the needs of the school community.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Preferred Option

 

b 

Location Plan

 

c 

Table 1 - Travel Modes to School

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

John Dore - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

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09 November 2017

 

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09 November 2017

 

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09 November 2017

 

 

12.    Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/477091

Contact:

Gary Watson
Mike Mora, Chairperson

gary.watson@ccc.govt.nz

941 8258

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board during October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held meetings on 10 October 2017 and 24 October 2017. 

Key decisions of the Board made under delegation were:

·   A grant of $500 from the Board’s 2017-18 Youth Development Fund to Nekholas Thompson towards competing in the Hip Hop Unite World Championships in Amsterdam, Holland.

·   A grant of $600 from the Board’s 2017-18 Youth Development Fund towards the cost of Lance Calderon, Brad Cross, Jovin Fabic, Ihaia Kendrew, Rhys Kershaw and Jacob Milne competing in the New Zealand Secondary Schools Basketball ‘A’ National Championships in New Plymouth.

·   A grant of $600 from the Board’s 2017-18 Youth Development Fund towards the cost of Hollie Carlisle-Reeve, Mesepa Fui, Rikiana Howden-Winter, Finlay Martin, Portia Smith and Kennedy Vallance competing in the New Zealand Secondary Schools Girls’ Basketball National Championships in New Plymouth.

·   A grant of $500 from the Board’s 2017-18 Youth Development Fund to Jake Tacon towards the cost of competing in the Craig Foster Futsal International Cup in Queensland.

·   The approval for the exchange of Council-owned land in Owaka Road.

·   The approval of the name Synergy Lane for a new right-of-way in the Waterloo Business Park Subdivision.

·   A grant of $1,000 from the Board’s 2017-18 Discretionary Response Fund to the Chinese Joyful Club towards the Chinese Senior Group.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following report from the Board presenting Part A recommendations, is included separately in this agenda for consideration by the Council:

4.1       Aidanfield Drive, Aidanfield Christian School – Proposed 40 Kilometres Per Hour School Speed Zone

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

       Hornby Library, Customer Services and South West Leisure Centre Projects       

5.1       Status

5.1.1   The Council’s Libraries team is meeting with Uru Mānuka – the Hornby Cluster of eight schools, to discuss the needs of the schools and how a new library in the area could compliment the resources they already have.

5.1.2   The Board received a workshop on 30 October 2017 from the project team identifying the next steps around the change in reserve classification of part of the Denton Park recreation reserve as well as public notification of the intention to change part of the Denton Park Management Plan 1987. The report on this issue will be considered at the Community Board meeting on 14 November 2017.

       Riccarton Road Corridor        

5.2       Status

5.2.1   At a joint seminar of the Infrastructure Transport and Environment Committee and the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board held on 3 November 2017, members were briefed on the current status and future programme of work regarding the Riccarton Road project.

5.3       Action Required

5.3.1   For information only.

5.4       Timeframe

5.4.1   Ongoing

 

6.   Significant Community Issues

       Lincoln Road         Widening (Curletts Road to Wrights Road)

6.1       Status

6.1.1   A joint briefing of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton and Spreydon-Cashmere Community Boards is to occur in November 2017 to update members about this project.

The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recently received representations on this matter from the Halswell Residents’ Association.

Comments on this specific project were made by both Boards in their respective submissions to the Council during the Annual Plan 2017-18 process.

6.2       Action Required

6.2.1   For information only.

6.3       Timeframe

6.3.1   During November 2017

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       The Board’s ongoing decisions are being included as measures against the Outcomes and Priorities contained in the 2017 – 2019 Community Board Plan.  This information will be presented in the monthly Area Report to the Board commencing in November 2017. 

 

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       Board/School Principals’ Discussions

As part of its agreed Outcomes and Priorities in its Community Board Plan, the Board will be hosting local School Principals and Boards of Trustees representatives on 15 November 2017 to informally discuss matters of mutual interest.

8.2       Events Update

8.2.1   Our Community, Our Riccarton, Let's Have Fun

The popular Riccarton Community Fun Day organised and run by the Oak Development Trust was held on Saturday 14 October 2017. Over 1,000 local people from the Riccarton area enjoyed a range of performances from local groups and artists, free food and lots of activities including face painting, cupcake and pebble decorating, Pony Parties, Cheapskates Skate Skool, Zumba, dunking machine and more. The finale culminated with a tug-o-war and the Design a Hat competition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.2.2   Pūkeko Stomp Treasure Hunt 

After an initial postponement due to inclement weather, the Pūkeko Stomp Treasure Hunt was held on Tuesday 12 October 2017 at the Halswell Quarry Park. As one of the walks being part of The Breeze Walking Festival, the event was run in partnership with Plunket, Canterbury Play Centre and Christchurch City Council. About 800 people attended to meet Perky the Pūkeko and search for the Pūkeko hidden around the track of one of the permanent orienteering courses at the park. Participants also got the chance to make their own model Pūkeko from playdoh and have their hands and faces painted to complete the treasure hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.3       Neighbourhood Week/Summer with your Neighbours. The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board have allocated funding to 22 Neighbourhood Week/Summer with your Neighbours events.  As there was unallocated funding, this will be made available for further events throughout the Summer with your Neighbours timeframe.

8.4       The Oak Development Trust has a team working on developing a Riccarton website called the Riccarton Community Hub.  The website (www.riccarton.org.nz) will feature news, events and a directory of Riccarton organisations.  A launch of the website will be held.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.5       The Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board received a presentation from Matt Meek of the Riccarton Community Church on an event planned for Riccarton in February 2018.  Our Amazing Place, Riccarton, will be held using a model successfully initiated in Waitakere, Auckland.  It will be a suburb-wide treasure hunt that community members participate in over a four hour period, finding out about the 'treasures' in their neighbourhood.  Locally based organisations will have activity stations throughout the area which will enable promotion of their organisation. This is  the first such occasion that the Amazing Place concept will have run in Christchurch.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Gary Watson - Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

Marie Byrne - Community Development Advisor

Emily Toase - Community Recreation Advisor

Karla Gunby - Community Development Advisor

Peter Dow - Community Board Advisor

Cindy Sheppard - Governance Support Officer

Noela Letufuga - Community Support Officer

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

Report from Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board  – 10 October 2017

 

13.    Aidanfield Drive - Aidanfield Christian School - Proposed School Speed Zone

Reference:

17/1213231

Contact:

Edwin Tiong

edwin.tiong@ccc.govt.nz

941 8188

 

 

 

 

1.  Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

Original Staff Recommendation accepted without change

Part A

That the Council:

1.         Approve the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour Variable Speed Limit on Aidanfield Drive (School Speed Zone) as it meets the requirements of Section 7.1 of the Land Transport Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2003, and the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a Variable Speed Limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on Aidanfield Drive, commencing at a point 45 metres north west of its intersection with Bibiana Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 380 metres.

3.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a Variable Speed Limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on Coppinger Terrace, commencing at its intersection with Aidanfield Drive and extending in a south westerly direction for a distance of 75 metres.

4.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a Variable Speed Limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on Nash Road, commencing at its intersection with Aidanfield Drive and extending in a north and then north westerly direction for a distance of 65 metres.

5.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendations 1 and 2 above, that the above mentioned Variable Speed Limit shall come into force on completion of the infrastructure installation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Aidanfield Drive - Aidanfield Christian School - Proposed School Speed Zone

93

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Aidanfield Christian School - Proposed School Speed Zone Drawing TG132015 - For Council Approval

98

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

        Aidanfield Drive - Aidanfield Christian School - Proposed School Speed Zone

Reference:

17/995823

Contact:

Edwin Tiong

edwin.tiong@ccc.govt.nz

941 8188

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to endorse the installation of a new variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour school speed zone) on Aidanfield Drive outside Aidanfield Christian School, and recommend to the Council that it approve the new variable speed limit and its inclusion in the Christchurch City Council Register of Speed Limits.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to the Aidanfield Christian School requests and this site becoming one of the top ten locations on the Council’s approved school speed zone implementation priority list.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by the project being low cost and affecting a limited group of residents by the preferred option.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommends that the Council:

1.         Approve the installation of a 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limit on Aidanfield Drive (school zone) as it meets the requirements of Section 7.1 of the Land Transport Setting of Speed Limits Rule 2003, and the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284) including the times of operation.

2.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on Aidanfield Drive, commencing at a point 45 metres north west of its intersection with Bibiana Street and extending in a north westerly direction for a distance of 380 metres.

3.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on Coppinger Terrace, commencing at its intersection with Aidanfield Drive and extending in a south westerly direction for a distance of 75 metres.

4.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendation 1 above, that pursuant to Clause 5(1) of the Christchurch City Speed Limits Bylaw 2010, a variable speed limit (40 kilometres per hour School Speed Zone) apply on Nash Road, commencing at its intersection with Aidanfield Drive and extending in a north and then north westerly direction for a distance of 65 metres.

5.         Approve, subject to the Council approving recommendations 1 and 2 above, that the above mentioned variable speed limit shall come into force on completion of the infrastructure installation.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan  (2015 - 2015)

4.1.1   Activity: Road Operations:

·     Level of Service: 10.0.1 Provide journey reliability on specific strategic routes

·     Level of Service: 10.0.6 Improve Road Safety: Reduce the number of reported crashes on the network

·     Level of Service: 10.0.31 Protect vulnerable users – minimise the number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 - Install School Speed Zone for Aidanfield Christian School (preferred option)

·     Option 2 - Do Nothing

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     Reduces the operational speed, therefore improves the safety in the area during the school hours.

·     The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     Increase amount of signage on the traffic route.

 

5.   Context/Background

5.1       The Council has a commitment to improve road safety. Reducing excessive vehicle speeds, where appropriate, outside schools during peak arrival and departure periods improves safety for children. The Council has a programme of installing 40 kilometres per hour variable speed limits (known as ‘School Speed Zones’) outside schools according to a prioritisation process. This process, including the methodology behind it, was endorsed by the Council on 25 August 2011 as the most appropriate method of improving road safety outside certain schools, where no other traffic control device(s) are practical or feasible.

5.2       For some time, the Aidanfield Christian School have raised concerns about the traffic environment around the school and the consequential road safety implications for children on their way to and from school.

 

 


 

6.   Option 1 - Install School Speed Zone for Aidanfield Christian School (preferred)

Option Description

Install the school speed zone as shown in Attachment A.On Aidanfield Drive, electronic signs are proposed to be placed at the start of the school zone and static (non-electronic) 'School Zone Ends' signs will be placed at the end of the zone.Significance

6.3       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.4       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.5       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.6       Engagement was carried out from 14 to 30 August 2017.

6.7       11 affected property owners and residents were advised by letter of the recommended option.

6.8       During the engagement period there were no feedback received.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.9       This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

6.10    Cost of Implementation - $32,000

6.11    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs - Covered under the area maintenance contract and effects will be minimal to the overall asset.

6.12    Funding source – School Speed Zone Signage Budget.

Legal Implications

6.13    The installation of any signs and/or markings associated with traffic control devices must comply with the Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004 and the New Zealand Gazette Notice (21/04/2011, Number 55, page 1284).

Risks and Mitigations

6.14    Not applicable

Implementation

6.15    Implementation dependencies – dependent on endorsement by the Community Board and approval by the Council to legalise school speed zone.

6.16    Implementation timeframe – Installed by January 2018.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.17    The advantages of this option include:

·   Reduces the operational speed, therefore improves the safety in the area during school hours.

·   The electronic speed zone signs enhance driver awareness of the likely presence of children.

6.18    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Increase amount of signage on the traffic route.

7.   Option 2 - Do Nothing

Option Description

7.1       Do nothing

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are low.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       This option was not consulted on.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is inconsistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

7.6.1      Inconsistency – it does not address the concerns raised by the school and community.

7.6.2      Reason for inconsistency – it does not offer any protections to vulnerable road users.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – cost of staff time investigating the proposal.

7.8       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Not applicable

7.9       Funding source – Not applicable

Legal Implications

7.10    Not applicable

Risks and Mitigations

7.11    Not applicable

Implementation

7.12    Implementation dependencies - Not applicable

7.13    Implementation timeframe - Not applicable

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   No additional cost to the Council.

7.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It does not address the safety concerns of the school and those of the community.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Aidanfield Christian School - Proposed School Speed Zone Drawing TG132015 - For Council Approval

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Author

Edwin Tiong - Traffic Engineer

Approved By

Ryan Rolston - Team Leader Traffic Operations

Aaron Haymes - Manager Operations (Transport)

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

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Council

09 November 2017

 

 

14.    Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1250670

Contact:

Shupayi Mpunga
Sally Buck, Chairperson

shupayi.mpunga@ccc.govt.nz

941 6605

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board held meetings on 2 and 18 October 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved:

·   Parking restrictions in:

·   Silvester Street, Woolston;

·   Ferry Road near Richardson Terrace;

·   227 Ferry Road

·   Ribbonwood Place;

·   Alexandra Street, Richmond;

·   McCormacks Bay Road – Saturday Stopping Restrictions;

·   99 Main Road, Redcliffs;

·   Riccarton Avenue Proposed Small Passenger Service Vehicle Stand.

·   Settlers Reserve Easement for a sewer main.

·   Funding contributions from the Linwood-Central-Heathcote Community Board Discretionary Response Fund for:

·   Sumner Pool to fix the leaks in the swimming pool in time for the upcoming summer season.

·   Sumner Neighbourhood Night.

·   Aranui Eagles Rugby League Club towards the Pacific Series.  The Board requested staff advice on the eligibility of this application to be funded from the Metropolitan Discretionary Fund.

·   To lay the Ferrymead Park Carpark report on the table to allow time for the Board to hold a workshop to consider the Ferrymead Development Plan, the Memorandum of Understanding with the Ferrymead Trust and the future use of the former Tamaki Village site as a potential dog park.


 

4.   Part A Recommendations to the Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       Linwood/Woolston Aquatic Facility – Site Selection

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

5.1.1   Redcliffs School – The Board received correspondence from the Redcliffs Residents’ Association advising that the Association wish to be involved in the retention and dispose of former Redcliffs School infrastructure and the layout and composition of new sports fields.  The Board has requested advice on how the Association can be included.

5.1.2   Woolston Playground Upgrade – The Woolston Park playground consultation closed at the end of August 2017.  The project team are currently working through the received submissions and preparing a report to come to the Board in November 2017.     

5.1.3   Matuku Takotako: Sumner Centre Community Meeting Rooms - In August this year Matuku Takotako: Sumner Centre opened.  At the completion of ongoing work the following names have been proposed for the community rooms including the hall, the breakout room and the meeting room behind the hall. 

·   Puoro-nuku and Puoro-raki were the Islands where Matuku Takotako lived.  Like Ying and Yang, the names give a female/male energetic duality to the spaces that hold their names.  Nuku is the female essence which gives life and Raki is the male essence which is given life and protects it.  It is therefore logical that the name of the performance space/hall be Puoro-nuku. This space gives life to creativity and performance.  It also gives ‘life’ (through the sliding wall) to the breakout/meeting room – Puoro-raki. Pariroa is the name of the coastal bluff/cliff area where Puoro-nuku and Puoro-raki are located.  The room behind Puoro-nuku faces the coastal seashore of Matuku Takotako (Sumner).

Puoro-nuku:

the community hall

Puoro-raki:

the breakout room from the performance space

Pariroa:   

the meeting room behind the performance space

 

6.   Significant Community Issues

People without homes

6.1       Status

6.1.1   The Linwood-Central-Heathcote Board was updated in relation to public safety issues in Doris Lusk Reserve, homelessness and related issues and the subsequent Council resolution CNCL/2017/0097 that the Council:

Request officers to report back to the Council and Community Board on a joined up approach to addressing the issues raised in the report regarding the Doris Lusk Park and the need for drop-in facilities

6.1.2   This item provides further information about actions since the previous report to the Board on the 19 July 2017.

6.2       Action

6.2.1   A Housing First steering group comprising of representatives of Christchurch City Council, Community Housing Providers, social service agencies working with the homeless and government departments have developed a draft community partnership proposal. The proposal was presented to the Ministry of Social Development on the 22 September 2017. The steering group is awaiting formal comments from Ministry of Social Development representatives.

6.2.2   A briefing paper was presented to the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee on 4 October 2017.

6.3       Timeframe

6.3.1   Proposals for support from the Christchurch City Council for the Housing First initiative will be included in the 2018 – 2028 Long Term Plan.

6.3.2   Progress is dependent on the nature of the comments from Ministry of Social Development, but at this stage both parties are envisaging that the Housing First initiative will begin in Christchurch in early 2018.

6.3.3   A fully developed proposal will be tabled at the Social, Community Development and Housing Committee in December 2017. The report will describe the proposal including timeframes, and recommended roles and levels of support from the Council.

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

7.1       At time of writing this report there was nothing to report.

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1       The Breeze Walking Festival from 30 September – 15 October has been very popular with walkers of all ages and abilities and has effectively partnered with organisations to integrate culture, mental health awareness, art, links with the Antarctic, latest developments, heritage and the environment to deliver the festival.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments to this report.

 

Signatories

Author

Shupayi Mpunga - Manager Community Governance, Linwood-Central-Heathcote

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

15.    Coastal-Burwood Community Board Report to Council

Reference:

17/1159387

Contact:

Jo Wells
Kim Money, Chairperson

jo.wells@ccc.govt.nz

941 6451

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

The purpose of this report is to provide the Council with an overview of Part A matters requiring a Council decision and of matters considered by the Community Board arising in October 2017.

 

2.   Community Board Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the Community Board report.

 

3.   Community Board Decisions Under Delegation

The Coastal-Burwood Community Board held meetings on 2 and 16 October 2017.  Key decisions made under delegation were:

·   The Board approved the removal and relocation of the flying fox from Muka Park, North Prestons (item 6.2 refers).

·   The Board approved the granting of funds to Neighbourhood Week applicants.

·   The Board received information about the damage of infrastructure (kerbs, footpaths and private properties) being caused by trees in the Westhaven subdivision. The Board requested that a letter is sent to residents in the subdivision to inform them that the Board has requested a replacement strategy be developed incorporating feedback from residents. 

·   The Board received correspondence from the Avon-Heathcote Estuary Ihutai Trust regarding South Brighton area flood protection. This is discussed in section 6.1 of this report.

·   The Board adopted the Coastal-Burwood 2017-19 Community Board Plan.

·   The Board approved a grant towards the $2 Pool project at Rawhiti Domain for the 2017/18 summer season. The “$2 Pool” attracted over 8000 visits in the previous summer.

·   The Board approved several Youth Development Fund grants to attend the 2017 GymnasticsNZ Aerobics National Championships in Auckland, the 2017 GymnasticsNZ Tumbling National Championships in Christchurch and the Hip Hop Unite World Championships in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

·   The Board approved a Discretionary Response Fund grant of $3,000 to the Family Help Trust towards their Breaking the Cycle for Christchurch Children Project.

·   The Board noted a recent newspaper article suggesting the possibility of the Council charging residents for the water they use. Should the notion of water charges be proposed, the Board agreed that they would not be in favour of that proposal.

·   The Board discussed Environment Canterbury’s (ECAN) Navigation Safety Bylaw rules for the Avon River. Members had been advised of requested safety changes that the Arawa Canoe Club and Canterbury Rowing wished made to Avon River traffic lanes. ECAN require the proposers to consult with other river users and the Community Board. The Board agreed to provide support to the change of rules proposed by the concerned users.

·   In response to a request received, the Board agreed to write a letter of support to St Ambrose Church for their funding application to the Rata Foundation towards a new kitchen.

 

4.   Part A Recommendations to Council

The following reports presenting Part A recommendations from the Board are included in this agenda for Council consideration:

4.1       9021 Rothesay Road - Application for formed access

 

5.   Significant Projects and Initiatives

5.1       QEII park Masterplan

The Board met with staff to discuss the initiation of the development of the QEII Park Masterplan.  An update regarding this will be provided in the next report.

 

6.   Significant Community Issues

6.1       Avon-Heathcote Estuary Ihutai Trust
At its meeting on 16 October 2017, the Board received the following correspondence from the Avon-Heathcote Estuary Ihutai Trust regarding the future of the estuary edge in South New Brighton.

 

 

The Board asked how the South New Brighton Reserves Management Plan can be updated to enable the edge protection to be considered.

 

6.2       Muka Park Flying Fox
The Board approved the relocation of the flying fox from Muka Park, North Preston and reduction of the height of the southern mound supporting the flying fox pole to a level that is compatible with supporting the skate path. The Board also asked staff to investigate relocating the flying fox to a location in close proximity to the current site.

The Board’s decision was made in recognition of District Plan night time noise level thresholds being exceeded.

 

 

 

 

7.   Progress Report Against the Community Board Plan 

The Board has now adopted their 2017 – 19 Community Board Plan.

8.   Community Board Significant Matters of Interest 

8.1   Ten Possible combinations of land uses and activities for the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor  Regeneration Area     

Regenerate Christchurch is currently seeking feedback on the 10 possible combinations of land uses and activities for the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor Regeneration Area.

The Board has suggested to Regenerate that it is taking some time for people to get a good understanding of the 10 land use combinations and the deadline of 5pm Monday 6 November 2017.  Therefore, the community board has requested a 2 week extension. A copy of the letter sent to Regenerate highlighting the Boards concerns is attached in Attachment A.

 

8.2  The Breeze Walking Festival

The Breeze Walking Festival 2017 was held over the September/October School holidays with very positive numbers attending walks despite the heavy rain which cancelled half a dozen walks.   2,500 pre-schoolers and their parents attended the Gruffalo Explorer walk in Bottle Lake Forest which doubled its participation numbers in the second year.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Letter to Regenerate Christchurch

107

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Katie MacDonald - Community Support Officer

Jo Wells - Manager Community Governance, Coastal-Burwood

Natalie Dally - Community Development Advisor

Heather Davies - Community Development Advisor

Jacqui Miller - Community Recreation Advisor

Peter Croucher - Community Board Advisor

Pip Pearse - Community Recreation Advisor

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

PDF Creator


 

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Council

09 November 2017

 

Report from Coastal-Burwood Community Board  – 2 October 2017

 

16.    9021 Rothesay Road - Application for formed access

Reference:

17/1181495

Contact:

Sarah Stuart

sarah.stuart@ccc.govt.nz

941 8191

 

 

 

 

 

1.  Board Comment

 

In considering this report, the Board sought and received comment from Property and Legal staff on the matters raised in the three deputations. The three deputations heard on this matter were from:

·    Mark Williams, a resident.

·    Andrew Schulte, representing the applicant Brent Falvey.

·    John Ryan, representing the property owner Elizabeth Thompson.

 

2.  Staff Recommendation

 

Part A

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.       Recommends the Council decline the application to form an access and undertake landscaping over the unformed legal road adjoining 9021 Rothesay Road.

 

3.  Coastal-Burwood Community Board Recommendation to Council

 

That the Council:

1.         Decline the application to form an access and undertake landscaping over the unformed legal road adjoining 9021 Rothesay Road.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

9021 Rothesay Road - Application for formed access

111

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan of affected area and aerial view

122

b

Access proposal Options A & B

123

c

Photos of unformed legal road

125

d

Full application (original) 24.7.17

129

e

Executive summary of original application 7.8.17

179

 

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

9021 Rothesay Road - Application for formed access

Reference:

17/814000

Contact:

Sarah Stuart

sarah.stuart@ccc.govt.nz

941 8191

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Coastal-Burwood Community Board to review and recommend to Council that it decline the application to form an access and undertake landscaping over the unformed legal road adjoining 9021 Rothesay Road.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated in response to the application received from Novo Group Ltd on behalf of Mr Brent Falvey.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by applying the Council’s SEP, taking into consideration (amongst other things) the number of people affected and/or with an interest, the level of community interest already apparent for the issue, possible environmental, social and cultural impacts, possible costs/risks to the Council, ratepayers and wider community of carrying out the decision, and whether the impact of the decision can be reversed.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations 

That the Coastal-Burwood Community Board:

1.         Recommends the Council decline the application to form an access and undertake landscaping over the unformed legal road adjoining 9021 Rothesay Road.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Roads and Footpaths

·     Level of Service: 16.0.1 Deliver an appropriate level of sealed local road network renewals

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·     Option 1 – Accept access proposal Option A

·     Option 2 – Accept access proposal Option B

·     Option 3 – Decline the application (preferred option)

 

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The outcome of public consultation has informed the Council’s decision.

·     The Environment Court has certainty on the Council’s position and can proceed to rule on the applicant’s resource consent appeal.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     None identified.

 

5.   Context/Background

Application

5.1       An application has been received on behalf of Mr Brent Falvey for permission to form a driveway, and associated landscaping, from Aston Drive over an unformed legal road to 9021 Rothesay Rd in Waimairi Beach.  The affected area is shown on the plan in Attachment A.

5.2       The application provides two alternatives, Option A and Option B, provided in Attachment B.

9021 Rothesay Rd

5.3       The 599 m2 site at 9021 Rothesay Rd is legally described as Lot 11 DP 5121 and held in title CB359/4.  It is owned by Elizabeth Thompson and has been in her family since it was created through subdivision in 1924.  An aerial plan is included in Attachment A.

Resource consent

5.4       The applicant has entered into a binding sale and purchase agreement to buy the land at 9021 Rothesay subject to obtaining resource consent to build a dwelling on the site.  The resource consent application was declined following public notification.

5.5       Residents living immediately to the south of the unformed road are opposed to the applicant’s development of the site at 9021 Rothesay Rd.  Submissions received in response to public notification of the resource consent totalled 28 submissions (12 in support and 18 in opposition).

5.6       It was subsequently appealed to the Environment Court which has put the proceedings on hold until November 2017 to allow time for the Council to provide certainty over the potential use of the unformed legal road.

5.7       The access options reviewed in this report would not eventuate if the resource consent is refused in the Environment Court appeal.

Unformed road

5.8       An unformed stretch of road (“the unformed road”) extends from Aston Drive to the track known as Whiskey Road.  It is 20m wide grassed area with a gravel footpath leading to the beach. The Council owns all of the land to the north of the unformed road, apart from the site at 9021 Rothesay Rd.  The northern area forms part of Bottle Lake Forest park.

5.9       Vehicular access to the unformed road is currently prevented by the Council through the use of bollards, a steel vehicle gate and a pedestrian gateway feature (see Attachment C).   These restrictions provide a pragmatic solution to anticipated problems associated with vehicle access such as littering, car-parking, and antisocial behaviours.  To date the Council has received no complaints regarding the restriction on access.

5.10    The unformed road also provides access to a vacant site at 9007 Marine Parade (identified as “the wedge” in the application).

5.11    The street names in the addresses of the two sites with frontage to the unformed road (9021 Rothesay Road and 9007 Marine Parade) are misnomers and bear no resemblance to the physical roads in the area. 

Emergency access

5.12    The unformed road provides critical access for emergency vehicles to both the beach and the forest park.

Engagement with Council staff

5.13    Council staff provided a legal opinion on the original proposal and subsequently met with the applicant’s lawyer and representatives to discuss a range of issues associated with the proposed application. 

5.14    Council staff expressed the following views during these discussions:

5.14.1 The Transport Asset Planning team was concerned that the proposal to form a driveway will create a demand for car-parking within the legal road.  This might create issues in controlling unwanted consequences such as littering, dumping rubbish, and enforcement.

5.14.2 The Regional Parks team was concerned that allowing such a proposal would result in vehicles entering the coastal area, including along Whiskey Road.  It was also concerned that additional planting may increase the risk and spread of fire from the forest to the residential area to the south.

5.14.3 The Legal Services unit was concerned that planting in the centre of the road (especially of trees) would hinder public passing and repassing.  It was concerned that groupings of plantings in combination with the existing gateway feature at the entrance of the unformed road would give the impression that the road is a private access-way.

5.15    The full application was submitted following engagement with Council staff and is provided in Attachment D.  Council staff suggested the applicant remove references to signage, pedestrian crossings and yellow no-parking lines from the proposal as these are subject to a separate regulatory process.  Staff also suggested the application be simplified to aid consultation.  The applicant subsequently provided an executive summary (Attachment E) but did not wish to remove the road markings or amend the proposed signage.  Staff are not seeking the Community Board’s approval to authorise the signage and yellow lines, i.e. they would not be enforceable.

5.16    The full application contains an opinion from the Council’s legal services unit (Appendix 3 of Attachment D) and its response from Cavell Leitch (Appendix 5 of Attachment D).  These do not relate to the options currently proposed but relate specifically to the original proposal (shown in Plan A & B of Appendix 5, Attachment D).

5.17    From a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) perspective Council staff advise that they have no real safety or crime concerns with either of the options proposed.

Licence to Occupy

5.18    If approved, a Licence to Occupy would be granted to the applicant as owner of 9021 Rothesay Rd for a term to coincide with their occupation of the residence.  A new owner would need to reapply for this right.  An annual fee would be payable and the Council would retain the right to terminate the licence with six months’ notice.  Under the term of the licence the licensee would be responsible for maintenance of the driveway and plantings.

Key differences between options

5.19    In both options the walking track is realigned.  In Option A it is separated from the driveway by a grass verge with bollards to discourage parking.  In Option B the walkway is directly beside the driveway.

5.20    Option A includes a raised curb to discourage vehicles from entering the coastal area.  Option B does not include this.  (Noting that the curb is a matter which would be dealt with at a detailed design phase to ensure emergency vehicle requirements are met).

5.21    The planting configurations differ with the overall effect being that Option A has a greater concentration of planting at the entrance to the road than Option B.  There are positive and negative aspects to this.  From a legal viewpoint it may impede the public’s right to pass and repass over legal road; from a pragmatic perspective it may minimise potential nuisance.

6.   Option 1 – Accept Access Proposal Option A

Option Description

6.1       This option includes:

·   a 3.5 metre wide sealed driveway on the northern side of Rothesay Rd constructed to the Council’s Construction Standard Specifications (CSS);

·   a realigned section of the gravel walking track;

·   a grass verge separating the walking track from the driveway with bollards along the southern side of the driveway to discourage informal parking;

·   a sign reading “Emergency and ranger vehicles only” and “No parking” installed at the Aston Drive end of the driveway, and broken yellow lines either side of the driveway;

·   a curb at the end of the driveway to discourage vehicles entering the coastal area;

·   strips of planting along the northern periphery of the road and the western side of Whiskey Rd along the boundary with 9021 Rothesay Rd.

·   a small area of planting on the north-east side of the gateway feature;

·   an area of planting (small) adjacent to the northwest boundary of 100 Aston Drive.

·   an island of planting in the centre of the road reserve near the Aston Drive intersection.

 

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

6.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance were identified by the Engagement Team as the need are to consult neighbouring residents, previous submitters (from the public notification undertaken for the resource consent application) and users of the walkway.  To effect this a leaflet drop was undertaken in the vicinity, previous submitters were contacted directly, and signage was placed on the walkway directing interested parties to the Council’s “Have Your Say” website. 

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.5       Community engagement for this project was undertaken from Friday 18 August 2017 to Friday 8 September 2017.


 

6.6       Consultation leaflets were delivered to properties on Aston Drive, Sandpiper Place, Sandalwood Place and Eastwood Rise.  Signage was erected on the site to notify users of the walkway that provides access to the beach.  Those who made submissions when the original resource consent application was publically notified were also included as affected parties and were notified of this consultation.  The consultation was also available on the Council’s Have Your Say website.

6.7       During the course of the engagement 103 submissions were received with the following results:

 

OPTION

NUMBER OF SUBMISSIONS

Option A

17

Option B

3

Do not support either option

83

Did not indicate

1

TOTAL

104

 

6.8       The main issues and concerns arising in the submissions opposing the proposal included:

·    The land as it currently stands is used by large numbers of pedestrians on a daily basis, including families with small children and dogs.  This caused significant concern from a large number of submitters in relation to safety if this was to become a formed road for vehicles.

·    The proposed driveway and landscaping are not in keeping with the coastal character of the area.

·    The potential for cars and motorbikes to gain access to the beach reserve.

·    The loss of visual amenity and natural character.

·    Drive on access from Aston Drive on a sharp bend adding risk to traffic and pedestrians crossing at this already extremely busy corner.

·    This area should be left as it is.

·    Do not agree with public land being used for private use.

·    Area used by many people as access to the beach, this change could cause confusion as to whether the public would still be able to use this.

·    If this road is formed this could result in illegal public parking or freedom camping on this strip which could be impossible to police.

·    Could encourage an extension of the road in the future if this access was to be formed.

·    Long term maintenance of the area.

·    This proposal, if approved, would set a precedent which may lead to the development of the remaining sections in the forest.

·    The proposed dwelling is inconsistent with the City Plan

·    Proposed planting will cause a nuisance and takes away from the ‘wild’ planting that is currently there.

·    Would change the current ecosystem.

·    Each option gains maximum benefit for the applicant at the expense of public access.

·    Impact on adjacent private properties.

·    Access is only be formed for the personal benefit of one property which is considered an unsuitable development in a rural setting.

6.9       Feedback received from those submitters who supported either Option A or Option B was:

·     This proposal would tidy up the area.

·     Support the landowner’s right to build on his land.

·     Option A was deemed a safer option than Option B.

6.10    A copy of all submissions received has been sent to elected members separately to this report to assist with their decision making.

6.11    A letter has been sent to all submitters advising of the outcome of the consultation, including details of the Community Board meeting, and how they can speak to their submission if they wish.  Also included in this letter was a link to the feedback received and the Community Board report.

6.12    The overwhelming quantity and quality of the submissions do not support either Option 1 or Option 2.  The community views and preferences indicate that the Council should retain the status quo and not permit formation of the accessway.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.13    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies.

6.13.1 Inconsistency – not applicable.

6.13.2 Reason for inconsistency - not applicable.

6.13.3 Amendment necessary - not applicable.

Financial Implications

6.14    Cost of Implementation – Staff time.  Consultation costs.

6.15    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable. If the application is successful a condition of the Licence to Occupy will be that the licensee is responsible for the maintenance of the driveway and planting areas.

6.16    Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

6.17    Notwithstanding that no road carriageway has been formed on it, the affected land has the status of legal road.  Thus, when considering this application the Council must have regard to this status.

6.18    Under the law, generally speaking, the public has a general right to pass and repass along legal road, whether it formed or not.  Accordingly, the Council cannot authorise a use or occupation of legal road that would unreasonably impede the right of the public to pass and repass along the legal road.

6.19    Whether a use or occupation of legal road creates an impediment to the public’s right of passage is a question of fact and degree according to the particular circumstances involved.  The law recognises that the public’s right of passage is not unlimited and the public doesn’t necessarily have a right of access to every part of the legal road.  Adjoining landowners’ frontager rights must be respected and some degree of obstruction to passage may be acceptable if reasonable in quantum and duration.  Relevant case law has referred to obstructions which constitute “an appreciable interference with the traffic on the street” as being unacceptable.

6.20    The Council will therefore need to consider whether the applicant’s proposals conform to these legal principles.

6.21    The Council will need to consider the extent of planting it will allow and to ensure that the use of the road will not unreasonably impinge on the common law right of the public to pass and repass unhindered.

6.22    A Licence to Occupy would be required as described in 5.18 above.

6.23    The landowner has no legal rights to form the legal road nor does the Council have an obligation to form it.  A decision not to proceed with the application does not affect the landowner’s frontager rights (frontager rights are the rights of the adjoining landowner to access the legal road from their land).

Risks and Mitigations   

6.24    Acceptance of this proposal may result in the following risks:

6.25    Risk of the area being used as a carpark which may result in potential nuisance such as littering and dumping rubbish, and may create enforcement issues.

6.25.1 Treatment: deal with issues as they arise.

6.26    Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium.

6.27    Risk of vehicles entering the coastal area, including along Whiskey Road. 

6.27.1 Treatment: install bollards and/or a chain barrier to prevent vehicular access.

6.28    Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

Implementation

6.29    Implementation dependencies - none.

6.30    Implementation timeframe – unknown.  The resource consent is still being considered by the Environment Court.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.31    The advantages of this option include:

·   The Environment Court has certainty on the Council’s position and can proceed to rule on the applicant’s resource consent appeal.

·   The applicant can proceed with his plans dependant on the Environment Court decision.

·   Option A has a greater concentration of planting at the entrance to the road than Option B. This may create the impression that it is more of a private driveway than a road which in this context offers the ability to minimise nuisance.

6.32    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It is not supported by the local community.  Those who did support the application favoured Option A above Option B.

·   Option A has a greater concentration of planting at the entrance to the road than Option B. This may create the impression that it is more of a private driveway than a road which may impact on the public’s right to pass and repass.

·   The potential for nuisance associated with car-parking and vehicular access to the coastal area; and

·   The increased risk of the spread of fire from the forest to the residential area to the south.

 

7.   Option 2 – Accept Access Proposal Option B

Option Description

7.1       Option B shares the same features as Option A given below with variance italicised:

·   a 3.5 metre wide sealed driveway on the northern side of Rothesay Rd constructed to the Council’s Construction Standard Specifications (CSS);

·   a realigned section of the gravel walking track (directly adjoins driveway);

·   a sign reading “Emergency and ranger vehicles only” and “No parking” installed at the Aston Drive end of the driveway, and broken yellow lines either side of the driveway;

·   strips of planting along the northern periphery of the road and the western side of Whiskey Rd along the boundary with 9021 Rothesay Rd.

·   a small area of planting on the north-east side of the gateway feature;

·   an area of planting (large) adjacent to the northwest boundary of 100 Aston Drive.

 

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are as identified in Option 1 above.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       See sections 6.5 – 6.12 above.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.6.1   Inconsistency – not applicable.

7.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - not applicable.

7.6.3   Amendment necessary - not applicable.

Financial Implications

7.7       Cost of Implementation – Staff time.  Consultation costs.

7.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable. If the application is successful a condition of the licence will be that the licensee is responsible for the maintenance of the driveway and planting areas.

7.9       Funding source – not applicable.

Legal Implications

7.10    Refer 6.17 – 6.23 above.

Risks and Mitigations   

7.11    Acceptance of this proposal may result in the following risks:

7.12    Risk of the area being used as a carpark which may result in potential nuisance such as littering and dumping rubbish, and may create enforcement issues.

7.12.1 Treatment: deal with issues as they arise.

7.13    Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is medium.

7.14    Risk of vehicles entering the coastal area, including along Whiskey Road. 

7.14.1 Treatment: install bollards and/or a chain barrier to prevent vehicular access.

7.15    Residual risk rating: the rating of the risk is low.

 

Implementation

7.16    Implementation dependencies - none.

7.17    Implementation timeframe – unknown.  The resource consent is still being considered by the Environment Court.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.18    The advantages of this option include:

·   In the context of allowing people to pass and repass, Option B has a lesser concentration of planting at the entrance to the road than Option A. This makes it appear like less of a private driveway than Option A.

·   The Environment Court has certainty on the Council’s position and can proceed to rule on the applicant’s resource consent appeal.

·   The applicant can proceed with his plans dependant on the Environment Court decision.

7.19    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   It is not supported by the local community.  Option B was the least favoured option by those who did support the application.

·   In the context minimising nuisance, Option B has a lesser concentration of planting at the entrance to the road than Option A. This makes it appear like less of a private driveway than Option A.

·   The potential for nuisance associated with car-parking and vehicular access to the coastal area; and

·   The increased risk of the spread of fire from the forest to the residential area to the south.

 

8.   Option 3 – Decline the application (preferred option)

Option Description

8.1       Decline the application to form a driveway and undertake the associated landscaping over the area of unformed legal road adjacent to 9021 Rothesay Rd.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is low consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are as identified in Option 1 above.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       See sections 6.5 – 6.12 above.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.6.1   Inconsistency – not applicable.

8.6.2   Reason for inconsistency - not applicable.

8.6.3   Amendment necessary - not applicable.

Financial Implications

8.7       Cost of Implementation –not applicable.

8.8       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – not applicable.

8.9       Funding source - not applicable.

Legal Implications

8.10    There are no implications as the Council is retaining the status quo.

Risks and Mitigations    

8.11    There are no known risks as the Council is retaining the status quo

Implementation

8.12    Implementation dependencies - not applicable.

8.13    Implementation timeframe – not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   The outcome of public consultation has informed the Council’s decision.

·   The Environment Court has certainty on the Council’s position and can proceed to rule on the applicant’s resource consent appeal.

8.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   None identified.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Plan of affected area and aerial view

 

b 

Access proposal Options A & B

 

c 

Photos of unformed legal road

 

d 

Full application (original) 24.7.17

 

e 

Executive summary of original application 7.8.17

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Stuart - Property Consultant

Ann Campbell - Senior Engagement Advisor

Robert O'Connor - Senior Solicitor

Approved By

Angus Smith - Manager Property Consultancy

Stuart Graham - Head of Facilities, Property & Planning

Chris Gregory - Head of Transport

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

 


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17.    Chief Executive's Report - October 2017

Reference:

17/1307284

Contact:

Karleen Edwards

karleen.edwards@ccc.govt.nz

941 8999

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       This Chief Executive’s Report provides a summary of the Council’s organisational performance for October 2017.

 

1.   Recommendation to Council

That the Council:

1.         Receive the report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chief Executive Report to Council October 2017

182

 

 

Signatories

Author

Christopher Turner-Bullock - Committee Advisor

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

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18.    Zone Committees' Quarterly Update

Reference:

17/933508

Contact:

Diane Shelander

diane.shelander@ccc.govt.nz

941 8304

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to be updated on the activities of the three water management zone committees.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the zone committees’ update report.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       On 3 August the Council requested that the three water management zone committees update the Council on a quarterly basis.

3.2       The zone committees’ quarterly update report is attached as Attachment A.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Zone Committees' updates - 9 November 2017

190

 

 

Signatories

Author

Diane Shelander - Senior Policy Analyst

Approved By

Helen Beaumont - Head of Strategic Policy

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

  


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19.    2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment for Christchurch and Banks Peninsula

Reference:

17/469168

Contact:

Peter Kingsbury

peter.kingsbury@ccc.govt.nz

027 599 4615

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Council to receive the information in the 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment for Christchurch and Banks Peninsula report.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Receive the information in the 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment for Christchurch and Banks Peninsula report.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       This report arises from Council resolution CNCL/2016/00453 29 September 2016:

That the Council:

                         1.         Note that the Coastal Hazard Assessment Report- Stage 2 (June 2015) will be revised in accordance with the recommendations of the Peer Review of the Christchurch Coastal Hazards Assessment Report (August 2016).

                         2.         Receive the technical investigation work programme (as directed in Council resolution CNCL/2016/00353) which will address all of the relevant recommendations of the peer review panel. Noting that this is an iterative programme and therefore a community advisory group will be established to support this process.

3.2       The Coastal Hazard Assessment for Christchurch and Banks Peninsula (2017) report was completed in October 2017 (Attachments A and B).  The report addresses the recommendations of the independent Peer Review Panel and is the fourth report prepared since 1999 for the Council on coastal hazards and climate change effects.

3.3       The 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment provides detailed information on inundation (coastal flooding) and erosion for the main inhabited coastal parts of Christchurch and Banks Peninsula.  Four climate change scenarios have been considered out to 2065 and 2120. Two sediment budgets are included as part of the erosion assessment to provide realistic future potential scenarios.

3.4       The 2017 Coastal Hazards Assessment provides a comprehensive technical basis for the Christchurch City Council and other organisations to engage with the community on adapting to coastal hazards and climate change. This work also informs Council’s infrastructure programmes and will be referenced in revised Land Information Memoranda (LIM) notations.

 

 


 

 

4.   Background

4.1       Communities around New Zealand and across the world are being affected by climate change and sea level rise, and the impacts are set to increase over time.  Much of our population lives close to the coast or on the floodplains of major rivers. Our communities rely on infrastructure – the three waters, the transport network and energy supply – designed for today’s climate and many systems are vulnerable to extreme weather events and rising seas. Our ecosystems, already under pressure from habitat reduction and pests, are also vulnerable to the changing climate.

4.2       Improving our knowledge about the impacts of climate change and understanding the risk from coastal hazards is an essential basis for planning and being better prepared for the future. The Council has commissioned four reports (published in 1999, 2013, 2015 and 2017) to investigate coastal hazard impacts along our coast. The New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement requires the Council to consider such coastal hazards over the long term – at least 100 years. Central government has provided some guidance to Councils and this has been followed in undertaking these investigations.

4.3       In 2015 Tonkin & Taylor Ltd. were engaged by the Council to prepare a report (Coastal Hazards Assessment - Stage 2, 2015) on coastal hazards as part of the review of our District Plan. The report was peer viewed by Dr Terry Hume. The proposed coastal hazard provisions, notified in July 2015, were removed from the replacement Christchurch District Plan (being heard by the Independent Hearings Panel) by an Order in Council.  Council was directed to undertake a subsequent review of the coastal hazard provisions using standard Resource Management Act 1997 processes.

4.4       The Council engaged GHD in March 2016 to manage a second peer review of the 2015 Coastal Hazard Assessment report.  An independent expert Peer Review Panel was formed with legal and technical expertise. The Council received the report of Peer Review Panel on 25 August 2016 and directed staff to report back with a programme of work to address the Panel’s recommendations.

4.5       The expert Peer Review Panel made a suite of recommendations for work that needed to be undertaken to revise the 2015 Coastal Hazard Assessment.  The panel also made some suggestions for further research that could be included as part of the first re-assessment of the coastal hazards zones in ten years’ time.

4.6       In September 2016 staff reported back to Council (Council report 16/1119102) on the work programme required to address the findings of the Peer Review Panel’s review of the Coastal Hazard Assessment Report (June 2015):

Part1: revision of the open coast coastal erosion maps, in response to peer review panel narrative at [18], [19], [21], [24 - 31], and recommendation [222].

Part 2: Harbour coast coastal erosion maps, in response to peer review panel recommendation [224].

Part 3: Harbour coast coastal inundation hazard, in response to peer review panel recommendation [223].

4.7       The Peer Review Panel recommendations in paragraphs [222 - 225] of the peer review report were read and considered by Tonkin & Taylor in conjunction with the more detailed explanations given in the main body of the peer review report.

4.8       The 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report was completed in October 2017 and the revision has been overseen by Dr Deirdre Hart, a member of the Peer Review Panel. Dr Hart has worked collaboratively with Tonkin & Taylor Ltd. to ensure that the panel’s recommendations were appropriately addressed.  During the ‘rolling peer review’ process Dr Hart referred several matters back to members of the Peer Review Panel for discussion and clarification. A copy of her summary review report is attached to this report (Attachment C). 

4.9       The cost of revising the work and producing the 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report was approximately $200,000. This cost was met through reprioritisation of the existing Strategic Policy work programme.

 

5.   2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment Report

5.1       The 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report covers the main inhabited coastal areas within Christchurch and on Banks Peninsula.  The report groups the areas into two coastal environments, open coast and harbour coast.  The open coast is the area from Waimairi Beach to Southshore, and Sumner and Taylors Mistake.  The harbour coast includes the Avon - Heathcote Estuary and Brooklands Lagoon, and four Lyttelton Harbour bays (Allandale, Teddington, Charteris Bay and Purau) and four Akaroa Harbour bays (Akaroa, Takamatua, Duvauchelle and Wainui).

5.2       The 2017 Coastal Hazard report uses best practice methodologies in its coastal hazard assessment of inundation (coastal flooding) and erosion.  The models adopted were used in conjunction with aerial photograph imagery, GPS (satellite) surveys, beach profile mapping, statistical modelling, LiDAR (laser measurement) technology, bathymetric data, comparative analysis, site visits and results from other technical investigations.

5.3       Coastal inundation assessment methodology:  Two approaches are used to assess inundation along harbour coasts – the bath tub method and the hydrodynamic model method. 

5.3.1   The open coast is general protected from inundation by foredunes.  The bath tub method maps flood levels inland to the same level as at the coast.  The bath tub method is also used where the backshore topography is relatively steep such as the Lyttelton and Akaroa harbours. 

5.3.2   The hydrodynamic model method uses flood and tide simulation software (called TUFLOW).  This model defines inundation more accurately in low-lying and wide flat areas such as the Avon-Heathcote Estuary and Brooklands Lagoon.

5.4       Coastal erosion assessment methodology:  Separate methodologies, recognising the different natural coastal environments within Christchurch and on Banks Peninsula, were used to assess and map coastal erosion along the open coast and the harbour coast. 

5.4.1   A probabilistic model is used to map erosion along the open coast.  A probabilistic model, where there are many possible outcomes with each having varying degrees of certainty, uses historic data to determine the probability of the shoreline being at a certain position within a defined period of time, for this study being 2065 and 2120. 

5.4.2   The methodology used to assess harbour coast erosion takes into account the low-lying morphology of parts of harbour coasts.  The method used is in accordance with national and international best practice.

5.5       Coastal inundation mapping:  For coastal inundation four climate change scenarios – the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Representative greenhouse gas Concentration Pathways (RCPs) – have been mapped out to 2065 and 2120.  The RCPs used in the 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report are RCP 2.6, 4.5, 8.5 and 8.5+. The selection of these four scenarios is consistent with Ministry for the Environment (MfE) guidance of three median IPCC projections and an upper range projection.  The range of sea level rise projections for the 2065 and 2120 periods across the four RCPs is 0.30 metre to 1.36 metres. 

5.6       The total extent of coastal inundation is generally similar to that mapped in the 2015 Coastal Hazard Assessment report.

5.7       Coastal erosion mapping:  As for coastal inundation, four climate change scenarios have been considered for defining the extent of coastal erosion over the 2065 and 2120 time periods.  In addition to this two sediment budget scenarios are considered – an ‘average sediment budget’ and a ‘reduced sediment budget’. 

5.8       The open coast erosion is similar in extent to that mapped in the 2015 Coastal Hazard Assessment report.  The extent of erosion on the estuary side of Brighton Spit is considerably less than modelled in the 2015 Coastal Hazards Assessment report.

5.9       The 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report provides a significantly broader range of inundation and erosion scenarios than did the 2015 Coastal Hazard Assessment report.  This new information provides a comprehensive basis for the Christchurch City Council and other organisations, including Regenerate Christchurch and Environment Canterbury, programmes of engagement with the Christchurch and Banks Peninsula communities on adapting to coastal hazards and climate change.  Other current Christchurch City Council projects, including Land Drainage Recovery Programme Multi-hazard Assessment and the development of the ‘city-wide’ flood model, will also contribute information to the programme of engagement.

5.10    The 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report was prepared with an awareness of the contents and direction of the Ministry for the Environment’s updated draft Guidance for Local Government on Coastal Hazards and Climate Change report.  At this time it is unknown when this draft guidance report will be finalised, however Council staff will keep a ‘watching-brief’ to help ensure Council’s coastal hazard work is consistent with key central government advice and guidance.

6.   Other Matters

6.1       The number of properties potentially affected by coastal inundation is similar to that derived from the 2015 Coastal Hazard Assessment report.  As derived from the 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report, there are fewer properties affected by erosion compared with 2015. 

6.2       There is a statutory requirement for the Council to make available information it holds on natural hazards.  In a report (16/1119082) in September 2016 the Council received revised coastal hazard notation on Land Information Memoranda (LIMs) following the Council’s receipt of the Peer Review Panel’s report. In that report it was noted that Council staff would review and revise LIMs following the completion of the 2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment report.  LIM notations will be updated on 9 November 2017.  LIM information assists people with making informed decisions on buying, building, repairing or investing in property.

1.   Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Final Coastal Hazards Report.R4

199

b

Final Coastal Hazards Report Appendices

299

c

2017 Coastal Hazard Assessment Report

505

 

 

Signatories

Author

Peter Kingsbury - Principal Advisor Natural Resources

Approved By

Helen Beaumont - Head of Strategic Policy

Brendan Anstiss - General Manager Strategy and Transformation

  


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20.    Adoption of the 2018 meeting schedule for the Council and its Committees, Subcommittees and Working Parties

Reference:

17/1268923

Contact:

Megan Pearce

megan.pearce@ccc.govt.nz

941 8140

 

 

1.   Purpose of Report

1.1       This report seeks the Council to adopt a schedule setting out the proposed times and dates of ordinary meetings of the Council and its committees, subcommittees and working parties for 2018.

 

2.   Staff Recommendations

That the Council:

1.         Adopt the schedule of meetings attached to this report and delegate to the Team Leader Hearings and Council Support the ability to make any changes to the schedule as necessary to meet circumstances as required.

 

 

3.   Key Points

3.1       In order that the business of the Council can be conducted in an orderly manner, and to allow for public notification of meetings to be given in compliance with the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), it is recommended that the Council adopt a schedule of meetings.

3.2       It is recognised that events may arise, or circumstances change that would mean the schedule may need to be revised or additional meetings added as required. It is therefore proposed that the Team Leader Hearings and Council Support be delegated the authority to make changes to the schedule in order to accommodate business needs. Any additional meetings will be appropriately publicly notified in compliance with the LGOIMA and Local Government Act 2002.

3.3       The draft schedule has taken into account the proposed dates for the 2018-28 Long Term Plan (LTP) process. The adoption of the draft LTP will likely take place around the 20th February 2018. Public hearings are scheduled to be within the period 1 May – 19 May 2018 and adoption of the LTP in a Council meeting tentatively commencing the 26 June 2018.  

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018 meeting schedule

615

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Samantha Kelly - Committee and Hearings Advisor

Megan Pearce - Team Leader Hearings and Council Support

Approved By

Lester Wolfreys - Head of Community Support, Governance and Partnerships

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Council

09 November 2017

 

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Council

09 November 2017

 

Report from Finance and Performance Committee  – 4 October 2017

 

21.    Regenerate Christchurch - August 2017 Status Report

Reference:

17/1307356

Contact:

Linda Gibb

linda.gibb@ccc.govt.nz

941 6762

 

 

 

 

This item was left to lie on the table at the Council meeting on 2 November 2017.

 

1.  Staff and Finance and Performance Committee Recommendation to Council

 

That the Council:

1.         Notes Regenerate Christchurch’s August 2017 Status Report set out in Attachment A;

2.         Notes the following issues that Councillors may wish to raise with Regenerate Christchurch:

a.            Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor regeneration area – whether and when Regenerate Christchurch will brief shareholders on the feedback received on the shortlist of options and supporting cost and technical studies, and what the next steps for Regenerate Christchurch are for progressing this project; 

b.            Cathedral Square and surrounds – what is the general indication of feedback received on the draft Concept, and what are the next steps for Regenerate Christchurch to progress this project following its development of a draft Strategy; and

3.         Notes that Regenerate Christchurch will be making a presentation to Councillors in November 2017 on the evaluation and progress of regeneration of the Central City.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Report Title

Page

1

Regenerate Christchurch - August 2017 Status Report

628

 

There are no attachments for this report.

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

Regenerate Christchurch - August 2017 Status Report

Reference:

17/1024418

Contact:

Linda Gibb

Linda.gibb@ccc.govt.nz

941 6762

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is for the Finance and Performance Committee to note Regenerate Christchurch’s progress and performance for July and August 2017.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated as a result of the August 2017 Status Report submitted to joint Council-Crown shareholders by Regenerate Christchurch.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report is of low significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by applying the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, taking into consideration the possible costs/risks to Council, ratepayers and the wider community of carrying out the decision.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Finance and Performance Committee recommends that Council:

1.         Notes Regenerate Christchurch’s August 2017 Status Report set out in Attachment A;

2.         Notes the following issues that Councillors may wish to raise with Regenerate Christchurch:

(i)            Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor regeneration area – whether and when Regenerate Christchurch will brief shareholders on the feedback received on the shortlist of options and supporting cost and technical studies, and what the next steps for Regenerate Christchurch are for progressing this project; 

(ii)          Cathedral Square and surrounds – what is the general indication of feedback received on the draft Concept, and what are the next steps for Regenerate Christchurch to progress this project following its development of a draft Strategy; and

3.         Notes that Regenerate Christchurch will be making a presentation to Councillors in November 2017 on the evaluation and progress of regeneration of the Central City.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       From 1 July 2017, Regenerate Christchurch will report its progress and performance against its work programme each month to shareholders.  Every second month, Council staff will provide a report, and any advice to the Finance and Performance Committee for its review. 

4.2       Regenerate Christchurch representatives will attend the Committee meeting to address issues and questions raised by Councillors.  In attendance at this meeting will be the board’s Chair, André Lovatt, Director Humphry Rolleston, Chief Executive Ivan Iafeta and General Manager Corporate Services, Jason Rivett.

4.3       Regenerate Christchurch’s August 2017 Status Report is at Attachment A.  Councillors may wish to raise the following matters with Regenerate Christchurch staff:

Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor Regeneration Area – the report notes that a shortlist of options and supporting cost and technical studies will be published for feedback between 11 September and 10 October.  There is no indication within the report of when feedback will be received.

Cathedral Square and Surrounds – the report notes that following Regenerate Christchurch’s analysis of feedback on the draft Concept, a draft Strategy will be developed.  The report does not indicate the nature of the feedback.

4.4       The financial information provided in the status report is for the month of July only (due to timing difficulties with Committee agenda deadlines and board meetings).  The notable issues are that:

·   Revenue is ahead of budget by $4 million which is the Council’s annual payment that was made at the end of July, but which was expected by Regenerate Christchurch at the beginning of August; and 

·   Total operating expenses are $279,000 (30%) under budget, mostly relating to staff salaries and consulting expenditure.  Regenerate Christchurch’s work programme anticipates the 2017/18 year as having its highest expenditure and output across its five year work programme.  It is very important that momentum is maintained to achieve the ambitious delivery targets.

·   Regenerate Christchurch has advised that total spend on consultants is at a level consistent with June and July 2017, however the budget for this financial year has been increased to reflect the increased delivery of the work programme and therefore an additional spend on external consultants.  With changing timelines for some projects, some consultant expenditure is being pushed out and therefore this is a timing difference rather than a permanent difference.

Staff Comment

4.5       We expect there to be some refinements made to the content of the status reports as time progresses.  At this early stage, we would like to see more discussion about material variances in expenditure, and identification of next steps following conclusion of current project milestones. 

4.6       By the time this report is considered by the Finance and Performance Committee, Regenerate Christchurch may be able to informally discuss its September activities. 

Central City Progress Report

4.7       At its meeting on 25 May, the Council passed a resolution (refer CNCL/2017/00158) as follows:

Request a written report, as soon as practicable, to the Finance and Performance Committee from Regenerate Christchurch on the evaluation and progress of regeneration of the Central City, particularly the private sector response to the investment of public funds and the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan (and associated measures), as referenced in the 14 April 2016 Letter of Expectations for Regenerate Christchurch.

4.8       We understand that Regenerate Christchurch is intending to give a presentation to Councillors on the outcome of its work in the central city in November.  The report from this briefing could then be referred to the Finance and Performance Committee, if required.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a 

Regenerate Christchurch - August 2017 Status Report

 

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Linda Gibb - Performance Monitoring Advisor

Patricia Christie - Manager External Reporting and Governance

Approved By

Diane Brandish - Head of Financial Management

Carol Bellette - General Manager Finance and Commercial (CFO)

 


Council

09 November 2017

 

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09 November 2017

 

 

22.  Resolution to Exclude the Public

Section 48, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

 

I move that the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, namely items listed overleaf.

 

Reason for passing this resolution: good reason to withhold exists under section 7.

Specific grounds under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution: Section 48(1)(a)

 

Note

 

Section 48(4) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 provides as follows:

 

“(4)     Every resolution to exclude the public shall be put at a time when the meeting is open to the public, and the text of that resolution (or copies thereof):

 

             (a)       Shall be available to any member of the public who is present; and

             (b)       Shall form part of the minutes of the local authority.”

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as follows:


Council

09 November 2017

 

 

 

ITEM NO.

GENERAL SUBJECT OF EACH MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED

SECTION

SUBCLAUSE AND REASON UNDER THE ACT

PLAIN ENGLISH REASON

WHEN REPORTS CAN BE RELEASED

23

Naval Point Development Plan

s7(2)(i)

Conduct Negotiations

Report discusses possible use and / or acquisition of prviate land.

22 December 2017

Conditional agreement with private land owner

24

Local Government Funding Agency - Annual General Meeting

s7(2)(a), s7(2)(f)(ii)

Protection of Privacy of Natural Persons, Protection from Improper Pressure or Harassment

The names of private parties are recorded in this report, which could give rise to reputational damage if the proposed appointments are not made.  In addition, advance publication of the names and other proposals could lead to pressure being put on shareholders to cast their votes in various ways.

22 November 2017

After the Local Government Funding Agency's AGM

25

Award of Design & Construction Contract

s7(2)(h)

Commercial Activities

Commercial sensitivity around tendered prices and the publication of the information will prejudice the commercial position of the Preferred Contractor.

On 30 June 2020.  Any requests for the report before the date will be considered on a case by case basis as required by LGOIMA