Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

Extraordinary Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An Extraordinary meeting of the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Saturday 12 August 2017

Time:                                    10.30am

Venue:                                 Board Room, Fendalton Service Centre,
corner Jeffreys and Clyde Roads

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mike Mora

Helen Broughton

Natalie Bryden

Vicki Buck

Jimmy Chen

Catherine  Chu

Anne Galloway

Ross McFarlane

Debbie  Mora

 

 

8 August 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Watson

Manager Community Governance, Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton

941 8258

gary.watson@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/meetings-agendas-and-minutes/

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

12 August 2017

 

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

12 August 2017

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 4

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 4

B       3.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 4

STAFF REPORTS

A       4.       Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre - Options Report .............................................................................................................................. 5   

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

12 August 2017

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant and to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Deputations by Appointment

3.1

Hornby Library, Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre

 

Speaking rights to address the Board have been granted to the following:

 

1.    Lyall Matchett, Kevin Hornbrook and Andy Clark, on behalf of Hornby Cricket Club

2.    Sarah Wylie, on behalf of Canterbury Track Cycling

3.    Lyn Hucklebridge, on behalf of Hornby Rugby Football Club

4.    David Chamberlain, on behalf of the Halswell Residents’ Association

5.    Lyn Hucklebridge

6.    Marc Duff

 

 


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

12 August 2017

 

 

4.        Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre - Options Report

Reference:

17/798767

Contact:

Lee Sampson

lee.sampson@ccc.govt.nz

941 6315

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to present the results of the consultation along with further information to the assist the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board to make a recommendation to the Council regarding the location and configuration of the new Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated.

2.   Significance

2.1       The decisions in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined in accordance with Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, by reviewing community interest and the potential impacts to local sports clubs, conversely the project deliverables involve maximising community usage of Denton Park for all citizens.

2.1.2   The community engagement and consultation completed reflects this assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board recommend that the Council:

1.         Approve Denton Park (Option 1) as the preferred location for the new Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre.

2.         Approve a combined ‘co-located’ configuration for the facility.

3.         Note the proposed use of Denton Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification and the Denton Park Management Plan 1987; and in order to be implemented, will first require a partial change in reserve classification to (Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan.

 

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Libraries

·     Level of Service: 3.1.2 Residents have access to a physical and digital library relevant to local community need or profile Sports and Recreation

4.1.2   Activity: Citizen and Customer Services

·           Level of Service: 7.0.1 Provide first point of contact services for enquiries and interaction for the citizen and customer of Christchurch.

4.1.3   Activity: Sports and Recreation

Level of Service: 7.0.1 Provide residents access to fit for purpose recreation and sporting facilities.

4.2       The following reasonably practicable options have been considered:

4.2.1   Option 1 (Preferred) – Combined facility at Denton Park 4,240 square metres

             New Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre - includes upgrades to Denton Park and further investment in Wycola Park (or other) for displaced activity.  Configured to limit the loss of amenity to sports clubs as far as practicable; involves the loss of one rugby field and one cricket wicket. Inclusive of consequential costs for:

I.          Denton Park upgrades to increase the capacity of the remaining playing fields.

II.         Investment in Wycola Park (or other) for any displaced sports activity.

4.2.2   Option 2 - Combined facility located at Kyle Park 3,300 square metres [reduced size*]

              New Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre; involves no consequential impacts to sport clubs. However contamination and overly complex ground conditions reduces the deliverable scope (*by 22 per cent) in order to deliver within the allocated budget.

4.2.3   Option 3 - Combined facility located at Kyle Park 4,240 square metres [over budget] New Hornby Library, Customer Services and the South West Leisure Centre; involves no consequential impacts to sport clubs, however contamination and overly complex ground conditions make this option over the allocated budget.

4.2.4   Option 4 - Combined facility located on Warren Park 4,240 square metres

             New Hornby Library, Customer Services and the South West Leisure Centre. Configured to limit the loss of amenity to sports clubs as far as practicable, includes upgrades to two football fields in increase capacity and infrastructure upgrades; inclusive of consequential costs for:

I.          Warren Park upgrades to two football fields to increase the capacity.

II.         Infrastructure upgrades to improve site connectivity.

4.2.5   Option 5 - Do Nothing

             Maintain the status quo with the current library at Goulding Avenue and the South West Leisure Centre deferred.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages Option 1 (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·     The creation of a ‘Civic heart’ for Hornby, with close proximity to schools, retail, health care and cultural activity centres; thereby enabling multi-purpose trips.

·     High connectivity, with a directly adjacent bus interchange, local roads, a proposed major cycleway and established pedestrian linkages. Allows equitable access for all citizens.

·     Good levels of acceptance from organisations (13); including Environment Canterbury (ECan), Hornby High School, local non-government organisations, sports clubs and retailers.

·     The opportunity to improve and integrate with the existing park functions; also increasing usage of poorly utilised spaces (including the rear of the Denton Oval for overflow parking) and to improve general safety to the Park (CPTED considerations).

·     Maintains many of the existing sports functions on Denton Park (one cricket wicket and two rugby fields inclusive of Denton Oval) along with the associated clubrooms. The Council would work closely will all clubs on Denton Park  to provide adequately for any displaced activities along with improvements to the retained Denton Park fields.

·     Offers an ‘on budget’ option further maximising what’s delivered to the community.

·     The combined ‘co-located’ facility offers operational (Opex) efficiencies over time and further aligns with the Council’s Citizen Hub Strategy. Link:

 https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/strategies/citizen-hub-strategy

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·     There is a lack of acceptance by some sports clubs currently based at Denton Park due to the displacement of one rugby field and one cricket wicket. This would fragment how the clubs (especially cricket) work operationally.

·     Denton Park is difficult in terms of vehicular access and will require new secondary or primary accesses necessitating close stakeholder engagement with the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and the Hornby Hub. Notably, the Christchurch Assignment and Simulation Traffic (CAST) modelling predicts a 20 per cent decrease to the Main South Road (at Denton Park frontage) upon completion of the Christchurch Southern Motorway (CSM2) due in 2020 which will ease traffic congestion.

·     The loss of approximately 8,000m2 of Denton Park, and that area being accessible for outdoor recreation purposes, with that area being proposed to be utilised for the building placement and infrastructure.

·     The proposed use of this part of Denton Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (recreation reserve), the operative Denton Park Management Plan 1987; any proposed change of use of this part of Denton Park will require a change of reserve classification to (Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan. The processes to change a Reserves Act classification and a management plan are separate statutory decision-making processes which both involve public consultation and, in the case of a change in classification, obtaining the consent of the Minister of Conservation.

·     The likely removal of several (Silver Birch) trees on the southern perimeter of the park and a cluster of (gum) trees to the east of the Denton Oval for improved accessibility.


 

Consultation Summary Report – Key findings

4.1       Figure 1 - Key statistical findings (dashboard) extract from consultation summary report.

·    293 total submissions

 

Summary of Options 1-5

4.2       Table 1 - Summary of reasonably practicable Options 1-5

 

Option

1

Preferred

Option

2

Option

3

Option

4

Option

5

 

Facility Location

Combined facility at Denton Park

Combined facility at

Kyle  Park – reduced buildable area of 22%

Combined facility at

Kyle  Park

Combined facility at Warren  Park

Do Nothing (Status Quo)

Incl. Investment in Wycola Park (or other)

 

Incl. Investment in Warren Park (or other)

Facilities – area in square metres

4,240

3,300* reduced scope

4,240*

4,240

N/A

-       Governance area

Y

Y - Reduced

Y

Y

N

-       Library

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y (Existing)

-       Customer Services

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

-       Gym/Fitness Area

Y

Y - Reduced

Y

Y

N

-       Leisure Pool

Y

Y - Reduced

Y

Y

N

-       Lanes (within leisure)

Y

Y - Reduced

Y

Y

N

-       LTS Pool

Y

Y - Reduced

Y

Y

N

Impact on existing  playing fields

One rugby field & one cricket wicket

One low grade football field

One low grade football field

Two football fields

NIL

 

 

 

(1) Consequential costs

$1.674m 

Investment in Denton Park + new rugby field & new wicket at Wycola Park or other

NIL – playing field unallocated

NIL – playing field unallocated

$1.638m   

Investment in Warren Park and infrastructure improvements

N/A

 

(2)* Extra over Contam/piling costs

 

NIL

$6.650m

incl. below

$7.120m

incl. below

 

NIL

NIL

Long Term Plan (LTP) allocation (inflation adjusted)

 

$35.732m

 

$35.732m

 

$35.732m

 

 

$35.732m

 

$35.732m

 

Total Cost incl. 12.5 per cent contingency.

Also (1) conseq and (2) extra over costs

 

 

$35.691m

 

 

$35.761m

 

$41.421m

 

$35.641m

 

NIL

 Net Position

-$0.041m

+0.028m

+5.688m

-$0.091m

-$35.732m

 

Figure 3 – Indicative Denton Park Bulk and Location (Option 1)

Figure 4 – Indicative Massing Options 1, 2, 3 and 4


 

Figure 5 - Indicative Area Summaries Options 1, 2, 3 & 4

 

 

 

Figure 6 – Investment in Wycola Park (indicative) for Displaced Sport Activity (Option 1)

5.   Denton Park (Option 1) – Issues and opportunities (Figure 3)

5.1       Indicative Bulk Location (Option 1)

5.1.1   Pros

·     Provides an excellent civic presence for a new community building.

·     Good visibility, street connectivity along with overall accessibility.

·     The building orientation creates high quality spaces with futureproofing opportunities 

·     The placement unlocks many poorly utilised spaces to the Denton Park but reduces the impacts to the recognised open space area.

·     Simplicity of layout and wayfinding - with further overflow car parking available to the rear of Denton Park oval.

·     Crime Prevention Through Environment Design (CPTED) – Location is considered optimal for Denton Park – with the potential to satisfy safety requirements and promote the success of the facility due to the prominence of the location and opportunity for layering of spaces. The facility can preserve oversight of the park and enhance the opportunities for better integration and activation.

·     Maintains cricket pavilion and rugby clubrooms on Denton Park. Preserves two rugby fields, one cricket wicket and nets on Denton Park. These fields would be upgraded.

5.1.2   Cons

·     One rugby field is displaced from Denton Park with investment in Wycola Park (or other) for upgraded fields.

·     The centrally located rugby field and cricket fields would overlap slightly and would be constrained albeit the quality would improve.

·     Cricket would be unable to play two games concurrently on Denton Park (as currently); a new high quality wicket is therefore proposed at Wycola Park (or other).

·     Reduces the direct visibility into Denton Park from Main South Road.

5.2       Traffic Engineering

5.2.1   Denton Park provides the better connection point to public transport when compared to other alternatives – this is due to the closeness in proximity to the Hornby Hub and interchange.

5.2.2   Denton and Kyle Parks offer similar levels of accessibility in terms of cycle and pedestrian networks. Warren Park to a lesser extent.

5.2.3   There are potential risks in providing vehicular access to Denton Park as the development will likely require multiple access points from a combination of SH1, Kathleen Crescent and Chalmers Street. The access to SH1 will require approval from the NZTA and Chalmers Street will require a right-of-way or nominal land purchase to improve the width of the access/ingress point. It is possible to manage these risks at Denton Park with early engagement with both the NZTA and the Hornby Hub once the design is suitably progressed.

5.2.4   Notably, the Christchurch Assignment and Simulation Traffic (CAST) modelling predicts a 20 per cent decrease for the Main South Road (at Denton Park frontage) on completion of Christchurch Southern Motorway (CSM2) due in 2020 which is expected to ease traffic congestion in this area.


 

 

5.3       Reserves Act

5.3.1   The processes to change a Reserves Act classification and a management plan are separate statutory decision-making processes which both involve public consultation and, in the case of a change in classification, obtaining the consent of the Minister of Conservation.  Accordingly, the outcome of those processes cannot be predetermined or guaranteed. A similar process is required at each of the three shortlisted sites.

5.4       Sports Clubs the current (Christchurch) climate

5.4.1   The operations of clubs in general has changed significantly over the last decade to address the challenges that are faced to ensure they are effective and efficient and meet the needs of their membership and the community. The major challenges are:

·     Many clubs are experiencing declining membership numbers - sport is changing to meet the different demands of the social and casual participant, while retaining the competitive and progression focused participants.

·     Volunteerism - sporting organisations are predominately run by well-meaning volunteers who may require more support to promote and administer a top performing club.

·     Suitability of facilities -there is considerable duplication of facilities, clubrooms and services located on the same sporting hub. These are generally lacking maintenance. The Council regularly receives requests from clubs to assist with facility development without any future planning.

·     Financial viability – the ability of clubs to maintain operations, keep facilities up to standard. Clubs are needing to look at alternative ways to meet needs as existing avenues are under pressure. The Council regularly receives requests to assist with funding.

5.4.2   There are a number of methods being used to address these challenges:

·     Sports Hubs - partnership of clubs sharing direction, planning and resources to create sustainable futures. Research identified that some sports club partnerships are very successful and there were a number of factors identified that led to this success.

·   The creation of an independent entity that does not require clubs to amalgamate, so they maintain club identity and history.

·   A focus on strong governance with skilled people to lead the new entity.

·   A clear purpose and reason for all clubs to want to be involved in a partnership.

·   Territorial authorities play a key role in the success of sports club partnerships and where Councils are involved and supportive, the partnerships are more likely to thrive.

·     Using multiple venues - Spreading operations across a number of venues to provide sufficient playing and training areas to meet membership needs.

Training and playing needs are in many cases different and require access to toilets, storage, training lights and changing rooms are considered to be of more importance than access to a clubrooms.


 

 

5.5       Displaced Sports Activities for Option 1 (Figure 6)

5.5.1   This indicative layout (within Option 1) demonstrates how some displaced activities (one cricket field and one rugby training field) could be located at Wycola Park, this layout is subject to further design development and collaboration with the clubs.

5.5.2   The park upgrades include significant investment in Wycola Park to ensure quality playing surfaces are available at multiple venues for the associated clubs.

5.5.3   Other opportunities involve Kyle Park for displaced activities; this potential could be given further consideration following the completion of detailed site investigations.

6.   Context/Background

Context

6.1       In collaboration with the local community, the Christchurch City Council identified a gap within the South West area and allocated funding in its Long Term Plan 2015–25 for:

6.2       Library - The current Hornby Library in Goulding Avenue is an older facility that is no longer fit for purpose in Christchurch’s new 21st century library service. It also suffers from a lack of visibility, with many Hornby residents unaware of its location and existence. Libraries are most effective when in the heart of communities, enabling great community connections and opportunities for customers to enjoy Council and community amenities in one easy-to-access place.

6.2.1   Creating a sense of place for the community – a welcoming library facility which encourages meeting and community connection.

6.2.2   Providing ready access to electronic resources and content, e-books, e-magazines, free Wi-Fi and the riches of the internet in the digital age.

6.2.3   Providing community intergenerational programmes, learning and events.

6.2.4   Providing skilled sta to oer library and other Council services.

6.2.5   Oering ready access to integrated Council customer services and community partnerships where appropriate.

6.3       Customer Services provide broader Council services i.e. paying rates, registering dogs, etc. There is currently a limited service available in the Hornby Library building. By incorporating Customer Services within a dedicated community hub, the Council is offering a better experience for the local community – maintaining multiple, joined-up services efficiently at one location, with increased hours. For our customers and community this will mean assisted or self-service options, and a one-stop shop for all their needs.

6.4       Leisure facilities - the Council is encouraging more people to be more active more often. Facilities like our pools and gyms improve quality of life across Christchurch, helping build strong communities, promote personal health and wellbeing, and develop lifelong physical and social skills.

6.4.1   Great recreation and sport facilities and the services they provide can act as a stimulus for the local economy and attract families to the community.

6.4.2   New facilities offering these services in Christchurch’s South West will achieve the following community outcomes:

·     Give people equitable access to parks, open spaces, recreation facilities, libraries and Council services.

·     Increase participation in recreation, sporting and community activities.

·     Ensure Christchurch is recognised as a great place to work, live, visit, invest and do business.

·     Enhance the services that are available locally within the urban areas.

·     Create an easy-to-access “heart” of the community that’s available to everyone.

6.5       The facilities will be easily accessible, enhancing and reflecting their location in the South West community and surrounding environment. Any future facility will be designed using best practice principles, ensuring environmentally responsible construction and efficient ongoing maintenance.

6.6       The project fulfils all four of the Council’s Community Outcomes – what the Council aims to achieve in meeting the current and future needs of our communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and regulatory functions. 

6.7       The Community Outcomes set the direction for the Council's Long Term Plan and its other key strategy and planning documents. These are:

·     Strong Communities

·     Liveable City

·     Healthy Environment

·     Prosperous Economy

6.8       Citizen Hub Strategy

6.8.1   Customers increasingly expect joined-up services, easy one-stop transactions, and channel choice in how they engage with the Council. The Citizen Hub Strategy has been developed in order to deliver a better experience for Christchurch citizens at all of our service facilities. www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/strategies/citizen-hub-strategy.

6.8.2   A hub can be far more than a place from which service is delivered - the key is integration. There is a worldwide trend towards establishing community hubs and the Council has already begun to adopt this concept with the development of our first co-located services in Papanui, Shirley, Fendalton, South Library and most recently, at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre.

6.9       Site Selection

6.9.1   The Council assessed a number of locations across the Hornby, Sockburn and Wigram areas, with attention given to attributes and external factors. Consideration was also given to what the ‘ideal site’ might look like. These assessments resulted in a shortlist of three sites (refer to Figure 6 overleaf): 

·     Denton Park (Main South Road) – 71,230 m2

·     Kyle Park (Waterloo Road) – 87,201 m2

·     Warren Park (Oakley Crescent) – 155,296 m2

·     Others – feedback could also be provided through the consultation process

 


 

Figure 6 - The three short listed sites including Wycola Park 

 

6.9.2   Assessing the Options

A number of factors and criteria can determine the best location for any new facility, although often a site will offer both strengths and challenges. These criteria include:

·     Access and transport   
Proximity to public transport, arterial roads and car parking, with sufficient and safe pedestrian and active transport links. This enables equitable access to all members of the community, including children or those of limited means.

·     Citizen proximity        
The facilities are close to higher-density residential suburbs, where future growth is expected, and will also serve a wide catchment area. The development would complement the existing networks, and minimise vehicle traffic.

·     Profile and sustainability     
Higher-profile sites with good visibility are more likely to encourage single trip/multi-use activity. The proximity to a Key Activity Centre or other major destination will be a main attribute. This enhances long-term commercial viability, as well as active and connected communities.

·     Planning and availability      
Supports the future growth of the city and is compatible with existing or proposed services. Availability of the site, disruption to existing users, and cost to develop the facilities, including infrastructure and ground conditions, affects what can be provided back to the community. Aligns closely with best practice and the District Plan and South West Area Plan (SWAP).

Combined versus Separate Facilities

6.10    Co-located facility - Christchurch City Council is moving towards grouping wider ranges of services together in convenient locations – by combining libraries, recreation and sport, customer services and community spaces together we can provide a one-stop-shop. Our conversations with the community have led us to this approach. Hubs like these aren’t just highly convenient for local residents – they also mean eciency, less duplication and cost savings on the Councils part. Our spatial analysis studies and high-level estimates tell us we achieve more with the same funding through adopting these hubbing strategies.

6.11    An analysis of the benefits of a combined facility vs separate facilities established efficiencies resulting in reducing costs both now and over time, these include:

·   Capital expenditure (Capex) - Estimated efficiencies of $2,500,000 in terms of spatial (plant rooms and common areas), infrastructure (including reduced transformer requirements; 150 KvA less) and potential for innovation in relation to the overall building performance (heat recovery) and building management systems (BMS).

·   Operational expenditure (Opex) - Estimated savings of $150,000 per annum. (Options 1, 3 and 4).  Improved efficiencies include staffing, security and power consumption.

·   A combined facility further supports the Council’s Citizen Hub Strategy.

·   A combined facility promotes better utilisation of land.

6.12    Separate facilities – Should services be provided separately, they would operate entirely independently at the two dierent sites. This may oer some benets by sharing services throughout communities. However, separate facilities are less ecient in terms of less space, higher ongoing costs and unnecessary duplication for the same price, about 10 to 15 per cent more oor area can be provided within a single co-located building, and over time the cost of operating a single co-located building is lower by about $150,000 per year.

Consultation Summary Report – Further Findings

6.13    Consultation on the new Hornby Library and Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre facilities was undertaken between Friday 28 April and Friday 9 June 2017.  The full consultation document was sent to 1,753 properties (including absentee landowners) within the vicinity of Denton Park, Kyle Park and Warren Park.  The document was also sent to 142 key stakeholders and all Council libraries and service centres.

6.14    Face to face engagement

Prior to formal consultation, project team members met with:

·        Hornby Cricket Club

·        Hornby Rugby Club

·        Hornby Football Club

·        Canterbury Track Cycling

·        Hornby Scout Group

·        Martial Arts Club

·        BMX Club

·        Hornby Softball Club

6.15    These initial meetings were for the project team to get an understanding and feedback from the clubs on how they used Denton Park.  A second meeting was held with these clubs again prior to consultation, to advise on what the Council proposed to consult on.

6.16    Public drop-in sessions were held on Saturday 6 May, Monday 8 May, and Monday 15 May 2017 and were attended by approximately 52 people.

6.17    Feedback

The Council received 293 submissions which included community organisations, local businesses, schools, sports organisations as well as the individual submissions.

6.18    Co-location of the new facility was the preferred option with 229 submissions supporting a co-located facility with 48 submissions preferring separate facilities.

Figure 8 – Location for a co-located facility

 

6.19    Key Submitters Comments

6.19.1 Denton Park 

Supporting comments

Number of submissions

Concerns raised

Number of submissions

Central/close to other key facilities, potential to be a daily hub for Hornby

56

Traffic congestion around Chalmers Street, vehicle movements around The Hub

27

Easy to access by car, foot and bike.  Close to public transport interchange

53

Impact on existing users of the park

41

 

 

6.19.2 Kyle Park

Supporting comments

Number of submissions

Concerns raised

Number of submissions

Currently underutilised and would not impact on existing users of other parks – also opportunity to remediate the land

53

Site is contaminated and requires remediation

3

Close to schools, The Hub, public transport and within good walking, biking distance

62

More costly site to build on

3

 

6.19.3 Warren Park

Supporting comments

Number of submissions

Concerns raised

Number of submissions

More space available at this location and currently under utilised

13

Too far away from the centre of Hornby

6

Would not impact on existing users

8

Too close to Halswell and its existing facilities

6

 

Refer to Attachment A for the Consultation Summary Report

Existing Hornby Library (Goulding Avenue)

6.20    There is an ongoing commitment to divest local property that is deemed to be surplus to requirements in order to support the scheme affordability within the overall capital programme.

6.21    The existing Hornby Library could therefore be divested if the new facility was to proceed.

 

Programme Schedule

6.22    The adjusted programme for a combined facility (subject to location and facility configuration decisions). The construction phase (enabling works) is due in the fourth quarter of 2018, with completion in May 2020.

7.   Option 1 (Preferred) – Combined facility at Denton Park 4,240 square metres

Option Description

7.1       New Hornby Library, Customer Services and South West Leisure Centre - includes upgrades to Denton Park and further investment in Wycola Park (or other) for displaced activity.  Configured to limit the loss of amenity to sports clubs as far as practicable; involves the loss of one rugby field and one cricket wicket. Inclusive of consequential costs for:

7.1.1   Denton Park upgrades to increase the capacity of the remaining playing fields.

7.1.2   Investment in Wycola Park (or other) for any displaced sports activity.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is medium and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

7.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium.

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.5       Refer to Attachment A Consultation summary Report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.6       This option is not consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies in terms of the current Reserve classification (recreation reserve) and the operative Denton Park Management Plan 1987.

Financial Implications (Capex)

7.7       Cost of Implementation – Total capital cost $35,691,000

7.8       Funding sources -  Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015/2025 – Capital Expenditure $35,732,000

Financial Implications (Opex)

7.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Estimated annual operating costs (Opex) are summarised below:

Annual Revenue $m

$2.122m

Annual Op Costs $m

$4.284m (excl Depn)

Net Cost to Council $m

$2.162m

Included in LTP Budget Opex

$2.102m

(LTP $1.27m + $0.8m for Library)

Legal Implications

7.10    Not implementable without a change in reserve classification, and a change to the operative Management Plan for Denton Park.

Risks and Mitigations  

7.11    Option is not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and a change to the operative Management Plan for Denton Park.

7.12    The delivery dates for Hornby and the Metro Sports facilities are now comparable.  This will pose a risk to the Council in stretching the internal staff resource and external industry capacity to commission two similar major projects concurrently.

7.12.1 Treatment - Involve key stakeholder and effected parties early in the initial decision making (consultation and engagement).

7.12.2 Track staff resources globally to ensure the mitigation of resourcing clashes and strain points. 

7.12.3 Change the project programme to avoid the clash to deliver in sequence not concurrently

7.12.4 Residual risk rating - the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

7.13    Implementation dependencies - Consultation and engagement including suggested amendments to the Denton Park reserve classification and Management Plan.

7.14    Implementation timeframe – Scheduled completion in May 2020.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages Option 1

7.15    The advantages of this option include:

·        The creation of a ‘Civic heart’ for Hornby – with close proximity to schools, retail, healthcare and cultural activity centres; thereby enabling multi-purpose trips.

·        High connectivity, with a directly adjacent bus interchange, local roads, a proposed major cycleway and established pedestrian linkages. Allows equitable access for all citizens.

·        Good levels of acceptance from organisations (12), including Environment Canterbury (ECan), Hornby High School, local non-government organisations, sports clubs and retailers.

·        The opportunity to improve and integrate with the existing park functions; also increasing usage of poorly utilised spaces (including the rear of the Denton Park oval for overflow parking) and to improve general safety to the Park (CPTED considerations).

·        Maintaining many of the existing sports functions on Denton Park including the club rooms; and this option provides adequately for any displaced sporting activity. Also improving the durability of the retained Denton Park fields.

·        Offers an ‘on budget’ option and maximises what is delivered to the community.

·        The combined ‘co-located’ facility offers operational (OPEX) efficiencies over time and further aligns with the Council’s Citizen Hub Strategy. Link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/strategies/citizen-hub-strategy.

7.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·        There is a lack of acceptance by some sports clubs currently based at Denton Park due to the displacement of one rugby field and one cricket wicket. This would fragment how the clubs (especially cricket) work operationally.

·        Denton Park is difficult in terms of vehicular access and will require a new secondary and or primary access necessitating close stakeholder engagement with NZTA and the Hornby Hub. Notably, the Christchurch Assignment and Simulation Traffic (CAST) modelling predicts a 20 per cent decrease to Main South Road (at Denton Park frontage) on the completion of the Christchurch Southern Motorway (CSM2) due in 2020, will ease traffic congestion.

·        The loss of approximately 8,000m2 of Denton Park, and that area being accessible for outdoor recreation purposes, with that area being proposed to be utilised for the building placement and infrastructure.

·        The proposed use of this part of Denton Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (recreation reserve), the operative Denton Park Management Plan 1987; any proposed change of use of this part of Denton Park will require a change of reserve classification to (Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan. The processes to change a Reserves Act classification and a management plan are separate statutory decision-making processes which both involve public consultation and, in the case of a change in classification, obtaining the consent of the Minister of Conservation.

·        The likely removal of several (Silver Birch) trees on the southern perimeter of Denton Park and a cluster of (gum) trees to the east of the Denton Oval, for improved accessibility.


 

8.   Option 2 - Combined facility located at Kyle Park 3,300 square metres [*reduced size]

Option Description

8.1       New Hornby Library, Customer Services and South West Leisure Centre; involves no consequential impacts to sport clubs. However, contamination and overly complex ground conditions reduce the deliverable scope (*by 22 per cent) in order to deliver within the allocated budget.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is medium and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

8.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium.

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.5       Refer to Attachment A Consultation Summary Report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.6       This option is not consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies in terms of the current reserve classification (Recreation Reserve) and the operative park Management Plan.

Financial Implications (Capex)

8.7       Cost of Implementation – Total capital cost $35,761,000

8.8       Funding sources:

8.8.1   Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025 – Capital expenditure $35,732,000


 

Financial Implications (Opex)

8.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Estimated annual operating costs (Opex) are summarised below:

Annual Revenue $m

$1.909 (reduced due to smaller facility)

Annual Op Costs $m

$4.284m (excl Depn)

Net Cost to Council $m

$2.375

Included in LTP Budget Opex

$2.102m

(LTP $1.27m + $0.8m for Library)

Legal Implications

8.10    Technically not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and a change to the operative management plan.

Risks and Mitigations  

8.11    Option is not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and change to the operative management plan.

8.12    The delivery dates for Hornby and the Metro Sports facilities are now comparable.  This will pose a risk to the Council in stretching the internal staff resource and external industry capacity to commission two similar major projects concurrently. 

8.12.1 Treatment - Involve key stakeholder and effected partiers early in the initial decision making (consultation and engagement).

8.12.2 Track staff resources globally to ensure the mitigation of resourcing clashes and strain points. 

8.12.3 Change the project programme to avoid the clash to deliver in sequence not concurrently.

8.12.4 Residual risk rating - the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

8.13    Implementation dependencies - Consultation and engagement including suggested amendments to the reserve classification and Management Plan.

8.14    Implementation timeframe – Scheduled completion May 2020.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Offers a location with good general proximity to other services including schools, retail, healthcare and cultural activity centres enabling - multi-purpose trips.

·   Connectivity – via underpass to bus interchange, and close to proposed major cycleway and established pedestrian links.

·   The vehicular access issues are lessor than the Denton Park alternative.

·   Impacts to sports clubs would be less. Low grade cricket and football only. No consequential costs to consider.

·   The combined ‘co-located’ facility offers operational (OPEX) efficiencies over time and further aligns with the Council’s Citizen Hub Strategy. Link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/strategies/citizen-hub-strategy.

8.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Kyle Park has extremely poor ground conditions due to the previous uncontrolled landfill and contamination.

·   Ground conditions impact the scope that could be delivered back to the community by up-to 25 per cent.

·   Site profile is not as strong as the alternatives, this could marginally impact hub visitor numbers.

·   The proposed use of this part of Kyle Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (Recreation Reserve) and Management Plan; any proposed change of use of this part of the park will require a change of reserve classification to (Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan. The processes to change a Reserves Act classification and a management plan are separate statutory decision-making processes which both involve public consultation and, in the case of a change in classification, obtaining the consent of the Minister of Conservation.


 

9.   Option 3 - Combined facility located at Kyle Park 4,240 square metres [over budget]

Option Description

9.1       New Hornby Library, Customer Services and South West Leisure Centre; involves no consequential impacts to sport clubs, however contamination and overly complex ground conditions make this option over the allocated budget.

Significance

9.2       The level of significance of this option is medium and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

9.3       Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium.

Impact on Mana Whenua

9.4       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

9.5       Refer to Attachment A Consultation Summary Report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

9.6       This option is not consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies in terms of the current reserve classification (Recreation Reserve) and the operative park Management Plan.

Financial Implications (Capex)

9.7       Cost of Implementation – Total capital cost $43,732,000

9.8       Funding sources:

9.8.1   Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025 – Capital expenditure $35,732,000

9.8.2   Not within capital allocation


 

Financial Implications (Opex)

9.9       Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Estimated annual operating costs (Opex) are summarised below:

Annual Revenue $m

$2.122m

Annual Op Costs $m

$4.284m (excl Depn)

Net Cost to Council $m

$2.162m

Included in LTP Budget Opex

$2.102m

(LTP $1.27m + $0.8m for Library)

Legal Implications

9.10    Technically not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and change to the operative park Management Plan.

Risks and Mitigations  

9.11    Option is not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and change to the operative management plan.

9.12    The delivery dates for Hornby and the Metro Sports facilities are now comparable.  This will pose a risk to the Council in stretching the internal staff resource and external industry capacity to commission two similar major projects concurrently. 

9.12.1 Treatment - Involve key stakeholder and effected partiers early in the initial decision making (consultation and engagement).

9.12.2 Track staff resources globally to ensure the mitigation of resourcing clashes and strain points. 

9.12.3 Change the project programme to avoid the clash to deliver in sequence not concurrently.

9.12.4 Residual risk rating - the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

9.13    Implementation dependencies - Consultation and engagement including suggested amendments to the reserve classification and Management Plan.

9.14    Implementation timeframe – Scheduled completion May 2020.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

9.15    The advantages of this option include:

·   Offers a location with good general proximity to other services including schools, retail, healthcare and cultural activity centres enabling - multi-purpose trips.

·   Connectivity – via underpass to bus interchange, and close to proposed major cycleway and established pedestrian links.

·   The vehicular access issues are less than the Denton Park alternative.

·   Impacts to sports clubs would be less. Low grade cricket and football only. No consequential costs to consider.

·   The combined ‘co-located’ facility offers operational (OPEX) efficiencies over time and further aligns with the Council’s Citizen Hub Strategy. Link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/strategies/citizen-hub-strategy.

9.16    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Kyle Park has extremely poor ground conditions due to the previous uncontrolled landfill and contamination.

·   Ground conditions and contamination make this option more expensive when comparing what can be delivered at Denton Park and Warren Park with the same capital expenditure.

·   Site profile is not as strong as the alternatives, this could marginally impact hub visitor numbers.

·   The proposed use of this part of Kyle Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (Recreation Reserve) and Management Plan; any proposed change of use of this part of the park will require a change of reserve classification to (Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan. The processes to change a Reserves Act classification and a management plan are separate statutory decision-making processes which both involve public consultation and, in the case of a change in classification, obtaining the consent of the Minister of Conservation.


 

10. Option 4 – Combined facility at Warren Park 4,240 square metres

Option Description

10.1    New Hornby Library, Customer Services and South West Leisure Centre. Configured to limit the loss of amenity to sports clubs as far as practicable, includes upgrades to two football fields to increase capacity and infrastructure upgrades; inclusive of consequential costs for:

10.1.1 Warren Park upgrades to two football fields to increase the capacity.

10.1.2 Infrastructure upgrades to improve site connectivity.

Significance

10.2    The level of significance of this option is medium and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

10.3    Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium.

Impact on Mana Whenua

10.4    This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

10.5    Refer to Attachment A Consultation Summary Report.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

10.6    This option is not consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies in terms of the current reserve classification (Recreation Reserve) and the operative Management Plan.

Financial Implications (Capex)

10.7    Cost of Implementation – Total capital cost $35,697,000

10.8    Funding sources -  Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025 – Capital expenditure $35,461,000


 

Financial Implications (Opex)

10.9    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – Estimated annual operating costs (Opex) are summarised below:

Annual Revenue $m

$2.122m

Annual Op Costs $m

$4.284m (excl Depn)

Net Cost to Council $m

$2.162m

Included in LTP Budget Opex

$2.102m

(LTP $1.27m + $0.8m for Library)

Legal Implications

10.10  Not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and change to the operative management plan.

Risks and Mitigations  

10.11  Option is not implementable without a change in reserve classification of, and change to the operative Management Plan.

10.12  The delivery dates for Hornby and the Metro Sports facilities are now comparable.  This will pose a risk to the Council in stretching the internal staff resource and external industry capacity to commission two similar major projects concurrently.

10.12.1  Treatment - Involve key stakeholder and effected parties early in the initial decision making (consultation and engagement).

10.12.2  Track staff resources globally to ensure the mitigation of resourcing clashes and strain points. 

10.12.3  Change the project programme to avoid the clash to deliver in sequence not concurrently.

10.12.4  Residual risk rating - the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

10.13  Implementation dependencies - Consultation and engagement including suggested amendments to the reserve classification and Management Plan.

10.14  Implementation timeframe – Scheduled completion May 2020.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages Option 1

10.15  The advantages of this option include:

·        There is an overall perception of lower vehicle congestion around this site. However, Springs Road at the Amyes Road and Awatea Road intersections are becoming increasingly busy and will come under consideration for traffic lights in time. Volumes on all these roads is growing, in part due to the residential growth in the area along with the Selwyn District.

·        There is sufficient land area for a combined facility, supporting the Council’s move towards providing community hubs.

·        The site is open to the adjacent residential development, with a good length of street frontage.

·        The site benefits from passing traffic and a major road in close proximity, however lacks a strong visual presence from the street.

·        The combined ‘co-located’ facility offers operational (OPEX) efficiencies over time and further aligns with the Council’s Citizen Hub Strategy. Link: https://www.ccc.govt.nz/the-council/plans-strategies-policies-and-bylaws/strategies/citizen-hub-strategy.

10.16  The disadvantages of this option include:

·        The site offers restricted connectivity for those without a vehicle and was noted as prohibitive to many within the consultation; therefore this site would not provide equitable access to all citizens, particularly children or those people with limited means in independently accessing the facilities.

·        Public transport is available from Awatea Road and Springs Road. However, further direct pedestrian connections and associated bus facilities would be required. Further investment would also be required to improve pedestrian and active transport connectivity.

·        The site is outside any identified key activity centre and would not support multi-purpose trips for user groups and does not contribute to the development of a "Civic Heart".

·         The site offers poor accessibility to the areas of Hei and Masham. The site is just five kilometres from Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre (which includes a library, customer services and outdoor pool).

·         Car movements within the area could increase due to the placement of a large facility on the very southern fringe.

·         Subject to the design of the facility, two football fields would be displaced. This may also affect seasonal cricket. Council staff would work with any affected stakeholders to try and find the best solutions for them. There are opportunities to re-accommodate any displaced sports locally or upgrade two fields to increase durability.

·         Warren Park presently experiences low levels of crime and antisocial behaviour, as do the surrounding properties. Minor graffiti and some fly-tipping is evident on Wilmers Road. Opportunities could be taken to improve and mitigate these issues within the project planning and design phases.

·      The proposed use of this part of Warren Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (Recreation Reserve) and Management Plan; any proposed change of use of this part of the Park will require a change of reserve classification to (Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan. The processes to change a Reserves Act classification and a management plan are separate statutory decision-making processes which both involve public consultation and, in the case of a change in classification, obtaining the consent of the Minister of Conservation.


 

11. Option 5 – Do Nothing

Option Description

11.1    Do nothing at this time. Maintain the status quo with the current library in Goulding Avenue. Defer the decision making to a later date around the South West Leisure Centre and the associated capital expenditure.

Significance

11.2    The level of significance of this option is medium and is consistent with section 2 of this report.

11.3    Engagement requirements for this level of significance are medium.

Impact on Mana Whenua

11.4    This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

11.5    There is a strong will for the facility within the wider community.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

11.6    This option is consistent with the Council’s Plans and Policies.

Financial Implications

11.7    Cost of Implementation – Nil

11.8    Maintenance/Ongoing Costs – As existing

11.9    Funding source – Nil

Legal Implications

11.10  None

Risks and Mitigations  

11.11  Risk of public discontentment.  This could further result in reputational risks.

11.11.1  Treatment - Involve key stakeholder early in the initial decision making (consultation and engagement).

11.11.2  Residual risk rating - the rating of the risk is medium.

Implementation

11.12  Not applicable.

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

11.13  The advantages of this option include:

·   No impact to Denton, Kyle or Warren Parks.

·   Reduces projected capital spend within the Council’s 2015-2025 Long Term Plan.

11.14  The disadvantages of this option include:

·   There is a strong will for the facility within the wider community.

·   As predicted, with population growth occurring, the current library service issues will become more compounded and expensive over time.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultation Summary Report

38

b

Consultation Document - Hornby Library, Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre

50

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Lee Sampson - Senior Project Manager - Development

John Filsell - Head of Recreation and Sports

Approved By

David Adamson - General Manager City Services

Mary Richardson - General Manager Citizen and Community

  


Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board

12 August 2017

 

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12 August 2017

 

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