Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

Extraordinary Agenda

 

 

Notice of Meeting:

An extraordinary meeting of the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board will be held on:

 

Date:                                     Wednesday 27 July 2016

Time:                                    5.30pm

Venue:                                 Hao Room, Te Hapua: Halswell Centre, 341 Halswell Road, Christchurch

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Members

Mike Mora

Helen Broughton

Natalie Bryden

Vicki Buck

Jimmy Chen

Peter Laloli

Debbie  Mora

 

 

19 July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Dow

Community Board Advisor

941 6501

peter.dow@ccc.govt.nz

www.ccc.govt.nz

Note:  The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted.  If you require further information relating to any reports, please contact the person named on the report.
To view copies of Agendas and Minutes, visit:
www.ccc.govt.nz/Council/meetingminutes/agendas/index

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 

 

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 

Part A        Matters Requiring a Council Decision

Part B         Reports for Information

Part C         Decisions Under Delegation

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

C       1.       Apologies.......................................................................................................................... 4

B       2.       Declarations of Interest................................................................................................... 4

B       3.       Deputations by Appointment........................................................................................ 4

B       4.       Presentation of Petitions................................................................................................ 4   

C       5.       Halswell Skate and Recreation Park - Site Selection.................................................... 5

 

 

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 

 

1.   Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

2.   Declarations of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

3.   Deputations by Appointment

3.1

Proposed Halswell Skate Park Facility

 

Speaking rights to address the Board have been granted to the following:

 

1.    Patrick McMahon, on behalf of Halswell Domain Action Group

2.    Brendon Miller, representing children from local Halswell schools

3.    Haley Anderson, local resident

4.    Sarah Wylie, on behalf of Team Skate Halswell

5.    Amy Smit, representing local teenagers from Halswell

6.    Russell Steadman, local resident

7.    Dr Chrys Horn, on behalf of Halswell Community Project

8.    Dave Markham, local resident

9.    Prawindra Mukhia, local resident

10.  Brian Bailey, local resident

11.  Joe Evans, local resident

12.  David Hawke, on behalf of Halswell Residents’ Association

 

4.   Presentation of Petitions

There were no petitions received at the time the agenda was prepared.  

  


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 

 

5.        Halswell Skate and Recreation Park - Site Selection

Reference:

16/205530

Contact:

Megan Carpenter

Megan.carpenter@ccc.govt.nz

941 6761

 

 

1.   Purpose and Origin of Report

Purpose of Report

1.1       The purpose of this report is to seek the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board’s approval of a location for a skate and recreation park in Halswell.

Origin of Report

1.2       This report is staff generated following a seminar with the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board on 6 October 2015 discussing potential sites for a skate and recreation park in Halswell. The project is identified in the Council’s Long Term Plan (2015-2025).

2.   Significance

2.1       The decision(s) in this report are of medium significance in relation to the Christchurch City Council’s (CCC) Significance and Engagement Policy.

2.1.1   The level of significance was determined by using the engagement significance matrix.  Staff have considered the significance of the decision to be made by the Community Board.  Their assessment is that the matter is of medium significance for the following reasons:

2.1.2   There is already a high level of local community interest in this project. Community workshops have been conducted. Public petitions have also been received on this matter.

2.1.3   The community engagement and consultation outlined in this report reflect the assessment.

 

3.   Staff Recommendations

That the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board resolves to:

1.         Approve Knights Stream Sports Park (preferred option) as the location for a skate and recreation park in Halswell.

 

4.   Key Points

4.1       This report supports the Council's Long Term Plan (2015 - 2025):

4.1.1   Activity: Sports Parks

·     Level of Service: 6.1.3 Overall customer satisfaction with sports parks

4.2       The following feasible options have been considered:

·   Option 1 – Knights Stream Sports Park (preferred option)

·   Option 2 – Alternative location – Halswell Domain

·   Option 3 – Alternative location – Westlake Reserve

·   Option 4 – Do not construct a skate and recreation park in Halswell

Consultation with the community also included Scott Park as an option but this is no longer considered feasible because of the low level of community support for this site and because it has the least favourable site attributes as detailed within this report.

4.3       Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages – Knights Stream Sports Park (Preferred Option)

4.3.1   The advantages of this option include:

·   Opportunity to design and coordinate the new proposed skate facility into other proposed new facilities, including a Learn to Ride bicycle track, car parking, public convenience facilities and basketball. This will ensure all facilities are well integrated and create a community space for all members of the family.

·   Opportunity to create a central social space that includes shelter/shade and seating that connects all proposed recreation activities

·   Knights Stream Sports Park was the preferred location in an acoustic assessment in respect to noise and separation to neighbouring residential dwellings.

·   Knights Stream Sports Park is located directly across the road from a proposed school which would be a target user group.

·   Demographics show projected growth in 0-19 year olds in the Halswell West Area.

·   There is suitable natural surveillance of site (“see and be seen”) and clear sightlines through space.

·   Installation of a skate and recreation park provides opportunity for local residents to be physically active and contribute to their health and wellbeing.

4.3.2   The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Currently the furthest location from the main Halswell catchment.

·   As a new park there are no landscape features to ‘soften’ the effects of a built structure, however the park will be landscaped as part of the development.

 

5.   Context/Background

Background

5.1       Christchurch City Council’s (CCC) Skateboarding, Inline Skating and Freestyle BMX Cycling Strategy 2004 has the following listed under Section Three, Future Direction and Geographic gaps;

5.1.1   "Gaps in provision are noted in the Halswell and Sumner area. Halswell area required further investigation to identify the youth priority needs."

5.2       The closest CCC skate park to Halswell can be found at Hoon Hay Park, Mathers Road, Hoon Hay. There is also a skate park located nearby in Selwyn District Council at Prebbleton Community Park, Stationmasters Way, Prebbleton.

5.3       A report to the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board discussed the need for a skateboarding area in Halswell in December 2008. This was in response to a deputation to the Community Board from a local resident requesting a skate park. The resident had completed a survey of children from the local schools around sporting interests and participation; provision for skate in Halswell was a common theme. The Board requested staff to identify suitable sites within Halswell for a skateboard area.

5.4       There was funding earmarked in the Council’s Long Term Plan (2009 – 2019), however the funding was held over due to the Canterbury Earthquakes.

5.5       Site selection for a skate park in the Halswell area was further considered in an information memorandum to the Board on 16 April 2013. Three sites were considered possible, however it was recommended by staff that site selection be reassessed when capital funding became available through Long Term Planning processes.

5.6       A Youth Voice event was held in Halswell on Friday 11 July 2014 with 34 people in attendance, the ages of people ranged from 11-23 year olds with a fairly even split of 11-13 year olds and 15-23 year olds. 17 votes were received from this group in support of a skate/BMX track. The group listed Halswell Skate in their top three projects for Halswell.

5.7       On 14 October 2014, the Halswell Residents’ Association along with a number of local youth representatives addressed the Community Board on the matter of facilities for youth in Halswell such as a skate park. The Board decided to convene a meeting with the Halswell Residents’ Association and appropriate Council staff.

5.8       The Council included funding in its Long Term Plan (2015 – 2025) for a Halswell Skate and Recreation Park. Staff held a seminar with the Community Board on 6 October 2015 around this available funding, which discussed the background of the project, the project brief, what is considered in site selection, the process for Halswell and proposed four sites to take to the community for consultation. These sites were Halswell Domain – beside playground, proposed Knights Stream Sports Park, Scott Park – beside playground and half basketball court and Westlake Reserve – beside playground.

5.9       Staff held a meeting with the Halswell Residents’ Association on Thursday 10 December 2015 as per the request from the Community Board on 14 October 2014.

Project Brief

5.10    The project brief is to develop a family orientated community space in Halswell that will include a skate area and other associated activities e.g. flying fox, outdoor fitness equipment, seating and shelter.

5.11    Skate parks provide a safe environment for skateboarding, scooter users and BMX biking to occur in a family setting.

5.12    The skate park will be aimed at riders of a beginner to intermediate level. Advanced users wanting more challenge tend to travel to Washington Skate Park.

5.13    The skate park will be site specific, designed into the existing environment (to compliment the park environment), with input from the community. During the design process, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), any appropriate noise mitigation and ongoing maintenance of the space will be considered.

5.14    There will be no lighting provided for the skate park, as the Council does not want to promote night time use of the space, due to it being located in a residential area.

5.15    The full scope of the project has not been defined although the size and the scale of the skate park would be comparative to Sheldon Park in Belfast and the Prebbleton Community Park.

5.16    A skate park is providing an opportunity for residents to be physically active in the community. There is a growing body of evidence that links physical activity to mental health benefits.

Site Selection

5.17    During the site selection process for the Halswell Skate and Recreation Park, the following were considered:

·   Suitability to demand centre e.g. shops and key activity areas.

·   Traffic e.g. is the proposed park located on a minor road, local road etc.

·   Transport – how would we expect skate park users to get to the site? With a local community facility we would expect more users to use active transport such as walking, biking, using scooters and skating. Availability of public transport and car parking also needs to be considered.

·   Demographics – what is the existing population and what is the projected growth.

·   City Plan Zoning – In the Proposed Christchurch Replacement District Plan, skate parks need to be located on reserves that are larger than 5000m2.

·   Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design – e.g. site visibility and casual surveillance.

·   Compatibility with other user groups and supporting activities e.g. playgrounds and other recreation activities, sports clubs, local schools, community facilities such as libraries and recreation centres.

·   Suitable separation from neighbouring residents – noise nuisance. 

The site selection process considered 34 sites, which were mostly Council owned parks in the Halswell area. A majority of sites were eliminated due to the parks being too small. 15 sites were considered in more detail (refer Attachment A & B – site selection analysis & site selection map). Six site visits were completed for the sites that best matched the site selection criteria, with four sites considered possible for a skate and recreation facility, refer paragraph 5.8.

Community Consultation

5.18    Consultation on the four proposed locations (Halswell Domain, Knights Stream Sports Park, Scott Park and Westlake Reserve in Halswell) was undertaken from 26 February to 18 March 2016.  The submission form asked submitters to rate each location with a number according to their preference (with 1 being the most preferred and 4 being the least preferred) and were provided with an opportunity to suggest other locations.

5.19    Two members of the project team door-knocked local residents who were located the closest to each of the proposed sites on 4 February 2016 (prior to formal consultation commencing), to discuss the upcoming consultation and to encourage these residents to participate in the consultation process.  Near Halswell Domain approximately 7 properties were door knocked, at Scott Park 17 properties, at Westlake Reserve 5 properties and at Knights Stream 7 properties.  Information was left in the letterboxes of those who were not at home and with those that were spoken to.  This information included a summary of the project and contact details for the project team.

5.20    The project team was available at the Halswell Community Market on Sunday 28 February 2016 between 12 noon and 3 pm, where approximately 30 local residents came along and spoke with members of the project team about this project.

5.21    The project team also attended the Council Halswell Liaison meeting at Te Hapua on 24 February 2016, to discuss this project and encourage residents to participate in the consultation.

5.22    1,480 consultation leaflets were hand delivered to properties surrounding each of the proposed locations, including 158 absentee landowners.  Information leaflets were also sent out to 226 key stakeholders.  The project was also posted on the Council’s ‘Have Your Say’ website and on the Council’s ‘Your Voice’ page (refer Attachment C & D, Public Information Leaflet and Submission Form).

5.23    A petition was also received that was not in support of a skate and recreation park at Halswell Domain. It contained 58 signatures, of which 9 in addition to signing the petition also completed a formal submission form, as either an individual or a group. An updated petition was then also handed to the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board Chairperson containing 570 signatures at the community workshop on 7 June 2016.  This updated petition was then subsequently formally received by the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board at their 14 June 2016 meeting.

5.24    A map is included in Attachment E to show the location of those on the petition within Christchurch.

5.25    For those with Christchurch addresses the petition also contained 10 names that included pp signatures (signing on behalf of someone else) and 5 with an X or no signature, as per below.

Category

How many signatures

Pp Signature

X Or No Signature

Resident

415

10

5

Park User

24

0

0

Playground User

24

0

0

Business and Customer

34

0

0

Canterbury Society of Model Experimental Engineers (CSMEE)

13

0

0

Totals

510

10

5

 

5.26    In addition, there were 46 signatures that were unable to be mapped (refer map 5.24), or included in the above table.  There were 38 CSMEE’s who signed on a sheet which only provided a column for names and phone numbers but no address.  There were also 7 petition signatures for addresses that are outside of Christchurch, as per below.  There was also one address that did not appear to exist in the business and customer category, so was excluded from the table.

Outside Christchurch

Number

Resident

2

Park User

1

Playground User

3

CSMEE (Canterbury Society of Model Experimental Engineers)

1

Total

7

 

5.27    The petition also contained the details of two residents who in addition to signing the petition against Halswell Domain, also completed a Council submission form and chose Halswell Domain as their first choice.

5.28    A group submission was also received representing five properties who were not supportive of a skate and recreation park at Knights Stream, but who do support the Halswell Domain location.

5.29    At the close of the consultation, 280 submissions (excluding the petitions) were received with 164 (59 per cent) in support of Halswell Domain, 71 (25 per cent) in support of Knights Stream, 35 (12 per cent) in support of Westlake Reserve and 10 (4 per cent) in support of Scott Park. 

 

Origin of submissions

Halswell Domain - first choice (1)

Knights Stream - first choice (1)

Westlake Reserve - first choice (1)

Scott Park - first choice (1)

Total

Have your say/paper feedback form

145 (60%)

60 (25%)

32 (13%)

6 (2%)

243

Your Voice - online site

19 (51%)

11 (30%)

3 (8%)

4 (11%)

37

Total

164 (59%)

71 (25%)

35 (12%)

10 (4%)

280

 

5.30    All submissions and petitions have been provided to the Riccarton/Wigram Community Board members and are publicly available on the Council project information page electronically http://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/HYS/2016/april/Halswell-Skate-and-Recreation-Park-submissions-WITHOUT-names-and-addresses-12-April-2016.pdf.

5.31    Submissions on this project have come in from all over Christchurch.  From those who responded and provided an address (Your Voice submissions do not contain addresses when they are submitted) they came from Addington (1), Burnside (1), Halswell (234), Rolleston (1) Riccarton (3) and those with no physical address PO Box numbers (3). 

5.32    Further analysis of where submissions in the Halswell area have come from in relation to their most preferred location (rated 1), indicates that many of the submitters have supported locations for the skate and recreation park that were the greatest distance from where they currently reside (refer Attachment F).

Community Workshop

5.33    In light of the results of the consultation, the project team organised a community workshop in order to gain more information from the community about each of the proposed sites and to find out if there were any other suitable sites. 

5.34    Those who participated in the Council consultation were invited to attend the community workshop, as well as those who had signed the first petition (58 signatures).

5.35    Due to the lack of support during consultation, and lack of supporting facilities such as public toilets and car parking at Scott Park, the Project team made the decision to only focus on the three remaining sites at Halswell Domain, Knights Stream and Westlake Reserve during the community workshop. This was explained at the beginning of the workshop.

5.36    The workshop was held on Tuesday 7 June 2016 from 4 pm to 6 pm at the Halswell School Hall.  There were 60 people who attended this community workshop.

5.37    Those who attended the workshop were broken into groups and circulated around tables for each of the three remaining locations, and the groups discussed the likes and dislikes of each potential site.  Any suggestions on alternative locations were also captured during the workshop.

5.38    Images of skate facilities and other recreational options were also provided on each table.

5.39    The notes from the community workshop were then made available at a later date to all those who made a submission on this project and attended the community workshop. http://ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/The-Council/HYS/2016/June/Halswell-workshop-feedback.pdf.

Other locations

5.40    During the consultation and the community workshop a number of other locations were also discussed with Council staff;

·   Wigram Parks – these parks are outside the scope of the project.

·   Milns Road Subdivision – the current planning for this subdivision does not show any parks of substantial size such as a sports park, therefore there would not be suitable separation from neighbouring residential dwellings.

·   Carrs Road Reserve – this was considered in the initial site selection process (refer Attachment A)

·   Four additional locations were suggested at Halswell Domain:

·     Beside Te Hapua: Halswell Centre – there is no available space beside Te Hapua as all the car parks are part of the resource consent requirements and other spare land is for landscaping and storm water purposes.

·     Beside the Halswell League Clubrooms – This site was considered in the initial site selection process and was eliminated due to no suitable surveillance of the site. A CPTED assessment supports this decision (refer Attachment G).

·     Beside the Halswell Bowling Club on Halswell Road – there is no suitable space available due to existing trees, and car parks are required through the resource consent process. In the Proposed Christchurch Replacement District Plan, the minimum setback from a road boundary for a site fronting a State Highway is 20 metres, which also impacts on the available space.

·     Beside the league fields on Halswell Road – No space due to the existing trees, some of which are memorial trees. See comment above about road setback.

6.   Option 1 – Knights Stream Sports Park (preferred Option)

Option Description

6.1       Approve Knights Stream Sports Park as the site for a skate and recreation park in Halswell. The skate and recreation park will be located between the car park and training fields (refer Attachment H).

Significance

6.2       The level of significance of this option is medium, consistent with section 2 of this report. 

Impact on Mana Whenua

6.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

6.4       At the close of the consultation, 280 submissions were received with 71 (25 per cent) in support of Knights Stream.

6.5       A group submission was also received representing five properties who were not supportive of a skate and recreation park at Knights Stream, but who do support the Halswell Domain location.

6.6       The petition against Halswell Domain did not indicate a preferred site instead of Halswell Domain, but the petition organisers were not against a skate park in Halswell.

6.7       For those who indicated Knights Stream as their first choice (1) as a preferred location and their least preferred location (4), the most common reasons were due to:

Likes

Number of comments

Dislikes

Number of comments

Is a developing area so can be site specifically designed

14

Not central

10

Has good natural surveillance

4

Too close to properties/noise

6

Would suit young families in the area

4

Too close to high speed road

5

Good location, will be next to the new school

4

Decrease property values

4

Is away from neighbours

1

Will reduce visual amenity

4

Good accessibility

1

Park not developed yet

1

 

6.8       The likes and dislikes captured from the community workshop in relation to Knights Stream, are summarised as:

Likes

Number of comments

Dislikes

Number of comments

Is a developing area so can be site specifically designed

15

Not accessible, is distance to other amenities

14

Will be close to the new school

5

Not central

4

Good accessibility, motorway and future bus routes

2

Concern over antisocial behaviour

2

Visible so good natural surveillance

2

Not developed yet

2

Not too close to neighbours

1

Not enough parking

1

 

 

Not visible enough

1

 

Likes

6.9       The common themes around supporting Knights Stream as an appropriate location for a skate and recreation park from the consultation and the community workshop relate to Knights Stream being in a developing area so it can be site specifically designed, is a good location near the proposed new school, having good natural surveillance, it would suit young families in the area, it has good accessibility, and because it is away from neighbours so less noisy.  Project team comments in relation to these are as follows.

6.10    Still to be developed, can be site specific

“Proposed Knights Stream Sports Park is the ideal location for the skate park as it will be developed along with the other recreation facets” (submitter ID # 76).

There is an existing landscape concept plan for the reserve (refer Attachment H), however there is an opportunity to design and integrate the skate area into the existing facilities that are proposed. A car park has already been built, and it is proposed that a Sports Pavilion will be built that will include two accessible toilets. The plan also includes two senior sports fields and two training fields, as well as a Learn to Ride facility similar to Westburn Park in Burnside and a half basketball Court. A skate park will compliment these proposed activities. Associated facilities such as shelter, seating and space for caregivers and those using the facilities will be considered during the design of the space.

6.11    Good location near new school

“I like Knights Stream idea the best as I have seen how many children use the Templeton area after school so if it was close to a school the convenience and use could be maximised” (submitter ID # 13).

Comments were made about the location at Knights Stream being appropriate as a new school is proposed to be built directly across the road on Richmond Road. There is also a pre-school proposed to be built nearby.

6.12    Good natural surveillance

“It is a growth area and the fact the neighbouring properties have an oversight of the park is very useful” (submitter ID # 36).

A Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) site visit was completed on 2 October 2015 (refer Attachment H). Because the site was presently undeveloped a complete assessment could not be completed, however it was noted that the neighbouring properties have open fencing that provides good opportunities for oversight of the park.

6.13    Suit young families in the area

“Knights Stream Sports Park is perfect for this venture.  There is a large amount of young families in Longhurst and Knights Stream” (submitter ID # 89).

Statistical information shows that there are a high number of under 19 year olds in the Halswell West area unit (30 per cent of population) compared to the Christchurch average (25 per cent of population). In the 2013 Census the usual resident population for 0-19 year olds in the Halswell West Unit was 153 (total residents 504). In the year 2043 the projected 0-19 year old population is 2060 (total projected residents 10,750).

6.14    Good accessibility

“Most fitting as has shops and school nearby and still has public transport and toilets” (submitter ID # 96).

There is a medical centre, café’s, convenience store (Dairy) etc. located at Longhurst which is 1.2 kilometres away which equates to a three minute drive, a four minute bicycle ride or a 14 minute walk.

In relation to Knights Stream Sports Parks proximity  to Te Hapua: Halswell Centre, Knights Stream Sports Park is 3.2 kilometres  away, which equates to a five minute drive, 11 minute bicycle ride or a 38 minute walk.

There is a Metro bus route proposed to go past this park.

6.15    Away from Neighbours/noise

“Skates are very noisy therefore I think it needs to be away from a residential area.  Being in the centre of this is not a good idea for at times on special occasions there would be loud music.  And so I think Knights Stream is the best place” (submitter ID # 206).

The proposed location for a skate and recreation park is approximately 75 metres away from the closest residential dwelling. An assessment completed by Marshall Day Acoustics (refer Attachment I), preferred this site in respect to noise and the separation to neighbouring residential dwellings. With a school proposed to be located directly south of the site, schools are less sensitive to noise than are dwellings particularly at night. There was also existing ambient road noise levels due to the park being located near a busy road.

Marshall Day have completed acoustic assessments for other skate park projects in Christchurch and have suggested a suitable separation between skate parks and residential dwellings of at least 40 metres. This was part of the site selection criteria for this project. Specific measures will be considered during the design of the skate park to mitigate noise, if required.

Dislikes

6.16    The most consistent comments around not supporting Knights Stream as an appropriate location for a skate and recreation park from the consultation and the community workshop relate to the park not being central, being too close to private properties/noise concerns, too close to a high speed road, risk of devaluing property, will reduce visual amenities, the park has yet to be developed, the park is not accessible, concern over antisocial behaviour, not enough parking exists and the skate facility not being visible.  Project team comments in relation to these are as follows.

 

6.17    Not central

“It is also a VERY lopsided and non-central in its location for the greater Halswell area, and is very likely to only end up catering to the immediate neighbourhood” (submitter ID # 217).

Refer to 6.14 around the distance to other areas in Halswell and 6.13 around the projected growth for under 19 year olds in the Halswell West Area.

6.18    Not accessible, away from amenities

“Knights Stream Sports Park is too far from a bus stop and shops.  It is a 10-15 minute walk from Longhurst and the shops are not the kind that attract users of skate parks” (submitter ID # 146).

Refer to paragraph 6.14 with regards to Longhurst being located 1.2 kilometres away, with café’s and a convenience store. There is a proposed Metro bus route to the Knights Stream subdivision.

6.19    Too close to private properties/noise

“The facility would be too close to residences and is highly likely to create noise issues” (submitter ID # 146).

Refer to paragraph 6.15, the proposed location is approximately 75 metres from the nearest property.

6.20    Too close to high speed road

“…when constructed will be close to high speed roads including motorway” (submitter ID # 19).

The speed limit along Halswell Junction Road is temporarily 60 kilometres per hour. This will be permanently changed to 60 kilometres per hour in the near future.

There is a fence along the Halswell Junction Road boundary of the park to provide a barrier between the park and road. When the Council plans for recreational spaces, staff consider the proximity of roads as a majority of playgrounds and recreation spaces such as skate parks have road frontages/relationships with roads to provide for visual surveillance (CPTED).

6.21    Decrease property values

“The negative connotations of a skate park (including the potential to attract a minority that exhibit antisocial behaviour), together with the decrease in visual amenity and increase in noise will have a potential negative and unreasonable effect on the value of neighbouring properties, particularly given that such properties were purchased when the Sports Park was identified for open sports fields only (as indicated on Fulton Hogan’s plan for the Knights Stream subdivision)” (submitter ID # 239).

There is no evidence that a skate and recreation park will impact on property prices in Halswell. Anecdotal evidence of house values surrounding Prebbleton Community Park show no evidence of a decrease in house prices following the installation of the Community Park. Young families for example may be more attracted to purchase a property near a park that has these type of facilities.

6.22    Reduction in visual amenity

“The visual amenity of neighbouring properties will be reduced.  Owners have purchased the neighbouring properties at such time as the Sports Park was identified as sports fields, with any parking or pavilion located towards the Richmond Avenue frontage.  The construction of the skate park and recreational facilities will reduce the visual amenity of these neighbouring properties” (submitter ID # 240).

The skate and recreation park will be designed into the existing environment to compliment other proposed facilities and existing space.  The community will be involved during the design process. Knights Stream will be a sports park and constructing a facility for scooters, skate boarders and BMX bikers, which are recreation activities, is consistent with the purpose of a sports park.

6.23    Park not developed yet

“No infrastructure to support this yet ….” (Submitter ID # 19).

Knights Stream Sports Park is being developed as per the draft landscape concept plan (refer Attachment H). The proposed skate facility will be developed to complement existing proposed activities proposed in the park. The other facilities on the park will be built over the next 12 months.

6.24    Antisocial behaviour

“The negative connotations of a skate park (including the potential to attract a minority that exhibit antisocial behaviour)…” (Submitter ID # 239).

Skate and recreation parks provide a sense of place for the community. Evidence actually indicates that ‘the lack of things for young people to do’ is a greater risk for undesirable behaviour. Skate parks provide opportunities for social interaction and social integration, along with the development of social skills, self-esteem, cooperation and respect for self and other.

An effectively designed and appropriately site skate park is a hub of positive activity. When a skate park is correctly integrated and activated regularly, positive culture overcomes negative behaviour because skate park users establish a sense of ownership and privilege.

It is important to involve the community throughout the planning of a skate park to ensure the community take ownership of the space. Involving young people in the design of the space can foster a sense of ownership in a way that merely providing them with facilities cannot.

Christchurch has a number of community based skate parks which do not have any record of anti-social behaviour. An example would be St Albans and Bishopdale skate parks.

6.25    Not enough parking

“Denali Street is not built to a width comparable with Richmond Avenue and does not provide for off-street parking bays.  Spill over parking in Denali Street from the proposed primary school (during drop off and pick up times) and organised sports at the Sports Park is to be expected.  However, given the outlying location of the Sports Park and likelihood that most Halswell residents will need to drive to get to the Sports Park, the addition of a further driver for the public to head to the Sports Park is likely to increase the congestion on Denali Street by the further ‘squeezing’ of available road between parked cars on either side of the road.  It will also reduce the parking ability for visitors and other invitees of the properties on Denali Street” (submitter ID # 242).

A car park has just been completed at Knights Stream Sports Park with approximately 50 spaces for cars and three accessible car parks. Bike racks are proposed when the pavilion is built and the Metro Bus Service will also go through Knights Stream subdivision.

6.26    Not visible enough

“Not visible enough” (from workshop notes)

CPTED principles are considered when all recreational activities are proposed in parks, Design features that will be considered for the development of a skate and recreational facility include natural surveillance of the site (“see and be seen”), clear sightlines through the space, encouraging a sense of ownership as previously mentioned and providing complimentary activities that attract people in the park.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

6.27    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

6.27.1 Skateboarding, Inline Skating and BMX Cycling Strategy 2004

6.27.2 Physical Recreation and Sport Strategy 2002

6.27.3 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

6.27.4 Long Term Plan 2015-2025

6.27.5 Children’s Policy 1998

6.27.6 Youth Policy 1998

Financial Implications

6.28    Cost of Implementation – Funding has been allocated as per CCC’s Long Term Plan (2015-2025). $14,203 was allocated in financial year 2015/16 for community consultation and site selection. $53,040 is allocated in financial year 2016/17 for community consultation around skate park design and detailed design. $318,240 is allocated in financial year 2017/18 for any consent requirements and construction of the Halswell Skate and Recreation Park. 

6.29    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – N/A – The skate and recreation park has not been designed, therefore expected maintenance costs are unknown.

6.30    Funding source – CCC’s Long Term Plan (2015-2025)

Legal Implications

6.31    There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option. There has been an appropriate consultation process for the level of significance. Appropriate consents will be obtained, as required, before construction of the project begins.

Risks and Mitigations

6.32    There is a risk that neighbouring residents do not support a skate and recreation park in Knights Stream Sports Park. If this site is selected it will be important to involve these residents in the design of the park to ensure community ownership of the space.

Implementation

6.33    Implementation dependencies - N/A – A site has not been selected, the design and construction dependencies will be considered in the next stage of the project.

6.34    Implementation timeframe - n/a – A site has not been selected, the design and construction timeframe will be considered in the next stage of the project

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

6.35    The advantages of this option include:

·   Opportunity to design and coordinate the new proposed skate facility into other proposed new facilities, including a Learn to Ride bicycle track, car parking, public convenience facilities and basketball. This will ensure all facilities are well integrated and create a community space for all members of the family.

·   Opportunity to create a central social space that includes shelter/shade and seating that connects all proposed recreation activities

·   Knights Stream Sports Park was the preferred location in an acoustic assessment in respect to noise and separation to neighbouring residential dwellings.

·   Knights Stream Sports Park is located directly across the road from a proposed school which would be a target user group.

·   Demographics show projected growth in 0-19 year’s olds in the Halswell West Area.

·   There is suitable natural surveillance of site (“see and be seen”) and clear sightlines through space.

·   Installation of a skate and recreation park provides opportunity for local residents to be physically active and contribute to their health and wellbeing.

6.36    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Currently the furthest location from the main Halswell catchment.

·   As a new park there are no landscape features to ‘soften’ the effects of a built structure, however the park will be landscaped as part of the development.

7.   Option 2 Halswell Domain – beside the existing playground

Option Description

7.1       Approve Halswell Domain as the site for a skate and recreation park in Halswell. The Skate and Recreation Park would be located beside the playground and existing car park. Relocation of existing playground equipment maybe required. No equipment is to be removed.

Significance

7.2       The level of significance of this option is medium and consistent with section 2 of this report. 

Impact on Mana Whenua

7.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

7.4       At the close of the consultation, 280 submissions were received with 164 (59 per cent) in support of Halswell Domain. 

7.5       A petition was also received that was not in support of a skate and recreation park at Halswell Domain. It contained 58 signatures, of which 9 in addition to signing the petition also completed a formal submission form, as either an individual or a group.  An updated petition was then also received containing 570 signatures at the community workshop on 7 June 2016.

7.6       From the submission, of those who indicated Halswell Domain as their first choice (1) and their least preferred location (4) the most common reasons were due to:

Likes

Number of comments

Dislikes

Number of comments

Has everything together/community hub

50

Antisocial behaviour (graffiti, vandalism, language, littering etc.)

11

Location is not too close to properties/no noise issues

29

The domain too busy already

10

Central location

23

Too close to properties/noise

6

Has good car parking, shops close by etc.

18

Not the right location in the domain

4

Has good natural surveillance

12

Will devalue properties

2

Good accessibility

11

Increase traffic

1

Good sized park

4

No need for a skate facility

1

 

 

Concern over maintenance

1

 

 

Surveillance not residents job

1

 

 

Wildlife effects

1

 

7.7       The likes and dislikes captured from the community workshop in relation to Halswell Domain, are summarised as:

Likes

Number of comments

Dislikes

Number of comments

Has everything together i.e. sports, recreation and facilities

11

Concern over antisocial behaviour

23

Good for families with mix of kids ages and good family space

8

Noise concerns, too close to houses

8

Central location with good accessibility

5

Not a good location, doesn’t fit with park

7

Good car parking and close to shops

3

No space at the Domain

4

Children will respect and take ownership

2

Concern over maintenance

2

 

 

Not safe to access with busy roads

2

 

 

Needs lighting

2

 

 

Not close to public transport

1

 

 

No need for skate in Halswell

1

 

 

Will devalue properties

1

 

Likes

7.8       The common themes around supporting Halswell Domain as an appropriate location for a skate and recreation park from the consultation and the community workshop relate to Halswell Domain being a community hub already, the location not being too close to private properties, being a central location, having good amenities nearby, good natural surveillance, good accessibility, is a good sized park, good family space and that users will respect the space.  Project team comments in relation to these are as follows.

7.9       Is already a community hub

“Near our new Library in summer the pool.  Then in winter we have Football & Rugby League located near the trains that are extremely popular in a wonderful location” (Submitter ID # 7).

Halswell Domain is a hub for community activity. Activities include, Te Hapua: Halswell Centre, Halswell Pool, CSMEE, Football, Rugby League, Netball, Softball, Lawn Bowls, Tennis and Scouts. There are two playgrounds located on the reserve, one near the CSMEE club and one near the Rugby League Clubrooms.

7.10    Not too close to residents

“…well populated in the weekends and away from residential property” (Submitter ID #90).

The proposed location on Halswell Domain is approximately 50 metres from the closest residential dwelling with a swale and William Brittan Avenue in between. 

Through an initial assessment completed by Marshall Day Acoustics (refer Attachment I), this site was deemed to be suitable for a skate facility. Ambient noise levels are likely to be reasonably low in the evening/nights, and as such, there may be some noise effects that require mitigation. Specific measures can be considered during the design of the skate and recreation park to mitigate noise.

Marshall Day have completed acoustic assessments for other skate park projects in Christchurch and have suggested a suitable separation between skate parks and residential dwellings of at least 40m. This was part of the site selection criteria for this project. Specific measures will be considered during the design of the skate park to mitigate noise if required

7.11    Central Location

“Halswell Domain would be the most central to existing population” (Submitter ID # 86).

Halswell Domain is a central location that is accessible for Halswell Residents.

7.12    Good amenities nearby

“The domain already has other facilities in place like the toilets & car parking and shops & bus route close by so it seems an obvious choice” (Submitter ID # 5).

The proposed location at Halswell Domain was deemed suitable due to its proximity to associated facilities such as a nearby toilet and car park. There is also public transport available on Halswell Road as well as shops at the Halswell New World site.

7.13    Good Natural Surveillance

“I think this would be the ideal place, central to Halswell and in an area where it would be regularly observed by the wider community creating a safer environment for younger children…” (Submitter ID # 11).

Halswell Domain processed the best safety attributes from a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) site visit on 2 October 2015 (refer Attachment G). During this site visit several family groups with younger children were using the playground. No graffiti or evidence of other vandalism, antisocial or criminal activity was found. There was no evidence of graffiti remediation. This section of Halswell Domain benefits from good oversight from properties facing the domain. The area appears well used by the community and is well maintained.

7.14    Good accessibility

“We think the Halswell Domain is the most suitable due to the fact there is easy access to the village” (Submitter ID # 80).

Refer to paragraph 7.12

7.15    Good sized park

“Halswell Domain has a number of other amenities and ample space” (Submitter ID # 55).

Refer to paragraph 7.12. Suitable space is available to integrate a skate and recreation park into Halswell Domain.                          

7.16    Good family space

“We feel that Halswell Domain is the best place for the proposed skate park as its location beside the playground, trains and grassed area/playing fields mean that families can come to the park for a variety of activities for all age groups, therefore creating a real family atmosphere” (Submitter ID # 74).

Skate parks provide a safe environment for skate boarding, scootering and BMX biking to occur in a family setting and the proposed site at Halswell Domain build on the recreational activities already in the park.

7.17    Users respect space

“Young people respect skate parks as they want to come back and use it” (workshop notes).

It is important to involve the community including young people throughout the planning of a skate and recreation park to ensure the community take ownership of the space. Involving young people can foster a sense of ownership of a public spaces in a way that merely providing facilities cannot.

Dislikes

7.18    The most consistent comments around not supporting Halswell Domain as an appropriate location for a skate and recreation park from the consultation and the community workshop relate to antisocial behaviour, the domain already being busy, not the right location in the domain, devaluing properties, increase in traffic, no need for skate in Halswell, maintenance concerns, surveillance not being the residents role, wildlife concerns, does not fit with the existing use, not safe with busy roads nearby, needs lighting and because it is not accessible.  Project team comments in relation to these are as follows.

7.19    Antisocial behaviour

“I am nervous about the ‘type’ of person the skate park might attract.  Already a lot of spray painting on buildings” (Submitter ID # 150).

Skate and recreation parks provide a sense of place for the community. Evidence actually indicates that ‘the lack of things for young people to do’ is a greater risk for undesirable behaviour. Skate parks provide opportunities for social interaction and social integration, along with the development of social skills, self-esteem, cooperation and respect for self and other. 

An effectively designed and appropriately site skate park is a hub of positive activity. When a skate park is correctly integrated and activated regularly, positive culture overcomes negative behaviour because skate park users establish a sense of ownership and privilege.

It is important to involve the community throughout the planning of a skate park to ensure the community take ownership of the space. Involving young people in the design of the space can foster a sense of ownership in a way that merely providing them with facilities cannot.

Christchurch has a number of community based skate parks which do not have any record of anti-social behaviour. An example would be St Albans and Bishopdale skate parks.

7.20    Domain busy already

“Halswell Domain has a lot of facilities already.  It would be good to spread them out around Halswell so that children can access them” (Your voice ID # 3).

Comments have been made around the domain being too busy, with no space for further activities, refer to paragraph 7.15. When locating a skate and recreation park, it is important to integrate the facility with other recreational activities. This allows for good visibility and casual surveillance of the space (other park users can keep an eye on the space).

7.21    Not the right location in the domain

“Not a great idea next to new car park in domain, also right beside kid’s playground (younger kids) Submitter ID # 59).

Refer to paragraph 7.16. The project brief is to develop a family orientated community space that will include a skate park and other recreational activities. Prebbleton Community Park is an example of a community park where play and skate are integrated successfully to provide a space for all members of the family.  By placing a skate facility next to an existing playground it also means that parents or caregivers who have children of mixed ages can supervise all their children at the same location.

7.22    Does not fit with existing use

“Sad to have a skate park in this location – would upset existing dynamics” (workshop notes).

Refer to paragraph 7.16. and paragraph 7.21. 

7.23    Maintenance concerns

“When the car park went in we were told the gates would be locked daily, but they never are” (Submitter ID # 120).

There has been comment made in relation to the current maintenance standards being carried out at the reserve being poor, and therefore lack of confidence that the maintenance will be of a suitable standard for a new skate and recreation park.

On Council’s request for service system, there have been no requests for work, complaints or issues raised against the following three Council owned skate facilities in the last 12 months; Sheldon Park, Bishopdale Park and St Albans Park, which are similar sized facilities as that’s  proposed for Halswell.

7.24    Devaluing of properties

“It has the potential to devalue properties in the area.  We would NOT have bought our home six months ago if there had been a Skate Park in the Domain – we bought it for the quiet and peaceful outlook” (Submitter ID # 38).

There is no evidence that a skate and recreation park will impact on property prices in Halswell. Anecdotal evidence of house values surrounding Prebbleton Community Park show no evidence of a decrease in house prices following the installation of the Community Park. Young families for example may be more attracted to purchase a property near a park that has these type of facilities.

7.25    No need for skate in Halswell

“Personally I don’t think we need a skate park” (Submitter ID # 120).

Refer to the background in section 5, which documents the project drivers and acknowledged demand for a skate facility in Halswell. Initial demand was noted in 2008 and has been on going.

There are a high number of under 19 year olds in the Halswell Domain Census area unit (29 per cent of population) compared to the Christchurch average (25 per cent of population). In the 2013 Census the usual resident population for 0-19 year olds in the Halswell Domain Census Unit was 456 (total residents 1578). The projected 0-19 year old population in 2043 is 410 (total projected residents 2140).

7.26    Not safe busy roads

“Traffic fast on William Britten Avenue” (workshop notes).

A majority of play and recreation spaces in Christchurch have road frontages/relationships with street to provide for visual surveillance into the space (CPTED). We need to have a balance between safety and convenience of roads. There is suitable separation between the proposed site and road and also a post and cable fence which provides a barrier.

7.27    Needs lighting

“Needs more lighting” (workshop notes).

As per CPTED guidelines lighting of parks is discouraged unless it’s an essential designated route, Lighting will not be provided, as Council do not want to promote night time use of the space.

7.28    Increase traffic

“It will increase the traffic movement in a quiet residential street” (Submitter ID # 38).

The skate park is designed for beginner to intermediate users, therefore it is anticipated that the predominant use will be from the local community, some of who will use active transport to get to the park. People visiting Halswell Domain will also use the skate park as part of their visit to other existing activities in the Domain.

7.29    Surveillance not residents role

“We do not intend to be put in the position of being police for the area by providing ‘natural surveillance’ for the Skate Park – who do we contact at 10 pm on a Tuesday night?” (Submitter ID # 38).

CPTED principles are considered when all recreational activities are proposed in parks, design features that will be considered for the development of a skate and recreational facility include natural surveillance of the site (“see and be seen”), clear sightlines through the space, encouraging a sense of ownership and providing complimentary activities that attract people in the park.

7.30    Wildlife concerns

“Dog walkers at Westlake and Halswell domain would be affected, also wildlife and young children” (Submitter ID # 13).

The skate and recreation park will be designed into the existing environment to compliment other proposed activities and existing space. This will include considering wildlife and their habitat.

7.31    Not accessible

“Children have to cross State Highway to get there” (workshop notes).

Halswell Road which is a state highway passes through the centre of Halswell, therefore some children will have to cross Halswell Road regardless of where the skate park is located.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

7.32    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

7.32.1 Skateboarding, Inline Skating and Freestyle BMX Cycling Strategy (2004)

7.32.2 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

7.32.3 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

7.32.4 CCC Long Term Plan 2015-2025

7.32.5 Children’s Policy 1998

7.32.6 Youth Policy 1998

Financial Implications

7.33    Cost of Implementation – Funding has been allocated as per CCC’s 2015-2025 Long Term Plan. $14,203 was allocated in financial year 2015/16 for community consultation and site selection. $53,040 is allocated in financial year 2016/17 for community consultation around skate park design and detailed design. $318,240 is allocated in financial year 2017/18 for any consent requirements and construction of the Halswell Skate and Recreation Park.

7.34    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – N/A – The skate and recreation park has not been designed, therefore expected maintenance costs are unknown.

7.35    Funding source – CCC’s Long Term Plan (2015-2025)

Legal Implications

7.36    There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option. There has been an appropriate consultation process for the level of significance.

Risks and Mitigations

7.37    There is a risk that neighbouring residents do not support a skate and recreation park in Halswell Domain. If this site is selected it will be important to involve these residents in the design of the park to ensure community ownership of the space. Refer to paragraph 5.23 around Council receiving a petition.

Implementation

7.38    Implementation dependencies - N/A – A site has not been selected, the design and construction dependencies will be considered in the next stage of the project.

7.39    Implementation timeframe – N/A – A site has not been selected, the design and construction timeframe will be considered in the next stage of the project

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

7.40    The advantages of this option include:

·   Halswell Domain is a central location that is accessible for Halswell residents. There are suitable associated activities in the Domain such as CSMEE Miniature Railway, existing playground, Te Hapua: The Halswell Centre, numerous sports club, car parking, toilets and nearby shopping centre and bus stops.

·   This site was the preferred location from Community Consultation, excluding the petition.

·   Halswell Domain processed the best safety attributes from a CPTED site visit on 2 October 2015. There is suitable surveillance of site (“see and be seen”) and clear sightlines through the space.

·   Installation of a skate and recreation park provides opportunity for local residents to be physically active and contribute to their health and wellbeing.

7.41    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Council do not have support of neighbouring residents on William Brittan Ave and the CSMEE railway club for the skate and recreation park to be located beside the existing playground. This is due mostly to concerns around existing antisocial behaviour at the park.

·   Council received a petition from local residents around Halswell Domain that had 570 signatures.

8.   Option 3 – Westlake Reserve – beside the existing playground

Option Description

8.1       Approve Westlake Reserve as the site for a skate and recreation park in Halswell. The Skate and Recreation Park would be located beside the playground and existing car park. Relocation of existing playground equipment maybe required. No equipment is to be removed.

Significance

8.2       The level of significance of this option is medium and consistent with section 2 of this report. 

Impact on Mana Whenua

8.3       This option does not involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

8.4       At the close of the consultation, 280 submissions were received with 35 (12 per cent) in support of Westlake Reserve.

8.5       For those who indicated Westlake Reserve as their first choice (1) as a preferred location and their least preferred location (4) the most common reasons were due to:

Likes

Number of comments

Dislikes

Number of comments

Good accessibility

5

Antisocial behaviour

22

Good sized park

4

Contrary to current use

19

Good natural surveillance

3

Wildlife concerns

14

Would suit young families in the area

3

Too close to residents/noise

11

Not too close to residents/noise

2

Safety concerns

5

 

 

Park too small

2

 

 

No amenities

2

 

 

Park not visible

1

 

 

Lots of retirees in the area

1

 

 

Not accessible

1

 

8.6       The likes and dislikes captured from the community workshop in relation to Westlake Reserve, are summarised as:

Likes

Number of comments

Dislikes

Number of comments

Good sized park with space for development

8

Antisocial behaviour

15

Good family space

7

Not accessible

9

Good accessibility

5

No natural surveillance

7

Good natural surveillance

5

Wildlife concerns

4

Has good amenities

5

Too close to residents/noise

3

Good distance from residents/noise

 

Safety concerns

2

 

Likes

8.7       The common themes around supporting Westlake Reserve as an appropriate location for a skate and recreation park from the consultation and the community workshop relate to Westlake Reserve being a good sized park, good accessibility, good natural surveillance, being a good family space, having good amenities and being a good distance from residents.  Project team comments in relation to these are as follows.

8.8       Good sized park

“1st choice Westlake Reserve – large park with plenty of space for a good sized facility” (submitter ID # 17).

During the site selection process one of the criteria for selecting a suitable site for a skate and recreation park, was for the park to be more and 5000m2. Westlake is 112,332m2, therefore meets this criteria.

8.9       Good accessibility

“…I think Westlake Reserve would be the best spot because it is centred and has car parking and heaps of entrances” (submitter ID # 196).

Transport and how users would get to the proposed skate and recreation park was considered during the site selection process.  Those living near Westlake Reserve can use active transport such as walking, biking, skating or scooters. There is also a car park on site as well as a public bus available in Westlake Drive.

8.10    Good natural surveillance

“Also the park will have plenty of passers-by which means security for the children playing” (submitter ID # 77).

A CPTED assessment was completed on 2 October 2015 (refer Attachment G). During this site visit significant activity was noted in and around the possible area of the proposed skate and recreation park. Children and caregivers were using the playground and residents were walking by.  It was also noted that there is good oversight from street and nearby properties.

8.11    Good family space

“There is a huge number of families living in the vicinity of Westlake it would be a great addition to the park which at present looks a little abandoned by the Council” (submitter ID # 107).

There is a similar number of under 19 year olds in the Oaklands West Census area unit (24 per cent of population) compared to the Christchurch average (25 per cent of population). In the 2013 Census the usual resident population for 0-19 year olds in the Oaklands West Census Unit was 573 (total residents 2361). The projected 0-19 year old population in 2043 is 480 (total projected residents 2650).

8.12    Good amenities

“Toilet fixed as part of project?  Near bus stop” (workshop notes).

There are suitable associated facilities at Westlake Reserve including a nearby toilet and car park. The roof of the toilets are going to be replaced, the tender for works has been accepted and work should begin over the next month.

There is also public transport available with a bus stop located near the car park entrance.

8.13    Good distance from residents

“Far enough away from nearest dwelling” (workshop notes).

The proposed location at Westlake Reserve is approximately 50 metres from the closest residential dwelling.

Through an initial assessment completed by Marshall Day Acoustics (refer Attachment I) this site was deemed to be suitable for a skate facility. Ambient noise levels are likely to be reasonably low in the evenings/nights, and as such, there may be some noise effects that require mitigation. Specific measures can be considered during the design of the skate and recreation park to mitigate noise.

Marshall Day have completed acoustic assessments for other skate park projects in Christchurch and have suggested a suitable separation between skate parks and residential dwellings of at least 40m. This was part of the site selection criteria for this project. Specific measures will be considered during the design of the skate park to mitigate noise if required

Dislikes

8.14    The most consistent comments around not supporting Westlake Reserve as an appropriate location for a skate and recreation park from the consultation and the community workshop relate to antisocial behaviour, contrary to current use, wildlife concerns, too close to residents/noise, no natural surveillance, accessibility, safety concerns, park too small, no amenities and the park not being visible.  The project team comments in relation to these are as follows.

8.15    Antisocial behaviour

“This is NOT an appropriate location for a skate park.  Already, residents are often wakened at night with fireworks, noise associated with alcohol consumption and other anti-social activity” (submitter ID # 195).

Skate and recreation parks provide a sense of place for the community. Evidence actually indicates that ‘the lack of things for young people to do’ is a greater risk for undesirable behaviour. Skate parks provide opportunities for social interaction and social integration, along with the development of social skills, self-esteem, cooperation and respect for self and other. 

An effectively designed and appropriately site skate park is a hub of positive activity. When a skate park is correctly integrated and activated regularly, positive culture overcomes negative behaviour because skate park users establish a sense of ownership and privilege.

It is important to involve the community throughout the planning of a skate park to ensure the community take ownership of the space. Involving young people in the design of the space can foster a sense of ownership in a way that merely providing them with facilities cannot.

Christchurch has a number of community based skate parks which do not have any record of anti-social behaviour. An example would be St Albans and Bishopdale skate parks.

8.16    Does not fit with current use

“Westlake is already used by a large number of under 5 year olds.  Therefore a skate park would change the culture of this area” (submitter ID # 36).

The project brief is to develop a family orientated community space that will include a skate park and other recreational activities. Prebbleton Community Park is an example of a community park where play and recreation are integrated successfully to provide a space for all members of the family including those that are under five years old.

8.17    Wildlife concerns

“I am concerned for the wildlife at Westlake if the skate park was to be there.  I have seen children from the ages of 7 to approximately 16 years chasing the black baby swans and on a couple of occasions throwing stones at the swans and geese and on one occasion resulting in the death of a baby swan due to stone throwing” (submitter ID # 8).

Refer to paragraph 8.15. The skate and recreation park will be designed into the existing environment to compliment other proposed activities and existing space. This will include considering wildlife and their habitat.

8.18    Too close to residents/noise

“The Westlake Reserve and Scott Park would be a definite NO because there would be no suitable separation from neighbouring residents” (submitter ID # 184).

Refer to paragraph 8.13

8.19    No natural surveillance

“Doesn’t have a busy street going past it – tucked away” (workshop notes).

Refer to paragraph 8.10

8.20    Accessibility

“Rabbit warren – lost in streets, even buses” (workshop notes).

Refer to paragraph 8.9

8.21    Safety concerns

“There is a power pylon right next to the proposed park, which will be too much temptation for the children, since we have already had a death.  The nearby lake is also a risk due to the fact it is not supervised as the Halswell Pool would be” (submitter ID # 34).

Many parks and reserves in Christchurch contain or are adjacent to water bodies including our major river networks. All safety issues are considered during the detailed design process.

8.22    Park too small

“Not here, this park has two largish lakes and is a nice peaceful area.  Not big enough” (submitter ID # 13).

Refer to paragraph 8.8

8.23    No amenities

“There is no other facilities nearby ie. shops, cafes…” (submitter ID # 29).

The closest block of shops to Westlake Reserve is located at Nottingham Ave which is 900m away, which equates to a two minute drive, three minutes bicycle ride or an 11 minute walk.

In relation to Westlake Reserves proximately to Te Hapua: Halswell Centre, Westlake Reserve is 2.0km away, which equates to a four minute drive, a five minute bike or a 21 minute walk.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

8.24    This option is consistent with Council’s Plans and Policies

8.24.1 Skateboarding, Inline Skating and Freestyle BMX Cycling Strategy (2004)

8.24.2 Physical Recreation and Sports Strategy 2002

8.24.3 Parks and Waterways Access Policy 2002

8.24.4 CCC Long Term Plan 2015-2025

8.24.5 Children’s Policy 1998

8.24.6 Youth Policy 1998

Financial Implications

8.25    Cost of Implementation – Funding has been allocated as per CCC’s 2015-2025 Long Term Plan. $14,203 was allocated in financial year 2015/16 for community consultation and site selection. $53,040 is allocated in financial year 2016/17 for community consultation around skate park design and detailed design. $318,240 is allocated in financial year 2017/18 for any consent requirements and construction of the Halswell Skate and Recreation Park.

8.26    Maintenance / Ongoing Costs – N/A – The skate and recreation park has not been designed, therefore expected maintenance costs are unknown.

8.27    Funding source – CCC’s Long Term Plan (2015-2025)

Legal Implications

8.28    There are not considered to be any legal implications arising from this option. There has been an appropriate consultation process for the level of significance.

Risks and Mitigations

8.29    There is a risk that neighbouring residents do not support a skate and recreation park in Westlake Reserve. If this site is selected it will be important to involve these residents in the design of the park to ensure community ownership of the space.

8.30    Implementation dependencies - N/A – A site has not been selected, the design and construction dependencies will be considered in the next stage of the project.

8.31    Implementation timeframe – N/A – A site has not been selected, the design and construction timeframe will be considered in the next stage of the project

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

8.32    The advantages of this option include:

·   Westlake Reserve is a central location that is accessible for Halswell Residents. There are suitable associated activities in the reserve such as an existing playground, car parking, toilets, sports fields and nearby shopping area.

·   There is suitable surveillance of site (“see and be seen”) and clear sightlines through the space.

·   Installation of a skate and recreation park provides opportunity for local residents to be physically active and contribute to their health and wellbeing.

8.33    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   Council do not have support of neighbouring residents for the skate and recreation park to be located at Westlake Reserve. This is due mostly to concerns around existing antisocial behaviour at the park.

9.   Option 3 - Do not construct a skate and recreation park in Halswell

Option Description

9.1       A skate and recreation park would not be installed in the Halswell area and the budget allocated to this project will be a saving to Council.

Significance

9.2       The level of significance of this option is medium and consistent with section 2 of this report.

Impact on Mana Whenua

9.3       This option does involve a significant decision in relation to ancestral land or a body of water or other elements of intrinsic value, therefore this decision does not specifically impact Ngāi Tahu, their culture and traditions.

Community Views and Preferences

9.4       Community views were not sought on this option.

Alignment with Council Plans and Policies

9.5       Nil

Financial Implications

9.6       Cost of Implementation - Nil, however funding has already been spent on existing consultation.

9.7       Maintenance / Ongoing Costs - Nil

9.8       Funding source - Nil

Legal Implications

9.9       Nil

Risks and Mitigations

9.10    Community demand has existed for skate in the Halswell area since 2008, there is a risk that if the Community Board decide to do nothing, that the Community will continue to demand for this type of facility. This is evident in other areas of the city where geographic gaps exist for skate facilities.

9.11    Community expectations have been raised around Council providing the community with a skate and recreation park, and funding is available.

Implementation

9.12    Implementation dependencies  - Nil

9.13    Implementation timeframe - Nil

Option Summary - Advantages and Disadvantages

9.14    The advantages of this option include:

·   Cost saving for Council

9.15    The disadvantages of this option include:

·   This is not the preferred option as demand exists from the community for a skate and recreation park in Halswell.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Selection Analysis - Halswell Skate and Recreation Park

33

b

Site Selection Map - Halswell Skate and Recreation Park - February 2016

37

c

Consultation - Public Information Leaflet - Halswell Skate and Recreation Park

38

d

Consultation - Submission Form - Halswell Skate and Recreation Park

42

e

Halswell Domain Action Group - Map of petition signatories

44

f

Halswell Skate and Recreation Park Consultation mapped responses

45

g

Halswell Skate and Recreation Park - Proposed sites CPTED report February 2016

46

h

Knights Stream Sports Park - Draft concept plan - May 2016

50

i

Marshall Day Acoustics - Halswell Skate and Receration Park - Site Selection Letter

51

 

 

Confirmation of Statutory Compliance

Compliance with Statutory Decision-making Requirements (ss 76 - 81 Local Government Act 2002).

(a) This report contains:

(i)  sufficient information about all reasonably practicable options identified and assessed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages; and

(ii) adequate consideration of the views and preferences of affected and interested persons bearing in mind any proposed or previous community engagement.

(b) The information reflects the level of significance of the matters covered by the report, as determined in accordance with the Council's significance and engagement policy.

 

Signatories

Authors

Megan Carpenter, Recreation Planner - Greenspace

Tara King,                  Consultation Leader

Approved By

Andrew Rutledge, Head of Parks

Mary Richardson,  General Manager Customer & Community

  


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


 


 


 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


 


 


 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


 


 


 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016

 


 


 


 

 


Riccarton/Wigram Community Board

27 July 2016